Repairing the Breach and Securing the Water















Today’s selected passage continues in the Old Testament prophetic book of Isaiah, and more specifically is found in the twenty-second chapter. This particular passage begins with a truly remarkable set of words—“The burden of the valley of vision”—which bring a certain amount of intrigue to what comes thereafter. Upon reading this passage of Scripture it becomes quite clear that the words contained therein describe the ancient and beloved city of David, which is Jerusalem in the southern kingdom of Judah. The words contained within this passage of Scripture speak of a great devastation that had laid hold of the city and thrust it into complete chaos. Consider what is recorded in the first three verses concerning this city—“What aileth thee now, that thou art wholly gone up to the housetops? Thou that are full of stirs, a tumultuous city, a joyous city: thy slain men are not slain with the sword, nor dead in battle. All thy rulers are fled together, they are bound by the archers: all that are found in thee are bound together, which have fled from afar” (Isaiah 22:1-3). As you continue reading this passage of Scripture you will notice the prophet’s respond to the chaos, devastation and destruction that had laid hold of his people. “Therefore said I, Look away from me; I will weep bitterly, labour not to comfort me, because of the spoiling of the daughter of my people. For it is a day of trouble, and of treading down, and of perplexity by the Lord of hosts in the valley of vision, breaking down the walls, and of crying to the mountains” (Isaiah 22:4-5). It is quite clear and obvious when reading these words that the prophet Isaiah was completely and totally overwhelmed with the devastation and destruction that had laid hold of and gripped his people. Perplexity, spoiling, trouble, and treading down were the words the prophet used to describe the great calamity that had seized and gripped the daughter of his people. The prophet Isaiah called those to whom he was writing to look away from him, for he was utterly and completely consumed with bitter weeping. Why? Why was the prophet utterly and completely consumed with bitter weeping, and so much so that he called others to look away from him? Why did the prophet ask those to whom he was writing to spend no time laboring to comfort him? The prophet goes on to describe the cause of his weeping which was the spoiling of the daughter of his people. Isaiah looked upon his day and saw that it was a day of trouble and of treading down—a day when the enemy and adversary was permitted to gain access and entrance into the ancient city of Jerusalem. The prophet wept bitterly because all he saw round about him was devastation and destruction. If you journey back to the first verse of the first chapter of this prophetic book you will recall that Isaiah prophesied during the reigns of four specific kings—Uzziah, Ahaz, Jotham and Hezekiah—and that the single greatest threat which the inhabitants of Judah and Jerusalem faced was the threat of Sennacherib king of Assyria when he sent both an envoy and a great host toward and against Jerusalem and Judah. During the days of Isaiah he did not witness the devastation and destruction of Judah and Jerusalem, but what he did witness was the devastation of the northern kingdom of Israel—the northern ten tribes with its capital city of Samaria. During the days of Isaiah he watched as the enemy invaded the inheritance of the people of God, and how the enemy brought devastation and destruction upon the land. Consider what is recorded in the eighteenth chapter of the Old Testament book of Second Kings concerning the northern kingdom of Israel during the days of Hezekiah—“And it came to pass in the fourth year of king Hezekiah, which was the seventh year of Hoshea son of Elah king of Israel, that Shalmaneser king of Assyria came up against Samaria, and besieged it. And at the end of three years they took it: even in the sixth year of Hezekiah, that is the ninth year of Hoshea king of Israel, Samaria was taken. And the king of Assyria did carry away Israel unto Assyria, and put them in Halah and in habor by the river of Gozan, and in the cities of the Medes: because they obeyed not the voice of the Lord their God, but transgressed His covenant, and all that Moses the servant of the Lord commanded, and would not hear them, nor do them” (2 Kings 18:9-12).

 This passage found within the eighteenth chapter of Second Kings brings us face to face with the reality that while the prophet Isaiah did not see the devastation and destruction of Judah and Jerusalem, he did, however, witness the devastation of the northern kingdom of Israel. The book of Second Kings makes it very clear that it was during the fourth year of the reign of Hezekiah king of Judah that Shalmaneser king of Assyria came up against Samaria, and besieged it. This particular chapter also goes on to reveal that the siege lasted three years, and at the end of those three years the Assyrians took Samaria. The prophet Isaiah was still prophesying according to the word of the Lord during the reign of Hezekiah and undoubtedly witnessed the devastation and destruction of both the people of God and the inheritance within the earth. The prophet Isaiah lived during the days of the invasion and captivity of the northern kingdom of Israel, as well as the days of the invasion of Judah by Sennacherib king of Assyria. The prophet Isaiah witnessed the captivity of the northern kingdom of Israel as well as the invasion of the southern kingdom of Judah—both which were intended to strip the people of God of their inheritance and to take them captive. The prophet Isaiah called those to whom he was speaking to look not upon him for he was utterly and completely consumed with weeping because of the devastation and destruction of his people. The prophet was undoubtedly aware of the invasion of the northern kingdom of Israel and the siege of Samaria, and how the adversary laid siege to the city for a full three years. For three years the city of Samaria and its inhabitants were oppressed under the tremendous weight and burden of a siege which was intended to severely weaken the city. I can’t help but see a powerful prophetic picture of the strategy of the enemy and adversary within our lives as he attempts to lay siege to our heart, to our mind, and to our soul. If there is one thing we must recognize and understand it’s that the adversary can and will seek to lay siege to as many areas within our lives with the ultimate and express purpose of weakening to the point where there is no longer anything defending or protecting them. If you study the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and his army, you will find that the siege itself produced within the city severe famine and pestilence, and those who didn’t perish because of these two calamities would be struck down by the sword. When the prophet Isaiah asked those to whom he was speaking to look not upon him because of his weeping, he was weeping over the devastation and destruction that had befallen the northern kingdom of Israel, the capital city of Samaria, and the captivity of the northern ten tribes.

 As you continue reading this passage of Scripture you will notice that while the southern kingdom of Judah and the city of Jerusalem were themselves not destroyed, there will still room and reason to be concerned and alarmed. “And it shall come to pass, that thy choicest valleys shall be full of chariots, and the horsemen shall set themselves in array at the gate. And he discovered the covering of Judah, and thou didst look in that day to the armour of the house of the forest. Ye have seen also the breaches of the city of David, that they are many: and ye gathered together the waters of the lower pool. And ye have numbered the houses of Jerusalem, and the houses have ye broken down to fortify the wall. Ye made also a ditch between the two walls for the water of the old pool: but ye have not looked unto the maker thereof, neither had respect unto him that fashioned it long ago” (Isaiah 22:7-11). These words are actually quite intriguing and compelling, for while it is true that the city of Jerusalem itself had not been destroyed, there was nonetheless reason to be concerned. The prophet Isaiah speaks of how his hearers “have seen also the breaches of the city of David,” and that they are many. This concept of breaches in the city of David must be carefully considered, for any breach of the city would serve as a potential access point of the adversary. If breaches were permitted to continue in the city of David it would only be a matter of time before the adversary was able to force his way through the breach and gain access into the city. If enough breaches were made in the city of David the adversary would have multiple access points and entrances to enter into the city and to unleash and wreak havoc and chaos. It is absolutely and incredibly important that we pay close attention to this concept of breaches, for breaches must be dealt with as soon as they are formed. There is a great danger and dilemma that is created when breaches are first formed, and rather than being dealt with upon their formation are permitted to remain. A breach not dealt with at the point of its creation can and will eventually grow and increase in size, and will eventually permit the forces of the adversary to enter in.

 YE HAVE SEEN ALSO THE BREACHES OF THE CITY OF DAVID THAT THEY ARE MANY! Please don’t miss the significance and weight of those words—the words that not only are there breaches in the city, but the breaches in the wall of the city were many. If you continue reading this passage of Scripture you will quickly discover that in order to fortify the wall—in order to repair the breaches which had been made in the wall of the city—the inhabitants of Jerusalem broke down houses in the midst of it. WHEN HOUSES ARE BROKEN DOWN TO REPAIR THE WALL! WHEN HOUSES ARE BROKEN DOWN TO FORTIFY THE WALL! WHEN HOUSES ARE BROKEN DOWN TO REPAIR THE BREACH! Consider the tragic reality that in order for the inhabitants of Jerusalem to fortify the wall of the city they had to break down houses which stood in the midst of it. There is a part of me that can’t help but wonder how the inhabitants decided which houses to break down in order to fortify the wall. Were there individuals within the city who agreed to allow their houses to be broken down in order to fortify the wall, or were houses selected at random in order to repair and fortify the wall. The prophet Isaiah declared that the breaches of the city were many and I can’t help but wonder how many houses needed to be broken down to repair the breaches which were present in the wall. How many houses does it take to repair the various breaches which have been made in the wall? How many men and women witnessed the breaking down of their home in order to repair the many breaches which were found in the wall? It is absolutely incredible that not only were breaches permitted to be made in the city, but that houses had to be broken down and destroyed in order to fortify the wall. What’s even more interesting is that through the prophet Isaiah the Lord declared that in their attempt to fortify the wall themselves they neither looked unto the Maker, nor had respect unto Him which had fashioned it. What an incredibly powerful thought it is that in their attempt to fortify and protect their wall they neither looked unto their Maker nor had respect unto Him. In other words, they trusted in their own ability to protect themselves and to fortify the wall rather than turning to, looking unto, and having respect unto the Lord their God.

 Through the prophet Isaiah the Lord not only spoke of and revealed how the breaches of the city were many and how they broke down houses to fortify the wall, but they also gathered together the waters of the lower pool and made a ditch between the two walls for the waters of the old pool. What the prophet Isaiah was undoubtedly speaking of was what has become known as Hezekiah’s Tunnel, or the Siloam Tunnel. According to Scripture this tunnel was constructed and built by Hezekiah to prepare Jerusalem for an impending siege by the Assyrians. In order to accomplish this Hezekiah had had the source of the waters of the upper Gihon blocked and led them straight down on the west to the City of David. The Gihon Spring was already protected by a tower and was included in the city’s defensive wall system. Hezekiah’s actions were intended to be an additional aqueduct designed for keeping the entire outflow of the spring inside the walled area, which included the Pool of Siloam. The express purpose was to withhold water from any besieging forces. By constructing such a tunnel Hezekiah was not only preventing besieging troops from partaking of this water, but also to provide and supply water to the inhabitants of the city only. External troops would have had absolutely no access to these waters because even the very outflow water released from the Pool of Siloam would have disappeared into a system located right outside the southern tip of the city walls. Hezekiah’s Tunnel was not only intended to deprive besieging forces and troops outside the wall from gaining access to it, but to ensure that the people within the city were supplied with all the water they needed during the siege. According to a description found on Wikipedia, the city of Jerusalem suffered from the drawback that its major source of fresh water, the Gihon Spring, is on the side of the mountain overlooking Kidron Valley. This very thing presented a major military weakness as the city walls, if high enough to be defensible, must necessarily leave the Gihon Spring outside, thus leaving leaving the city without a fresh water supply in the event of a siege. The Canaanites recognized this weakness and built a fortified tower around the spring and connected it to the city walls on the slope by an additional wall. During the days of Hezekiah he blocked the spring’s water outside the city and diverted it through a channel into the Pool of Siloam. Consider what is recorded of Hezekiah in the books of the Kings and the Chronicles: “And the rest of the acts of Hezekiah, and all his might, and how he made a pool, and a conduit, and brought water into the city, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah?” (2 Kings 20:20). “This same Hezekiah also stopped the upper watercourse of Gihon, and brought it straight down to the west side of the city of David. And Hezekiah prospered in all his works” (2 Chronicles 23:30).

 In this particular chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah the prophet describes how the inhabitants of Judah broke down houses in order to fortify the wall, as well as gathered together the waters of the lower pool. Within this chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah we not only find the inhabitants of Jerusalem fortifying the wall, but also securing their water supply as well. In order to prepare for the siege of the Assyrians both the breaches in the wall were addressed, as well as the water supply of the city was secured. This is actually quite interesting, for in order to prepare for the eventual siege of the enemy the people of God not only had to fortify the wall which stood round about them, but they also had to secure the supply of water for themselves. Thus, when Sennacherib came against Jerusalem to besiege it the wall was fortified and the water supply was secured. FORTIFYING THE WALL AND SECURING THE WATER SUPPLY! I can’t help but see a tremendous prophetic picture in this passage—one which we as the saints of God must understand and recognize. I am convinced that in these Last Days there is an incredible prophetic call—not only to fortify the wall, but also to secure the water supply within our lives. It is not enough to fortify the wall without also securing the water supply just as it is not enough to secure the water supply without also fortifying the wall. I believe with all my heart that in these Last Days we as the people of God need to fortify the wall within our lives—that which both guards and protects us from the siege and invasion of the enemy. I feel very strongly within my heart and spirit the Spirit of Almighty God calling for the saints of God to invest themselves—their time, their effort and their energy—in the secret closet of prayer as they fortify their defenses from the onslaught(s) and threat(s) of the adversary. I believe within the depths of my spirit that the saints of God need to spend a considerable amount of time fortifying the defense(s) around their heart, around their mind, around their soul, around their home, around their finances, around their calling, around their relationship with the Lord of hosts, and so much more. I believe the Spirit of the Lord is calling the saints of God in this generation to fortify the defenses within their lives, as well as to secure the source of water that supplies them with strength, with sustenance, with life and with vitality. Jesus declared of Himself that He was the living water and that all who come to Him would never thirst again, and I can’t help but get the sense that we need to devote ourselves to not only drinking from that deep well, but also securing that well within our lives. In all reality, the enemy and adversary has always been after our supply of water, for he is very much aware of how valuable water is—not only for drinking and cooking, but also for washing and cleansing. Scripture itself speaks of being washed with the water of the Word, and we must strive diligently to guard that supply of water within our lives so we might always experience the washing and cleansing of the Word.

 In these Last Days—days which will grow increasingly dark, difficult and dangerous—it is absolutely imperative that we look to our Maker and to have respect unto Him. In these Last Days which may very well grow increasingly trying and troublesome as we go, it is absolutely imperative that we spend a considerable amount of time in prayer each day fortifying the wall within our lives. It is absolutely necessary and vital that we spend a great deal of time, effort and energy in fortifying the defenses within our lives to both guard and protect ourselves from the devices, schemes and tactics of the adversary. In these Last Days we must thoroughly examine our lives and see if there be any breaches that have been made through our own willful disobedience and transgression before the Lord. We must through prayer examine our lives and see if there are any areas of our lives where breaches have been made, thus allowing the adversary to gain access to our lives. The prophet Isaiah would later go on to speak of those who would be repairers of the breach, and I believe that in this generation especially—men and women are called to rise up and stand as repairers of the breach. Do you want to discover how to rise up as a repairer of the breach? The prophet Isaiah reveals the powerful truth that surrounds one rising up to repair the breach(es) which have been made—within the land, within our homes, within our families, within our marriages, within our finances, within our churches, within our lives, etc. “Is it such a fast that I have chosen? A day for a man to afflict his soul? Is it to bow down his head as a bulrush, and to spread sackcloth and ashes under him? Wilt thou call this a fast, and an acceptable day to the Lord? Is not this the fast that I have chosen? To loose the bands of wickedness, to undo the heavy burdens, and to let the oppressed go free, and that ye break every yoke? Is it not to deal thy bread to the hungry, and that thou bring the poor that are cast out to thy house? When thou seest the naked, that thou cover him; and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh? Then shall thy light break forth as the morning, and thine health shall spring forth speedily: and thy righteousness shall go before thee; the glory of the Lord shall be thy rereward. Then shalt thou call, and the Lord shall answer; thou shalt cry, and He shall say, Here I am. If thou take away from the midst of thee the yoke, the putting forth of the finger, and speaking vanity; and if thou draw out thy soul to the hungry, and satisfy the afflicted soul; then shall thy light rise in obscurity, and thy darkness be as the noonday: and the Lord shall guide thee continually, and satisfy thy soul in drought, and make fat thy bones: and thou shalt be like a watered garden, and like a spring of water, whose waters fail not. And they that shall be of thee shall build the old waste places: thou shalt raise up the foundations of many generations; and thou shalt be called, The repairer of the breach, the restorer of paths to dwell in” (Isaiah 58:5-12).

 The prophet experienced an intense manifestation of weeping because he witnessed not only the breaking down of walls, but also the breaking down of houses as well. What’s more is that the Lord wasn’t merely calling the prophet to weeping, but the inhabitants of the land as well: “And in that day did the Lord God of hosts call to weeping, and to mourning, and to baldness, and to girding with sackcloth: and behold joy and gladness, slaying oxen, and killing sheep, eating flesh, and drinking wine: Let us eat and drink; for to morrow we shall die. And it was revealed in mine ears by the Lord of hosts, Surely this iniquity shall not be purged from you till ye die” (Isaiah 22:12-14). The Lord of hosts was calling the inhabitants of the land to weeping and to mourning, to baldness and a girding with sackcloth, yet instead of weeping and mourning the inhabitants gave themselves to joy and gladness. The prophet Isaiah revealed that during his days—days when the Lord was calling for the people to give themselves to weeping and mourning—they actually ignored such a call and continued to give themselves over to joy and gladness. The inhabitants of Judah and Jerusalem continued on in this generation as though nothing was going on—completely ignoring the desire of the Lord. The Lord of hosts was calling them to sackcloth and ashes, yet they continued giving themselves over to eating and drinking and being merry. Rather than weeping over the ruin of the people of Jacob they were giving themselves over to feasting as though nothing was even amiss among them. Through the prophet Isaiah the Lord declares that a deliberate and willful ignoring of His call to weeping and mourning was iniquity which would not be purged from them until the day they died. “Therefore also now, saith the Lord, turn ye even to me with all you rheart, and with fasting, and with weeping, and with mourning: and rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the Lord your God: for He is gracious and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repenteth him of the evil. Who knoweth if he will return and repent, and leave a blessing behind Him; even a meat offering and a drink offering unto the Lord your God? Blow the trumpet in Zion, sanctify a fast, call a solemn assembly: gather the people, sanctify the congregation, assemble the elders, gather the children, and those that suck the breasts: let the bridegroom go forth out of his chamber, and the bride out of her closet. Let the priests, the minister of the Lord weep between the porch and the altar, and let them say, Spare thy people, O Lord, and give not thine heritage to reproach, that the heathen should rule over them: Wherefore should they say among the people, Where is their God?” (Joel 2:12-17).

 I am also reminded of the words of the prophet Amos which are recorded in the sixth chapter of the book bearing his name: “Woe to them that are at ease in Zion, and trust in the mountain of Samaria, which are named chief of the nations, to whom the house of Israel came! Pass ye unto Calneh, and see; and from thence go ye to Hamath the great: then go down to Gath of the Philistines: be they better than these kingdoms? Or their border greater than your border? Ye that put far away the evil day, and cause the seat of violence to come near; that lie upon beds of ivory, and stretch themselves upon their couches, and eat the lambs out of the flock, and the calves out of the midst of the stall; that chant to the sound of the viol, and invent to themselves instruments of musick, like David; that drink wine in bowls, and anoint themselves with the chief ointments: but they are not grieved for the affliction of Joseph” (Amos 6:1-6). When reading the words of the prophet in this passage I not only see a description of repairing and fortifying the wall of the city, as well as securing the water supply, but also of being given over to weeping and mourning because of the devastation that had befallen and struck the land. Both Joel and Amos spoke of the Lord’s call to weeping and mourning, to sackcloth and ashes as the inhabitants of the land looked upon the devastation and destruction that had befallen the land. The prophet Isaiah spoke of how instead of giving themselves to weeping and mourning they gave themselves to joy and gladness, and the prophet Amos spoke of how they drank wine in bowls, and anointed themselves with the chiefest of ointments, yet they were not grieved for the affliction of Joseph. As surely as I am convinced the Lord is calling His saints to fortify the defenses within their lives and to secure the source of living water within the depths of their soul and spirit, I am also convinced the Lord of hosts is calling His saints to once more give themselves to weeping and mourning, to fasting before the Lord, to grieve and to be afflicted at the devastation and destruction that has befallen the land. I do not believe that we are living in days of feasting and drinking, but in days of fasting, of weeping and mourning, and we give ourselves over to the devastation and destruction that has befallen our nation. The Lord is looking for those who will once more be grieved for ruin, for devastation, for destruction in the land, and to give themselves to weeping and mourning before Him. The Lord is looking for His priests, His ministers to weep between the porch and the altar, and to once more cry out to the Lord to spare and pardon a people.

 What’s more, is that I am not only convinced the Lord is looking for those who will give themselves to weeping and mourning, but those to whom He can give, commit and entrust His government to. “And it shall come to pass in that day, that I will call my servant Eliakim the son of Hilkiah: and I will clothe him with thy robe, and strengthen him with thy girdle, and I will commit thy government into his hand: and he shall be a father to the inhabitants of Jerusalem, and to the house of Judah. And the key of the house of David will I lay upon his shoulder; so he shall open, and none shall shut; and he shall shut, and none shall open. And I will fasten him as a nail in a sure place; and he shall be for a glorious throne to his father’s house. And they shall hang upon him all the glory of his father’s house” (Isaiah 22:20-24). The Lord is looking for those whom He can entrust with the very same government that was given to His own son—the dominion and authority of the kingdom of God. The government of heaven was given unto and placed upon the shoulders of the Messiah, yet we have been called and ordained to be a kingdom of priests who demonstrate and manifest the authority and government of the kingdom of God. The Lord is looking for those whose shoulders He can place His government, His kingdom and His authority—those whom He can entrust with the key of David. The Lord is looking for those whom He can entrust with the key of the house of David—that key which opens and none can shut, and shuts and none shall open. The Lord is looking for those whom He can given and entrust the keys of the kingdom of heaven in order that whatsoever they bound on earth would be bound in heaven, and whatever they loosed on earth would be loosed in heaven. The Lord is actively seeking those whom He can entrust His government to—those whom He can entrust with the keys to His kingdom who can both bind and loose on the earth. The Lord is looking for those whom He can entrust with the manifestation of the kingdom and will of God upon the earth—those who understand the reality of heaven and strive to bring the reality and activity of heaven upon the earth. Jesus’ words “thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven” bring us face to face with the manifestation of the activity of heaven upon the earth—something that characterized the life and ministry He partook of while upon the earth. Oh that we would read these words of the prophet Isaiah and would allow ourselves to be completely and totally stirred by their context and meaning, and that we would hear with our ears that which the Spirit is speaking to the churches.

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