The Other Woman: Who Is the Strange Woman With Her Foreign Gods









Today’s selected reading continues in the Old Testament prophetic book of Jeremiah, and s’more specifically, is found in verses twenty-nine through thirty-seven of the second chapter. “WHAT INIQUITY HAVE YOUR FATHERS FOUND IN ME, THAT THEY ARE GONE FAR FROM ME, AND HAVE WALKED AFTER VANITY, AND ARE BECOME VAIN?””HATH A NATION CHANGED THEIR GODS, WHICH ARE YET NO GODS?” “IS ISRAEL A SERVANT? IS HE A HOMEBORN SLAVE? WHY IS HE SPOILED?” HAST THOU NOT PROCURED THIS UNTO THYSELF, IN THAT HAST FORSAKEN THE LORD THY GOD, WHEN HE LED THEE BY THE WAY?” “AND NOW WHAT HAS THOU TO DO IN THE WAY OF EGYPT, TO DRINK THE WATERS OF SIHOR? OR WHAT HAST THOU TO DO IN THE WAY OF ASSYRIA, TO DRINK THE WATERS OF THE RIVER?” “HW THEN ART THOU TURNED INTO THE DEGENERATE PLANT OF A STRANGE VINE UNTO ME?” “HOW CANST THOU SAY, I AM NOT POLLUTED, I HAVE NOT GONE AFTER BAALIM?” “WHEREFORE WILL YE PLEAD WITH ME?” “HAVE I BEEN A WILDERNESS UNTO ISRAEL? A LAND OF DARKNESS?” “WHEREFORE SAY MY PEOPLE, WE ARE LORDS; WE WILL COME NO MORE UNTO THEE?” “CAN A MAID FORGET HER ORNAMENTS, OR A BRIDE HER ATTIRE?” “WHY TRIMMEST THOU THY WAY TO SEEK LOVE?” “WHY GADDEST THOU ABOUT SO MUCH TO CHANGE THY WAY?” These are the various questions the Lord asks of His chosen people through His servant, the prophet Jeremiah. When you come to the second chapter of the prophetic book of Jeremiah, you will quickly discover the Lord beginning to reason together with His people. If I am being incredibly honest and truthful when reading this particular passage of Scripture, I am utterly amazed at how much the Lord was ready and willing to plead and deal with His people. In the process of dealing with the sin(s), the rebellion(s), the wickedness, the transgression(s) of His people, the Lord asks a series of questions—questions which are more rhetorical than anything, yet which are meant to cause the people of Jerusalem and Judah to consider their ways. There are a number of questions that are found in this passage of Scripture, which although I would dare say went largely unanswered, yet were meant to bring the people of Jerusalem and Judah into a place of consideration. BROUGHT INTO A BROAD PLACE OF CONSIDERATION! BROUGHT INTO A BROAD PLACE OF CONTEMPLATION! WHEN THE QUESTIONS OF ALMIGHTY GOD BRING US TO THE PLACE OF CONSIDERATION!

 When I read these questions of the Lord of hosts, I can’t help but think how they were designed to bring the children of Israel into a place of consideration—a consideration of their ways. BROUGHT INTO THE BROAD PLACE OF CONSIDERING ONE’S HEART! BROUGHT INTO A BROAD PLACE OF CONSIDERING ONE’S WAYS! BROUGHT INTO A BROAD PLACE OF CONSIDERING ONE’S THOUGHTS! The more I read and consider the various questions that were asked by the Lord in this particular passage of Scripture, the more I can’t help but consider how such questions were meant to bring the people of Israel and Judah into a place where they were willing to examine themselves. There is no indication in the second chapter of the prophetic book of Jeremiah the Lord demanded or was even requiring answers to His questions—a reality which I am convinced must be considered today. There are several times within our lives when the Lord will come to us with questions, yet His questions are not meant to require or demand answers from us. The Lord will come to us with questions which are designed and meant to bring us to the place of consideration—consideration of our thoughts, consideration of our ways, consideration of our heart and our mind. Tell me dear brother, dear sister—when was the last time you took the time to consider your ways before the Lord? When was the last time you took the time to consider your actions before the Lord? When was the last time you took the time to consider your emotions and your feelings before the Lord? There are times when the Lord will come to us, and rather than coming to us with words which He speaks, He comes to us with questions intended on bringing us to the place of consideration. There is a part of me that can’t help but wonder how many men and women—upon hearing these various questions asked of the Lord—actually took the time to consider their ways before the Lord. How many men and women truly took to heart the words which Jeremiah was speaking in their hearing, and actually considered their ways before the Lord their God? The various questions the Lord of hosts asked His people through the prophet Jeremiah were designed to bring them into the place where they were forced to at least acknowledge that which the Lord was speaking. Whether or not the children of Israel answered the questions the Lord had asked—whether they answered them audibly before the prophet, or inaudibly within their heart and spirit—is actually quite irrelevant, for they were forced to acknowledge that which the Lord was speaking. It’s one thing for the Lord to merely speak to His people, yet when He incorporates questions in the midst of it, He actually brings His people into a place where they must choose whether or not they will confront and deal with the issues which are present within their hearts and minds.

 In this second portion of the second chapter of the prophetic book of Jeremiah, the Lord declares unto His people that their own wickedness would correct them, and their backsliding would reprove them. The Lord declares unto His people that it is both an evil thing and bitter, that they had forsaken the Lord their God, and that His fear was not in them. Perhaps one of the most astounding realities that is contained within this passage of Scripture is what we learn in regards to their forsaking the Lord of hosts. As you read this passage of Scripture, you will undoubtedly notice that it wasn’t simply about the children of Israel forsaking the Lord. If you study this passage of Scripture, you will find that directly connected to and associated with this forsaking is a vain pursuit of that which is other. For example, in the thirteenth verse of this chapter we find the Lord declaring His people had committed two evil—they had forsaken Him the fountain of living waters, and they had hewn out for them cisterns, broken cisterns which can hold no water. The children of Israel didn’t merely forsake the fountain of living waters, but they had actually attempted to hew out for themselves cisterns of their own making—cisterns which they perceived would satisfy and provide for them. It is absolutely imperative that we pay close attention to the words of the prophet Jeremiah, for one doesn’t merely forsake the Lord without also pursuing and going after that which is other. In the seventeenth verse of this same chapter we find the Lord asking the people of Jerusalem and Judah—“Hast thou not procured this unto thyself, in that thou hast forsaken the Lord thy God, when he led thee by the way?” This question in and of itself is quite pointed and powerful, yet the Lord doesn’t merely end with this question. Immediately after asking the children of Israel concerning their forsaking Him, He immediately asks them what they had to do in the way of Egypt, to drink the waters of Sihor. The Lord asks them what they had to do in the way of Assyria, to drink the waters of the river. In other words, the children of Israel didn’t merely forsake the Lord of hosts, but they actually forsake Him to go after and pursue others. The single greatest example I can’t help but think of when considering this passage of Scripture is that husband who leaves his wife for another woman. After perhaps spending several years being married, the husband tells his wife he no longer loves her, has fallen in love with another woman, and was leaving her in order to join himself to this new woman. PURSUING THE OTHER WOMAN! FORSAKING THE WIFE FOR THE OTHER WOMAN! TRADING THE WIFE FOR THE OTHER WOMAN!

 WHO IS THE OTHER WOMAN IN YOUR LIFE? WHO IS THE OTHER WOMAN WITHIN YOUR HEART? WHO IS THE OTHER WOMAN THAT HAS CAPTURED YOUR ATTENTION? WHO IS THE OTHER WOMAN WHO HAS STOLEN YOUR AFFECTION? WHAT HAS CAUSED YOU TO GET UP, FOLLOW AFTER AND PURSUE THE OTHER WOMAN? I can’t help but be reminded of the words which Solomon king of Israel spoke in the Old Testament book of Proverbs—Solomon the king who had numerous wives and countless concubines. Before considering the words of Solomon which are found in the Old Testament book of Proverbs, it is important that we first consider the course of his own life and actions. In the eleventh chapter of the Old Testament book of First Kings we find a tragic description of Solomon—Solomon, the king who had asked the Lord for wisdom and received his prayer. This same king which oversaw the building and construction of the Temple of the Lord in the city of Jerusalem experienced a tremendous tragic period within his life—one that not only directly impacted him, but also impacted the life of his son, and even the future of the kingdom of Israel. “But king Solomon loved many strange women, together with the daughter of Pharaoh, women of the Moabites, Ammonites, Edomites, Zidonians, and HIttitues; of the nations concerning which the Lord said unto the children of Israel, Ye shall not go in to them, neither shall they come in unto you: For surely they will turn away your heart after their gods: Solomon clave unto these in love. And he had seven hundred wives, princesses, and three hundred concubines: and his wives turned away his heart. For it came to pass, when Solomon was old, that his wives turned away his heart after other gods: and his heart was not perfect with the Lord his God, as was the heart of David his father. For Solomon went after Ashtoreth the goddess of the Zidonians, and after. Milcom the abomination of the Ammonites. And Solomon did evil in the sight of the Lord, and went not fully after the Lord, as did David his father. Then did Solomon build an high place for Chemosh, the abomination of Moab, in the hill that is before Jerusalem, and for MOlech, the abomination of the children of Ammon. And likewise did he for all his strange wives, which burnt incense and sacrificed unto their gods” (1 Kings 11:1-8).

 Consider the Lord’s direct response to Solomon’s actions in the land as a result of his love and affection for foreign women. “And the Lord was angry with Solomon, because his heart was turned from the Lord God of Israel, which had appeared unto him twice, and had commanded him concerning this thing, that he should not go after other gods: but he kept not that which the Lord commanded. Wherefore the Lord said unto Solomon, Forasmuch as this is done of thee, and thou hast not kept my covenant and my statutes, which I have commanded thee, I will surely rend the kingdom from thee, and will give it to thy servant. Notwithstanding in thy days I will not do it for David thy father’s sake: but I will rend it out of the hand of thy son. Howbeit I will not rend away all the kingdom; but will give one tribe to thy son for David my servant’s sake, and for Jerusalem’s sake which I have chosen” (1 Kings 11:9-13).

 It is clear from this particular passage in the book of First Kings that Solomon was not only a man who loved many strange and foreign women, but he also allowed his heart to be turned after the foreign gods which these women served. FOREIGN WOMEN AND FOREIGN GODS! STRANGE WOMEN AND STRANGE GODS! FOREIGN WOMEN AND THE FOREIGN GODS THEY SERVE! STRANGE WOMEN AND THE STRANGE GODS THEY SERVE! Solomon allowed his heart to be consumed with affection for strange women—strange women of whom the Lord instructed the children of Israel to abstain from connecting themselves to. The account of Solomon is actually one that is incredibly tragic, for Solomon—the same Solomon who oversaw the building of the Temple of the Lord—allowed himself to build high places for the foreign and strange gods which were followed by the strange and foreign women he clave to in love. TRADING THE TEMPLE OF THE LORD FOR HIGH PLACES OF STRANGE GODS! What we read in the eleventh chapter of the book of First Kings is quite remarkable, for within it we find that not only did Solomon cleave to foreign women in love, but he also clave to the foreign gods which those women served. It’s worth noting that the author of the book of First Kings used the word “strange” to describe the women whom Solomon allowed himself to cleave to. The author of this particular book didn’t merely state that Solomon loved many women, but many strange women. The author was very specific to include the word “strange” in front of women to add additional emphasis to those women whom Solomon chose to cleave to in both love and affection. The use of the word “strange” is actually a remarkable connection to the countless women Solomon allowed himself to cling to, for this word “strange” actually directly links to a word which carries an even greater weight—the word “abomination.” STRANGE WOMEN AND THEIR ABOMINABLE GODS! STRANGE WIVES AND THEIR ABOMINABLE GODS! The author of this passage of Scripture makes it very clear and evident that Solomon’s affection and love for these women would ultimately turn his heart away from the Lord of hosts, and would turn his heart toward foreign and strange gods. One of the single greatest realities surrounding the concept of strange women is the behind those strange women were strange and foreign abominable gods whom they worshipped. What’s more, is that behind those abominable and foreign gods whom these strange women worshipped were demonic forces which were under the direct authority of Lucifer himself. STRANGE WOMEN, STRANGE GODS and the DEMONS BEHIND THE GODS! BEHIND EVERY STRANGE WOMAN THERE MAY VERY WELL BE A FOREIGN GOD and BEHIND EVERY FOREIGN GOD THERE IS A DEMONIC FORCE AND PRESENCE!

 I asked the question earlier regarding who the strange woman was within your life, and I must hold fast to that question. WHO IS THE STRANGE WOMAN WITHIN YOUR LIFE? WHO IS THE OTHER WOMAN WITHIN YOUR LIFE? Solomon was no stranger to “other” women, for he wrote of such a reality on more than one occasion within the Old Testament book of the Proverbs. “When wisdom entereth into thine heart, and knowledge is pleasant unto thy soul; discretion shall preserve thee, understanding shall keep thee: to deliver thee from the way of the evil man, from the man that speaketh froward things; who leave the paths of uprightness, to walk in the ways of darkness; who rejoice to do evil, and delight in the frowardness of the wicked; whose ways are crooked, and they froward in their paths: to deliver thee from the strange woman, even from the stranger which flattereth with her words; which forsaketh the guide of her youth, and forgetteth the covenant of her God. For her house inclineth unto death, and her paths unto the dead. None that go unto her return again, neither take they hold of the paths of life. That thou mayest walk in the way of good men, and keep the paths of the righteous. For the upright shall dwell in the land, and the perfect shall remain in it. But the wicked shall be cut off from the earth, and the transgressors shall be rooted out of it” (Proverbs 2:10-22). Consider also the words which Solomon wrote and are recorded in the fifth chapter of the same Old Testament book: “My son, attend unto my wisdom, and bow thine ear to my understanding: that thou mayest regard discretion, and that thy lips may keep knowledge. For the lips of a strange woman drop as an honeycome, and her mouth is smoother than oil: but her end is bitter as wormwood, sharp as a two-edged sword. Her feet go down to death; her steps take hold on hell. Lest thou shouldest ponder the path of life, her ways are moveable, that thou canst not know them. Her ways are moveable, that thou canst not know them. Hear me now therefore, O ye children, and depart not from the words of my mouth. Remove thy way far from her, and come not night the door of her house: lest thou give thine honour unto others, and thy years unto the cruel: lest strangers be filled with thy wealth; and thy labours be in the house of a stranger; and thou mourn at the last, when thy flesh and thy body are consumed” (Proverbs 5:1-11). Later on in the same chapter Solomon records these words—“Drink waters out of thine own cistern, and running waters of thine own well. Let thy fountains be dispersed abroad, and rivers of waters in the streets. Let them be only thine own, and not strangers’ with thee. Let thy fountain be blessed: and rejoice with the wife of thy youth. Let her be as the loving hind and pleasant roe; let her breasts satisfy thee at all times; and be thou ravished always with her love. And why wilt thou, my son, be ravished with a strange woman, and embrace the bosom of a stranger? For the ways of a man are before the eyes of the Lord, and he pondereth all his goings. His own iniquities shall take the wicked himself, and he shall be holden with the cords of his sins. He shall die without instruction; and in the greatness of his folly he shall go astray” (Proverbs 5:15-23).

In the sixth chapter we find similar words written by Solomon concerning “the strange woman,” and our need to keep our path far from her. “When you goest, it shall dad thee; when thou sleepest, it shall keep thee; and when thou awakest, it shall talk with thee. For the commandment is a lamp; and the law is light; and reproofs of instruction are the way of life: to keep thee from the evil woman, from the flattery of the tongue of a strange woman. Lust not after her beauty in thine heart; neither let her take thee with her eyelids. For by means of a whorish woman a man is brought to a piece of bread: and the adulteress will hunt for the precious life. Can a man take fire in his bosom, and his clothes not be burned? Can one go upon hot coals, and his feet not be burned? So he that goeth in to his neighbours’ wife; whosoever toucheth her shall not be innocent. Men do not despise a thief, if he steal to satisfy his soul when he is hungry; but if he be found, he shall restore sevenfold; he shall give all the substance of his house. But whoso committeth adultery with a woman lacketh understanding: he that doeth it destroyeth his own soul. A wound and dishonor shall he get; and his reproach shall not be wiped away. For jealousy is the rage of a man: therefore he will not spare in the day of vengeance. He will not regard any ransom; neither will he rest content, though thou givest many gifts” (Proverbs 6:22-35). Finally, in the seventh chapter we read these words which Solomon continued to write concerning the strange woman: “My son, keep my words, and lay up my commandments with thee. Keep my commandments, and live; and my law as the apple of thine eye. Bind them upon thy fingers, write them upon the table of thine heart. Say unto wisdom, Thou art my sister; and call understanding thy kinswoman: that they may keep thee from the strange woman, from the stranger which flattereth with her words. For at the window of my house I looked through my casement, and beheld among the simple ones, I discerned among the youths, a young man void of understanding, passing through the street near her corner; and he went the way to her house, in the twilight, in the evening, in the black and dark night: and, behold, there met him a woman with the attire of an harlot, and subtil of heart. (She is loud and stubborn; her feet abide not in her house: now is she without, now in the streets, and lieth in wait at every corner.) So she caught him, and kissed him, and with an impudent face said unto him, I have peace offerings with me; this day have I payed my vows. Therefore came I forth to meet thee, diligently to seek thy face, and I have found thee. I have decked my bed with coverings of tapestry, with carved works, with fine linen of Egypt. I have perfumed my bed with myrrh, aloes, and cinnamon. Come, let us take our fill of love until the morning: let us solace ourselves with loves. For the goodman is not at home, he is gone a long journey: he hath taken a bag of money with him, and will come home at the day appointed. With her much fair speech she caused him to yield, with the flattering of her lips she forced him. He goeth after her straightway, as an ox goeth to the slaughter, or as a fool to the correction of the stocks; till a dart strike through is liver; as a bird hasteth to the snare, and knoweth not that it is for his life. Hearken unto me now therefore, O ye children, and attend to the words of my mouth. Let not thine heart decline to her ways, go not astray in her paths. For she hath cast down many wounded: yea, many strong men have been slain by her. Her house is the way to hell, going down to the chambers of death” (Proverbs 7:1-27).

What’s worth noting and pointing out is the apparent connection between the words of Solomon as recorded in the fifth chapter of the book of Proverbs and the words of Jeremiah in the prophetic book bearing his name. In the fifth chapter of Proverbs we read “Drink waters out of thine own cistern, and running waters out of thine own well. Let thy fountains be dispersed abroad, and rivers out of thine own well. Let thy fountains be dispersed abroad, and rivers of waters in the streets. Let them be only thine, and not strangers’ with thee. Let thy fountain be blessed: and rejoice with the wife of thy youth” (Proverbs 5:15-18). In the second chapter of the prophetic book of Jeremiah we read these words concerning Judah and Jerusalem: “For my people have committed two evils; they have forsaken me the fountain of living waters, and hewed them out cisterns, broken cisterns, that can hold no water” (Jeremiah 2:13). We must recognize and understand the connection between these two passages of Scripture, for while Solomon speaks of cisterns and fountains as being connected to the wife of one’s youth, Jeremiah speaks of fountains and cisterns being connected to the Lord of hosts. Solomon speaks of one’s wife as a fountain from which one should drink, while Jeremiah speaks of the Lord of hosts as the fountain of living waters from which one should drink. We dare not, we cannot, we must not miss the importance of these words, for these words bring us face to face with the reality of “the other woman” or “the strange woman.” I have asked the question concerning who is “the strange woman,” and who is “the other woman” within your life, and we cannot afford to consider such a question as offensive. In fact, if you make any attempt to read the prophetic book of Jeremiah you will notice the use of strong language that I guarantee might be highly offensive. I can’t help but wonder what would happen if Jeremiah prophesied and spoke in many of our churches and used words such as “backsliding,” “whoredom,” “harlotry,” and the like. Jeremiah declared how Jerusalem and Judah had forsaken the Lord who was the fountain of living waters, and how they hewed out for themselves empty and broken cisterns that can hold no waters. Jeremiah then goes on to speak of the waters which they began to drink from instead of the fountain of living waters—“drink the waters of Sihor” and “drink the waters of the river.” Please don’t miss the significance and importance of these words, for Jeremiah clearly sets forth that the forsaking of one fountain—the fountain of living waters—led to drinking from and partaking of other fountains which weren’t fountains at all.

In the nineteenth verse, Jeremiah speaks of the wickedness of Jerusalem and Judah, but he also speaks of their backsliding, and how they had forsaken the Lord their God. In the very next verse Jeremiah declares and describes how the children of Israel had wandered upon every high hill and under every tree while playing the harlot. Within this chapter we find that the harlotry and whoredom of Jerusalem and Judah took place on two distinct fronts. On the one hand their harlotry and whoredom took place in their worship of the idols and foreign gods of the nations and peoples around them. On the other hand, their harlotry and whoredom took place in their joining themselves together with the nations and peoples around them. They had forsaken the fountain of living waters which was the Lord, and how they began to drink the waters of Egypt and Assyria. I am highly convinced that the language which the prophets spoke to Jerusalem and Judah would be highly offensive in many of our churches and congregations, for they were completely unafraid and unashamed to use words such as “whore” and “harlot” when speaking to the Lord’s people. In the twenty-fifth verse we find these words—“Withold thy foot from being unshod, and thy throat from thirst: but thou saidst, There is no hope: no; for I have loved strangers, and after them will I go.” I believe the words which Solomon spoke in chapters two through seven of the book of Proverbs are directly connected to what we read in this passage, for while Solomon spoke of natural and physical adultery, the prophet Jeremiah spoke of an adultery that was much more serious and severe. There is a natural adultery which is committed between a man and woman, yet there is a spiritual adultery which is committed within the heart(s) of men and women. There is a tangible and physical idolatry that takes place in the earth, yet there is a hidden idolatry—an idolatry that is concealed and not visible to the natural eye. In the fourteenth chapter of the prophetic book of Ezekiel we find the Lord speaking to the prophet when certain of the elders of Israel came unto him to sit before him. “And the word of the Lord came unto me, saying, Son of man, these men have set up their idols in their heart, and put the stumblingblock of their iniquity before their face: should I be inquired of at all by them? Therefore speak unto them, and say unto them, Thus saith the Lord God; Every man of the house of Israel that setteth up his idols in his heart, and putteth the stumblingblock of his iniquity before his face, and cometh to the prophet; I the Lord will answer him that cometh according to the multitude of his idols; that I may take the house of Israle in their own heart, because they are all estranged from me through their idols. Therefore say unto the house of Israel, Thus saith the Lord God; Repent, and turn yourselves from your idols; and turn away your faces from all your abominations. For every one of the house of Israel, or of the stranger that sojourneth in Israel, which separateth himself from me, and setteth up his idols in his heart, and putteth the stumblingblock of his iniquity before his face, and cometh to a prophet to inquire of him concerning me; I the Lord will answer him by myself: and I will set my face against that man, and will make him a sign and a proverb, and I will cut him off from the midst of my people and ye shall know that I am the Lord” (Ezekiel 14:1-7).

It is necessary that we understand the severity and danger of natural and physical adultery, but even more than natural and physical adultery, we must understand spiritual idolatry which is committed not before the eyes of others, but within the heart and mind of an individual. I mentioned and included in the words of the prophet Ezekiel in this passage, for in order to understand the “harlotry” and the “whoredom” which Jeremiah spoke of, we must understand that such realities take place and are manifested within one’s heart. I asked the question regarding the strange woman, and concerning the other woman, and I must ask again the same question of you. Who is the strange woman within your life? Who is the other woman within your life? Who is that strange woman that is setting herself up before you to dissuade you from the path upon which you have been on? Please understand that I am not speaking of a natural and physical woman, but rather that thing within your life that attempts to turn your heart away from the Lord. Are you forsaking the fountain of living waters in order to drink waters from the broken cisterns and fountains of Egypt and Assyria? What strange and foreign gods are you allowing yourself to worship at this moment within your life? There are very few who are willing to speak to the reality of backsliding, whoredom and harlotries, yet the truth of the matter is that it is possible for us to commit adultery within our heart. Think about it—if Jesus declared that adultery does not begin, nor is committed first in the actual, but rather with lust within one’s heart, than spiritual adultery does not begin with the outward act and manifestation, but rather with the lust and affection that is present within one’s heart. What is your heart lusting after right now? I can’t help but be reminded of the words of the sons of Korah as recorded in the forty-second chapter of the book of the Psalms—“As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. My soul thirseth for God, the living God: when shall I come and appear before God” (Psalm 42:1-2). What about the words of the prophet Isaiah as recorded in the fifty-fifth chapter—“Ho, every one that thirseth, come ye to the waters, and he that hath no money; come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price. Wherefore do ye spend money for that which is not bread? And your labour for that which satisfies not? Hearken diligently unto me, and eat ye that which is good, and let your soul delight itself in fatness” (Isaiah 55:1-2). I am also reminded of the words which Jesus spoke, which the apostle John recorded in the gospel account of Jesus’ life and ministry—“IN the last day, that great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. He that believeth on me, as the Scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water” (John 7:37-38). I leave you with these two questions: “Who is the other woman—the strange woman—that is present within your life right now?” And “What fountain are you presently drinking from?”

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