Interruption In the Spotlight: Lord of the Chains

Today’s selected passage continues in the New Testament epistle of the apostle Paul which was written unto the saints which were at Ephesus. More specifically, today’s reading is found in the first sixteen verses of the fourth chapter. When we come to this particular passage of scripture within the fourth chapter of the epistle written unto the Ephesian congregation we find the second reference of the apostle Paul concerning his being a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ. What’s more, is that when we come to this passage of scripture we find the second of four references the apostle Paul made to his being a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ. The more I read the writings and epistles of the apostle Paul in the New Testament the more I am completely gripped and captivated by his words concerning being a prisoner of Jesus Christ? Why you might ask? The reason is actually quite simple for when the apostle Paul spoke of himself as a prisoner he did not do so by referring to himself as a prisoner of men. Despite the fact that it was man who seized him as well as perhaps his companions he never viewed himself a a prisoner of man. Pause for a moment and consider this simple fact—the fact that despite Paul’s being seized by man, despite his being cast into prison by men, despite the fact that it was man who placed him in chains, shackles and fetters—that it was not man to whom he was a prisoner. Oh it might have been man who put him in prison but he was never a prisoner to men. It might have been man who cast him into prison but man could never truly make him a prisoner. Man might have seized him and taken away his freedom and liberty in the physical and natural realm, and yet the apostle Paul could never truly be a prisoner unto men. I can’t help but think of how many men seized the apostle Paul and cast him into prison, and yet regardless of how many times he was in prison he was never nor could he ever be a prisoner to any man. Consider the tremendous reality that exists around that reality—the reality that despite the fact that man might strip us of our freedom it is not man to whom we are a prisoner to.

The more I read the words of the apostle Paul concerning his being a prisoner of Jesus Christ the more I am absolutely captivated by the fact that when he spoke of himself as a prisoner he did not do so in connection with man. What’s more, is that Paul didn’t seek to sugar coat the reality in which he was in, for he readily acknowledges that he was in fact a prisoner and that that was his particular lot and portion at the time. The mere fact that the apostle Paul emphatically declares that he was a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ not only acknowledges his present situation and circumstance, but it also readily acknowledges the lordship of Jesus over his imprisonment. I wouldn’t state that it was the Lord who cast him into prison, but it was the Lord who was very much aware of his being seized, his freedom and liberty being taken away and removed, and his being cast into prison. We would be incredibly wise to recognize this incredible reality, for by referring to himself as a prisoner of Jesus Christ the apostle Paul was making two emphatic and powerful declarations. The first was that he was never and could never be a prisoner of any man no more than he could be a space to any man. For the apostle Paul he could never be a prisoner to any man—despite the fact that it was man who held the physical and natural key to his freedom. I am reminded of the words which Jesus declared unto Pilate when Pilate said that he had the power to deliver him to death or set him free. Jesus responded by declaring that he would have no power or authority over Him unless and except it was given him from His Father in heaven. The second declaration Paul made when speaking of himself as a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ was that Jesus was in fact Lord over his imprisonment and Lord over his chains. The simple fact the apostle Paul spoke of himself as a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ was an emphatic declaration—perhaps not audibly or verbally to those who cast him into prison, but to the Lord Jesus Christ Himself, as well as even the demonic forces that sought to silence him—that Jesus Christ was in fact Lord over his imprisonment. It might very well have been man who seized him in the square, or seized him in the street, or seized him in the marketplace and immediately put him in chains and ultimately cast him into prison, but it was not man who had authority over his imprisonment.

I have presented you who have read these writings with three passages in Scripture that emphatically and powerfully display the reality that the Lord and He alone who has authority and dominion over our chains, over our shackles, over our fetters, over our prison cells, over gates, over bars and the like. I feel the tremendous need once more to present you with the three specific accounts in the New Testament book of Acts which bring us face to face with the fact that even though man might cast us into prison—man is not the ultimate and final authority over our imprisonment. The first passage of Scripture I would like to direct your attention to is the fifth chapter of the New Testament book of the Acts of the apostles. Consider if you will that which Luke writes and records beginning with the seventeenth verse of the fifth chapter:

“Then the high priest rose up, and all they that were with him, (Which is the sect of the Sadducees,) and were filled with indignation, and laid their hands on the apostles, and put them in the common prison. But the angel of the Lord by night opened the prison doors, and brought them forth, and said, Go, and stand and speak in the temple to the people all the words of this life. And when they heard that, they entered into the temple early in the morning, and taught. But the high priest came, and they that were with him, and called the council together, and all the senate of the children of Israel, and sent to the prison to have them brought. But when the officers came, and found them not in the prison, they returned, and told, saying, The prison truly found we shut with all safety, and the keepers standing without before the doors: but when we had opened, we found no man within. Now when the high priest and the captain of the temple and the chief priests heard these things, they doubted of them whereunto this would grow. Then came one and told them, saying, Behold, the men whom ye put in prison are standing in the temple, and teaching the people. Then went the captain with the officers, and brought them without violence: for they feared the people, lest they should have been stoned” (Acts 5:17-26).

This particular passage in the fifth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts is the first of three specific passages found within this particular treatise of Luke that describes the tremendous reality that Jesus Christ is in fact Lord over our chains, Lord over our shackles, Lord over our fetters, Lord over our prisons, Lord over the bars and gates we might find ourselves behind. The second passage within this treatise of Luke that wonderfully demonstrates the fact that the Lord is in fact Lord over our chains and Lord over our prisons is found in the twelfth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts. This particular chapter begins with Herod putting James the apostle to death with the sword, and then when he saw that it pleased the people, he proceeded to imprison the apostle Peter. Beginning with the third verse of the twelfth chapter of the book of Acts we find the following account of Peter’s imprisonment:

“And because he [Herod] saw it pleased the Jews, he proceeded further to take Peter also. (Then were the days of unleavened bread.) And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to four quaternions of soldiers to keep him; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people. Peter therefore was kept in prison: but prayer was made without ceasing of the church unto God for him. And when Herod would have brought him forth, the same night Peter was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains: and the keepers before the door kept the prison. And, behold, the angel of the Lord came upon him, and a light shined in the prison: and he smote Peter on the side, and raised him up, saying, Arise up quickly. And his chains fell off from his hands. And the angel said unto him, Gird thyself, and bind on thy sandals. And so he did. And he saith unto him, Cast thy garment about thee, and follow me. And he went out, and followed him; and wrist not that it was true which was done by the angel; but thought he saw a vision. When they were past the first and the second ward, they came unto the iron gate that leadeth unto the city; which opened to them of his own accord: and they went out, and passed on through one street; and forthwith the angel departed from him. And when Peter was come to himself, he said, Now I know of a surety, that the Lord hath sent his angel, and hath delivered me out of the hand of Herod, and from all the expectation of the people of the Jews” (Acts 12:3-11).

This passage found in the twelfth chapter of the New Testament book of the Acts provides us with the second of three specific references within the book which powerfully demonstrate the fact Jesus Christ and He alone is truly Lord over our chains, Lord over our shackles, Lord over our prisons, and even Lord over gates. If you continue reading in the book of Acts you will find a third instance where the Lord demonstrated His authority, His power, His dominion, His might over our chains, over our shackles, over our stocks, over our prisons, and the like. If you turn and direct your attention to the sixteenth chapter of the New Testament book of the Acts you will find the account of Paul and Silas which were seized and cast into prison. Consider if you will the account of Paul and Silas when they themselves were cast into prison:

“And when her masters saw that the hope of their gains was gone, they caught Paul and Silas, and drew them into the marketplace unto the rulers, and brought them to the magistrates, saying, These men, being Jews, do exceedingly trouble our city, and teach customs, which are not lawful for us to receive, neither to observe, being Romans. And the multitude rose up together against them: and the magistrates rent off their clothes, and commanded to beat them. And when they had laid many stripes upon them, they cast them into prison, charging the jail or to keep them safely: who, having received such a charge, thrust them into the inner prison, and made their feet fast in the stocks. And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sandy praises unto God: and the prisoners heard them. And suddenly there was a great earthquake, so that the foundations of the prison were shaken: and immediately all the doors were opened, and every one’s bands were loosed. And the keeper of the prison awaking out of his sleep, and seeing the prison doors open, he drew out his sword, and would have killed himself, supposing that the prisoners had been fled. But Paul cried with a loud voice, saying, Do thyself no harm: for we are all here. Then he called for a light, and sprang in, and came trembling, and fell down before Paul and Silas, and brought them out, and said, Sirs, what must I do to be saved? And they said, Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved, and thy house. And they spake unto him the word of the Lord, and to all that were in his house. And he took them the same hour of the night, and washed their stripes; and was baptized, he and all his, straightway. And when he had brought them into his house, he set meat before them, and rejoiced, believing in God with all his house” (Acts 16:19-34).

I absolutely love these three passages of Scripture, for with and through these three passages of Scripture we mightily encounter the wonderful reality that it is Jesus Christ who alone is Lord over our chains, Lord over our shackles, Lord over our fetters, Lord over our stocks, Lord over our prison cells, Lord over our prison doors, and even Lord over iron gates and bars. In the fifth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts we find that the angel of the Lord came by night and opened the prison doors, and brought the apostles forth from the the prison and instructed them to go and stand and speak in the temple of the Lord. Please don’t miss the tremendous significance of what we find and what we read in this particular passage of Scripture, for within this passage of Scripture we find that Jesus was not only Lord over the prison in which the apostles were cast, but He was also Lord over the prison doors. This particular passage mentions nothing about chains, or stocks, or fetters, so I would dare say that the apostles which were cast into prison were simply cast into prison where they were secured behind prison doors. How absolutely wonderful and remarkable it is, however, that not only did the Lord demonstrate His authority and dominion over their imprisonment, but the Lord also demonstrated His authority over the prison doors behind which they had been bound and secured. When we come to the twelfth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts we again and once more find the Lord exercising dominion and authority over the imprisonment of the apostle Peter. Luke records how Peter was seized by Herod and delivered unto four quaternions of soldiers to keep him, and how the night before he was to be brought before the people he was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains. What Luke records next is absolutely incredible, for Luke records how the angel of the Lord caused the chains to fall off from Peter’s hands and brought him forth. Luke goes on to record how the angel of the Lord led Peter out of the prison and past the first and second ward and unto the iron gate which leads into the city. Luke further records how when the angel of the Lord and the apostle Peter came to the iron gate of the city it opened of its own accord and Peter passed through the gate as though it were nothing. How truly wonderful and amazing this particular passage was, for not only did the Lord exercise dominion and authority over the chains which bound the apostle Peter, but the Lord also exercised dominion and authority over the iron gate to the city by causing it to open of its own accord and thus allowing Peter to pass through. When you come to the sixteenth chapter of the same New Testament book you will find that not only did the Lord exercise dominion and authority over the chains and stocks of Paul and Silas, but He also exercised dominion and authority over the chains of all the other prisoners, as well as the prison doors. Luke records how at midnight while Paul and Silas were singing there was a great earthquake which shook the very foundation of the prison. What’s more, is that not only was the very prison shaken, but the prison doors of each prison cell were opened, and the chains of each and every prisoner were removed and cast off.

Please don’t miss the tremendous significance and importance of these three passages of Scripture, for these three passages of Scripture wonderfully and powerfully demonstrate the incredible reality that Jesus Christ is in fact Lord over our chains, Lord over our shackles, Lord over our stocks, Lord over our fetters, Lord over prison doors, Lord over prisons, and even Lord over iron gates of cities. I previously wrote how Paul speaking of himself as a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ emphatically proclaimed that he was no longer in control of his own comforts, nor was He Lord over his own conveniences. The fact that the apostle Paul spoke of himself—not once, not twice, but four times as a prisoner of Jesus Christ—suggests that Jesus was in fact Lord over his chains, Lord over His shackles, and Lord over his imprisonment. In all reality, I would dare say that the words of the apostle Paul wonderfully demonstrate the fact that Jesus is in fact Lord over the interruptions that enter into, and perhaps even invade our lives. I would dare say that the words of the apostle Paul powerful demonstrate the fact that Jesus is in fact Lord over the inconveniences that seem to enter into our lives—perhaps and oftentimes unannounced and without advanced warning. LORD OF THE CHAINS! LORD OF THE SHACKLES! LORD OF THE PRISON! LORD OF THE INCONVENIENCE! LORD OF THE INTERRUPTIONS! The more I consider the reality of the apostle Paul as a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ the more I can’t help but be confronted with the fact that more often than not when we complain about the interruptions and inconveniences that seemingly enter into our lives unwarranted, unwanted, and unexpectedly, what we are truly doing is declaring unto Jesus that He is not in fact Lord over our interruptions, nor is He Lord over the inconveniences of our lives. What’s more, is that I would dare say that if we spend our days and our time murmuring and complaining about the little interruptions and inconveniences that somehow invade our lives, we not only make a statement that we could not handle that which the apostles faced and dealt with, but also that we are not prisoners of the Lord Jesus Christ. The declaration that Paul was a prisoner of Jesus Christ emphatically declared and proclaimed that he was not in control of his own comforts, nor was he in control of his freedom, and even his life. We would be incredibly wise to recognize and understand this reality, and to accept it without arguing, murmuring or complaining, for such a reality has the power to dramatically alter and transform our lives.

What’s more, is that when you journey to the third chapter of the epistle which Paul wrote unto the Ephesian congregation you will find that he not only spoke of himself as a prisoner of Jesus Christ, but he also spoke of himself as a prisoner of Jesus Christ “for you Gentiles.” It would be very easy to quickly move past these words of the apostle Paul in this passage of Scripture, but I feel that to do so would be to sorely miss the beauty and power of what is contained within his words. The apostle Paul not only viewed himself as being a prisoner of Jesus Christ, but he also viewed his being a prisoner of Jesus Christ as not even having anything to do with him. What? Are you kidding me? Did the apostle Paul really just make such a statement? Did the apostle Paul really just state and declare that he was a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and not only that he was a prisoner of Jesus Christ, but also that his being a prisoner of Jesus Christ wasn’t even about, nor did it have anything to do with him? The answer to these questions is a resounding and wholehearted “Yes.” This very reality was seen and demonstrated in the sixteenth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts when as a direct result of the opening of the prison doors, and as a direct result of the chains falling from the prisoners, and as a result of the foundation of the prison being shaken, the jailor asked the apostle Paul what he must be do to be saved. What’s more, is that not only did the jailor hear and receive the word of the Lord, but so also did his entire house. Moreover, the jailor and his entire house were baptized as a direct result of the authority and dominion the God whom Paul and Silas served had over prisons, prison doors, and chains. This is absolutely necessary to recognize and understand, for it is a remarkable demonstration that our chains, our shackles, our imprisonment, our prison doors, and even our stocks are not even about us, nor do they have anything to do with us. When Paul declared that he was a prisoner of Jesus Christ for the Gentiles that which he was in all reality declaring was that his chains, his shackles, his bonds, his fetters, his stocks had absolutely nothing to do with him, and that his imprisonment was for the sake of those whom he was sent to minister unto.

As I am sitting here right now I am captivated and gripped by the fact that the apostle Paul declared that he was a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and that he was a prisoner of Jesus Christ for Gentiles. The reason I am so captivated by such a statement is because not only was the apostle Paul declaring that Jesus was Lord over his chains, Lord over His imprisonment, Lord over his shackles, and the like, but the apostle Paul was also emphatically declaring that it was Jesus Christ who exercised true dominion and authority over any prison he found himself in. What’s more, is that by making such a statement the apostle Paul was declaring unto the Ephesians that he had absolutely no control over his own comforts, no control over his conveniences, no control over his freedom, no control over his life whatsoever. If Paul was in prison—though it might have been man who put him in prison, it was Jesus Christ and He alone who had all authority, all dominion, and all power over his imprisonment. Furthermore, it was Jesus Christ who had completely and supreme control and authority over the inconveniences and interruptions of his life—regardless and despite what those interruptions and inconveniences were. I feel the great need to expound on this all the more, for if Paul being a prisoner of Jesus Christ was for the sake of the Gentiles, then I would dare say that our own interruptions and our own inconveniences are not for us, nor are they even about us. In fact, I would dare say that the interruptions and inconveniences which seem to enter into and invade our lives have absolutely nothing to do with us. What’s more, is that more often than not we need to get over ourselves and look beyond the interruptions and inconveniences that seem to invade our lives, and recognize and understand that such instances and occurrences within our lives have absolutely nothing for us, and are more often than not for the sake of others. Tell me dear brother, tell me dear sister—what would happen if you viewed the interruptions of your life, the inconveniences of your life, and that which seems to interfere with your day, your week, and even your life as having something to do with those to whom you have been called to minister to?

INTERRUPTION IN THE SPOTLIGHT! INCONVENIENCE IN THE SPOTLIGHT! What is so interesting about the words which the apostle Paul wrote concerning his being a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ is that the interruptions and inconveniences which seemed to come unannounced and unwarranted in his life were more often than not public rather than being private. If you read the New Testament book of the Acts of the apostles you will find that more often than not the interruptions and inconveniences of his life were before the watching eyes of the public. This is absolutely necessary to pay close attention to, for those before whom Paul was interrupted and inconvenienced were watching how he responded to such invasions of liberty, such invasions of freedom, such invasions of ministry, such invasions of routine, and the like. The reason I even mention this is because whether we would like to admit it or not, those around us are watching how we handle the various interruptions and inconveniences of our lives. What’s more, is that we need to recognize and understand that we are not at all lord over, nor are we at all in control over the comforts, the securities, the conveniences of our lives. So many times we think that we are in control of our routine, and we are in control of our days and our lives, and yet the truth of the matter is that that simply isn’t the case. In fact, I would dare say that more often than not the interruptions and inconveniences we experience within and throughout the course of our lives are reminders and demonstrations that we are not in control of our lives in the slightest bit. In fact, I would emphatically state that interruptions and inconveniences that enter into our lives are in fact messengers from the living and holy God that we are no longer in control of our lives, and that our lives are not our own. The simple fact that we grumble, the simple fact that we murmur, the simple fact that we complain about interruptions and inconveniences which enter our lives are nothing more than statements we make to the living God that we desire to be in control of our lives and in control of our days. If you as my brother, or if you as my sister, or even I myself—not only have a difficult time handling and dealing with interruptions and inconveniences, but also complain about and grow frustrated over them, we are doing nothing more than making a statement before the throne of God that we ourselves want to be in complete control of our lives.

Twice within the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote to the Ephesian congregation he spoke of himself as a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ, and on the second occurrence and occasion he spoke of himself as a prisoner of the Lord, he made quite a remarkable declaration. If you read the fourth chapter of the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the Ephesian congregation you will find that not only did he speak of himself as a prisoner of the Lord, but he also went on to use that reality as means to appeal to the Ephesians to walk worthy of the vocation wherewith they were and had been called. I find this to be rather peculiar and interesting to read, for it’s almost as if the two realities are somehow directly connected and linked to each other. What would you say if I told you that sometimes your walking worthy of the vocation or calling wherewith you have been called means you must forfeit and sacrifice your freedom and liberty? What would you say if I told you that sometimes your walking worthy of the vocation and calling wherewith you were called means that you must live your life completely interrupted and inconvenienced? LIVING LIFE INTERRUPTED! LIVING LIFE INCONVENIENCED! It would be very easy to read the words of the apostle Paul in this passage of Scripture and simply read that we are to walk worthy of the vocation wherewith we have been called, yet do so without understand its direct connection and link to being a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ. I am sitting here right now and I am completely convinced that more often than not our walking worthy of the vocation wherewith we have been called means we live constantly and consistently in the reality that we are no longer in control of our lives, and that we have absolutely no control over our comforts, our conveniences, and even our liberty and freedom. Walking worthy of the vocation wherewith we have been called may very well mean that we live our lives in a constant state of being interrupted and inconvenienced knowing that the Lord has completely and total authority and dominion over our lives. Walking worthy of the vocation wherewith we have been called requires us to do so with all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, and with forbearing one another in love, and even endeavoring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace, and this all points to the reality that walking worthy of the vocation wherewith we have been called strongly points to the reality that our lives are not our own, and that we have absolutely no control over our lives. More often than not we think and believe that we our in control of our lives we do anything and everything to control what happens in, and what takes place around our lives. The truth of the matter is that this simply is not the case, and that we play a very dangerous game when we seek to remain in control of our lives rather than allowing the Lord to be in control of our lives.

The apostle Paul in the third chapter of the epistle written unto the Ephesian congregation declared that he was a prisoner of Jesus Christ for the Gentiles, and then in this passage he once more makes the statement that he is a prisoner of the Lord. This time around, however, the apostle Paul appeals to his being a prisoner of the Lord as means to instruct and invite those to whom he is writing to walk worthy of the vocation wherewith they had been called. In fact, when you turn and direct your attention to the final chapter of this apostle you will find that the apostle Paul appeals to the Ephesian congregation to pray for him, that utterance might be given unto him, that he might open his mouth boldly, to make known the mystery of the gospel. The apostle Paul goes on to write that he was an ambassador in bonds, or an ambassador in chains for the sake of making known the mystery of the gospel. AMBASSADORS OF CHAINS! AMBASSADORS OF BONDS! AMBASSADORS OF SHACKLES! AMBASSADORS OF INTERRUPTIONS! AMBASSADORS OF INCONVENIENCES! The apostle Paul wrote that he was an ambassador in chains, thus suggesting that even though he was in chains, the work for which and the work to which he had been called would and must still continue. The apostle recognized and understood the tremendous importance that he was an ambassador in chains, and that he was a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ, and that sometimes walking worthy of the vocation wherewith we have been called means we must endure chains, endure shackles, endure bonds, and endure the loss of our freedom and liberty. Oh, in all reality this is what so scares me about the nation and country in which we live in, for I am convinced that many of us don’t know what it’s like to sacrifice our freedom. In fact, we pride ourselves on being a nation of freedom, and we call such rights and such entitlements as amendments—i.e. the right to bear arms, the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the freedom of religion, the separation of church and state, and the like. We as a nation make great boasts of our freedom—freedom which men and have fought for, shed their blood for, and even died for—and while I am in no way diminishing or minimizing the freedom such men and women fought for, we know absolutely nothing of living without and living apart from any sacrifice to our freedom or liberty.

What would happen if walking worthy of the vocation wherewith we have been called means that we must sacrifice and forfeit our comforts, sacrifice and forfeit our conveniences, sacrifice and forfeit our freedom, and the like? I am convinced that as certainly as we must be ambassadors in chains, we must also be prisoners of Jesus Christ, for by being a prisoner of Jesus Christ means that we are no longer in control of our lives, and that He is indeed and He is in fact Lord over every area of our lives. Oh that we would welcome the various interruptions and inconveniences that seem to invade our lives as reminders and declarations that our lives are not our own, and that we should not have any control or authority over our lives. Tell me dear brother, tell me dear sister—are you willing to be a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ and live your life interrupted and inconvenienced for the sake of those to whom you have been called? Are you willing to live your life interrupted and inconvenienced in order that the mystery of the gospel might flow forth from your life? Are you willing to live your life as an ambassador in chains in order that those around and before you might see and bear witness to the powerful testimony of Jesus Christ within your life here upon the earth? In the fourth chapter the apostle Paul speaks of himself as a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ, and then goes on to speak of the Lord Jesus Christ who had and demonstrated authority and dominion over death, over hell, and over the grave, for when before He ascended He first descended into the lower parts of the earth and led captivity captive. I can’t help but think about all Christ gave up and forfeited—albeit for a brief period of time—in order that He might redeem us and give unto us the spirit of adoption as sons and daughters of the Father in heaven. Who are we to think that we should somehow guard our lives as so sacred and dear unto ourselves that we aren’t willing to be interrupted, or inconvenienced for the sake of others in order that the gospel of Jesus Christ might be manifested and brought forth from our lives.? Oh that we would allow ourselves to be challenged by the words which the apostle Paul spoke unto the Ephesian congregation this day, and that we would live our lives as prisoners of Jesus Christ and as ambassadors in chains before the God whom we serve.

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