Clearing The Battlefield Before Coming to the Altar











Today’s selected reading continues in the Old Testament prophetic book of Amos, and more specifically, is found in the fifth chapter. The fifth chapter of the prophetic book of Amos has quite the powerful prophetic message, and packs quite a punch for those who would read the words contained therein. When you begin reading this particular passage of Scripture you will find these words recorded within the first three verses—“Hear ye this word which I take up against you, even a lamentation, O house of Israel. The virgin of Israel is fallen; she shall no more rise: she is forsaken upon her land; there is none to raise her up. For thus saith the Lord God; the city that went out by a thousand shall leave an hundred, and that which went forth by an hundred shall leave ten, to the house of Israel” (Amos 5:1-3). This particular passage of Scripture begins with a prophetic word of the Lord against the house of Israel—even a lamentation concerning it, which was expressed by the prophet Amos. It’s actually quite interesting to read this passage of Scripture, for while it begins with a word and a lamentation toward and against the house of Israel, there is a very specific prophetic word that is contained within it. This particular prophetic word begins with the fourth and fifth verses of the chapter, continues with verses six and seven, and continues even more with verses eight and nine. When you come to the fourth and fifth verses, these are the words you will read which were proclaimed by the prophet Amos—“For thus saith the Lord unto the house of Israel, Seek ye me, and ye shall live: but seek not Beth-el, nor enter into Gilgal, and pass not to Beer-Sheba: for Gilgal shall surely go into captivity, and Beth-el shall come to nought” (Amos 4:4-5). This prophetic word is continues even more in the next series of two verses, for the Lord was seeking to relay and convey an incredible truth to His people. In verses six and seven of this passage we find these words—“Seek the Lord, and ye shall live; lest He break out like fire in the house of Joseph, and devour it, and there be none to quench it in Beth-el. Ye who turn judgment to wormwood, and leave off righteousness in the earth” (Amos 4:6-7). This reality is continued even further as you come to the eighth verse, for the prophet would go on to repeat this specific call to action one more time—“Seek Him that maketh the seven stars and Orion, and turenth the shadow of death into the morning, and maketh the day dark with night: that calleth for the waters of the sea, and poureth them out upon the face of the earth: the Lord is His name: that strengtheneth the spoiled against the strong, so that the spoiled shall come against the fortress” (Amos 5:8-9).

 Within verses four through nine of this passage of Scripture we encounter three distinct times when through and according to the word of the Lord the prophet calls and instructs the house of Israel to seek the Lord. In the fourth verse the prophet proclaims to the house of Israel to “seek ye the Lord,” while in the sixth verse, the prophet proclaims to the house of Israel to “seek the Lord.” In the eighth verse of this same passage we find the prophet once more proclaiming unto the house of Israel to seek the Lord—to seek Him who makes the seven stars and Orion, He who turneth the shadow of death into the morning, He who makes the day dark with night, He that calleth for the waters of the sea and poureth them out upon the face of the earth. It is quite obvious and clear when reading this particular set of verses that the Lord of hosts was seeking to call and bring the house of Israel into a very specific place—the place of seeking the Lord. What actually causes this to become even more gripping and telling—is not so much in the tri-fold instruction and command to seek the Lord, but rather in what is found toward the end of the chapter. If you journey to the twenty-first verse of this passage of Scripture you will find language that is actually quite similar to the words which another prophet spoke. Consider if you will the words which the prophet Amos proclaimed, which are recorded for us beginning with the twenty-first verse of this passage of Scripture—“I hate, I despise your feast days, and I will not smell in your solemn assemblies. Though ye offer me burnt offerings and your meat offerings, I will not accept them: neither will I regard the peace offerings of your fat beasts. Take thou away from me the noise of thy songs; for I will not hear the melody of thy viols. But let judgment run down as waters, and righteousness as a mighty stream. Have ye offered unto me sacrifices and offerings in the wilderness forty years, O house of Israel? But ye have borne the tabernacle of your Moloch and Chiun your images, the star of your god, which ye made to yourselves. Therefore will I cause you to go into captivity beyond Damascus, saith the Lord, whose name is The God of hosts” (Amos 5:21-27).

 If you take the time to examine the words which are recorded in this passage of Scripture, you will discover that these words weren’t new to the house of Israel. Scripture makes it very clear that out of the mouth of two or three witnesses a matter is confirmed, and the words which the prophet Amos proclaimed here wasn’t the first time words like this were spoken unto the house of Israel. The opening verse of the prophetic book of Amos reveals that Amos prophesied according to the word of the Lord “in the days of Uzziah king of Judah, and in the days of Jeroboam the son of Joash king of Israel, two years before the earthquake. This is actually quite interesting, for if you journey back to the first chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah you will discover the time frame in which he ministered according to the word of the Lord—“The vision of Isaiah the son of Amoz, which he saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem in the days of Uzziah, JOtham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah” (Isaiah 1:1). The reason I mention the periods of time in which Amos and Isaiah prophesied is that the words which we find in the fifth chapter of the prophetic writing of Amos is also found in the first chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah. In fact, there is a part of me that can’t help but wonder if these words weren’t given specifically during the days and reign of Uzziah king of Judah. The reason I am inclined to consider this reality to be true is when you consider the fact that while Isaiah prophesied during the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah kings of Judah, Amos only prophesied during the reign of one of those kings—Uzziah. I can’t help but consider the tremendous possibility that the words which Amos prophesied were proclaimed at the same time the prophet Isaiah prophesied, for the Lord would have every reason to raise up two prophetic voices that would confirm His word within the earth. I believe with all my heart that there are times within a specific generation when it is not enough for the Lord to merely raise up a single prophetic voice within a generation, but to raise up a second, a third, or perhaps even more prophetic voices. I am convinced that during the days of Uzziah, both the prophet Amos, as well as the prophet Isaiah prophesied a very similar message, despite the fact that could have been some minor differences between the messages. There is a part of me that can’t help but wonder if the Lord doesn’t have a specific prophetic word that is exclusive to a particular generation. In other words, is it possible the Lord of hosts raises up multiple prophetic voices within a generation in order that His word might be confirmed in the hearing of the people? THERE WAS NEVER JUST ONE! THERE IS NEVER JUST ONE! I am convinced that when it comes to the prophetic ministry of the Lord, there was never, and there can never be just one prophetic voice. During the days prior to the Messiah the Lord raised up the voice of one crying out in the wilderness, and that was necessary during that period of time, however, I believe that in the days and generation in which we are living, the Lord doesn’t merely have a single prophetic voice within and upon the earth, but multiple prophetic voices that—although and while they are different from each other—confirm the words which each speaks before and unto the people.

 When you come to the first chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah—specifically beginning with the tenth verse—you will notice and discover words which Isaiah spoke, which were eerily similar to the words which we read within the prophetic book of Amos. Beginning with the tenth verse of the prophetic book of Isaiah we read and find these words—“Hear the word of the Lord, ye rulers of Sodom; give ear unto the law of our God, ye people of Gomorrah. To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? Saith the Lord: I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed feats; and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he goats. When ye come to appear before me, who hath required this at your hand, to tread my courts? Bring no more vain oblations; incense is an abomination unto me; the new moons and sabbaths, the calling of assemblies, I cannot away with; it is iniquity, even the solemn meeting. Our new moons and your appointed feasts my souls hateth: they are a trouble unto me; I am weary to bear them. And when ye spread forth your hands, I will hide mine eyes from you: yea, when ye make many prayers, I will not hear: your hands are full of blood” (Isaiah 1:10-16). These words which the prophet Isaiah prophesied and proclaimed are incredibly similar to those which the prophet Amos prophesied at the same time, and there is not a doubt in my mind that within and through these two prophetic voices, the Lord was speaking directly to the worship of that generation. WHEN THE LORD SPEAKS TO THE WORSHIP OF A GENERATION! When I read the words which the prophets Amos and Isaiah prophesied and proclaimed unto that particular and that specific generation, I can’t help but get the strong sense the Lord was indeed speaking to the worship of that generation. I am utterly and completely convinced the Spirit of the Lord can and will speak directly to the worship of a generation, and can either speak in favor of such worship, or can speak out against such worship. What makes the words contained within these two prophetic books so incredibly powerful is that it would appear to me that the Lord looked upon the worship that was being offered within that generation, and the Lord was displeased with such worship. The Lord looked at the worship which was present among the people within that generation, and within that particular nation, and the Lord had absolutely no delight or pleasure in it. In fact, notice in the eleventh verse of the first chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah the Lord actually goes so far to declare that He did not delight in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or he goats. In other words—despite the fact the people were bringing unto the Lord that which He had required through His servant Moses, the Lord was not pleased with such offerings. The question then becomes why—why wasn’t the Lord pleased with the sacrifices and offerings the people brought unto Him?
I am convinced that in order for us to understand the reason why the Lord would not and could not be pleased with the presentation of rams, bulls, sheep and goats before Him in His sanctuary is found beginning with the Old Testament book of First Samuel. In the fifteenth chapter of the book of First Samuel we read of king Saul being given a specific command according to the prophet Samuel—the command to utterly destroy all of Amalek, thus leaving absolutely nothing to remain within and upon the earth. As you read the account of the actions Saul took, you will discover that while it is true that Saul did perform certain facets and portions of the command of the Lord, he nonetheless spared Agag king of Amalek alive, and even spared the best of the sheep, and of the oxen, and of the failings, and the lambs, and all that was good. When you come to the tenth verse of this chapter, however, you will find the Lord’s perspective on the actions Saul committed against Amalek—a perspective that was vastly different than Saul’s own perspective. Consider if you will the words found within this chapter beginning with the tenth verse—“Then came the word of the Lord unto Samuel, saying, It repenteth me that I have set up Saul to be king: for he is turned back from following me, and hath not performed my commandments. And it grieved Samuel; and he cried unto the Lord all night. And when Samuel rose early to meet Saul in the morning, it was told Samuel, saying, Saul came to Carmel, and, behold, he set him up a place, and is gone about, and passed on, and gone down to Gilgal. And Samuel came to Saul: and Saul said unto him, Blessed be thou of the Lord: I have performed the commandment of the Lord. And Samuel said, What meaneth then this bleating of the sheep in mine ears, and the lowing of the oxen which I hear? And Saul said, They have brought them from the Amalekites: for the people spared the best of the sheep and of the oxen, to sacrifice unto the Lord thy God; and the rest we have utterly destroyed. Then Samuel said unto Saul, Stay, and I will tell thee what the Lord hath said to me this night. And he said unto him, Say on. And Samuel said, When thou wast little in thine own sight, wast thou not made the head of the tribes of Israel, and the Lord anointed thee king over Israel And the Lord sent thee on a journey, and said, Go and utterly destroy the sinners the Amalekites, and fight against them until they be consumed. Wherefore then didst thou not obey the voice of the Lord, but didst fly upon the spoil, and didst evil in the sight of the Lord? And Saul said unto Samuel, Yea, I have obeyed the voice of the Lord, and have gone the way which the Lord sent me, and have brought Agag the king of Amalek, and have utterly destroyed the Amalekites. But the people took of the spoil, sheep and oxen, the chief of the things which should have been utterly destroyed, to sacrifice unto the Lord thy God in Gilgal” (1 Samuel 15:10-21).  

 WORSHIP ABSENT DESTRUCTION! WORSHIP ABSENT OBEDIENCE! The more I read this particular passage of Scripture, the more I can’t help but see something that is absolutely remarkable and astounding.When Saul was approached by Samuel the prophet concerning his obedience to the commandment and word of the Lord, Saul responded to his arrival by declaring to him that he carried out and fulfilled the word and will of the Lord. When confronted by the prophet Samuel, however, Saul emphatically declared that the best of the sheep, the best of the cattle, the best of the oxen were spared in order that they might be sacrificed unto the Lord. I am convinced there is a powerful prophetic picture that is found within this passage of Scripture, for while it might be true that they had an abundance of sheep, an abundance of oxen, an abundance of cattle to present as offerings and sacrifices unto the Lord, they did not utterly destroy that which the Lord instructed and commanded them to. ABUNDANCE ABSENT UTTERLY! Saul and those with him had an abundance of sheep, and oxen, and cattle to sacrifice unto the Lord their God, but they did not obey the word and command of the Lord to utterly destroy everything. I can’t help but wonder how many of us attempt to enter into the presence of the Lord, and we do so attempting to present offerings and sacrifices we think and believe the Lord can and will be pleased with, and yet the Lord has absolutely no pleasure, nor does He have any delight in such worship. Why? Why does not, why would not the Lord find any pleasure or taken any delight in such offering? Tell me dear brother, tell me dear sister—what good is your worship, what good is your offerings, what good are your sacrifices if you have not utterly destroyed that which the Lord has instructed you to destroy? There are a number of men and women who would dare enter into the sanctuary of the Lord, and would dare approach His sacred and holy altar to present their offerings and sacrifices unto Him, and yet they have not utterly destroyed that which the Lord has instructed them to destroy. Does this describe you? Have you been instructed to utterly destroy something within your life, and yet you have not carried out that command to completion? The key to understanding the command and instruction given unto Saul is found in one single word—a word which oftentimes gets overlooked. The word I am referring to is the word “utterly,” for the command that was given unto Saul was not “go and destroy the sinners the Amalekites,” but rather “go and utterly destroy the sinners the Amalekites.” What’s more, is the Lord didn’t merely instruct Saul to “utterly” destroy the Amalekites, but to fight against them until they be consumed.

UTTERLY DESTROY UNTIL THEY BE CONSUMED! Oh, there is a tremendous prophetic word that is contained within this particular passage of Scripture, and that prophetic word is centered upon the Lord’s command within our lives to utterly destroy something within our lives, and to continue fighting against that thing until it is consumed. I am convinced that there are times in our lives when the Lord gives us a specific command—a command to not only utterly destroy that which the Lord has instructed us to destroy, but a command to fight against it until that thing is consumed. The question I am finding myself asking right now is how many of us are actually fighting against that thing within our lives until it be utterly and completely consumed. Oh, it is true that we wage a certain war, and fight against it to a certain degree; but how many of us actually fight and continue fighting against that thing within our lives until it be completely consumed. This brings me the question surrounding those things within our lives which should be, and those things which should have long been destroyed within our lives, yet they are still present among us until this day. If you read the Old Testament books of Joshua and Judges, you will discover the presence of certain peoples within the land of Canaan which the people of Israel failed to destroy, and as a result, those people remained with and among them until the present day. Oh, how much is present within our lives simply because we have not obeyed the voice and command of the Lord in utterly destroying it? How much is presently within our lives simply because we have not fought against it until it be completely consumed? Oh, it is true we might have waged a certain fight against it, but we did not fight against it until it be destroyed. HAVE YOU GIVEN UP THE FIGHT TOO EASILY? HAVE YOU GIVEN UP THE FIGHT TOO QUICKLY? Are there things in my life that should have been destroyed a long time ago, yet because I have not utterly destroyed them, they have been permitted to remain within my heart, my mind, or within my life in general? Are there things within my life which should have been consumed quite some time ago, yet because I have not fought against them until they be consumed, they are still alive and well within my life? Saul thought he could worship before the Lord, and even bring that which he had spared during his conquest, and yet the prophet Samuel rebuked such a worship that is not only absent obedience, but a worship that has not destroyed that which the Lord has commanded. Does this describe you? Has the Lord instructed you to utterly destroy something within your life, and to fight against that thing until it be consumed, and while it is true you might have waged a certain war against that thing, you have neither utterly destroyed it, nor fought against it until it has been destroyed? THE CONFLICT BEFORE WORSHIP! THE BATTLE BEFORE WORSHIP! THE STRUGGLE BEFORE WORSHIP! Saul could very well have worshipped before the Lord at His holy altar without consequence or judgment had he faithfully carried out and completed the will, word and command of the Lord, and yet he chose instead to spare the best of the flock, the best of the cattle, the best of the oxen, and even the king of Amalek alive. Have you utterly destroyed that which the Lord has instructed and commanded you to destroy? Have you fought against that thing within your life until it has been completely consumed?

In order to truly understand the weight and significance of what we read in the prophetic books of Amos and Isaiah, it is absolutely necessary to understand and pay close attention to the words which Samuel spoke to Saul in response to the mindset that he could present as offerings and sacrifices that which the Lord had instructed him to utterly destroy. “Hath the Lord as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the Lord? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams. For Rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry. Because thou hast rejected the word of the Lord, He hath also rejected from being king” (1 Samuel 15:21-23). Let us turn and direct our attention to the words which the prophet Hosea proclaimed during the days of the prophetic ministry appointed unto him—“For I desired mercy, and not sacrifice; and the knowledge of God more than burnt offerings” (Hosea 6:6). Consider also the words which the prophet Micah prophesied and are recorded for us in the sixth chapter of the prophetic book bearing his name—“Wherewith shall I come before the Lord, and bow myself before the high God? Shall I come before Him with burnt offerings, with calves of a year old? Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams, or with ten thousands of rivers of oil? Shall I give my Fairborn for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul? He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy god” (Micah 6:6-8). If you journey to the Old Testament book of the Psalms—specifically the fifty-first chapter, which is David’s prayer of repentance unto the Lord after his adultery with Bathsheba—you will encounter this reality confirmed even more. IN the sixteenth and seventeenth verses of this chapter we go on to read these words spoken by David in the midst of his prayer of repentance before the Lord—:For thou desirest sacrifice; else would I give it: thou delightest not in burnt offering. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, thou wilt not despise” (Psalm 51:16-17). Each of these passages combined together bring us face to face with the incredible reality that it is not as much about sacrifices and offerings we may seek to bring before the Lord, but it is about the condition of our heart and spirit. What’s more, is that if we examine all of these passages together, we will discover that the Lord desires more than just sacrifices brought unto Him and presented upon His altar, for the Lord desires obedience, the Lord desires mercy, the Lord desires justice, and the like. The reason the Lord could and would not accept the sacrifices and offerings which were brought before Him during the days of Amos and Isaiah was because their sacrifices were brought in connection with injustice and a lack of mercy within the land. Oh it is absolutely imperative that we understand that sacrifice in and of itself is not enough—particularly and especially when such sacrifice not only demands and requires action, but also requires obedience to a specific command given by the Lord of hosts.

What adds even more light and insight on to this present reality is when you consider the words which the prophet Isaiah spoke, which are recorded for us in the twenty-ninth chapter. Beginning with the thirteenth verse of this particular chapter we notice and discover these words—“Wherefore the Lord said, Forasmuch as this people draw near me with their mouth, and with their lips do honour me, but have removed their heart far from me, and their fear toward me is taught by the precept of men: therefore, behold, I will proceed to do a marvelous work among this people, even a marvelous work and a wonder: for the wisdom of their wise men shall perish, and the understanding of their prudent men shall be hid” (Isaiah 28:13-14). What marks these particular words spoken by the prophet Isaiah is that the weight, the meaning and the significance of these words transcended the days and generation of Isaiah, and were expressed from the very mouth of Jesus during His generation. In the fifteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew we read of the scribes and Pharisees, which were of Jerusalem, coming unto Jesus to ask Him why His disciples transgressed the traditions of the elders by not washing their hands when they ate bread. Note Jesus’ response to the scribes and Pharisees when they came to Him attempting to indict the disciples concerning their practices—“Why do ye also transgress the commandment of God by tyour tradition? For God commanded, saying, Honour thy father and mother: and, He that curseth father or mother, let him die the death. But ye say, Whosoever shall say to his father or his mother, It is a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me; and honour not his father or his mother, he shall be free. Thus have ye made the commandment of God of none effect by your tradition. Ye hypocrites, well did Esaias prophesy of you, saying, This people draweth nigh unto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with their lips; but their heart is far from me. But in vain they do worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men” (Matthew 1 5:3-9). It’s actually quite remarkable and astounding that the words which the prophet Isaiah spoke not only directly applied to his generation—a generation that had blood on their hands, and a generation that did not obey the voice and command of the Lord—but those words also transcended that generation and directly applied to the days and time in which Jesus walked the earth and ministered. I mentioned earlier concerning the Lord’s speaking to and addressing the worship of a generation, and while I firmly hold to that belief and reality, I am convinced that there are words which transcend time and generations—words such as what are found in the prophetic book of Isaiah. Those words which were spoken by the prophet would later be echoed by the Messiah as He indicted the scribes and Pharisees for their attempt to draw near the Lord with their mouths, while their hearts are far from Him. I firmly believe the Lord is examining the worship of this generation—and yes, this includes worship produced by popular venues such as Hillsong, Bethel Music, Elevation Worship, Hillsong United, Passion, etc.—and has something to say concerning it. The question that must be asked is what is the Lord’s perspective, and what is the Lord’s opinion of such worship—despite the fact that such worship and music is performed within countless churches throughout the world.

When you journey back to the fifth chapter of the prophetic book of Amos, you will find that three times within a series of six verses, the prophet called the people of God to seek the Lord. The prophet would go on to instruct and invite them to seek the Lord in order that they might live, thus directly connecting the seeking of God with life. What’s interesting about this is when you come to the fifth verse and you discover the prophet instructing the people of Israel not to seek Beth-el, nor to enter Gilgal, nor pass to Beer-Sheba. This is actually quite remarkable and holds within it a tremendous prophetic truth, for that which the Lord was seeking to convey unto the house of Israel was that while it is true they were to seek the Lord, they were not to seek a place. The Lord highlighted three specific places within the land of Israel—three places of tremendous and significant importance for them from a religious perspective—and yet the Lord instructed them not to seek any of those places. There is a tremendous part of me that wonders how many of us in this generation spend more time seeking a place rather than seeking the Lord. How many times have men and women journeyed across and throughout the country chasing every “move of God” that is supposedly taking place? How many men and women will travel land and sea in order that they might come unto a specific place, for they believe the lie and the delusion that it is there they will experience the Lord their God. I am convinced there are and there have been a number of men and women who have sought particular places, and by doing so, have actually thought and believed that they were seeking the Lord. One thing we must understand about the inheritance promised unto the children of Israel was that despite the fact that they were journeying to a specific land within and upon the earth, the land itself wasn’t their inheritance. How many times have we mistaken the land for the inheritance, not recognizing or realizing that it is the Lord of hosts who is our inheritance? How many times have we grown and become content with the land, while completely neglecting and ignoring the true inheritance promised and given unto us—the Lord Himself. In these Last Days,

I am convinced that we do not need to travel to any specific place to experience the presence of the Lord, and to even seek His face—despite what “moves” and “awakenings” might emerge upon the earth. This is not to say that there aren’t specific places where the presence of the Spirit is manifested in a very real and tangible way, but that we dare not become consumed with a particular and specific place. What’s more, is that we dare not even allow ourselves to be consumed with a specific person—unless of course, that person is the true and living God. I absolutely love that the prophet instructed the house of Israel not to seek Beth-el, nor to enter into Gilgal, nor to pass unto Beer-Sheba, for they could seek the Lord right where they were. Even the Temple of the Lord—despite the fact that it was the place the Lord placed His name and His presence, and despite the fact that it was the place where men and women brought and presented their sacrifices—was not the only place the people of God could seek the Lord, for they could seek the Lord at any moment of any day without even coming near to the Temple. Don’t you know that you are the Temple of the Holy Spirit and that the Father seeks such as will worship Him in Spirit and in truth? In these Last Days the Spirit of the Lord is instructing us to not seek a place, nor even to seek a person, but to seek the Lord. The reason why this is so incredibly dangerous is that those who seek a place, as well as those who seek a person may very well find themselves in a dangerous place, as they pursue that which Jesus warned against in the twenty-fourth chapter of Matthew—“Then if any man shall say unto you, Lo, here is Christ, or there; believe it not. For there shall arise false Christs, and false prophets, and shall shew great signs and wonders; insomuch that, if it were possible, they shall deceive the very elect. Behold, I have told you before. Wherefore if they shall say unto you, Behold, He is in the desert; go not forth: behold, He is in the secret chambers; believe it not. For as the lightning comets out of the eat, and shineth even unto the west; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be” (Matthew 24:23-27). OH that we would in these Last Days and within this generation seek a person—the true and living God—and not allow ourselves to be caught up and consumed with seeking a specific place, or even a specific person within the earth. The word which the Spirit of the Lord is speaking unto us in these Last Days is quite simple—“Seek the Lord!” The Spirit of the sovereign Lord is instructing us to seek the Lord in order that we might live, and not just to seek the Lord, but to also “seek good, and not evil, that ye may live.” The word we must recognize in these Last Days is that we are not only to seek the Lord of hosts, but we are also to seek good as well—and please note that this is good as defined by the Lord of hosts and not according to our own definition of the word. OH that there would be a generation in these Last days that would not only seek God, but would also seek that which is good in the midst of this generation.

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