Are You Ready to Sing: The Spontaneous Song of the Saints of God When Adversaries Are Defeated and Wickedness Is Judged

 













Today’s selected reading continues in the Old Testament prophetic book of Isaiah, and more specifically, is found in the twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth chapters. These particular chapters are quite unique when you consider them in light of the entirety of the prophetic book of Isaiah. In fact, the previous thirteen chapters dealt exclusively with the prophetic utterance of the Lord concerning the nations of the earth which surrounded the house of Israel. The prophetic utterance concerning the nations of the earth concluded with the Lord powerfully proclaiming and declaring that it would not just be the divided houses of Israel—Judah and Israel—nor the nations of the earth which surrounded Israel that would experience the judgment of the Lord. The twenty-fourth chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah describes how the entire earth will experience the judgment of the Lord, and how the inhabitants of the earth will themselves stand before the Lord in judgment. The Lord would judge the wickedness, the iniquity, the idolatry, the immorality, the rebellion and the transgression of the inhabitants of the earth. By the time you come to the conclusion of the twenty-fourth chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah you will undoubtedly come to the realization that there would be none who can escape the dealing(s) of the Lord. The Lord of hosts would deal with Israel and Judah, and it would be during the reign of Hezekiah and during the days of the prophet Isaiah that Shalmaneser king of Assyria would invade the northern kingdom of Israel, would lay siege to and eventually take the capital city of Samaria, and would ultimately take captive the people of the northern ten tribes. Judah and Benjamin would witness the Lord’s dealing with and judgment upon their northern brethren—a specific and powerful warning concerning their own iniquity, immorality and idolatry. Hezekiah was the last king under whose reign the prophet Isaiah would declare the word of the Lord, and one of the prophet’s final words of warning concerned the Babylonians entering ijnto the city of Jerusalem and carrying away all the treasure which Hezekiah foolishly showed the Babylonian envoys when they entered into the city of Jerusalem. Hezekiah foolishly displayed the wealth and treasure of the southern kingdom of Judah, and it would be this wealth—coupled together with the splendor of the Temple of the Lord with its gold, silver and bronze—that would eventually bring the Babylonians into Jerusalem to destroy the Temple, strip it of its precious materials, and destroy anything that was left. By the time we come to the end of the twenty-fourth chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah we discover that every inhabitant of the earth would have to give an account of how they lived their lives upon the earth, and the Lord’s judgment upon the wickedness, rebellion, iniquity, transgression and sin which was so pervasive upon the earth.

 When you come to the twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth chapters you notice a dramatic shift and powerful transition taking place within the prophetic writing of Isaiah. Immediately after proclaiming judgment upon the entire earth and the inhabitants upon it the prophet then seems to break forth into what appears to be spontaneous song and praise. After prophesying judgment upon the nations of the earth according to the word of the Lord, it is absolutely incredible that the prophet Isaiah seemed to break forth and break out in spontaneous song before the Lord. After prophesying the judgment of the Lord upon Moab, upon Ammon, upon Damascus, upon Egypt, upon Tyre, upon Babylon, and Edom, the prophet now directs His attention to the Lord as his heart was lifted up in worship before Him. There is something that is incredibly interesting and powerful when you consider how the prophet could break forth into spontaneous worship and praise before the Lord—especially after he had just prophesied the judgment of the Lord upon the nations of the Earth beginning with Babylon. If you study Scripture—particularly and especially the New Testament book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ—you will notice something take place after the Lord brings judgment upon the earth, and even brings judgment upon the adversary and his angels with him. If you read the twelfth chapter of the book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ you will notice the dragon and his angels fighting against and engaging Michael and his angels in war in heaven. Unable to prevail and no longer having place in heaven the dragon and his angels were cast forth out of heaven and cast down into the earth. What takes place immediately after the dragon was cast forth out of heaven and cast into the earth is actually quite astounding and remarkable, for immediately after the dragon and his angels were cast down something wonderful takes place in heaven. “And I heard a loud voice saying in heaven, Now is come salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God, and the power of His Christ: for the accuser of our brethren is cast down, which accused them before our God day and night. And they overcame him by the blood of the Lamb, and by the word of their testimony; and they loved not their lives unto the death. Therefore rejoice, ye heavens, and ye that dwell in them. Woe to the inhabiters of the earth of the se! For the devil is come down unto you, having great wrath, because he knoweth that he hath but a short time” (Revelation 12:7-12).

 Did you catch what took place after the dragon and his angels were cast forth out of heaven and cast down into the earth? The apostle John records how immediately after the dragon and his angels were cast forth out of heaven and cast down into the earth a loud voice was heard in heaven which spoke of the salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God, and the power of His Christ coming and being manifested. The one who spoke with a loud voice proclaimed that the accuser of the brethren had been cast down, which accused the saints of God before our God day and night. What’s more, is that this one who spoke with a loud voice also proclaimed how they overcame him by the blood of the Lamb, by the word of their testimony, and how they loved not their lives unto the death. Right after these words the one who spoke with a loud voice called the heavens and those which dwelt within them to rejoice—rejoice because the accuser of the brethren had been cast forth our of heaven once and for all. Why? How? How could the heavens and those which dwelt within them rejoice? The one who spoke with a loud voice actually answers this question and reveals the cause of their rejoicing—the accuser of our brethren being cast down out of heaven and into the earth. The cause for their rejoicing is actually two-fold—the casting down of the accuser of our brethren, and what that would mean in the heavens itself. With the accuser of our brethren being cast forth and cast down, salvation, strength, the kingdom of our God, and the power of His Christ had come and were being manifested in an unbelievable and powerful new way. In other words, the one who spoke with a loud voice called the heavens and the earth to rejoice because the devil—the ancient serpent, the great red dragon, and the accuser of our brethren—had been cast out of heaven and cast into the earth. Please don’t miss this, for their rejoicing was a direct result of the accuser of our brethren being cast forth and cast down into the earth. With the adversary being dealt with once and for all in the heavens, both the heavens themselves as well as those who dwelt within them were called to rejoice. This is quite significant, for it reveals a powerful source of our worship and praise before the Lord our God—the Lord’s dealing with and judgment upon the adversary and his angels. The heavens and all those who dwelt within them could rejoice because the accuser of our brethren was finally and once and for all cast forth, cast out and cast down. No longer would the heavens be polluted, defiled and corrupted by the vile presence of the adversary and his angels.

The fact that the devil and his angels were once and for all dealt with in the heavens was great cause for rejoicing, for the devil and his angels no longer had any place within the heavens, and could never again wage war therein. THE FINAL WAR OF THE ADVERSARY IN THE HEAVENS. How absolutely marvelous and wonderful it is that the apostle John witnesses war in heaven as the dragon and his angels fought against Michael and his angels, yet could not prevail. The twelfth chapter of the book of the Revelation of Jesus reveals Satan’s final attempt to mount his forces in war against the heavenly host, and how they were not only defeated, but also cast forth out of heaven and cast into the earth. When the adversary was once and for all defeated in the heavens—when neither the adversary nor his angels had access to the heavens—there was one who spoke with a loud voice calling both the heavens and all those who dwelt within them to rejoice. Their rejoicing was in the manifestation of the salvation and strength of God, in the kingdom of our God, and in the power of His Christ, as the adversary was finally and eternally expelled from the heavens. No longer could the adversary accuse the saints of God night and day before the Lord, for both he and his angels had lost all access before the throne of God. This was cause for great rejoicing, for through Michael and his angels the Lord once and for all dealt with the adversary and his angels in heaven. The source of their rejoicing was the direct result of the defeat, the overthrow, and the casting down of the adversary. Please don’t miss the incredible significance found within this chapter, for there is great cause for rejoicing within our lives when the adversary is once and for all defeated, overthrown, cast forth, and cast out of our lives. Spontaneous song and worship before the Lord would break forth in heaven as the accuser of our brethren along with his angels were cast forth out of heaven—never to return and no longer having any access. Worship and praise would burst and break forth in heaven as salvation and strength, the kingdom of our God, and the power of His Christ could be released without opposition as the adversary and his angels had fought their last war in heaven, and were not only overcome, but also expelled and cast forth by Michael and his angels. There is great cause for rejoicing, great cause for worship, great cause for praise, great cause for singing within our lives when the adversary is once and for all defeated, overthrown and cast forth out of our lives. If there is one thing this chapter reveals, it’s that spontaneous song and worship can and will break forth in that moment when the adversary is once and for all defeated, overthrown and cast forth out of our lives. It is my prayer even as I am writing these words that I would experience this spontaneous song and worship before the Lord, but also that others would experience this song within the depths of their heart and spirit. Oh that the Lord would give us this song of deliverance, victory and triumph—a reality which He promised to provide for all who earnestly and desperately sought it.

There is another place in Scripture when this spontaneous song is found bursting forth from the hearts and mouths of the people of God. If you journey back to the fifteenth chapter of the Old Testament book of Exodus you will discover another spontaneous song breaking forth in the earth among the children of Israel. Consider the words which Moses and the children of Israel sang unto the Lord on the other side of the Red Sea after the Lord had not only brought them through the waters of the Red Sea, but also drowned Pharaoh’s army in the sea. “I will sing unto the Lord, for He hath triumphed gloriously: the horse and his ride hath He thrown into the sea. The Lord is my strength a nd song, and He is become my salvation: He is my God, and I will prepare Him an habitation; my father’s God, and I will exalt Him. The Lord is a man of war: the Lrod is His name. Pharaoh’s chariots and his host hath he cast into the sea: His chosen captains also are drowned in the Red Sea. The depths have covered them: They sank into the bottom as a stone. Thy right hand, O Lord, is become glorious in power: thy right hand, O Lord, hath dashed in pieces the enemy. And in the greatness of thine excellency thou hast overthrown them that rose up against thee: thou sentest forth thy wrath, which consumed them as stubble. And with the blast of thy nostrils the waters were gathered together, the floods stood upright as an heap, and the depths were congealed in the heart of the sea. The enemy said, I will pursue, I will overtake, I will dive the spoil; my lust shall be satisfied upon them; I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them. Thou dust blow with thy wind, the sea covered them: they sank as lead in the mighty waters. Who is like unto thee, O Lord, among the gods? Who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders? Thou stretchedst out thy right hand, the earth swallowed them. Thou in thy mercy hast led forth the people which thou hast redeemed: thou hast guided them in thy strength unto thy holy habitation. The people shall hear, and be afraid: Sorrow shall take hold on the inhabitants of Palestina. Then the dukes of Edom shall be amazed; the mighty men of Moab, trembling shall take hold upon them; all the inhabitants of Canaan shall melt away. Fear and dread shall fall upon them; by the greatness of thine arm they shall be as still as a stone; till thy people pass over, O Lord, till the people pass over, which thou hast purchased. Thou shalt bring them in, and plant them in the mountain of thine inheritance, in the place, O Lord, which thou hast made for thee to dwell in, in the sanctuary, O Lord, which thy hands have established. The Lord shall reign forever and ever” (Exodus 15:1-18). In the very next verse Moses records and reveals once more the reason and source of this spontaneous song breaking out among Moses, Aaron, Miriam and the children of Israel—“For the horse of Pharaoh went in with his chariots and with his horsemen into the sea, and the Lord brought again the waters of the sea upon them; but the children of Israel went on dry land in the midst of the sea” (Exodus 15:19). There was no song sung as the children of Israel were departing from the land of Egypt, or even when the final sandal of the final man, woman or child crossed over the border of Egypt. However, spontaneous song did break forth when the Lord drowned both horse and chariot alike in the waters of the Red Sea. Spontaneous song broke forth among all the children of Israel after the Lord had completely destroyed Pharaoh’s army which dared pursue the children of Israel through the waters of the Red Sea.

This reality is further confirmed by the psalmist David, and is not only recorded in one, but two chapters within the Old Testament. In both the eighteenth chapter of the Book of the Psalms, as well as the twenty-second chapter of the book of Second Samuel. What is recorded in both of these chapters is actually the same song which David sang—a song which he sang at a very specific point in his life. “To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David, the servant of the Lord, who spake unto the Lord the words of this song IN THE DAY THAT THE LORD DELIVERED HIM FROM THE HAND OF ALL HIS ENEMES, AND FROM THE HAND OF SAUL” (Psalm 18, 2 Samuel 22 heading). Consider but a few words which David sang unto the Lord in the day that He delivered him from the hand of all his enemies, and from the hand of Saul: “I will love thee, O Lord, my strength. The Lord is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, and my high tower. I will call upon the Lord, who is worthy to be praised: so shall I be saved from mine enemies. The sorrows of death compassed me, and the floods of ungodly men made me afraid. The sorrows of hell compassed me about: the snares of death prevented me. IN my distress I called upon the Lord, and cried unto my God: He heard my voice out of His Temple, and my cry came before Him, even into His ears. Then the earth shook and trembled; the foundations also of the hills moved and were shaken, because He was wroth. There went up a smoke out of His nostrils, and fire out of His mouth devoured: coals were kindled by it. He bowed the heavens also, and came down: and darkness was under His feet. And He rode upon a cherub, and did fly: yea, He did fly upon the wings of the wind. He made darkness His secret place; His pavilion round about Him were dark waters and thick clouds of the skies. At the brightness that was before Him His thick clouds passed, hail stones and coals of fire. The Lord also thundered in the heavens, and the Highest gave His voice; hail stones and coals of fire. Yea, He sent out His arrows, and scattered them; and He shot out lightnings, and discomfited them. Then the channels of waters were seen, and the foundations of the world were discovered at thy rebuke, O Lord, at the blast of the breath of thy nostrils. He sent from above, He took me, He drew me out of many waters. He delivered me from my strong enemy, and from them which hated me: for they were too strong for me. They prevented me in the day of my calamity: but the Lord was my stay. He brought me forth also into a large place; He delivered me, because He delighted in me. The Lord rewarded me according to my righteousness; according to the cleanness of my hands hath He recompensed me” (Psalm 18:1-20). These words were very deliberate words which David spontaneous sang before the Lord in the day He delivered him out of the hands of all his enemies, and out of the hand of Saul. These words were sang by David in the day the Lord gave him complete and total victory over all his adversaries, foes and enemies which had compassed him round about—a powerful word of encouragement for each and every saint of God in this generation.

If you continue with this line of thought, you must return back to the book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ, and to the nineteenth chapter. It’s in the nineteenth chapter where we read of a great voice of much people in heaven singing forth wondrous words before the Lord—words which were sang upon the devastation and destruction of Babylon within the earth. Read the words which were sang by this great multitude in heaven and try and hear them as if you yourself are there partaking in the same song. “And after these things I heard a great voice of much people in heaven, saying, Alleluia; Salvation, and glory, and honour, and power, unto the Lord our God: For true and righteous are His judgments: for He hath judged the great whore, which did corrupt the earth with her fornication, and hath avenged the blood of His servants at her hand. And again they said, Alleluia. And her smoke rose up for ever and ever. And the four and twenty elders and the four beasts fell down and worshipped God that say on the throne, saying, Amen; Alleluia. And a voice came out of the throne, saying, Praise our God, all ye His servants, and ye that fear Him, both small and great. And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of mighty thundering, saying, Alleluia: for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth. Let us be glad and rejoice, and give honour to Him: for the marriage of the Lamb is come, and His wife hath made herself ready. And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints” (Revelation 19:1-8). 

These words were sang by all in heaven upon the utter destruction, devastation and judgment upon the great whore upon the earth—Babylon the great. In the day that the Lord had finished pouring out His wrath upon the earth and the inhabitants thereof, and in the day He judged Babylon the great whore in the earth, another spontaneous song broke out in heaven. It is necessary and imperative that we pay close attention to this particular event, as well as the words which were sung in the twelfth chapter after the dragon and his angels were cast out of heaven and cast down into the earth, for it reveals spontaneous song and worship that breaks and bursts forth in the day when the Lord not only deals with evil and wickedness in heaven, but also upon the earth. In the day when the Lord overthrows and overcomes all His enemies and adversaries, all the saints of God, and all the heavenly host with the four and twenty elders break out in worship and song before the Lord. The heavens and the inhabitants therein were called to rejoice in the day when the dragon and his angels were cast forth out of heaven, as the Lord had begun to bring about the complete and utter destruction and annihilation of the adversary and his angels. Another song would be sung in the day the Lord judged the great whore in the earth—the great whore who had become drunk with the blood of the saints, and had caused all upon the earth to engage in her fornication.  

When we read the twenty-fifth chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah we must not be alarmed by the presence of what appears to be a spontaneous song in the midst of it. When I read the words of this song which the prophet Isaiah sang before the Lord I can’t help but see it in the same light as the song which the children of Israel sang after Pharaoh’s army—with horses and chariots—were destroyed by the waters of the Red Sea. I can’t help but see it in the same light as the song which David sang before the Lord in the day He delivered him out of the hand of all his enemies, and out of the hand of Saul. In the day when all David’s adversaries and enemies were defeated he broke out in spontaneous song and worship before the Lord, for he sought to turn back his life of triumph and victory to the Lord in praise. The words of the prophet Isaiah must also be considered in light of the heavens and the inhabitants therein rejoicing when the dragon and his angels were cast forth our of heaven and cast into the earth. They must be considered in light of the song and praise which broke out in heaven after the Lord had judged the great whore and harlot in the earth—Babylon the great. “O Lord, thou art my God; I will exalt thee, I will praise thy name; for thou hast done wonderful things; thy counsels of old are faithfulness and truth. For thou hast made of a city an heap; of a defensed city a ruin: a palace of strangers to be no city; it shall never be built. Therefore shall the strong people glorify thee, the city of the terrible nations shall fear thee. For thou hast been a strength to the poor, a strength to the needy in his distress, a refuge from the storm, a shadow from the heat, when the blast of the terrible ounces is as a storm against the wall. Thou shalt bring down the noise of strangers, as the heat in a dry place; even the heat with the shadow of a could: the branch of the terrible ones shall be brought low. And in this mountain shall the Lord of hosts make unto all people a feast of fat things, a feast of wines on the lees, of fat things full of marrow, of wines on the lees will refined. And He will destroy in this mountain the face of the covering cast over all people, and the vail that is spread over all nations. He will swallow up death in victory; and the Lord God will wipe away tears from off all faces; and the rebuke of His people shall He take away from off all the earth. For the Lord hath spoken it. And it shall be said in that day, LO, this is our God; we have waited for Him, and He will save us; this is the Lord; we have waited for Him, we will be glad and rejoice in his salvation. For in this mountain shall the hand of the Lord rest, and Moab shall be trodden down under Him, even as straw is trodden down for the dunghill. And He shall spread forth His hands in the midst of them, as He that swimmers spreadeth forth His hands to swim: and He shall bring down their pride together with the spoils of their hands. And the fortress of the high fort of thy walls shall He bring down, lay low, and bring to the ground, even to the dust” (Isaiah 25).

As I read the words of the prophet Isaiah within the twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth chapter I can’t help but see him breaking out in the same type of spontaneous song which the children of Israel broke out in on the other side of the Red Sea—after the Lord had destroyed both horse and chariot alike with their ride in the waters of the Red Sea. The words of the prophet in this chapter are wonderfully similar to the words of David in the day the Lord gave him victory over all his enemies, and had delivered him out of the hand of Saul. The words of the prophet Isaiah come on the heels of the Lord’s judgment upon the nations of the earth, and upon the wickedness, rebellion, transgression and iniquity which had consumed and covered the earth. Spontaneous song broke forth in the heart and spirit of Isaiah when he saw the Lord confront and deal with the pride of man upon the earth, and judging Israel’s adversaries and foes upon the earth. When the children of Israel would return from their captivity of seventy years they would return to a completely different land as Moab, Ammon, Philistia, Edom were subdued before the Lord and were no more. The prophet Isaiah rejoiced in the salvation of his God as He was a strength to the poor, a strength to the needy in his distress, and a refuge from the storm, a shadow from the heat, when the blast of the terrible ones is as a storm against the wall. The prophet Isaiah broke out in spontaneous song as he witnessed the Lord destroying “ in this mountain the face of the covering cast over all people, and the vail that is spread over all nations.” The prophet Isaiah broke out in spontaneous song for he even saw death swallowed upon victory, and the Lord Himself wiping away tears from all faces. For the prophet, there was great cause for rejoicing and singing, as the Lord had judged the enemies and adversaries of the house of Israel. The Lord had judged the wickedness, the iniquity, the immorality, the idolatry, the rebellion, the transgression, the sin of the inhabitants of the earth. The words we read in the twenty-sixth chapter is but an extension and expression of the reality we find in the twenty-fifth chapter, as it was not the prophet Isaiah who would sing unto the Lord, but the inhabitants of Judah. “We have a strong city; Salvation will God appoint for walls and bulwarks. Open ye the gates, that the righteous nation which keepeth the truth may enter in.” Furthermore, the prophet Isaiah even declares that the Lord will keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on Him, because he trust in Him. Oh dear brother, is the Lord keeping you in perfect peace because your mind is stayed upon Him, and because you trust in Him? The words we find recorded in these chapters are found on the heels of the Lord’s dealing with the nations of the earth, and the inhabitants of the earth themselves, and for bringing forth salvation for His people. The prophet Isaiah urged those who would hear and read his words to “trust in the Lord for ever, for in the Lord JEHOVAH is everlasting strength.”

The prophet Isaiah proclaimed how the Lord would ordain Peace for them, for the Lord has wrought all their works within them. The prophet went on to declare how other lords beside the Lord have had dominion over them, but by the Lord only would they make mention of His name. The question that I must ask is in regards to this reality of “others lords beside the Lord having dominion” over the people of God. Oh dear brother, dear sister—are there other lords beside the Lord of hosts who have dominion over you? Do you find yourself in a similar place as the children of Israel in the land of Egypt when cruel taskmasters ruled over them with great oppression? The tremendous significance of these words is that all those who have been lord over us are going to be and should be destroyed from within our lives. There should be nothing, nor anyone who should be lord over you beside the Lord of hosts Himself. There should be nothing, nor anyone who should exercise any dominion over you other than the Lord of hosts. The song which David sang and the song which the children of Israel sang were centered upon this reality—the reality that the children of Israel are not to be held under the dominion of any adversary, foe or enemy. The Lord had delivered the children of Israel from the Egyptians exercising dominion over them—from their slavery, bondage and oppression. The Lord had destroyed the enemy and adversary which had pursued the children of Israel through the waters of the Red Sea—never to be seen or heard from again. Moreover, the Lord had delivered David from the hand of all his enemies, foes and adversaries, for David was not to come under the dominion of any nation or people. What we read in these chapters is that spontaneous song when the Lord delivers us from and brings us out from underneath anything and everything that has exercised lordship and dominion over us. Tell me brethren—are you tired of cruel task masters oppressing you and keeping you in bondage? Are you tired of our enemies and adversaries exercising lordship and dominion over you? The words recorded in these two chapters not only reveal the power of the Lord keeping us in perfect peace, and ordaining Peace for us according to us waiting on Him, but also His tremendous victory and triumph over all enemies and adversaries—even including death itself;. Oh that the Lord would bring us through and to the other side of the Red Sea, and would cause us to break forth in spontaneous song before Him as He has not only delivered us from our enemies and adversaries, but also from death itself. Oh that the Lord would ordain Peace for us, and that He would keep us in perfect peace as our minds are stayed on Him. OH that we would join together with the songs of David, of the children of Israel, and of the host in heaven as mentioned in the book of the Revelation of Jesus. Let us wait patiently for the Lord and put our complete trust in Him, and watch as the Lord of hosts delivers us from our adversaries, but also teaches and trains our hands for war to engage and triumph over those adversaries which would exercise dominion and lordship over us.

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