It Takes A Corporate Body to Lay Hold of Inheritance: Partakers of the Heavenly Calling

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament epistle which was written unto the Hebrews. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the first eight verses of the third chapter. When we come to this particular passage of scripture we find it building upon that which was written upon the language found and contained in the previous chapter. As we approach the third chapter of the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews we find the author beginning with the word “wherefore,” and using it to bring the audience into a brand new reality that perhaps was not previously understood or acknowledged. The author of this epistle begins using the word “wherefore,” and then directly connects it to two distinct realities. The first reality is that of our being part of the holy brethren, as well as our being partakes of the heavenly calling. It is absolutely incredible how the author of the epistle begins and opens up this chapter, for they express two specific realities which in all reality define who we are, as well as our purpose, our function and our role here upon the Warth. The initial reality of “holy brethren” addresses, acknowledges and points to our identity and who we are in the earth. This first reality not only describes our nature and character as the followers of Jesus Christ in the earth—holy—but also describes our relationship and fellowship in the earth. What’s so incredibly powerful about this particular reality is that the concept of brethren doesn’t just apply and connect to our relationship and fellowship with others which are present within the Warth, but it also directly connects it to the reality of our being directly connected to our brothers and sisters who have gone before us. Consider for a moment that the great cloud of witnesses which the author later speaks about in this epistle refers to a tremendous company of brethren—those who have gone before us and who are now a wonderful cloud of witnesses who are joined together for all eternity with the Lord Jesus Christ. What’s more, is that this particular concept of brethren doesn’t just apply to flesh and blood which are present within and upon the earth in this generation, and not only does it apply to the brethren and saints which have gone before, but it also directly applies to Christ.

Pause for a moment and consider the tremendous reality that within scripture—not only are we spoken of as having been given power to become sons of God, but it is also spoken of how we are brethren together with Jesus who is both Christ and Lord. We dare not, we cannot, we must not forget the absolutely wonderful reality that Christ is not ashamed to call us who believe in His name and age who sent Him holy brothers and sisters. How absolutely wonderful and powerful it is to consider that for us who believe we have been given power to become sons of God, and the Spirit of Christ bears witness with our spirit that we are the children of God. Even more than this, Christ takes great pride, Christ takes great pleasure, and takes great joy in calling and considering us as brethren. With that being said—and while it is easy to get caught up in the reality and concept of being brethren—we must not lose sight of or forget the reality that as brethren, we are called to holiness. In the eleventh chapter of this epistle the author declares that without faith it is impossible to please God, but it is also written that without holiness we shall not see God. In other words, it takes faith to please God, and it takes holiness to see God. Two in refugee my important realities within the Christian life are intrinsically linked to faith and holiness, and we would be incredibly wise to recognize and understand that. We know for a fact that we are called to be the brethren, but we are called to be brethren with a purpose. It is not enough that we are called to be brethren, but we are called to be brethren who are holy, brethren who are righteous, brethren who are righteous before and in the sight of the living God. While we can most certainly be called and known to be brethren before God in Christ, we are called to be brethren who are holy in the sight of God. It is necessary that we understand this reality, for when Christ died—one of the reasons He died was to make us holy and blameless before Him in the sight of the living God. It is true we have been called to be brethren with the saints, but we are also called to be between with Jesus Christ Himself. How absolutely wonderful and incredible it is to think and consider for a single moment that we can be the brethren-/brothers and sisters—with Jesus who is both Christ and Lord. In order to present this reality even greater within this writing, I feel it absolutely necessary to present you with the words which the author of this epistle uses to conclude the previous chapter:

“But now we see not yet all things put under Him. But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that He by the grace of God should taste death for every man. For it became Him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For both He that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause He is not ashamed to call them brethren, saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee. And again, I will put my trust in Him. And again, Behold, I and the children which God hath given me. Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, He also Himself likewise took part of the same; that through death He might destroy Him that had the power of death, that is, the devil; and deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. For verily He took not on Him the nature of angels; but He took on Him the seed of Abraham. Wherefore in all things it behoved Him to be made like unto His brethren, that He might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people. For in that He Himself hath suffered being tempted, He is able to succour them that are temped” (Hebrews 2:8-18).

This reality of our being “the brethren” is greatly seen and expressed in the words which the author of the epistle to the Hebrews wrote concerning Jesus Christ not being ashamed to call us brethren, but it is also expressed towards the end and conclusion of the eighth chapter of the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the church in Rome. Consider if you will the words which are found in this particular chapter beginning with the fourteenth verse:

“For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, they are the sons of God. For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption whereby we cry, Abba, Father. The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God: and if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with Him, that we may be also glorified together.l For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us. For the earnest expectation of the creature waiteth for the manifestation of the sons of God. For the creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but by reason of Him who hath subjected the same in hope, because the creature itself also shall be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groaners and travailest in pain together until now. And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adop[toon, to wit, the redemption of our body. For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for? But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it. Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know now what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groaning which cannot be uttered. And He that searcheth the hearts knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit, because He maketh intercession for the saints according to the will of God. And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to His purpose. For whom He did foreknow, He also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of His Son, that He might be the firstborn among many brethren. Moreover whom He did predistinate,, them He also called: and whom he called, them He also justified: and whom He justified, them He also glorified. What shall we then say to these things? If God be fore us, who can be against us? He that spared not His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how shall He not with Him also freely give us all things? Who shall lay any thing to the charge of God’s elect? It is God that justified. Who is He that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written, For thy sake we are killed all the day long; we are account as sheep for the slaughter” (Romans 8:14-36).

Within this passage of Scripture we find a tremendous amount of language concerning our relationship among the brethren, as well as our relationship to God as our Father, and Christ as the firstborn among many brethren. The apostle Paul begins this portion of the chapter by emphatically declaring that as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are in fact the sons of God. It is these individuals who have not been given the spirit of bondage again to fear, but have been given and have received the Spirit of adoption. It is this Spirit of adoption whereby we cry before and unto God in heaven, saying, Abba, Father. As if this weren’t enough, the apostle Paul goes on to write that the Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit that we are the children of God. If we are the children of God, we are also heirs—heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ. In other words, absolutely everything that was given unto and promised to Christ has been given directly unto us. As joint-heirs and co-heirs with Jesus Christ we are partakers of an inheritance that is not and cannot be found within the earth. There is an inheritance that has been promised unto and given unto Christ, and that inheritance is intrinsically connected to Jesus who is the Christ. The apostle Paul not only believed that we are the brethren of Christ, but also that we are joint-heirs with Christ. Essentially, that which was promised unto Christ is in fact made available unto us since we are not only the children of God, but we are also joint and co-heirs with Jesus Christ. As surely as we have been called and destined to reign with Christ in heavenly places, so also have we been called to receive all that was promised unto Christ. Dear brother, dear sister—know beyond a shadow of a doubt that there is an inheritance that is made available unto us in and through Jesus who is the Christ. With this being said, we must also come to the understanding that creation itself groans in eager and earnest anticipation for the manifestation and revelation of the sons of God within the earth. Creation itself is crying out and yearning within itself for the manifestation and revelation of the sons of God within and upon the earth, and each and every day we move closer and closer to that very reality. Found within this passage of Scripture is also the declaration that we have been called to be conformed to the image of the eternal Son, in order that He Himself might be the firstborn among many brethren. Oh that we would recognize and understand that Jesus Christ is essentially and in all reality the firstborn among many brethren, and that we as the saints of God have a unique relationship with Jesus—not only as co-heirs and joint-heirs together with Him, but also as brethren uniquely and intrinsically linked together with Him. This reality is further seen and expressed in the first chapter of the epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the Ephesian congregation beginning with the third verse:

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ: according as He hath chosen us in Him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before Him in love: having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to Himself, according to the good pleasure of His will, to the praise of the glory of His grace, wherein He hath made us accepted in the beloved. In whom we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of His grace; wherein He hath abounded toward us in all wisdom and prudence; having made known unto us the mystery of His will, according to His good pleasure which He hath purposed in Himself: that in the dispensation of the fulness of times He might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven, and which are on earth; even in Him: In whom also we have obtained an inheritance, being predestinated according to the purpose of Him who worketh all things after the counsel of His own will: that we should be to the praise of His glory, who first trusted in Christ. In whom ye also trusted, after that ye heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation: in whom also after that ye believed, ye were sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise, which is the earnest of our inheritance until the redemption of the purchased possession, unto the praise of His glory” (Ephesians 1:3-14).

If we transition back to the third chapter of the epistle which was written unto the Hebrews we find the author not only writing and speaking of us as holy brethren, but also speaking of us as “partakers of the heavenly calling.” I have alluded to the fact that the reality of “holy brethren” speaks directly to the reality of our identity, our fellowship, and our relationship within the earth—not only with our brethren here upon the earth, and not only with our brethren who make up and comprise the great cloud of witnesses, but also with Jesus Himself who is both Christ and Lord. In addition to this reality, the words “partakers of the heavenly calling” speak to our purpose, our role, and our function here within and upon the earth. With this being said, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we understand that what the author is speaking of is not “calling” in the sense of something specific we have been called to individually. In fact, if you read these words you seem to be confronted with the reality that this isn’t even an individualistic reality, but rather is a corporate reality that directly links and applies to the brethren who are found to be in Christ. When the author of this epistle writes and speaks of our being “partakers of the heavenly calling,” they aren’t merely speaking of it on an individual and limited basis, but rather on a corporate and collective setting. If we are the sons of God, and if we are the children of God, and if we are the brethren of Christ, then we have been made to be partakers of the heavenly calling. With that being said, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we understand that this reality cannot and should not be understood and interpreted as something which is specific to our lives as individual saints of God within and upon the earth. There is a calling which is specific to us as individuals, and there is something we have been called to fulfill and accomplish in the earth, yet when the author of this epistle writes and speaks of being partakers of the heavenly calling, they are speaking of something much greater and something far more powerful in the earth. There is a calling we have been called to lay hold of and partake of within our own individual lives, but there is another calling that we have been called to lay hold of and partaker of together with our brethren within the earth. I can’t help but be reminded of the words which the apostle Peter writes in the first chapter of the second epistle which he wrote unto the saints beginning with the third verse:

“According as His divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him that hath called us to glory and virtue: whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world t rough lust. And beside this, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge, and to knowledge temperance; and to temperance patience; and to patience godliness; and to godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness charity. For if these things be in you, and abound, they make you that ye shall neither be barren nor unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. But he that lacketh these things is blind, and cannot see afar off, and hath forgotten that He was purged from His old sins. Wherefore the rather, brethren, give diligence to make your calling and election sure: for if ye do these things, ye shall never fall: for so an entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 1:3-11).

Contained within this passage of Scripture is found a powerful statement and declaration concerning our calling, however, the calling that is referenced within this passage of Scripture is not at all referring to our calling as we have long thought of and believed it to be. When we hear the word “calling,” we immediately think of that specific calling we have as it pertains to ministry and service before and unto the Lord within the earth. More often than not when we think of, and when we hear the word “calling” our minds immediately transition to something specific and unique we have been called to as individuals. Can I be incredibly truthful, blunt and honest with you right now? I would dare say that we have become so selfish, so self-centered, and so self-seeking when it comes to the reality and concept of calling that we completely neglect and ignore the fact that each and every one of us share the same calling. Please note and understand that I fully recognize and realize that as individuals we might have been called to different roles and different functions with the body of Christ. I am keenly aware of the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints of Corinth concerning the diversity of the members of the body, and how each member of the body has their own unique place within the body of Christ. I am fully aware that what I have been called to do you have not been called to do, and perhaps even are not positioned and qualified to do, and what you have been called to do, I myself might not be positioned, qualified or even capable of doing. You and I have each been given our own unique place and purpose within the body of Christ, and we have all been given a unique role and function within the earth—one that is in fact unique unto us. Even with that being said, however, it is absolutely possible that we can be so caught up in what we have been called to do as individuals that we completely lose sight of and miss the incredible reality and importance of what we have been called to do collectively and corporately as the body of Christ. When the author of the epistle unto the Hebrews writes and speaks of being “partakers of the heavenly calling,” and when the apostle Peter writes of giving diligence to “make your calling and election sure,” they weren’t speaking of ministry as we have come to know it. Neither the apostle Peter, nor the author of the epistle to the Hebrews were writing and speaking of calling in an individualistic setting, but rather in a corporate setting—one that encompasses, and one that touches us all.

When the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews writes concerning our being partakers of the heavenly calling, and when the apostle Peter writes and encourages us to give all diligence to making our calling and election sure, it is absolutely necessary that we understand that they weren’t speaking of calling as we have come to know it within our hearts and lives. I would dare say that much time has been lost and even wasted focusing so much on our own individual calling that we have completely failed and neglected to pursue the calling we share together with the brethren. Did you know that the Church and the body of Christ is a collected group of members which have been called to pursue the same heavenly calling? Did you know that there is a calling which is present within the earth which we have all been invited to partake of and pursue? It is absolutely possible that we can become so caught up and consumed with the individual calling we have within the earth that we completely close ourselves off and shut ourselves up from that calling which we have been called to pursue and partake of with others. The more I read and the more I consider the words which the author of the epistle unto the Hebrews wrote concerning our being partakers of the heavenly calling, the more I can’t help but see it in direct relationship to and with fellowship and relationship. There is a calling which you and I have been called to pursue, and that calling is to be pursued and laid hold of when we come together as the corporate body of Christ. Please note that this can take place in the house of the Lord on Sunday morning, or it can take place in a prayer room during the week, or it can even take place in our homes any day or night during the week. We dare not miss or lose sight of the tremendous significance that we as the body of Christ have been uniquely called to pursue, and to help each other pursue a calling that is so far beyond ourselves that it can’t be laid hold of by any one individual. This heavenly calling is one that could not and cannot be laid hold of on an individual level and on an individual basis, and it requires the brethren to gather together and to come together and pursue it together. One of the greatest dangers and one of the greatest sources of divisiveness within the church today is men and women pursuing their own individual callings without paying attention to, or giving heed to the corporate and collective calling we have been called to possess together. Could you imagine what would happen if when the children of Israel entered into the land of Canaan each man went off on his own to engage enemies by themselves, or to lay hold of their inheritance alone without and apart from the brethren which made up the nation?

IT TAKES FELLOWSHIP TO LAY HOLD OF INHERITANCE! IT TAKES RELATIONSHIP TO LAY HOLD OF INHERITANCE! IT TAKES A CORPORATE REALITY TO LAY HOLD OF INHERITANCE AND TO TRULY TAKE POSSESSION! This reality of needing each other to lay hold and obtain that for which we have been called is perhaps perfectly seen in the children of Israel in the Old Testament when they were called to enter into the land of Canaan, and to take possession of the land. One thing I can’t help but notice is that there wasn’t any one individual who could have laid hold of and taken possession of the inheritance without and apart from another. There wasn’t a single individual within the company of the people of Israel who could have crossed the Jordan River by themselves, driven out all the nations within the land, taken possession of the land, and even divided the inheritance among the children of Israel. There wasn’t a single man or woman who could have crossed over the Jordan River into the land of Canaan and accomplished by themselves that which the entire company and group of individuals of the corporate body of Israel was called to do. When we speak of the inheritance that was promised to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—though it was promised to them, and though they were permitted to dwell within that inheritance during their tenure here on the earth—this inheritance could not be laid hold of alone and without the help and assistance of other men and women. Though the inheritance was promised on an individual level unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and even later on unto Jacob, it would not be laid hold of and taken possession of on an individual level and basis. It would take a great company—a great fellowship of.the children of Israel—who would rise up together, cross the Jordan River, enter into the land of Canaan, and drive out the nations which were present within the land. Consider if you will the words which the Lord spoke unto Joshua after Moses His servant had died and gone the way of his fathers:

“Now after the death of Moses the servant of the Lord it came to pass, that the. Lord spake unto Joshua the son of Nun, Moses’ ministers, saying, Moses my servant is dead; now therefore arise, go over this Jordan, thou, and all this people, unto the land which I do give them, even to the children of Israel. Every place that the sole of your foot shall tread upon, that have I given unto you, as I said unto Moses. From the wilderness and this Lebanon even unto the great river, the river Euphrates, all the land of the Hittites, and unto the great sea toward the going down of the sun, shall be your coast. There shall not any man be able to stand before thee all the days of thy life: as I was with Moses, so I will be with thee: I will not fail thee, nor forsake thee. Be strong and of a good courage: for unto this people shalt thou divide for an inheritance the land, which I sware unto their fathers to give them. Only be thou strong and very courageous, that thou mayest observe to do according to all the law, which Moses my servant commanded thee: turn not from it to the right hand or to the left, that thou mayest prosper whithersoever thou goest. This book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth; but thou shalt meditate therein day and night, that you mayest observe to do according to all that is written therein: for then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have good success. Have not I commanded thee? Be strong and of good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee whithersoever thou goest” (Joshua 1:1-9).

In the twelfth chapter of the Old Testament book of Joshua we find the children of Israel accomplishing together what no man could do separately or individually. When we speak of inheritance and possession it is absolutely critical and vital that we recognize and understand that it takes an entire company and an entire corporate body of men and women to truly lay hold of the inheritance. When we write and speak of being “partakers of the heavenly calling” we must understand it in direct relationship to that which we have been called to inherit and possess within the earth. We cannot be partakers of the heavenly calling individually and without joining ourselves together and with the corporate body of Christ. Just as the children of Israel could not lay hold of, nor take possession of the land of Canaan on an individual level and on an individual basis, so also can no individual saint of God lay hold of this heavenly calling alone and by themselves. Partaking of this heavenly calling was never, and is never meant to be something we pursue alone by ourselves, for ourselves and with ourselves alone. When I read the words which are recorded in the twelfth chapter of the Old Testament book of Joshua I don’t see an individual laying hold of the inheritance and taking possession of that which was promised, but rather a corporate host of men and women who worked together as one body to accomplish in the earth that for which they have been called. What we find in the eleventh chapter of the book of Joshua presents us with this reality—the reality of what the corporate and collective host and body of the children of Israel accomplished together as one unit and one body. Consider if you will the words which are found and recorded in this chapter beginning with the ninth verse:

“And Joshua did unto them as the Lord bade him: he hugged their horses, and burnt their chariots with fire. And Joshua at that time turned back, and took Hazzan, and smote the king thereof with the sword: for Hazor beforetime was the head of all those kingdoms. And they smote all the souls that were therein with the edge of the sword, utterly destroying them: there was not any left to breathe: and he burnt Hazore with fire. And all the cities of those kings, and all the kings of them, did Joshua take, and some them with the edge of the sword, and he utterly destroyed them, as Moses the servant of the Lord commanded. But as for the cities that stood still in their strength, israel burned none of them, save Hazor only; that did Joshua burn. And all the spoil of these cities, and the cattle, the children of Israel took for a prey unto themselves; but every man they smote with the edge of the sword, until they had destroyed them, neither left they any to breath. As the Lord commanded Moses His servant, so did Moses command Joshua, and so did Joshua; he left nothing undone of all that the Lord commanded Moses. So Joshua took all that land, the hills, and all the south country, and all the land of Goshen, and the valley, and the plain, and the mountain of Israel, and the valley of the same; even from the mount Halak, that goeth up to Seir, even unto Baal-gad in the valley of Lebanon under mount Hermon: and all their kings he took, and smote them, and slew them. Joshua made ware a long time with all those kings. There was not a city that made peace with the children of Israel, save the Hivites the inhabitants of Gibson: all other they took in battle. For it was of the Lord to harden their hearts, that they should come against Israel in battle, that He might destroy them utterly, and that they might have no favour, but that he might destroy them, as the Lord commanded Moses. And at that time came Joshua, and cut off the Anakims from the mountains, from Hebron, from Debbie, from Anab, and from all the mountains of Judah, and from all the mountains of Israel: Joshua destroyed them utterly with their cities. There was none of the Anakims left in the land of the children of Israel: only in Gaza, in Gath, and in Ashdod, there remained. So Joshua took the whole land, according to all that the Lord said unto Moses; and Joshua gave it for an inheritance unto Israel according to their divisions by their tribes. And the land rested from war” (Joshua 11:9-23).

What’s important to note and recognize within this passage is that Joshua is a type of Jesus who is the Christ, for just as Joshua was the captain of the host of the children of Israel, so also is Jesus the Christ the captain of our salvation. We must recognize and understand that Jesus is and has always been the captain of our inheritance, and the captain of the corporate body of Israel within the earth who have been called as one corporate and collective group of individuals to lay hold of the inheritance which is before them. There is a heavenly calling which we as the corporate and collective body of Christ have been called to rise up, pursue, lay hold of and pursue, and it is not one that can be accomplished alone and by ourselves. Consider the words which the apostle Peter wrote in the first chapter of the epistle which bears his name beginning with the third verse: “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which according to His abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ form the dead, to an inheritance incorruptible, and undefined, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you, who are kept by the power of God through faith unto salvation ready to be revealed in the last time” (1 Peter 1:3-5). In the first chapter of the epistle which was written unto the saints which were at Colossae we find the following words: “giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light: who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of His dear Son” (Colossians 1:12-13). It is absolutely critical and necessary that we recognize and understand that we have been called to be partakers of the heavenly calling which is in Christ Jesus, and yet we have been called to be partakers of this heavenly calling together with the help of our brothers and sisters. It is true that we must forget those things which are behind, and we must reach forth unto those things which are before, and that we press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus, yet this was never meant to be pursued and accomplished on an individual basis, but rather with a corporate body of believers. It takes fellowship and relationship, partnership and unity to lay hold and take possession of the land of Canaan which was filled with giants and nations stronger and mightier than the children of Israel, and it takes a corporate fellowship working in direct unity and partnership with each other to lay hold of and truly be partakers of the heavenly calling which is found in Christ Jesus. The question we must ask ourselves is are we really aware of how much we need each other, and are we ready, willing and able to position ourselves to allow others to come alongside us, and our coming alongside others in order that we might all be partakers of the heavenly calling which is found in Christ Jesus.

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