Inheritance Begins With the Sanctuary










Today’s selected reading continues in the Old Testament prophetic book of Ezekiel, and more specifically, is found in the forty-fifth chapter of the book. The more I read the final several chapters of the prophetic book of Ezekiel, the more I am utterly and completely fascinated by the language and text that is contained therein. In all reality, the transitions seems to begin in the thirty-sixth chapter—a chapter in which the prophet is given a prophetic word from the Lord concerning a new covenant the Lord of hosts Himself would enter into with the house of Israel. I have spent time writing of the progression that seems to take place within the prophetic book of Ezekiel, which begins in and with the thirty-chapter. What we find in the thirty-sixth chapter is a powerful prophetic declaration concerning the covenant the Lord of hosts would enter into with His people—a prophetic word that would immediately be followed by the prophet being set down in the midst of a vast valley that was filled with bones round about. Ezekiel was set down in the midst of a valley that was full of bones which were very many and bones which were very dry. Immediately upon being set down in the midst of the valley, Ezekiel was asked a very specific question from the Lord of hosts—a question that a number of men and women are asked at some point within their lives. The question Ezekiel was asked of the Lord was quite simply, and yet so profound—“Son of man, can these bones lives?” At some point within your life, you have been faced with, confronted by and asked this question of the Lord of hosts, as the Lord has placed you in a position or location where you have been surrounded by your number of bones which are very many and very dry. The account goes on to describe two distinct prophetic words that were spoken by the prophet Ezekiel—one prophetic word that began and brought about the process of transformation, as there was a noise and a shaking that was experience within the valley. Upon the noise and the shaking, each bone came together, bone to his bone, as sinews, flesh and skin covered the bones which had come together. While the process of transformation had begun, it was only the first part and phase of the work, for the work was not yet and would not be complete. Transformation was only the beginning of the work, for there was a second instruction that was given unto the prophet Ezekiel from the Lord of hosts—instruction that would ultimately lead to and bring about the process of resurrection within the valley. TRANSFORMATION IN THE MIDST OF THE VALLEY! RESURRECTION IN THE MIDST OF THE VALLEY! Ezekiel was then instructed to prophesy to the breath of the divine to come forth from the four winds of the earth, and to breath upon these slain that they might live. The breath came into the lifeless corpses which were before Ezekiel, and there stood before him an exceeding great and exceeding vast army.

 As you continue reading the prophetic book of Ezekiel, you will notice that transformation and resurrection in the midst of the valley would be followed by a tremendous conflict that would strike the very heart of the house and land of Israel. The thirty-eighth and thirty-ninth chapters of the prophetic book of Ezekiel describe an event which has been widely debated, and largely discuss throughout the years. Within these two chapters we find the famed war of “Gog and Magog”—a war in which Gog leads a caste horde of enemies and adversaries upon the land of Israel to utterly and completely consume it. In the thirty-sixth chapter of the book of Ezekiel we notice and encounter the process of covenant, as the Lord of hosts would provide a new heart and a new spirit within His people—a reality that would help and enable them to walk in and follow His commands, His statutes, His law and His precepts. The reality of covenant would be followed by the process of transformation and resurrection—a process which would ultimately be followed by conflict. What’s interesting about this, is that not only were covenant, transformation and resurrection followed by conflict in and of itself, but they were followed by the single greatest conflict the house of Israel has ever faced. It is true the house of Israel experienced three distinct invasions of the enemy and adversary, as the northern kingdom of Israel was invaded by the Assyrians, and the southern kingdom of Judah was invaded by the Babylonians. Centuries later, the nation and house of Israel would once more be invaded, yet this time, they would be invaded by the Babylonians. Each of these invasions would be catastrophic and devastating for the house and land of Israel, with two of them resulting in the utter destruction of the Temple of the Lord which stood in the midst of the city of Jerusalem. One thing that’s interesting about the invasions of the Babylonians and the Romans, is that while both invasions resulted in the destruction of the Temple, and the scattering of the people of God within and throughout the nations and countries of the earth, When speaking of this final invasion of the land of Israel—instead of finding the people of God being scattered throughout the nations and countries of the earth, we find the Lord of hosts rising up to defend His people from this vast horde of enemies and adversaries, and bringing about the greatest physical and earthly deliverance israel has ever experienced. The Lord vowed that His people would never again be scattered among and throughout the nations of the earth, and despite the fact that Gog invaded the beautiful land with a vast horde of enemies and adversaries, the Lord would bring about His deliverance of the house of Israel. What’s more, is that, whereas the invasions of the Babylonians and Romans would result in the destruction of the Temple of the Lord, I am convinced this final invasion would be the catalyst that would bring about the rebuilding of the third and final Jewish Temple that would stand in the midst of the city of Jerusalem.

 Immediately following the conflict of Gog and Magog, and the destruction of all but one sixth of the invading force, we find in the fortieth chapter a prophetic word released and revealed unto Ezekiel concerning a Temple that would once more stand in the midst of the city of Jerusalem. Beginning with the fortieth chapter of the prophetic book of Ezekiel we notice that immediately following the single greatest conflict the house and land of Israel has ever faced, a Temple would emerge in the midst of the people who were dwelling securely within the land. It’s interesting to note that it seemed their ease, their comfort, their rest, and even their peace in the midst of the land seemed to invite the conflict of Gog and Magog, as undoubtedly Gog viewed Israel as being vulnerable and exposed before the nations of the earth. It would appear that Israel’s rest and security would invite the conflict of Gog and Magog, as Gog purposed within his heart to invade the land and take for himself a vast spoil. What I find to be absolutely incredible is that the single greatest conflict the house of Israel has ever faced would not only result and bring about the greatest act of divine intervention ever experience, but it also brought about the rebuilding of the Temple of the Lord in their midst. The prophet Ezekiel was brought face to face with covenant, with transformation, with resurrection, with conflict, and none we find him being brought face to face with a Temple being rebuilt and once more standing in the midst of the city of Jerusalem. How absolutely wonderful and incredible it is, for with the declaration of a Temple once more standing in the midst of the city of Jerusalem, it was a powerful declaration the Lord of hosts would once more dwell in the midst of and inhabit His people. The rebuilding of houses, the planting of vineyards, and the like would be a sign that the people had returned to and were being restored in the midst of the land. The rebuilding of the Temple of the Lord, however, would not be a sign of the people having returned to the land, but rather the Lord of hosts Himself returning to the land and dwelling in the midst of His people. With the Temple once more standing in the midst of Jerusalem, and the altar of burnt offering being found within the courts of the Lord, we find the Lord dwelling in the midst of His people, and the people being able to draw near to Him. With the altar once more in the midst of the Temple court, the people of Israel could and would once more draw near to the Lord with their offerings and sacrifices. One thing I can’t help but wonder is whether or not there will be Gentiles from the surrounding nations coming to the Temple of the Lord in Jerusalem to present their own offerings and sacrifices unto the Lord. The prophet Isaiah spoke of the mountain of the house of the Lord being exalted in the last days, and men and women speaking to and encouraging one another to go unto the house of the Lord—undoubtedly to present and offer their sacrifices and offerings unto the Lord. How absolutely wonderful it is to consider men and women from every nation, every tribe, every tongue, every people upon the face of the earth seeking to come to Jerusalem to present and offer their sacrifices unto the Lord.

 Let us pause for a moment and stay on that subject of men and women coming from all nations, all lands, all tongues, all tribes, all tongues, and all peoples to the Temple of the Lord to present their offerings and sacrifices unto the Lord of hosts. Even in the days in which we are living, there are countless men and women who journey to the holy city of Jerusalem each and every year. Men and women come to the sacred city of Jerusalem to experience two distinct realities that are contained therein. The first is the wailing wall where we find men and women writing their prayers on tiny pieces of parchment and paper and placing them within the cracks of the wall. PLACING PRAYERS WITHIN THE CRACKS OF THE WALL! PLACING PRAYERS IN THE PLACES OF THE BREACH! I happen to find it absolutely incredible that men and women throughout the years—even kings, nobles, princes, presidents, rulers, and the like—have come to this wall to place prayers they have written within the cracks of this sacred and iconic wall. The more I consider this, the more I can’t help but consider the words of Ezekiel, which are recorded for us in the twenty-second chapter of this prophetic book. “And I sought for a man among them, that should make up the hedge, and stand in the gap before me for the land, that I should not destroy it: but I found none. Therefore have I poured out mine indignation upon them; I have consumed them with the fire of my wrath: their own way have I recompensed upon their heads, saith the Lord God” (Ezekiel 22:31-32). Pay careful attention to those words spoken by the Lord through the prophet Ezekiel, for the Lord not only saw the gap that was before Him within the land, but He sought for a man to stand in the place of the gap, and to make up the hedge. The more I consider prayers being placed within the cracks of the wall, the more I can’t help but think—not only of the prayers of God’s people being found in the places of cracks, but also in the places of breaches and gaps. There is something truly powerful and wonderful to be said of those people who are able to identify the cracks that are found in the midst of the walls within homes, marriages, families, communities, churches, and even the nation, and are willing to place their prayers in the places where the cracks are found. Those cracks may have been there for an extended and lengthy period of time, but there are men and women who identify the cracks, and are willing to take their prayers and fill in those crevices and cracks. There are men and women who notice the countless breaches within this nation, as well as within homes, marriages, families, communities, churches, and the like, and they take their prayers and secure them in the place of the breach. PRAYERS IN THE PLACE OF THE BREACH! PRAYERS IN THE PLACES OF CRACKS! Regardless of how the cracks have formed, and regardless of how a breach, or breaches have been made within such walls, there are men and women who are willing to take their prayers and place them in those places to build up and make up that which is needed. What an absolutely incredible concept it is to consider how men and women from all over the world have journeyed to Jerusalem to place their prayers within “the Wailing Wall.”

 If you examine the city of Jerusalem, you will also notice that men and women come from all over the world to visit the famed and famous Temple Mount which is found in the midst of the city. Consider how many Muslims in this generation alone have traveled and journeyed to the city of Jerusalem to make their way to the Dome of the Rock—that place which is one of the most sacred and holy sites in all of Islam. Consider how many countless men and women throughout the years have made their way to the Dome of the Rock in order that they might catch a glimpse of the famous site. There are millions of men and women who make it a point to visit the Temple Mount to visit and catch a glimpse of the Dome of the Rock, and they do so purely from a tourist perspective and point of view. The Dome of the Rock means no more to them than any other structure and building within the earth, yet they make it a point to journey and travel to it in order to catch a glimpse of it, grab a picture with it, or perhaps even get their picture with the Dome in the background. There are other individuals who actually make their way to this sacred site within the earth as a religious obligation and duty. There are countless men and women who journey to the city of Jerusalem to worship Allah at this sacred and holy site within Islam. I can’t help but wonder how many millions of men and women the Temple Mount attracts each and every year—regardless of whether they are tourists, or worshippers. In fact, if you study Islam as a whole, you will notice that it has within its system what is known as the “hajj.” The “hajj” is an annual pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia, which is the most holy city of Muslims. The “hajj” is a mandatory obligation and religious duty which must be carried out at least once within the lifetime of any Muslim who is physically and financially capable of doing so. Countless millions—if not billions—of Muslims make their way to Mecca within Saudi Arabia each year to worship before the Kaaba during the “hajj” in order to fulfill their religious duty and obligation. The Kaaba located within Mecca is the first and primary sacred site within Islam, while the Dome of the Rock is the second most sacred and holy site within the religion. If you study Islam even further, you will notice that they have as part of their core what is known as “the five pillars of Islam,” which (1) the declaration of faith, (2) Obligatory prayer, (3) compulsory giving, (4) fasting in the month of Ramadan, and finally (5) the pilgrimage to Mecca. The reason I mention “the hajj” and the “five pillars of Islam” is because there are countless millions of Muslims throughout the world who adhere to the five pillars, and countless millions—perhaps billions—of Muslims who make their way to Mecca to worship before and at the Kaaba. I find this to be incredibly intriguing, for the prophet Isaiah speaks of a different pilgrimage that will take place in the last days—a pilgrimage and journey not to a site in the desert in Saudi Arabia, but to the mountain of the house of the Lord. I am convinced that the only reason why the mountain of the house of the Lord would be exalted in the earth is because the Temple is found there, and men and women will once more journey to the Temple of the Lord to bring their offerings. Imagine a world where men and women no longer make their way into the desert of Arabia to worship before and at the Kaaba, but to the city of Jerusalem to worship the Lord of hosts at the Temple which stands in the midst of the city. There are those who believe that the conflict of Gog and Magog will not only bring about the destruction of all but one sixth of the horde which invaded the land, but also that might very well bring about the destruction of the Dome of the Rock, and perhaps even the destruction of Mecca within the desert of Arabia.

 If you study these particular chapters within the prophetic book of Ezekiel, you will notice and encounter covenant, transformation, resurrection, and conflict—all which are followed by the re-presenting of the Temple of the Lord in the midst of the city of Jerusalem. The are a few chapters which speak of the Temple which would once again stand in the midst of the city of Jerusalem, but there is also a reference to the glory of the Lord entering into and filling the Temple. The prophet Ezekiel didn’t simply see a third Jewish Temple standing in the midst of the city of Jerusalem, but He also saw the glory of the Lord filling that Temple. The rebuilt Temple standing in the midst of the city of Jerusalem would not only bring about the restoration of the ministry of the priests and Levites before and around the altar, but also the bringing of gifts, offerings and sacrifices unto the Lord in worship. The rebuilt Temple standing in the midst of the city of Jerusalem would bring about the glory of the Lord once more entering the sanctuary—and not only entering the sanctuary, but also filling the sanctuary. Ezekiel watched and witnessed earlier on the glory of the Lord departing from the Temple of the Lord in the midst of Jerusalem, but the prophet would also witness the return of the glory to the Temple of the Lord. Ezekiel witnessed the glory of the Lord departing from the Temple, and even heard of the destruction of the Temple in the midst of the city, yet later on during the captivity of the people of God, Ezekiel not only saw the Temple once more standing within Jerusalem, but the glory of the Lord filling the Temple. The ultimate manifestation within the Temple of the Lord is the glory of the Lord filling the sanctuary, for without and apart from the glory filling the house, what good is the house in and of itself? The Lord didn’t raise up a Temple in the midst of His people within the earth to have a beautiful structure that could be beheld by His people, and/or even those from the surrounding nations. The Lord didn’t raise up a Temple in the midst of the earth simply to have a place where sacrifices and offerings could be made upon His holy and sacred altar. SACRIFICE ISN’T ENOUGH! OFFERINGS AREN’T ENOUGH! Samuel declared to Saul that obedience was better than sacrifice, and taking heed was better than offering bulls, and lambs, and goats, thus indicating that sacrifice without and apart from obedience can and may very well be shallow. With that being said, I would dare say that sacrifice—if it not accompanied by obedience, and if it is not met with the glory and presence of the Lord filling the house—is nothing more than vain offerings and actions before the Lord. Tell me—what good is it if you have all the sacrifices and offerings in the sanctuary, and yet you never experience the glory of the Lord filling the sanctuary? If there is one thing the days of Moses, and the days of Solomon reveal, it’s that the Lord not only desires to fill the house with His glory, but the Lord also desires to send His fire down from heaven upon the altar. One of the main problems is that we have become so used to offering sacrifices without the fire of heaven upon the altar, and without the glory of the Lord filling the house. Ezekiel saw the glory of the Lord filling the house, and that glory accompanying the priest and Levites ministering before and around the altar within the courts of the Lord.

 When we come to the forty-fifth chapter of the prophetic book of Ezekiel we encounter something beyond covenant, beyond transformation, beyond resurrection, beyond conflict, and the like. As we come to the forty-fifth chapter of the prophetic book of Ezekiel we encounter what is perhaps one of the single greatest realities surrounding the land of Israel. If you take the time to read this particular chapter, you will quickly discover that what is spoken of within this chapter is inheritance within the land. Consider how this particular chapter opens—“Moreover, when ye shall divide by lot the land of inheritance, ye shall offer an oblations unto the Lord, an holy portion of the land: the length shall be the length of five and twenty thousand reeds, and the breadth shall be ten thousand reeds, and the breadth shall be ten thousand. This shall be holy in all the borders thereof round about. Of this reality shall be for the sanctuary five hundred in length, with five hundred in breadth, square round about; and fifty cubits round about for the suburbs thereof. And of this measure shalt thou measure the length of five and twenty thousand, and the breadth of ten thousand: and in it shall be the sanctuary and the most holy place. The holy portion of the land shall be for the priests the ministers of the sanctuary, which shall come near to minister unto the Lord: and it shall be a place for their houses, and an holy place for the sanctuary. And the five and twenty thousand of length, and the ten thousand of breadth, shall also the Levites, the ministers of the house, have for themselves, for a possession for twenty chambers. And ye shall appoint the possession of the city five thousand broad, and five and twenty thousand long, over against the oblations of the holy portion: it shall be be for the whole house of Israel. And a portion shall be for the prince on the one side and on the other side of the oblations of the holy portion, and of the possession of the city, before the oblations of the holy portion, and before the possession of the city, from the west side westward, and from the east side eastward: and the length shall be over against one of the portions, from the west border unto the east border. In the land shall be his possession in Israel: and my princes shall no more oppress my people; and the rest of the land shall they give to the house of Israel according to their tribes” (Ezekiel 45:1-8). It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we pay close attention to what is recorded within this passage, for within this passage we find words that up until this point had not been used for quite some time. Within this passage of Scripture we discover language of inheritance and possession—language which speaks of and reveals the people’s place within the land. It was true the Lord of hosts returned and restored the people to the land, and within that land the people needed to understand inheritance and possession.

 UNDERSTANDING INHERITANCE AND POSSESSION! I am convinced that in order to truly understand inheritance and possession, we need to understand it in terms of what is recorded within the Old Testament book of Joshua. When you journey to the eleventh chapter of the book of Joshua, you will discover the recounting of the conquests and conflicts Joshua and the children of israel engaged in after crossing the river Jordan and marching through the land. “So Joshua came, and all the people of war with him, against them by the waters of Merom suddenly; and they fell upon them. And the Lord delivered them into the hand of israel, who smote them, and chased them unto great Zidon, and unto Misrephoth-maim, and unto the valley of Mizpeh eastward; and they smote them, until they left them none remaining. And Joshua did unto them as the Lord bade him: he hugged their horses, and burnt their chariots with fire. And Joshua at that time turned back, and took Hazzan, and smote the king thereof with the sword: for Hazor beforetime was the head of all those kingdoms. And they smote all the souls that were therein with the edge of the sword, utterly destroying them: there was not any left to breathe: and he burnt Hazor with fire. And all the cities of those kings, and all the kings of them, did Joshua take, and smote them with the edge of the sword, and he utterly destroyed them, as Moses the servant of the Lord commanded. But as for the cities that stood still in their strength, israel burned none of them, save Hazor only; that did Joshua burnt. And all the spoil of these cities, and the cattle, the children of Israel took for a prey unto themselves; but every man smote with the edge of the sword, until they had destroyed them, neither left they any to breathe. As the Lord commanded Moses his servant, so did Moses command Joshua, and so did Joshua; he left nothing undone of all that the Lord commanded Moses. So Joshua took all that land, the hills, and all the south country, and all the land of Goshen, and the valley, and the plain, and the mountain of Israel, and the valley of the same; even from the mount Halak, that goeth up to Seir, even unto Baal-gad in the valley of Lebanon under mount Hermon: and all their kings he took, and smote them, and slew them. Joshua made war a long time with all those kings. There was not a city that made peace with the children of Israel, save for the Hivites the inhabitants of Gibson: all other they took in battle. For it was of the Lord to harden their hearts, that they should come against Israel in battle, that He might destroy them utterly, and that they might have no favour, but that He might destroy them, as the Lord commanded Moses. And at that time came Joshua, and cut off the Anakims from the mountains, from Hebron, from Debbie, from Anab, and from all the mountains of Judah, and from all the mountains of Israel: Joshua destroyed them utterly with their cites. There’s as none of the Anakims left in the land of the children of Israe: only in Gaza, in Gath, and in Ashdod, there remained. So Joshua took the whole land, according to all that the Lord said unto Moses; and Joshua gave it for an inheritance unto Israel according to their divisions by their tribes. And the land rested from war” (Joshua 11:7-23).

 When you come to the thirteenth chapter of the same Old Testament book, you will find the Lord speaking unto Joshua, and speaking to him of land that was still left unconquered. Within this particular passage, we notice the Lord providing Joshua with a very specific command—namely, to divide the land they had entered into and conquered. “Now therefore divide this land for an inheritance unto the nine tribes, and the half tribe of Manasseh, with whom the Reubenites and the Gadites have received their inheritance, which Moses gave them, beyond Jordan eastward, even as Moses the servant of the Lord gave them; from Aroer, that is upon the bank of the river Arnon, and the city that is in the midst of the river, and all the plain of Medeba unto Dibon; and all the cites of Sihon king of the Amorites, which reigned in Heshbon, unto the border of the children of Ammon; and Gilead, and the border of the Geshurites and Maachathites, and all mount Hermon, and all Bashan unto Salcah; all the kingdom of Og in Bashan, which reigned in Ashtaroth and in Edrei, who remained of the remnant of the giants: for these did Moses smite, and cast them out. Nevertheless the children of Israel expelled not the Geshurites, nor the Maachathites: but the Geshurites and the Maachathites dwell among the Israelites until this day. Only unto the tribe of Levi he gave none inheritance; the sacrifices of the Lord God of Israel made by fire are their inheritance, as he said unto them” (Joshua 13:7-140. It is at this point in the Old Testament book of Joshua where we begin to note a transition taking place within the land—a transition from conquering and taking possession of the land, to actually dividing the land among the nine and a half tribes of Israel. The children of Israel entered into the land, yet the land itself could not immediately be divided and given as an inheritance unto the people without it first being conquered and subdued. It’s worth noting that while the land as a whole belonged collectively and corporately to the people of God, each tribe had their own inheritance and possession within the land. The Lord spoke unto Joshua concerning the inheritance within the land that was to be divided between the nine and a half tribes, thus indicating that each tribe had a stake in the inheritance. What’s more, is that when we read this passage, we not only notice the nine and a half tribes of Israel being given their potion in the midst of the land, but we also find a description of the Levites within the land. The Levites, however, had not their inheritance from the land of Israel, for their inheritance was the offerings which were offered by fire upon the altar of the Lord in the midst of the sanctuary. The twelve tribes of Israel each had their own inheritance from the land that was divided among the individual tribes, and the Levites themselves had their inheritance from the offerings that were sacrificed upon the altar in the midst of the sanctuary.

 The forty-fifth chapter of the prophetic book of Ezekiel is actually quite remarkable when you consider it, for within it we once more encounter the concepts of inheritance and possession. With that being said, however, the concepts of inheritance and possession did not begin with the people themselves, but with the sanctuary of the Lord. INHERITANCE BEGINS WITH THE TABERNACLE! INHERITANCE BEGINS AT THE ALTAR! INHERITANCE BEGINS WITH GLORY AND WITH FIRE! If you read these particular words written by the prophet Ezekiel, you will notice and discover that inheritance began not with the people, but with the sanctuary of the Lord. If you are to understand the concept and reality of inheritance according to the prophetic book of Ezekiel, you will notice that inheritance begins from and with the sanctuary, and then transitions out toward the people. Inheritance begins with and at the sanctuary of the Lord of hosts within the land, and before it touches and reaches the people, it first touches the priests and the Levites. What’s more, is that before we even read of inheritance touching the people of Israel, we first notice that inheritance touched the prince of the land as well. Inheritance began with the Temple and sanctuary of the Lord, and then transitioned to the priests who were ministers of the sanctuary, and the Levites who were ministers of the house. If we are going to truly understand the concept and reality of inheritance, we must understand that inheritance has always and must always begin with and at the sanctuary of the Lord. The single greatest portion with the land is not necessarily that piece of the land that has been allotted to us, but access to the sanctuary of the Lord. When speaking of inheritance, let us never come to the conclusion that our the single greatest portion within the inheritance is not first our access to the sanctuary of the Lord. If you study the encampment of the children of Israel in the wilderness, you will notice that the Tabernacle was the first to be set up in the desert, and then each tribe was to set their camp up after the Tabernacle. If you study the layout of the Tabernacle and the encampment of the children of Israel, you will notice that there were three tribes encamped to the north of the Tabernacle, three tribes encamped to the south of the Tabernacle, three tribes encamped to the west of the Tabernacle, and three tribes encamped to the east of the Tabernacle. Thus, the Tabernacle was in the very center of the people of Israel, and they camped themselves round about the sanctuary. This is the reality we encounter within the prophetic book of Ezekiel, for within this book we encounter inheritance beginning with and at the sanctuary of the Lord, and then transitioning to the priests and the Levites—those who had charge of and ministered before and around the sanctuary and house. When speaking of inheritance within our lives, we dare not, we cannot, we must not attempt to seek to understand inheritance outside of and apart from the sanctuary of the Lord, the fire upon the altar, and the glory that is present in the midst of the sanctuary. Your inheritance, my inheritance, our inheritance must have at the very heart and center of it the sanctuary of the Lord—that place where the fire is burning upon the altar, and the glory is present in the midst of the sanctuary. Let us recognize and understand this day that any inheritance the people of God have and experience within the earth must have at the very heart, center and foundation of it the glory of God and the fire upon the altar, as the Lord dwells in the midst of His people, and His people draw near to Him with their sacrifices and offerings.

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