Here On Earth As It Is In Heaven: The Christ, The Church, The Throne

Today’s selected reading continues in the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus the Christ, and more specifically, begins with the first verse of the fourth chapter and continues through to the fourteenth verse of the fifth chapter. The fourth chapter of the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ marks a profound and powerful transition that takes place within the book. In the first chapter we essentially discover an introduction to the book—an introduction to the revelation of Jesus Christ which was shown and revealed unto the apostle John while exiled on the isle of Patmos. It was in the first chapter of the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ that we encounter a vision and revelation of Jesus Christ, as when John turned to see the One whose voice he had heard speaking to him, he was confronted with the ascended, exalted and glorified Christ. Consider the revelation of Jesus the Christ which is found in the first chapter of the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus: “And I turned to see the voice that spake with me. And being turned, I saw seven golden candlesticks; and in the midst of the seven candlesticks one like unto the Son of man, clothed with a garment down to the foot, and girt about the paps with a golden girdle. His head and His hairs were white like wool, as white as snow; and his eyes were as a flame of fire; and his feet like unto fine brass, as if they burned in a furnace; and his voice as the sound of many waters. And he had in His right hand seven stars: and out of his mouth went a sharp tow-edged sword: and His countable was as the sun shineth in His strength. And when I saw him, I fell at His feet as dead. And He laid His right hand upon me, saying unto me, Fear not; I am the first and the last: I am He that liveth, and was dead; and, behold, I am alive for evermore, Amen; and have the keys of hell and of death. Write the things which you hast seen, and the things which are, and the things which shall be hereafter; the myster of the seven stars which thou sawest in my right hand, and the seven golden candlesticks. The seven stars are the angels of the seven churches: and the seven candlesticks which thou sawest are the seven churches” (Revelation 1:12-20).

The more I read, study and consider the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ, the more I am gripped by the progression of the revelation that is found within the book. Within the first five chapters of the book we encounter three distinct revelations. Within the first chapter of this prophetic book we encounter the revelation of Jesus Christ, as this revelation was released when John turned to see the voice which had spoken unto Him. It was in the first chapter where John saw One like unto the Son of man—one who was clothed with a garment down to the foot, One who was girt about the paps with a golden girdle, one whose hairs were white like wool and as white as snow, one whose eyes were as flames of a fire, and one whose feet were like unto fine brass. Furthermore, when the apostle John turned to see the voice which spake unto him, He saw One whose voice was as the sound of many waters, and who had in His right hand seven stars. This One whose voice the apostle had heard speaking unto him had coming forth from His mouth a sharp two-edged sword, and a countenance which was as the sun shining in all its strength. This is actually incredible important to recognize and understand, for at the very outset of the prophetic revelation we encounter a revelation of Jesus Christ Himself. When attempting to read and study the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ, it’s important to note that at the very heart, at the very center, at the very center of this revelation is a revelation—not of end times events, or even the judgment of Babylon, or the rise of the antichrist and the false prophet, or of the war which took place in heaven, or even Satan’s being bound and sealed in the bottomless pit for one thousand years. The very heart and center of the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ is indeed and is in fact a revelation of Jesus Christ.

There would be many who would seek to understand this book solely as a revelation of end times events, yet the truth of the matter is that that simply isn’t the case. We cannot, we dare not, we must not attempt to read and understand this prophetic book solely as a vision and revelation of end times events, and that which is to take place in the days to come. It is true that the language that is found within this prophetic book does in fact center upon the events that are going to take place in the days to come, yet those events cannot and must not be understood independent and separately from an understand and knowledge of the revelation of Jesus Christ. In fact, I would dare say that the events which we read unfolding in this prophetic book take place and occur in light of the revelation of Jesus Christ. I am reminded of one of the parables spoken by Jesus the Christ, which is recorded for us in the twenty-fifth chapter of gospel account of His life and ministry. Beginning with the thirty-first verse of the twenty-fifth chapter of this book we find and read these words:

“When the Son of man shall come in His glory, and all the holy angels with him, then shall He sit upon the throne of His glory: and before Him shall be gathered all nations: and He shall separate them one from another, as a shepherd divideth His sheep from the goats: and he shall set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left. Then shall the King say unto them on His right hand, Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world: for I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in: Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me. Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? Or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? Or naked, and clothed thee? OR when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me” (Matthew 25:31-40).

“Then shall He say also unto them on the left hand, Depart from me, the cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels: For I was an hungred, and ye gave me no meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me no drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me not in: naked, and ye clothed me not: sick, and in prison, and ye visited me not. Then shall they also answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, or athirst, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister unto thee? Then shall He answer them, saying, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to me. And these shall go away into everlasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal” (Matthew 25:41-46).

What we read, and what we find in the final portion of this particular chapter within the gospel according to Matthew is a powerful description of a great reckoning that will take place at the end of time. There is coming a point in time when the nations will be divided before the Lamb, and before the One who sits upon the throne—the sheep on his right hand, and the goats on his left. There is coming a point in time when a great reckoning is going to take place—a reckoning that is based solely on what men and women have done unto, for and on behalf of Jesus. The entire premise and deciding factor of this particular discourse is what men and women did unto Jesus the Christ. Where they found themselves before Him at this particular moment, and which category they found themselves in was based purely and solely on how they treated Jesus upon the earth. What causes this reality to become so incredibly intriguing is when you consider the fact that both those who were commended for their treatment of Christ, and those who were condemned for their mistreatment of Christ were shocked, stunned and surprised at the words of Jesus. Neither those who actually ministered unto the Christ, nor those who failed to minister unto Christ understood or even recognized how they could be described as having done such while moving upon the earth. Jesus would go on to reveal and clarify their ministry unto Him by referencing and speaking of those who hungered, those who thirsted, those who were strangers, those who were naked, those who were sick, and those who were in prison—five categories of men and women who would reveal one’s treatment of Christ. WHEN MINISTRY UNTO MEN DETERMINES MINISTRY UNTO CHRIST! Did you know that your ministry unto men (and women) can in fact translate into ministry unto Christ? Perhaps one of the greatest examples of this type of ministry is found in a portion of Scripture that most would not even expect or think to look. When speaking unto one who asked Him who their neighbor was, Jesus proceeded to speak a parable which has come to be known as “the parable of the Good Samaritan.” It is within this parable where we encounter a powerful description of ministry alongside a dirt road that could and may very well have translated into ministry unto Christ, and ministry in heaven. Consider if you will the text that is found within Scripture concerning the parable of the Good Samaritan:

“A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which stripped him of his raiment, and wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead. And by chance there came down a certain priest that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side. But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him, and went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him. And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee. Which not of these three, thinkest thou, was neighbour unto him that fall among thieves?” (Luke 10:29-36).

I am convinced that what we read within this parable is a powerful example of what Jesus the Christ spoke concerning ministry unto the least of those—those who were naked, those who were thirsty, those who were hungry, those who were sick, and those who were in prison. What is so surprising about this parable is the activity and actions of both the priest and the Levite. Upon reading this parable I can’t help but wonder if either the priest or the Levite had ever given themselves to helping those in need before. There is a part of me that can’t help but wonder if they would ever step out of their comfort zone in order to help another in need. Had both the priest and the Levite made it a regular practice not to help those in need—perhaps because they were unwilling to get their garments dirty? I fully recognize that Jesus’ words in this passage of Scripture are merely a parable, yet when you read the four gospels found within the New Testament, you will note the activity of the priests, the Pharisees, the Sadducees, the chief elders, and all those in prominent places among the Jews. Within the four gospels you will not find a single account of any priest, or any Pharisee, or any Sadducee, or any elder lifting a finger to minister unto the least of these. In fact, when speaking unto the scribes, the Pharisees, and the hypocrites, Jesus speaks something so profound and tragic concerning them: “For they bind heaven burdens and grievous to be burned, and lay them on men’s shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers” (Matthew 23:4). Within this passage of Scripture we discover a tragic truth concerning the scribes and Pharisees of Jesus’ day—namely, that they were unwilling to help lift the burdens that were being carried by those around them. The priests, the scribes, the Pharisees, the chief elders, the Sadducees—all those in prominent places and positions during Jesus’ day—were not willing to do anything to help with the burdens those around them were carrying, nor even minister unto “the least of these.” What I find so tragic and alarming about what we read in the parable of the Good Samaritan is that the Good Samaritan might have been one of the sheep to Jesus’ right hand, while both the priest and the Levite might have been one of the goats to Jesus’ left hand. WHEN PRIESTS AND LEVITES STAND TO THE LEFT, AND SAMARITANS STAND TO THE RIGHT!

The reason I included Jesus’ words within the twenty-fifth chapter of the gospel according to Matthew, as well as Jesus’ words recorded in the tenth chapter of the gospel of Luke is because both of these passages bring us fact to face with a powerful description of what it looks like to minister unto Christ. The question that I have to ask is whether or not we are even truly aware of the fact that ministry unto Christ can in fact take place outside the four walls of the Church. We have spent a considerable amount of time focusing on the fact that ministry unto Christ takes place within the sanctuary and Temple, yet we have completely ignored the fact that ministry unto Christ can in fact take place outside of and apart from the sanctuary and Temple. Is it possible that both the priest and Levite chose to bypass ministry unto this particular man who would been robbed, beaten and left half dead because they were on their way to perform a specific ministry at the Temple in Jerusalem? Is it possible that believed that ministry before and ministry unto the Lord was completely and totally limited to that which is done around the altar and within the courts of the sanctuary and Temple of the Lord. Oh how many times have we allowed ourselves to get so caught up in the trap of ministry within the sanctuary and house of the Lord that we have failed to recognize the ministry that takes place and Is available all around us beyond and outside the four walls of the Church? How many goats which are found to the left hand of Jesus were those who ministered—and perhaps even effectively ministered before and around the altar—in the sanctuary and house of the Lord? What if many of the sheep that find themselves to the right hand of Jesus at this particular moment in time were those who did no ministry within the sanctuary and house of the Lord, but engaged in ministry apart from, and outside the sanctuary and house of the Lord? Oh, the question that must be asked right now is what type of ministry are you engaged in? Please note and please understand that this doesn’t mean or even suggest that ministry within the house of the Lord is not important. I wholeheartedly believe in the words of the apostle Paul concerning the body of Christ, and the ministry that is necessary within the church of Jesus Christ. What I am speaking of and suggesting is that ministry unto Christ which takes place not within the comfort of the four walls of the church, but outside the four walls of the church within the trenches, within the deep waters, within the dirt and dust that surrounds us.

The prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ begins and opens with a revelation of Jesus Christ, for the entire book is centered upon man’s relationship to, and man’s treatment of Jesus the Christ. Everything that we find, and everything we read in this particular book within the New Testament of Scripture centers upon what men did unto, and how men treated Jesus the Christ. Every single event we find within the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ is centered upon what men and women did with and unto Jesus the Christ. Within the first chapter of the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ we indeed encounter a vision and revelation of Jesus the Christ. When we come to the second and third chapters, however, we transition away from and apart from a revelation of Jesus Christ unto a vision and revelation of the Church. The language and text we read in the second and third chapters of the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ—while they do in fact contain specific revelations concerning the Christ—are in fact revelations of the seven churches within the province of Asia. The apostle John transitions from a place of revelation concerning Christ, to a place of revelation concerning the Church, and I can’t help but find tremendous significance in this concept. While the prophetic book opens with a revelation of Jesus Christ, it doesn’t immediately transition to a revelation of humanity, or a revelation of the sin, the humanity, the transgression, the iniquity of the world. What’s more, is that we walk through five chapters within this prophetic book before we are even confronted with a revelation concerning the world and the judgment that would be unleashed within and upon it. Before judgment would ever be released upon and released within the world, it would first be meted out and experienced within the church. Any true revelation from God must first begin with a revelation of Jesus the Christ, must continue to a revelation of the Church, and must then progress to a revelation of the throne of God. THE REVELATION OF CHRIST! THE REVELATION OF THE CHURCH! THE REVELATION OF THE THRONE! It’s interesting to note the progression of thought that takes place and is found within the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus, for between the revelation of the Christ and the revelation of the throne is a revelation of the Church. It was the revelation of Jesus Christ that stood as the heart and foundation of all other revelation, yet it was from that place of revelation that the apostle John would then move and transition to a place of revelation concerning the Church. Once the revelation of the Church was complete, the apostle John was immediately brought and transitioned to a place of revelation concerning the throne of God in heaven. What’s more, is that not only was the apostle transitioned to a place of revelation concerning the throne of God in heaven, but the apostle John was also permitted to see and experience a vision and revelation of the worship that takes place around the throne and before the Lord of heaven and earth. What we read in the fourth chapter of this prophetic book is more than just a vision and revelation concerning the throne of God in heaven, but it is also a vision and revelation of the One who sits upon the throne, and the worship which takes place before and around the throne.

What we first notice when reading the fourth chapter is a vision of the throne of God in heaven, and of the One who is seated upon that throne. “After this I looked, and, behold, a door was opened in heaven: and the first voice which I heard was as it were of a trumpet talking with me; which said, Come up hither, and I will shew thee things which must be hereafter. And immediately I was in the spirit: and, behold, a throne was set in heaven, and one sat on the throne. And He that sat was to look upon like a jasper and a sardine stone: and there was a rainbow round about the throne, in sight like unto an emerald. And round about the throne were four and twenty seats: and upon the seats I saw four and twenty elders sitting, clothed in white raiment; and they all had on their heads crowns of gold. And out of the throne proceeded lightnings and thunderings and voices: and there were seven lamps of fire burning before the throne, which are the seven spirits of God. And before the throne there was a sea of glass like unto crystal: and in the midst of the throne, and round about the throne, were four beasts full of eyes before and behind” (Revelation 4:1-5). I find the first five chapters of this prophetic book to be absolutely astounding and remarkable, for within the first five chapters—not only did the apostle John see a vision of Jesus the Christ, but He also saw a vision of the throne of God in heaven, and even a vision of the One who sat upon that throne. How absolutely incredible and amazing it is that the apostle John—while living in exile upon the isle of Patmos—not only saw a vision of the exalted Christ, but he also saw a vision of the throne of God, as well as the One who sat upon the throne. The more I read and consider the vision and revelation the apostle John saw within these two chapters, the more I can’t help but think of two others who had a vision and revelation of the throne of God in heaven. The first was the prophet Isaiah in the Old Testament, while the second was the prophet Ezekiel—also in the Old Testament. Consider the vision which the prophet Isaiah saw in the year king Uzziah died—a vision that is recorded in the sixth chapter of the prophetic book which bears the name of the prophet:

“In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple. Above it stood the seraphim: each one had six wings; with twain he covered his face, and with twain he covered his feet, and with twain he did fly. And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory. And the posts of the door moved at the voice of him that cried, and the house was filled with smoke. Then said I, Woe is me! For I am undone; because I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: For mine eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts. Then flew one of the seraphim unto me, having a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with the tongs from off the altar: and he laid it upon my mouth, and said, Lo, this hath touched thy lips; and thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged. Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me. And He said, Go, and tell this people” (Isaiah 6:1-9)

IN the final three verses of the first chapter of the prophetic book of Ezekiel we discover the vision which Ezekiel saw—a vision of the throne of God in heaven. “And above the firmament that was over their heads was the likeness of a throne, as the appearance of a sapphire stone: and upon the likeness of the throne was the likeness as the appearance of a man above upon it. And I saw as the colour of amber, as the appearance of fire round about within it, from the appearance of his loins even upward, and from the appearance of his loins even downward, I saw as it were the appearance of fire, and it had brightness round about. As the appearance of the bow that is in the cloud in the day of rain, so was the appearance of the brightness round about This was the appearance of the likeness of the glory of the Lord. And when I saw it, I fell upon my face, and I heard a voice of one that spake” (Ezekiel 1:26-28).

How appropriate, and how necessary it is that the revelation of Jesus Christ as is recorded in the prophetic book of Revelation has directly connected to the revelation of Christ a revelation of the throne, as well as the One who sits upon the throne. I can’t help but see the direct connection that exists between the revelation of Christ, the revelation of the Church, and the revelation of the throne of God. In all reality, I would dare say that these three revelations are intrinsically connected. IN other words, one cannot separate the revelation of Christ from the revelation of the Church, and the revelation of the throne, and the One who sits upon the throne. No revelation of Jesus Christ is complete without and apart from a revelation of the Church, as well as a revelation of the throne of God. It is from the place of the revelation of Christ that we can truly enter into that place of revelation concerning us as the Church—us as the body of Christ, the saints of God, and the disciples of Christ. It is from that place of recognizing, understanding and encountering Christ that we can truly understand and encounter who we are as individuals, and as the saints of God. I do not believe it is any coincidence that we find the revelation of Christ, the revelation of the Church, and then the revelation of the throne. It was the revelation of the throne where the apostle John witnessed and encountered the worship that takes place before and around the throne. Just as one cannot have or experience a revelation of Christ without and apart from a revelation of the Church, one cannot have a revelation of the throne without understanding what takes place before and around the throne. The prophet Isaiah experienced a vision and revelation of the throne of God in heaven, but he also experienced a vision and revelation of the worship of the seraphim which stood above the throne. The apostle John experienced a vision of the throne of God in heaven, and he also a vision of the worship that takes place before and around the throne. The throne of God in heaven is that place where all dominion, all authority, all government originates and flows, but it is also that place where true worship of the King takes place.

One of the most profound realities I find when reading the fourth and fifth chapters is the worship that takes place before and around the throne. In the fourth chapter—beginning with the eighth verse—we read of the four living creatures which are before the throne, and the worship of the four living creatures in heaven: “And the four beasts had each of them six wings about him; and they were full of eyes within: and they rst not day and night, saying, Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty, which was, and is, and is to come. And when those beasts give glory and honour and thanks to Him that sat on the throne, who liveth for ever and ever, the four and twenty elders fall down before Him that sat on the throne, and worship Him that liveth forever and ever, and cast their crowns before the throne, saying, Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honour and power: for thou hast created all things, and for thy pleasures they are and were created” (Revelation 4:8-11). When you come to the eighth verse of the following chapter, you will once more find worship taking place in heaven—worship of the Lamb who was worthy to take the scroll with its seven seals out of the hand of the One who sat upon the throne, and break the seals: “And when He had taken the book, the four beasts and four and twenty elders fell down before the Lamb, having every one of them harps, and golden vials full of odours, which are the prayers of saints. And they sung a new song, saying, Thou art worthy to take the book, and to open the seals thereof: for thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation; and hast made us unto our God kings and priests; and we shall reign on the earth. And I beheld, and I heard the voice of many angels round above the throne and the beats and the elders: and the number of them was ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands; saying with a loud voice, Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing. And every creature which is in heaven, and on the earth, and under the earth, and such as are in the sea, and all that are in them, heard I saying, Blessing and honour, and glory, and power, be unto him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb for ever and ever. And the four beasts said, Amen. And the four and twenty elders fell down and worshipped Him that liveth for ever and ever” (Revelation 5:8-14).

As I’m sitting here right now, I am confronted with three unique and distinct visions and revelations we as the saints and people of God must have. The first vision and revelation which we must have within and upon the earth is indeed a vision of the risen, the exalted, the glorified, and the victorious Christ. The apostle John first met and encountered the exalted and glorified Christ, and then from that place of vision and revelation He saw a vision of the Church itself. Please note that when I speak of a vision of the Church of Jesus Christ, I am not speaking of the Church as a whole alone, but also a vision of ourselves. It was the prophet Isaiah who in and from the place of vision and revelation of the throne of God also saw a vision and revelation of Himself. It must be from that place of vision and revelation of Christ that we encounter a true vision of who we are as saints and disciples. Our image and our identity must flow from the place of understanding the image of Christ, and who truly is within our lives. Taking this even further, we must also press on toward the vision of the throne of God in heaven—a vision of that place where all authority, all dominion, all power, all government truly flow. It is this place of vision and revelation of throne of God that we encounter a vision of the One who sits upon the throne, and of the worship that takes place before the throne. Any vision and revelation of the throne of God must ultimately and inevitably lead us into a place of worship before the One who is seated upon the throne, as we join with the angels, the elders, the seraphim, the cherubim, and the four living creatures in worship of the King of kings and Lord of lords. Oh that would allow ourselves to enter into a place of vision and revelation of Jesus the Christ, a vision and revelation of the Church and body of Christ, as well as a vision of the throne of God and the worship which takes place before and around the throne. REVELATION: THE CHRIST, THE CHURCH, & THE THRONE! Let us in these Last Days press toward and pursue living in this place of revelation that can ultimately and dramatically alter, shape and transform our lives. The prophet Isaiah had a vision of and an encounter before the throne of God in heaven, and it would ultimately and inevitably lead him into a place where he would receive a divine commission to proclaim the word of the Lord to the house of Israel. I can’t help but think how the apostle John was not dramatically transformed by the vision of the throne he received while on the isle of Patmos

I read the text and language that is found within these two chapters, and I can’t help but gripped and consumed with the apostle John’s encounter—not only with the throne of God, but also with the worship of heaven around the throne. Pause for a moment and consider the vast array of worship services you have been in. Think for a moment upon those worship experiences you have watched on the internet, or perhaps even on the television. Think of all those times you have been engaged in a worship experience you thought was absolutely incredible, and despite how incredible you thought that experience was, it is nothing compared to the worship we find before the throne of God in heaven. The apostle John had a vision of the worship which took place before and around the throne, and I can’t help but wonder what the sound of that worship was like. It’s one thing to see the four and twenty elders fall to the ground and bow before the Lord while laying their crowns before Him. It’s something else altogether to hear with your own ears the worship that takes place around the throne. The apostle John is the only one in all of Scripture who perhaps saw a full and complete vision of the worship that takes place in heaven before the throne of God. The apostle John didn’t merely see the throne of God, and one who was seated upon the throne, but he also saw the worship that takes place around the throne as well. Imagine the sight and sound of the worship around the throne as myriads upon myriads of angels worship the King and Creator of the universe. Pause and consider the sight and sound of the four and twenty elders bowing down upon their faces before the throne of God and casting their crowns before Him. If the sound of the seraphim in the vision of Isaiah shook the posts of the temple, I can’t help but wonder what this worship sounded like to the apostle. Keep in mind that the apostle John was there on the Day of Pentecost, and was there when the Spirit came as a mighty rushing wind with tongues of fire. The apostle John undoubtedly witnessed countless settings and environments where the saints of God worshipped God upon the earth, but it wasn’t until he experienced the vision of the throne of God in heaven, and the saints and living creatures round about the throne worshipping the King that he truly encountered worship unlike anything he had every witnessed or experienced. The question I can’t help but wonder and consider is what our worship is like when compared to the worship which takes place before and around the throne of God in heaven. The Father of lights is not only worshipped in earth, but the Father is also worshipped in heaven as well. The vision which the apostle John saw one of worship—not worship on the earth, but worship in heaven itself. This is actually something I find worth noting and considering, for we have been taught to pray, “thy kingdom come, thy will be done,” and yet I can’t help but wonder if this cannot and does not include the worship which takes place before and around the throne of God in heaven. What would happen if the sounds of heaven began to be manifested and translated upon the earth, and the worship upon the earth began to mirror and reflect the worship which takes place in heaven? I would dare say that when the worship of the earth begins to mirror and somewhat reflect the worship that takes place in heaven a powerful shift and transition can and will occur among the saints of God, and upon the earth.

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