Bondage A.D. Trading A Blatant Bondage For a Polished Bondage

Today’s ssl Fred passage continues in the New Testament epistle of the apostle Paul unto the churches which were in Galatia. More specifically, today’s reading is found in verses twenty-one through thirty-one of the fourth chapter. There is a recurring theme that continues to echo within my soul and spirit the more I read the New Testament epistle of the apostle Paul unto the churches which were in Galatia. If you study the scripture you will notice a tremendous amount of language that centers upon the reality and concept of being in bondage to sin. In fact, if you read the New Testament epistle of Paul unto the saints which were at Rome you will find a tremendous amount of language concerning this bondage and slavery to win. The apostle Paul spends a considerable amount of time, effort, and energy writing and speaking about the tremendous danger of one being in bondage and slavery to sin. What’s more is that if you study the ancient history of the children of Israel you will notice that they were enslaved within the land of Egypt for four hundred and thirty years. For more than four centuries the children of Israel not only lived as strangers within a land that wasn’t there own, but they also lived as slaves within that land—those who spent their days serving the will and desire of the pharaoh of Egypt. The first chapter of the Old Testament book of exodus brings us face to face with the tremendous suffering, the tremendous affliction, the tremendous oppression the children of Israel faced and experienced within the land of Egypt. For more than four hundred years they weren’t merely strangers, but they were also slaves to the will of one other than the living God and the Lord of hosts. We dare not miss the tremendous significance and importance of the history of the children of Israel in the land of Egypt, for it is a history that is completely filled and saturated with bondage, slavery and oppression.

The more I read the epistle which Paul wrote to the churches which were in Galatia, the more I am convinced that this epistle must be read in direct connection to and conjunction with the epistle which he wrote unto the saints which were at Rome. If you examine and study the epistle which Paul wrote unto the various churches you will find that some of them—although they are separate and written unto different churches—are eventually two sides of the same coin. It is obvious that the first and second epistles which Paul wrote unto the Corinthians are to be read together and in direct connection with each other for they were two letters written unto the same church and body of saints within the city of Corinth. This same reality and principle holds true to the epistles which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Thessaloniki, for the apostle Paul wrote a first and second epistle unto this particular congregation. When we come to epistles such as the epistle unto the saints which were at Rome, the epistle which was written unto the churches which were in Galatia, the epistle which was written unto the saints which were at Ephesus, as well as the epistle which was written unto the saints which were at Colossae we will notice that these four epistles should be read and studied in direct harmony and union with each other. What I mean by this statement is that when we read the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome we must read it in direct connection with the words which were found in his epistle to the churches which were in Galatia. Similarly, when we read the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Ephesus we must also read—either side by side, or one after the other—the epistle which he wrote unto the saints which were at Colossae. You will find a lot of the same language which is found in the New Testament epistle unto the saints at Ephesus is also found in the epistle of Paul unto those which were at Colossae. What’s more, is that when you read the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome you will notice that there are strong ties and pointed similarities to that which he wrote unto the churches which were in Galatia.

Whereas in the epistles which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Ephesus and Colossae speak about the believer’s inheritance in the person of Jesus Christ, the epistles which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome, as well as the churches which were in Galatia speak to a much different reality. If you take the time to thoroughly read and study the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome, you will quickly discover that he writes a considerable amount concerning the bondage and slavery of sin within the life of an individual. When writing to the saints which were at Rome the apostle Paul sought to convert very powerfully and succinctly the tremendous danger of allowing oneself to remaining in bondage unto sin. One does not have to delve too deep and too far into the epistle before discovering the tremendous reality that our lives apart from, our lives outside of, and our lives without Christ were indeed spent living in bondage and slavery to sin. What’s more, is that the apostle goes on to write that through our being in bondage to sin we are also coincidentally and intrinsically in bondage to death. For the apostle Paul bondage to sin and bondage to death were synonymous and were intrinsically linked and connected with each other. Consider what the apostle Paul writes in the first chapter of the epistle which was written unto the saints which were at Rome, beginning with the eighteenth verse: “For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who hold the truth in unrighteousness; because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of Him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse; because that, when they knew God, they glorified Him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened. Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools, and changed the glory of the uncorruptible God into an image made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and four-footed beasts, and creeeping things. Wherefore God also gave them up to uncleanness through the lusts of their own hearts, to dishonour their own bodies between themselves: who changed the truth of God into a lie, and worshipped and served the creature more than the Creator, who is blessed for ever. Amen” (Romans 1:18-25).

If you continue reading in this same first chapter within the epistle of Paul unto the saints which were at Rome you will find the same language and reality is further expressed by and expounded on by the apostle Paul. Beginning with the twenty-sixth verse of the first chapter you will find the following words written by the apostle Paul which build on what was written in verses eighteen through twenty-five: “For this cause God gave them up unto vile affections: for even their women did change the natural use into that which is against nature: and likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust one toward another; men with men working that which is unseemly, and receiving in themselves that recompense of their error which was meet. And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a reprobate mind, to do those things which are not convenient; being filled with all unrighteousness, fornication, wickedness, coveteousness, maliciousness; full of envy, murder, debate, deceit, malignity, whisperers, backbiters, haters of God, despiteful, proud, boasters, inventors of evil things, disobedient to parents, without understanding, Covenant breakers, without natural affection, implacable, unmerciful: who knowing the judgment of God, that they which commit such things are worthy of death, not only do the same, but have pleasure in them that do them” (Romans 1:26-32). Both that which is found in verses eighteen through twenty-five, as well as that which is found in verses twenty-six through thirty-two of this passage bring us face to face with the tremendous bondage to sin all men find themselves in prior to turning their lives to Christ. In fact, much of what we read within this particular set of verses describes a number of men and women within and throughout this country, as well as all over the world. What we read and what we find in the first chapter of the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome describes just what this bondage to sin truly does in fact look like. It is absolutely unmistakable when reading the words which the apostle Paul writes unto the saints which were at Rome that he was seeking to clearly set forth the reality of what bondage to sin truly does look like, as well as to define what that sin actually looks like in its proper context. Almost from the very beginning of the epistle the apostle Paul seeks to confront his audience with this bondage to sin, and what the manifestation of this bondage truly does look like.

As you continue reading this epistle you will come to the second chapter which seems to transition away from a description of the bondage of sin to one judging that bondage and that sin within the life of another. JUDGING THE BONDAGE OF ANOTHER! JUDGING ANOTHER’S BONDAGE TO SIN! Did you know and were you aware of the reality that it is possible that you and I can judge the bondage which another individual faces and experiences within their life? Did you know that it is possible for a brother or sister before and around us to be bound by sin, and yet instead of seeking to restore that brother or that sister in sin we seek to judge—not only judge their bondage, but also the sin they are in bondage to. Consider the contrast between the words we find within the second chapter of the epistle which Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome and the words which the apostle Paul wrote in the sixth chapter of the epistle unto the churches which were in Galatia. Beginning with the first verse of the second chapter of the epistle which was written unto the saints which were at Rome we find the following words: “Therefore thou art inexcusable, O man, whosoever thou art that judgest: for wherein thou judgest another, thou condemnest thyself; for thou that judgest doest the same things. But we are sure that the judgment of God is according to truth against them which commit such things. And thinkest thou this, O man, that judgest them which do such things, and doest the same, that thou shalt escape the judgment of God? Or despisest thou the riches of His goodness and forbearance and longsuffering; not knowing that the goodness of God leadeth thee to repentance? But after thy hardness and impenitent heart treasureest up unto thyself wrath against the day of wrath and revelation of the righteous judgment of God; who will render to every man according to his deeds: to them who by patient continuance in well doing seek for glory and honour and immorality, eternal life: but unto them that are contentious, and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, indignation and wrath, tribulation, and anguish, upon every soul of man that doeth evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Gentile; but glory, honour, and peace, to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Gentile: for there is no respect of persons with God. For as many as have sinned without law shall also perish without law:L and as many as have sinned without law shall also perish without law: and as many as have sinned in the law shall be judged by the law; (For not the hearers of the law are just before God, but the doers of the law shall be justified. For when Tentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves: which shew the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and their thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another;) in the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ according to my gospel” (Romans 2:1-16).

The apostle Paul uses som incredibly strong and incredibly powerful language within the second chapter of the epistle which was written unto the saints of Rome, for the apostle Paul emphatically declares that they are inexcusable who judge—particularly and especially when those who judge are guilty of themselves doing the very same things which they judge within the life of another. In fact, the apostle Paul declares that those who judge another actually condemn themselves based on the fact that they who are judging are in fact guilty of doing the very same thing which they judge in others. It brings us face to face with the words which Jesus spoke in His famous Sermon on the Mount, as well as what we read in the eighth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John. If you read Jesus’ words in His Sermon on the Mount you will find Him speaking of those who would seek to judge the speck that is found within the eye of another without first examining the log and/or plank that is found to be within their own eye. Did you know that it is easier to judge specks than it is to deal with planks? JUDGING SPECKS WHILE IGNORING PLANKS! I am firmly convinced that we it is far too easy for us to judge the speck that is found within the eye of another rather than confronting and dealing with the plank and log that is found to be within our own eye. There are men and women who find it far too easy to judge the speck that is found to be within the eye of another, while simultaneously ignoring the plank that is found within their own eye. Such a reality was manifested in the eighth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John, for within the New Testament gospel of John we find a woman who was caught in the act of adultery and brought into the presence of Jesus who was at the Temple. It’s worth noting concerning this particular encounter that not only was this woman brought into the presence of Jesus after having been caught in the act of adultery, but this woman was also brought into the Temple after having been caught in the act of adultery. When this woman was brought into the presence of Jesus those who sought to accuser her—both before Jesus, as well as before God in heaven and according to the law of Moses—Jesus didn’t immediately respond to their words, but proceeded to stoop down in the dirt and began writing with His finger. When pressed even further, Jesus rose from His place in the dirt and declared unto them, “He that is without sin let him cast the first stone.” Immediately after hearing the words which Jesus spoke, those who sought to stone this woman dropped their stones and left one by one starting with the oldest.

Within the epistle of the apostle Paul unto the saints which were at Rome we not only find a powerful description of this bondage to sin, but we also find directly connected to this bondage of sin the description of judging the bondage that is found to be within the life of another. In the first chapter of the epistle we encounter the reality of this bondage to sin, while in the second chapter we are confronted with the tremendous danger that lurks around and behind the possibility of our judging the bondage that is found within the life of another. What’s more, is that not only can we judge the bondage of another—judging the fact that another finds themselves in bondage in the first place—but we also judge the nature of the sin with which that particular individual is in bondage to. Thus, we not only judge the bondage itself, but also the nature of the bondage that is found to be present within the life of another. What’s more, is that as you continue reading the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome you will not only discover that he concluded that the wages of sin were death, but he also concluded that all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. Consider if you will the words which the apostle Paul wrote in the third chapter of this epistle written unto the saints which were at Rome: “But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets; even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference: for all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:21-23). With these words the apostle Paul not only concludes that all have sinned, but all have sinned and as a direct result of that sin have come short of the glory of God. Furthermore, if you journey to the sixth chapter of the same New Testament epistle you will find the apostle Paul not only declaring that all have sinned and come short of the glory of God, but also that the wages of sin is in fact death. Consider if you will the words which the apostle Paul writes toward the end of the sixth chapter: “For when ye were the servants of sin, ye were free from righteousness. What fruit had ye then in those things whereof ye are now ashamed? For the end of those things is death. But now being made free from sin, and become servants to God, ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life. For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 6:20-23).

Having concluded that all have sinned and come short of the glory of God, and having determined that the wages of sin is death, I feel it is absolutely necessary to examine the words which the apostle Paul wrote at the beginning of the sixth chapter. I am convinced that the words we read in the sixth chapter of the epistle written unto the saints of Rome perfectly and wonderfully set the stage for what we find and what we read in the New Testament epistle written unto the Galatians, for whereas the epistle written unto the Romans deals exclusively with bondage unto sin, and how that bondage unto sin ultimately leads to bondage unto death, the epistle written unto the churches which were in Galatia speaks to a different bondage. Before getting into the bondage found in the epistle written unto the churches which were in Galatia it is necessary to present you with the words the apostle Paul wrote in the sixth chapter of the epistle to the Roman congregation, beginning with the first verse of the chapter: “What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein? Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into His death? Therefore we are buried with Him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. For if we have been planted together in the likeness of His death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection: knowing this, that our old man is crucified with Him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. For he that is dead is freed from sin. Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with Him: knowing that Christ being raised from the dead dieth no more; death hath no more dominion over him. For in that he died, He died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God. Likewise reckons ye also ourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord. Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey it in the lusts thereof. Neither yield ye your members instruments of unrighteousness unto sin: but yield yourselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and your members as instruments of righteousness unto God. For sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace” (Romans 6:1-14).

It is absolutely necessary that we read the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were at Rome, for they help set the stage for that which we find and that which we read in the epistle which was written unto the churches which were at Galatia. Whereas in the epistle which was written unto the saints which were at Rome deal exclusively and specifically with bondage unto sin—bondage which ultimately and inevitably leads unto death—the epistle which was written unto the churches of Galatia deals with a completely different form of bondage. If I am being honest with you who are reading this, I feel the tremendous need to declare unto you that there is a bondage B.C., but as surely as there is a bondage that is found in our life before Christ, there is also a bondage A.D. Now, you might be wondering what type of bondage could be found within the life of an individual after Christ, however, when you read the words which are found in the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the churches which were in Galatia you will find that there is a bondage that can be manifested and experienced within the heart and life of an individual—even after they have accepted and believed on Christ. If you turn and direct your attention to the third chapter of the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the churches which were in Galatia you will find the following words which speak to this concept of what I would like to call BONDAGE A.D.: “O foolish Galatians, who hath betwithced you, that ye should not obey the truth, before whose eyes Jesus Christ hath been evidently set forth crucified among you? This only would I learn of you, Received ye the Spirit by the works of the law, or by the hearing of faith? Are ye so foolish? Having begun in the Spirit, are ye now made perfect by the flesh? Have ye suffered so many things in vain? If it be yet in vain. He therefore that ministereth to you the Spirit, and worketh miracles among you, doeth he it by the works of the law, or by the hearing of faith?” (Galatians 3:1-5).

We must be absolutely clear about one thing concerning our life after Christ, and that is that just because we have delivered and set free from the bondage of sin and death, that doesn’t mean that it isn’t possible to find ourselves in bondage once more. In fact, I am convinced that as certainly and as surely as we can be in bondage to sin, so also we can be in bondage to religion. What’s more, is that as surely and as certainly as being in bondage unto sin does in fact lead to death, so also can bondage to religion lead to death. There is a death we can face and experience in and through our being in bondage to sin, but there is also a death we can face and experience in and through our bondage to religion. When I read the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the churches which were in Galatia I can’t help but find the other side of the coin of bondage, which isn’t bondage unto sin, but bondage unto religion. This bondage unto religion can be characterized and summarized as bondage unto the law, and bondage unto the works of the law. TRADING ONE BONDAGE FOR ANOTHER! TRADING OUR BONDAGE B.C. FOR BONDAGE A.D.! I am firmly convinced that there are a number of men and women although they have found themselves set free and delivered from their bondage to sin, which is found in their life before Christ, these same individual have found, and even given themselves to bondage unto religion. In all reality, I am convinced that there are two different types of bondage that can be found within the life of any individual, for there is a bondage unto sin, as well as a bondage unto death. We dare not be so naïve to think that once we have been delivered from the bondage of sin which ultimately leads to death that that is somehow the end of the story of bondage within our lives. The entire epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the churches which were in Galatia reveals the tremendous truth that it is possible that we can trade our bondage unto sin for a different type of bondage—a bondage that indeed looks a bit more polished, a bit more refined, a bit more easy on the eyes.

When you come to the end of the fourth chapter of the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the churches which were in Galatia you will find him using the account of Abraham and two sons who were born unto him. If you read the Old Testament book of Genesis you will quickly discover that there was a first son who was born unto Abraham by Sarah’s handmaiden Hagar. This initial son which was born unto Abraham by Hagar bore the name of Ishmael, and although he was in fact born from the lions of Abraham, and although he was essentially the firstborn son of Abraham, he wasn’t the heir of promise or inheritance. This is in fact what the apostle seeks to express and reveal in the final portion of the fourth chapter of this epistle to the churches which were in Galatia, for he seeks to set forth a strong comparison and contrast between the birth of Ishmael by Hagar, and the birth of Isaac by Sarah. Beginning with the twenty-first verse of the sixth chapter we find the following words written by the apostle Paul concerning the birth of these two sons: “Tell me, ye that desire to be under the law, do ye not hear the law? For it is written, that Abraham had two sons, that one by a bondmaid, the other by a freewoman. But he who was of the bondwoman was born after the flesh; but he of the freewoman was by promise. Which things are an allegory: for these are the two covenants; the one from the mount Sinai, which gendereth to bondage, which is Agar. For this Agar is mount Sinai in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem which now is, and is in bondage with her children. But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all. For it is written, Rejoice, thou barren that bearest not; breath forth and cry, thou that travailest not: for the desolate hath many more children than she which hath an husband. Now we, brethren, as Isaac was, are the children of promise. But as then he that was born after the flesh persecuted him that was born after the Spirit, even so it is now. Nevertheless what saith the Scripture? Cast out the bondwoman and her son: for the son of the bondwoman shall not be heir with the son of the freewoman. So then, brethren, we are not children of the bondwoman, but of the free” (Galatians 4:21-31).

CAST OUT THE BONDWOMAN! CAST OUT THE BONDWOMAN WITH HER SON! I can’t help but be directly challenged when reading the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the churches which were in Galatia, for there is a strong prophetic warning and word of caution that is found within this particular set of verses. If you turn and direct your attention to the twenty-first verse of this fourth chapter you will find the apostle Paul speaking to and directly confronting those who desire to be under the law. When speaking to and confronting those which desire to be under the law, the apostle Paul appeals to the history of Abraham and the two sins which were born unto him. There is not a doubt in my mind that one of the greatest words of caution that can be found within this particular passage of Scripture is casting out the bondwoman and her son. The apostle Paul makes it very clear that Agar and her son are a type and shadow of that which is found in the wilderness of Arabia, and the mountain of Sinai in the wilderness. That which was conceived and born of the flesh gendereth to bondage, slavery and oppression, and this is precisely what the apostle Paul seeks to establish and reveal within this passage of Scripture. It’s worth noting that when the apostle Paul writes concerning the law of Moses, he describes it as that which only produces bondage within the life of an individual who seeks to bring themselves under it. What we find in the New Testament epistle of the apostle Paul unto the churches in Galatia is a powerful description that there are saints of God who have traded their bondage to sin before Christ for a new bondage in their life after Christ—a bondage that looks, sounds and feels entirely different than bondage to sin. I have previously written, and continue to believe that it is possible that our adversary the devil may very well release us from our bondage to sin which leads to death, but that doesn’t mean he is finished pursuing us and seeking to bring us into bondage again.

If you read the Old Testament book of Exodus you will find that while Pharaoh ultimately allowed the children of Israel to be released from their slavery and oppression within the land of Egypt—shortly thereafter, he sought to pursue them in the wilderness in an attempt to overtake them and bring them back into bondage. I am convinced that this is a powerful picture of what takes place and what has taken place within the lives of countless men and women among us within our churches. There are men and women who like the children of Israel have been delivered and set free from bondage, slavery and oppression, yet no sooner have they been delivered from such bondage than the adversary rises up after realizing what has just happened and seeking to bring them into bondage once more. When Pharaoh heard that the children of Israel were at the Red Sea with no apparent direction, he sought to come against them with horses and chariots in order to overtake them and bring them back into bondage. It is imperative that we recognize and understand this, for although the adversary might very well allow us to be delivered and set free from sin and death within our lives before Christ, that doesn’t mean he can’t and won’t seek to engage us with a new and different bondage—one that doesn’t look, sound, or feel like the bondage we experienced before Christ. We must recognize and understand that while there is a bondage that is found before Christ which is more blatant and vile, there is a bondage that is found after Christ which is much more polished, much more refined, and much more appealing. The churches which were in Galatia were delivered and set free from their bondage unto sun, but they experienced an entirely new bondage in their life after Christ—a bondage not unto sin which leads to death, but a bondage of religion which leads to death. What began with and among the Pharisees, scribes, elders, chief priests, and Sadducees during the days of Jesus would ultimately be transitioned to a full-blown gospel of religion which plagued the early churches found within the book of Acts. The epistle which was written unto the churches in Galatia wasn’t written to speak of this first bondage—this bondage unto sin which is found in our lives before Christ—but to speak to a second bondage which is found in our lives after Christ.

The epistle of Paul which was written unto the churches which were in Galatia was written to directly confront this bondage unto religion which was infiltrating the churches in that particular region. There were false brethren who were infiltrating these churches unaware and privly—not only to spy out the liberty they had in C heist, but also to once more bring them into bondage. I am firmly and powerfully convinced that one of the greatest tactics and strategies of the enemy and adversary within the lives of the saints of God is to bring them into and under a new form of bondage after Christ. There is not a doubt in my mind that if the adversary has to release you from your bondage unto sin and death, that doesn’t mean he won’t continue to seek to bring you into and keep you in bondage within your life. I am firmly convinced there are countless men and women among us within our churches who may not be bound to sin which leads to death as was evident before Christ, but they are nonetheless in bondage unto a new type of danger and threat—namely, bondage unto religion. It is this bondage of religion which the Pharisees, the scribes, and the religious system and community found themselves engaged in during the days of Jesus. It was this bondage of religion which Jesus absolutely despised and abhorred, which was why there was so much direct confrontation between Jesus and the religious system and establishment of His generation. It is absolutely necessary that we recognize that which is written in the epistle of Paul unto the churches in Galatia, for it is this epistle which directly confronts and combats this polished and refined bondage unto religion which might even be unnoticeable by those around us. It takes a tremendous amount of discernment to truly recognize and understand this bondage unto religion—not only within the lives of others, but also within our own lives. The reason I speak of this bondage to religion as being more polished and refined is that were it not for the presence of Jesus in Jerusalem and the surrounding cities, towns and villages, those of that generation wouldn’t have even been aware of the bondage of religion. Until Jesus came there was no need to suspect anything was awry with the religious system and establishment of that day for there was such a strong adherence to the law and all that was contained therein. It wasn’t until Jesus came and flipped the script and turned everything on its head that we encounter the fact that even though this bondage unto religion is more polished and refined, it is still bondage which leads to and produces death within our hearts and lives. It is necessary that we read the words which Paul wrote unto these churches in Galatia, for it is with these words we encounter the tremendous danger of this “Bondage A.D.,” which on the outside appears to be polished, refined and appealing, yet is still nothing more than a bondage which leads to death.

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