The Unsung Heroes of the Faith: Every Burden and Cross You Bear Has A Destination

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament epistle of the apostle Paul unto the saints which were at Rome, and more specifically, is found in the first thirteen verses of the fifteenth chapter. Upon first glance and first reading this passage of scripture it’s incredibly interesting to notice how it opens up and begins—especially in light of how the fourteenth chapter opens. The fourteenth chapter of the epistle of Paul unto the Roman congregation opens up with the apostle instructing the gentile believers to receive those who are weak in the faith, while the fifteenth chapter of the epistle begins with instruction to those who are strong bearing the infirmities of those who are weak and not to please themselves. RECEIVING THE WEAK IN FAITH & BEARING THE INFIRMITIES OF THE WEAK! Perhaps one of the greatest realities surrounding the first verse of the fifteenth chapter is the revelation and awareness of the weakness one faces. I do not believe for one money that the infirmities which the apostle spoke of in this particular verse were specifically limited and relegated to the physical realm as it pertains to wickedness. In the fifty-third chapter of the Old Testament prophetic book of Isaiah we find the prophet issuing a tremendous revelation concerning the Messiah and how the Messiah bore our infirmities. I am utterly and completely convinced that that which the prophet was speaking of didn’t merely pertain to physical infirmities, but also touched the emotional, mental, and even spiritual realms.

If the infirmities which the prophet Isaiah spoke of in the fifty-third chapter of that prophetic book spoke only to that which was manifested in the physical realm, the entire earthly ministry or Jesus would have taken place solely in the physical and natural realm. I do not believe for one moment that Jesus came to this earth simply to bear our physical infirmities while leaving our emotional infirmities untouched and not dealt with. I do not believe for one moment that when Jesus came to this earth He came solely to touch the physical infirmities while leaving the mental infirmities untouched and not dealt with. This same reality holds true to the reality and concept of spiritual infirmities which those in that generation experienced. If you do an in depth study or the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ, you will witness His willingness and ability to touch and deal with those infirmities which were perhaps present in the unseen and invisible realms. We would be incredibly naïve to think that the only realm where we can struggle with and be afflicted by infirmities is in the physical realm within our bodies. It is true that the Scripture speaks of by His stripes we are healed, but I don’t believe that healing takes place in a bubble. I do not for one minute believe that healing takes place solely in the physical realm and in the physical bodies of those whom Jesus touched. If this were the case then Jesus would have only healed the physical needs of those who were brought unto Him while leaving the deeper unseen issues untouched and not dealt with.

If we are to truly and properly understand the purpose of the ministry of Jesus while on the earth, it’s necessary that we examine—not only the fortieth chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah, but also the fifty-third chapter of the same book. In fact, the prophet Isaiah—perhaps more than any other Old Testament prophet—had more to say about the Messiah during his ministry upon the earth. Beginning with the fortieth chapter of the prophetic book we begin to see a picture of the Messiah being painted by the prophet—one that must be carefully considered. Beginning with the fortieth chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah we find and read the following words: “Comfort ye, Comfort ye my people, saith your God. Speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem, and cry unto her, that her warfare is accomplished, that her iniquity is pardoned: for she hath received of the Lord’s hand double for all her sins. The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low: and the crooked shall be made straight, and the touch places plain: and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together: for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it. The voice said, Cry. And he said, What shall I cry? All flesh is grass, and all the godliness thereof is as the flower of the field: the grass withereth, the flower fadeth: because the Spirit of the Lord bloweth upon it: surely the people is grass. The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God shall stand for ever. O Zion, that bringeth good tidings, get thee up into the high mountain; O Jerusalem, that bringeth good tidings, lift up thy voice with strength; lift it up, be not afraid; say unto the cities of Judah, Behold, your God! Behold, the Lord God will come with strong hand, and His arm shall rule for Him: Behold, His reward is with Him, and His work before Him. He shall feed His flock like a shepherd: he shall gather the lambs with his arm, and carry them in His bosom, and shall gently lead those that are with young” (Isaiah 40:1-11).

When you come to the forty-second chapter of this same prophetic book you will find another reference concerning the Messiah who was to come among the nation and people of Israel in the days to come. Beginning with the first verse of this chapter we find and read these words, which only enhance and increase the picture which the prophet was painting concerning the Messiah. “Behold my servant, whom I uphold; mine elect, in whom my soul delighteth; I have put my sprit upon him: he shall bring forth judgment to the Gentiles. He shall not cry, nor lift up, nor cause his voice to be heard in the street. A bruised reed shall he not break, and the smoking flax shall he not quench: he shall bring forth judgment unto truth. He shall not fail nor be discouraged, till he have set judgment in the earth: and the isles shall wait for his law. Thus saith God the Lord, He that created the heavens, and stretched them out; He that spread forth the earth, and that which cometh out of it; he that giveth breath unto the people upon it, and spirit to them that walk therein: I the Lord have called thee in righteousness, and will hold thine hand, and will keep thee, and give thee for a covenant of the people, for a light of the Gentiles; to open the blind eyes, to bring out the prisoners from the prison, and them that sit in darkness of the prison house. I am the Lord: that is my name: and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images. Behold, the former things are come to pass, and new things do I declare: before they spring forth I tell you of them. Sing unto the LORd a new song, and His praise from the end of the earth, ye that go down to the sea, and all that is therein; the isles, and the inhabitants thereof” (Isaiah 42:1-10).

There are two other very distinct passages found within this Old Testament prophetic book—the first being found in the fifty-third chapter, while the second is found in the sixty-first chapter. Both of these passages are both beloved and well-known, for both directly speak of and reference the Messiah who was to come among the Lord’s people within the earth. Consider if you will the words and language that is found in the fifty-third chapter of this prophetic book concerning the Messiah as the suffering servant of the Lord within and upon the earth: “Who hath believed our report? And to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is not beauty that we should desire him. He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. Surely he hath born our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the Lord hath laid on Him the iniquity of us all. He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth. He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare his generation? For he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was he stricken. And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth. Yet it pleased the Lord to bruise him; he hath put him to grief: when thou shalt make his soul an offering for sin, he shall see his seed, he shall prolong his days, and the pleasure of the Lord shall prosper in his hand. He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities. Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong; because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors” (Isaiah 53:1-12).

If you journey forward just a few chapters later in this prophetic book you will find and discover another powerful reference concerning the Messiah who was to come among His people upon the earth. In fact, what is so incredibly powerful about this particular passage of Scripture is that it was directly read by Jesus when He read from the scroll in the synagogue in His hometown of Nazareth. Beginning with the first verse of the sixty-first chapter we find these words written and recorded concerning the Messiah who was to come upon the earth: “The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the broken-hearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are found; to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord, and the day of vengeance of our God; to comfort all that mourn; to appoint unto them that mourn in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that He might be glorified. And they shall build the old wastes, they shall raise up the former desolations, and they shall repair the waste cities, the desolations of many generations. And strangers shall stand and feed your flocks, and the sons of the alien shall be your plowmen and your vinedressers. But ye shall be named the Priests of the Lord: men shall call you the Ministers of our God: ye shall eat the riches of the Gentiles, and in their glory shall ye boast yourselves. For your shame ye shall have doubled; and for confusion they shall rejoice in their portion: therefore in their land they shall possess the double: everlasting joy shall be unto them. For I the Lord love judgment, I hate robbery for burnt offering; and I will direct their work in truth, and I will make an everlasting covenant with them. And their seed shall be known among the Gentiles, and their offspring among the people: all that see them shall acknowledge them, that they are the seed which the Lord hath blessed. I will greatly rejoice in the Lord, my. Soul shall be joyful in my. God; for he hath clothed me with the garments of salvation, he hath covered me with the robe of righteousness, as a bridegroom deckers himself with ornaments, and as a bride adorned herself with her jewels. For as the earth bringeth forth her bud, and as the garden causeth the things that are sown in it to spring forth; so the Lord God will cause righteousness and praise to spring forth before all the nations” (Isaiah 61:1-11).

The words and language we find in the sixty-first chapter of the prophetic book of Isaiah must be carefully considered—not only in light of the entire earthly ministry of Jesus, but also because the words which are found in this particular chapter were referenced by Jesus Himself when He began teaching among the people within their synagogues. If you begin reading with the fourteenth verse of the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Luke you will find the reference of that which was proclaimed by the prophet in the sixty-first chapter of that prophetic book. Read and consider the words that are recorded in the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Luke concerning this moment during the life and ministry of Jesus: “And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee: and there went out a fame of Him through all the region round about. And he taught in their synagogues, being glorified of all. And he came to Nazareth, where He had been brought up: and, as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and stood up for to read. And there was delivered unto him the book of the prophet Esaias. And when He had opened the book, He found the place where it was written, The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, to preach the acceptable year of the Lord. And he closed the book, and He gave it again to the minister, and sat down. And the eyes of all them that were in the synagogue were fastened on Him. And He began to say unto them, This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears. And all bare Him witness, and wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of His mouth. And they said, Is not this Joseph’s son? And He said unto them, Ye will surely say unto me this proverb. Physician, heal thyself: whatsoever we have heard done in Capernaum, do also here in thy country. And he said, Verily I say unto you, No prophet is accepted in his own country. But I tell you of a truth, many widows were in Israel in the days of Elias, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, when great famine was throughout all the land; but unto none of them was Elias sent, save unto Sarepta, a city of Sidon, unto a woman that was a widow. And many lepers were in Israel in the time of Eliseus the prophet; and none of them was cleansed, saving Naaman the Syrian” (Luke 4:14-27).

There is a particular passage that is found in the apostle Paul’s first epistle unto the saints which were at Thessalonica and warrants strong consideration in direct reference to all we have read thus far. Beginning with the sixth verse of the fifth chapter of this epistle we read these words which were written by the apostle: “Thereofre let us not sleep, as do others; but let us watch and be sober. For they that sleep sleep in the night; and they that be drunken are drunken in the night. But let us, who are of the day, be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love; and for an helmet, the hope of salvation. For God hath not appointed us to wrath, but to obtain salvation by our Lord Jesus Christ, who died for us, that, whether we wake or sleep, we should live together with Him. Wherefore Comfort yourselves together, and edify one another, even as also ye do. And we beseech you, brethren, to know them which labour among you, and are over you in the Lord, and admonish you; and to esteem them very highly in love for their work’s sake. And be at peace among yourselves. Now we exhort you brethren, warn them that are unruly, Comfort the feeble-minded, support the weak, be patient toward all men. See that none render evil for evil unto any man; but ever follow that which is good, both among yourselves, and to all men. Rejoice evermore. Pray without ceasing. IN every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you. Quench not the Spirit. Despise not prophesying. Prove all things; hold fast that which is good. Abstain from all appearances of evil. And the very God of peace sanctify your wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. Faithful is He that calleth you, who also will do it” (1 Thessalonians 5:6-24).

It is the words which are found in the twenty-third verse of this particular chapter which I am convinced must be recognized and understood when seeking to understand that which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome—and ultimately unto the saints which were members of all the churches which were found in the provinces of Asia. I am convinced this single verse must stand at the very forefront of understanding the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ, for this verse will help us understand exactly what Jesus came to save, exactly what Jesus came to redeem, and exactly what Jesus came to restore. It’s worth noting that as surely and as certainly as the apostle Paul spoke of the whole being of a man being sanctified wholly, as well as the whole spirit and soul and body being preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, this does not merely touch the realm of sanctification. In fact, I would dare say that anything that is and can be sanctified must first be saved and experience the salvation of the Lord. If our spirit can be sanctified in the presence of the Lord by the person and power of His Spirit, then so also our spirit can and must be saved. If our soul can and must be sanctified, then I am convinced that our soul can and must also be saved. Similarly, I am convinced that if our body can be sanctified by and in the presence of the living God, so also our body must be saved. There can be no sanctification without and apart from salvation, for salvation is the door and the gate that enables and makes possible sanctification within our bodies, our souls and our spirits. I am convinced that when Jesus came to this earth and took on the form and likeness of human flesh, He came not only to minister unto our physical bodies, but also our souls, as well as our spirits. If we are to truly understand the life and ministry of Jesus, it’s absolutely necessary that the salvation, the restoration and the redemption Jesus came to bring unto us extends beyond simply our physical bodies, and actually touches our soul and our spirit. There are many who would seek to limit healing as something that touches the physical realm and the physical body alone, while leaving the inner man completely untouched and not dealt with. I am convinced that to think such thoughts would be to do a great disservice to that which the Lord desires to do within our lives.

Consider the language that is found within the fifteenth chapter of the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome beginning with the first verse, and continuing through to the thirteenth verse: “We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Let everything one of us please his neighbor for his good to edification. For even Christ pleased not himself; but, as it is written, The reproaches of them that reproached thee fell on me. For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope;. Now the God of patience and consolation grant you to be like-minded one toward another according to Christ Jesus: that ye may with one mind and one mouth glorify God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. Wherefore receive ye one another, as Christ also received us to the glory of God. Now I say that Jesus Christ was a minister of the circumcision for the truth of God, to confirm the promises made unto the fathers: and that the Gentiles might glorify God for His mercy; as it is written, For this cause I will confess to thee among the Gentiles, and sing unto thy name. And again He saith, Rejoice, ye Gentiles, with His people. And again, Praise the Lord, all ye Gentiles; and laud him, all ye people. And again, Esaias saith, There shall be a. Root of Jesse, and he that shall rise to reign over the Gentiles; in him shall the Gentiles trust. Now the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that ye may abound in hope, through the power of the Holy Ghost” (Romans 15:1-13).

I am convinced that there have been countless men and women who have been shortchanged within and throughout their lives simply because they have focused on salvation only in one realm, while completely leaving the other realms untouched and not dealt with. If you read and study the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ you will find that while there were a number of times when He did in fact heal the physical bodies of those He encountered, He didn’t simply stop there. There were countless times and multiple examples within the four Gospels of Jesus healing the physical bodies of those whom He encountered, and yet taking it a step further and addressing an even greater and an ever deeper issue. If you read the four gospels written by Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, you will discover Jesus did in fact heal the physical bodies of those whom He encountered—restoring sight to blinded ears, restoring hearing to deaf ears, causing the lame to walk, causing the lepers to be healed, and even raising the dead. With all of this being said, we do a great disservice and a great dishonor to the life and ministry of Jesus Christ by choosing to focus solely on His ability and willingness to heal the physical needs of those whom He encountered. It is true that it is by His stripes we are healed, and it is true that Jesus sought to bring healing to the physical bodies of countless men and woman. Additionally, it is also true that Jesus met the physical needs of two large crowds—the first crowd being five thousand, while the second crowd was four thousand. On each of these occasions, Jesus fed both crowds using nothing more than a few loaves of bread and a few fish. There is much evidence concerning Jesus the Christ—not only bringing physical healing to those whom He encountered, as well as concerning His willingness to feed and meet the physical needs of those whom He encountered during His days upon this earth. The question I can’t help but ask myself is what good is physical healing if our souls and our spirits remain untouched and not dealt with? What good is physical healing if our hearts and our minds remain untouched and not dealt with within our hearts and minds? I am convinced there have been a number of times when we have stopped far short of that which the Lord actually desires to do within our lives because we focus only on one single realm, while leaving the others completely untouched and not dealt with.

As we read the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome, it’s necessary that we understand that those who are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and to not please themselves. If we are truly willing to be honest with ourselves we have to admit that this is perhaps one of the most difficult things to do within our hearts and lives. Forget the concept of bearing the infirmities of the weak for a moment and focus solely on not pleasing ourselves. Consider how incredibly difficult it is to not seek to please ourselves, and to not seek to fulfill our own desires and to meet our own needs. It is incredibly easy to focus solely on ourselves and to look out for our own self-interests while leaving the needs of those around us completely untouched. I can’t help but wonder how many times I myself have been both selfish and self-seeking, self-centered and self-serving, and have completely ignored the needs of those which are around me. If I am being honest with myself, as well as with the Lord, I have to admit that it is much easier to please myself and to focus on my own needs rather than pleasing those around me. There is a popular Christian television show that bears a title which I believe is incredibly interesting—the television show that is hosted by James Dobson and his wife called “Focus On the Family.” Now, while I am convinced that it is absolutely necessary and imperative to focus on the family, I am convinced that we must focus on more than simply the family, but must focus on the body, must focus on the brethren, focus on those outside the fold, focus on those who have not yet made the decision to follow Jesus Christ. When I read the words which the apostle wrote concerning those who are strong bearing the infirmities of the weak, I can’t help but consider—not only those who are weak among us within the body of Christ, but also those who are weak outside of and apart from the body of Christ. We would be incredibly naïve to think that those who are weak are found only in the four walls of our churches and do not exist and are not present outside them. What’s more, is that we dare not assume that all those who are present within the four walls of the church are indeed and are in fact strong.

One of the greatest mistakes we as the saints of God make is thinking, and perhaps even believing that every one among us within the body of Christ is strong and possesses the strength that is mentioned of in the Scripture. We would be incredibly naïve to think and believe that every one among us within the four walls of the church are strong in their faith and aren’t weak, and/or don’t experience moments in their lives when they are weak in their faith. Not everyone who walks among us within our churches is strong in their faith and strong within their souls and spirits, and I would venture to say many of us would be utterly and completely shocked if we learned and discovered who among us was truly weak and who was truly strong. What if those who we perceived as being strong were actually weak, and those who we perceived as being weak were actually strong? What’s more, is who actually defines strength among and within the body? How do we actually determine who is strong among us within the body of Christ and who is weak? I am convinced that if the Spirit of the Lord removed the veil and revealed those among us who were truly strong, we might very well be completely and totally shocked. Within this verse the apostle Paul wrote how not even Christ sought to please Himself, but that the reproaches of those that were reproached fell upon Him. When we read the words which the prophet Isaiah wrote and spoke concerning the Messiah, it is imperative that we recognize and understand that the Christ was able to engage in such activity because of the strength that was given unto Him. When we read concerning the Christ how He “bore our griefs” and “carried our sorrows,” it’s important that we recognize that he was able to bear our griefs and carry our sorrows because it was given unto Him to be able to do it. When we read how He was wounded for our transgressions and bruised for our iniquities, it’s worth noting and pointing out that this was made possible through, according to, and by the person and power of the Spirit.

BEARING GRIEFS! CARRYING SORROWS! WOUNDED FOR TRANSGRESSIONS! BRUISED FOR INIQUITIES! Now, while it is obvious that the Lord can never and will never ask us to be wounded for the transgressions of men, or being bruised for the iniquities of men, it is true that when we read words such as what we find in the fifteenth chapter of the epistle of the apostle Paul unto the saints which were at Rome that engaging in such activities within our lives may very well require and ask of us more than we originally bargained for, or perhaps were even ready and willing to give. Christ was wounded and bruised on behalf of and for all of humanity, and I can’t help but wonder what we ourselves are willing to endure and undergo in order that we might be used to make a different and impact on those who are around us. I can’t help but wonder how many of us are willing to bear the griefs of those who are around us, and are willing to carry the sorrows of those who desperately need us. Much like Jesus who could not carry His cross the rest of the way to Golgotha and Calvary needed another to come alongside Him to help Him carry that cross, so those around us need others—perhaps even we ourselves—to come alongside them and help them carry that which they have been forced to carry and bear. Did you know that you weren’t meant, nor were you intended to bear your griefs and carry your sorrows alone and by yourself? One of the greatest dangers we face within our lives is when we think we can carry our own sorrows and bear our own griefs, and/or that those around us can do the same. Each and every one of us have been given a cross to carry and a cross to bear, yet there are times when the weight and burden of the cross is simply too much for us to carry alone and by ourselves, and we desperately need the strength and help of another to come alongside us. I am convinced that one of the most unsung heroes in all of Scripture is and was Simon who helped Jesus carry His cross the rest of the way to Calvary when He crumbled under the weight and burden of the cross. I am convinced that the unsung heroes among us in the body of Christ are those “Simon’s” who are willing and able to come alongside us and help us carry the crosses we have been called to carry and bear. The unsung heroes are those who are ready, willing and able to come alongside us and help us bear our griefs and carry our sorrows.

I would leave you with the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Galatia, and are recorded in the sixth chapter of the epistle: “Brethren, if a man be overtaken in a fault, ye which are spiritual, restore such an one in the spirit of meekness; considering thyself, lest thou also be tempted. Bear ye one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ. For if a man think himself to be something, when he is nothing, he deceiveth himself. But let every man prove his own work, and then shall he have rejoicing in himself alone, and not in another. For every man shall bear his own burden. Let him that is taught in the word communicate unto him that teacheth in all good things. Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. For he that soweth to his flesh shall of the flesh reap corruption; but he that soweth to the Spirit shall of the Spirit reap life everlasting. And let us not be weary in well doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not. As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith” (Galatians 6:1-10). I am convinced that the greatest heroes among us within the body of Christ are those who are willing to come alongside others who are crumbling under the weight of their griefs, those who are crumbling under the weight of their burdens, those who are crumbling under the weight and burden of their cross, and who desperately need another to come alongside them as Simon did, and help them carry it to the place they were destined to carry it. EVERY BURDEN HAS A DESTINATION! EVERY GRIEF HAS A DESTINATION! EVERY SORROW HAS A DESTINATION! EVERY CROSS HAS A DESTINATION! I am convinced that every burden, every grief, every sorrow, every infirmity, every iniquity, every cross, and the like which we carry and bear within our hearts and lives has a specific destination where it must be carried to, and along the way we need another, and perhaps others to come alongside us and help us finish carrying it. It is once we reach that place of destination where that which we have been carrying is planted in the ground, the work which the Father ordained and appointed for it is completed, and true salvation, true victory, true deliverance, true redemption, true restoration, true sanctification takes place. Oh that we would conclude this writing understanding the concept of unsung heroes among us, and the reality that every sorrow, every grief, every burden, every cross, everything we carry and bear has a destination and en ending point where it is not only planted, but also removed from us in order that the work of Christ according to the Spirit might be accomplished within us.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s