Reflecting the Glory & Carrying the Presence

Today’s selected reading continues in the second New Testament epistle written by the apostle Peter unto those who have received a like precious faith. More specifically, today’s passage is found in verses twelve through twenty-one of the first chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find the apostle Peter continuing the line of thought which he began in the previous verses. If you read the beginning and opening of the first chapter of the epistle which was written by the apostle you will find that he desired that those who had obtained and received like precious faith would not only add to their faith, but would also work out their own salvation with fear and trembling. The apostle Peter wrote unto those who shared a common faith to strive and to make every effort to make their calling and election sure, and that they would neither be barren nor unfruitful. One thing I absolutely love concerning the opening chapter of this second epistle written by the apostle Peter is that when writing it he emphasized unto his readers and audience that they shared a common faith—a faith which brought about their righteousness, and a faith by which they were justified. The apostle Peter sought to convey unto his audience that the same faith by which the just walk by was the same faith which they all shared and which they all had in common. That which the apostle Peter was seeming to do when writing this second epistle was bringing them face to face with the wonderful and powerful concept that this faith was of such a caliber and nature that it could unite them and bring them together as the saints of God and disciples of Christ. I have heard it said over and over again that we all bleed the same crimson blood, and that it is this commonality of blood which makes us all alike and makes no person better than another. With that being said—as much as we all bleed the same blood, we are also and have also been washed by the same precious blood which our Lord Jesus Christ shed for us when He died upon the cross two thousand years ago. We were all bought with the previous blood of Jesus Christ, It is that blood which unites and joins us together.

When I read the words which the apostle Peter wrote unto those who obtained, and those who shared like previous faith, I can’t help but be captivated by the tremendous spirit of unity the apostle was seeking to convey. In fact, if you read the writings of the apostle Paul you will find him too speaking of the like common faith we all share—a faith which we can all partake of. It is absolutely wonderful and incredibly keep to think that when it comes to this faith, God is no respecter of personas, and this faith is made available unto each and every one who calls on the name of the Lord, and who believes with their heart and confesses with their mouth that Jesus is Lord. One of the most incredible realities surrounding the words which the apostle Peter wrote within this epistle is that he sought to promote this overwhelming unity that existed within and the body of Christ and among the saints of God. I absolutely love the words we find within this epistle, for before the apostle Peter even begins writing the thoughts he sought to convey unto his audience, he first sought to bring them to the place where they recognized and understood the common faith which they all shares one with another. It was this common faith which he sought to instruct and invite them to build upon and add unto during their lives as children of God, and disciples and followers of Jesus Christ. If there is one thing I can’t help but be gripped and consumed by when reading the words which the apostle Peter wrote in this particular passage of Scripture, it’s that faith alone is not enough, and that faith is only the starting point. One thing we must recognize and understand is that faith is the starting point and is the foundation upon which we are to build a life of virtue and on which the heavenly nature begins to be cultivated and displayed within and upon our lives. James the half brother of Jesus wrote how faith alone wasn’t enough, and that we needed to show and demonstrate our faith by, through and according to our works. The apostle Peter believes that faith alone wasn’t enough and that faith was but the starting point, and that which we were to build a life of patience, a life of virtue, a life of experience, a life of temperance, a love of charity, and the like.

Within the first eleven verses of this first chapter we find the apostle Peter not only seeking to bring them to the place where they would add to and build upon their faith, but also to bring them to the place where they would make their calling and election sure. The apostle Peter sought to invite them into a reality where they would take the common faith they shared, and would add to and build upon that faith a life that was pleasing and acceptable unto the living God. For the apostle Peter, faith was the starting point upon which all other virtue was added to the saints of God. Essentially faith was the key which unlocked the door to the awesome and incredible life that lie before and in store for the disciples of God. It is absolutely necessary that we pay close attention to this reality, for until and unless we recognize and understand that faith is the foundation upon which a life which pleases God is built, we cannot and will not develop and cultivate a life which possesses a nature that pleases the living God. One of the greatest questions we must ask is whether or not we are allowing this common faith which we all share to unite us together one with another. We must ask ourselves whether or not we are sharing this common faith which is not only precious, but also which unlocks an entirely new realm of a divine nature which completely consumes, envelops and replaces our old, sinful nature. It is this common faith which positions us in such a place where we are able to partake of this divine nature, and to begin to cultivate this nature within and upon our lives. What’s more, is that the responsibility for the development of this nature does not fall to, nor does it belong to anyone else, but it falls on and belongs to us and us alone. There is no one else who is able to develop this divine nature within and upon your life, and we dare not look to, nor expect anyone else to develop it within us. This divine nature starts with faith, which means that it is not possible without and apart from faith. Regardless of how hard we may seek to try and cultivate and develop this nature without and apart from faith, it is utterly and completely impossible to do so. Oh, we might have a measure, or certain measures of this nature in and of ourselves without and apart from faith, but it is only faith which unlocks the divine nature.

I absolutely love the words which the apostle Peter wrote in this particular epistle, for not only did he seek to invite them to build upon and develop their faith by developing and partaking of the divine nature, but he also invited them to make their calling and election sure. It was Jesus Himself who declared that many are called, but few are chosen, and it is this calling and this election which we need to pay close attention to, and develop within our own hearts and lives. The apostle Paul wrote in the first chapters of the epistles written unto the Colossian and Ephesian congregations concerning this election, whereby we have obtained the adoption as sons and daughters of the living God. The apostle Paul wrote unto these congregations that we have been chosen and called by the living God to partake of the divine nature, and that we have obtained a wonderful inheritance as the sons and daughters of the living God. Within the first chapter of this second epistle written by the apostle Peter he would write unto those who have obtained like precious faith with the apostles of Jesus Christ how according to the divine power of the living God working within and through us, we have been given all things that pertain to life and godliness. This comes through the knowledge of Him who has called us unto glory and virtue. Pause for a moment and consider the awesome and incredible magnitude of the words which the apostle Peter wrote within this chapter, for not only did he emphatically write that we have been given—according to the divine power—all things which pertain unto life and godliness, but we have also been called to glory and virtue. Please don’t quickly move past those wonderful and powerful declarations which were written by the apostle Peter, for they bring us face to face with an absolutely incredible reality concerning our lives as saints of God—namely, that we have been given everything that pertains to life and godliness. We have been given absolutely everything we need to develop and cultivate a life of godliness. We have been given absolutely everything we need in order that we might develop a wonderful and powerful life of godliness that is put on display before a watching world. What I absolutely love about this passage of Scripture is that the apostle Peter is bringing us face to face with the fact that not only have we been called to a life of godliness, but we have also been given everything we need to cultivate and develop this life. It would be very easy to pursue this life of godliness without and apart from that which the Lord has made available unto us on a consistent and daily basis, and yet the apostle Peter seeks to convert the wonderful and awesome reality that the living God has given us everything which pertains to life and godliness, and that this ability comes through the knowledge of Him who has called us. What’s more, is that this one who called us has called us unto a life of glory and virtue—called us to a life where we have been called to move from glory to glory and from faith to faith.

I feel compelled when writing concerning that which the apostle Peter has written within this epistle to emphatically declare that we have indeed and have in fact been called to a life of glory and virtue. We as the saints of God have been called to a wonderful and incredible life of glory and virtue—a life in which the divine nature of God is on display within this generation and before those whom we interact with on a daily and consistent basis. When you read verses three and four of this first chapter—not only are you brought face to face with the fact that we have been given all things which pertain unto life and godliness, but we have also been called to glory and virtue before and by the living God. What’s more, is that we have been given exceeding and precious promises whereby we might be partakers of the divine nature, having escape the corruption which is in the world through lust. GODLINESS! GLORY! VIRTUE! THE DIVINE NATURE! Would it surprise you to learn that you have been called and chosen to put on display the divine nature of heaven in your generation within and upon the earth? If you read the four gospels in the New Testament concerning the life and ministry of Jesus Christ, you will find that Jesus Christ was the perfect and complete embodiment of the divine nature of the living God within and upon the earth. What’s more, is that if you journey back to the Old Testament book of Genesis, you will discover that it has always been the original design and intention of the living God that we would put on display the divine nature of the living God. If you read both the first and second chapters of this Old Testament book, you will find and discover that when we were created and formed by the living God, we were formed and created in order that we might put on display His nature, His image and His likeness within and upon the earth. Consider if you will that which is found in the first chapter of the Old Testament book of Genesis, beginning with the twenty-sixth verse, as well as that which is found and recorded in the second chapter of his same Old Testament book:

“And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth. God God created man in His own image, in the image of God created He him; male and female created he them. And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth. And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat. And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat: and it was so. And God saw every thing that He had made, and, behold, it was very good. And the evening and the morning were the sixth day” (Genesis 1:26-31).

“These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the Lord made the earth and the heavens, and every plant of the field before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field before it grew: for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground. But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground. And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul. And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed. And out of the ground made the Lord God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil” (Genesis 2:4-9).

Within the first two chapters of the Old Testament book of Genesis we encounter the awesome and tremendous reality that when the Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground, He fully intended on his being a display of His own image and likeness within and upon the earth. When man was created and formed by the living God, and when the Lord breathed the breath of life into his nostrils causing him to be a living soul, man was the ultimate expressions and display of the nature, the image and the likeness of the living God upon the earth. While everything that was created—both in the heavens and upon the earth—puts on display and shows for the divine power of the living God, and points to His divine power, the presence of man within and upon the earth points to the divine nature, the divine image, and the divine character of the living God. Until the formation and creation of man from the dust of the ground, that which was and that which had been created merely demonstrated the creative nature and the divine power of the living God. Up until the sixth day when the Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, the only thing on display concerning the living God was His divine power, and His creative power of bringing something forth from nothing. It wouldn’t be until man himself was formed from the dust of the ground that the Lord would place something different within and upon the earth. It wouldn’t be until man was formed from the dust of the ground and the Lord breathed into his nostrils the breath of life that the Lord had on display within the earth an expression of His divine nature, an expression of His divine character, and an expression of His divine image and likeness. One of the greatest acts and factors of creation was not that which was made within the heavens and the earth, but that which was formed from the dust of the ground and which had the breath of life breathed into it. It’s worth noting that it wasn’t until everything in the heavens and the earth was formed and created that the Lord would then take from that which He had created and bring forth something entirely new and different within and upon the earth. Up until that point in creation only the fish in the sea, the fowl in the air, the beasts on land were present within and upon the earth. Up until that point in time, the only life that was present upon the earth was the life that was found in the seas, the life that was found in the air, and the life which found in the land—not only the life of the beasts which moved upon the earth, but also the life that was found in the trees and everything which grew forth from the earth. It wouldn’t be until the sixth day when the Lord would do something completely and totally different from that which He had previously done, for the Lord took from the dust of the ground and formed and fashioned a vessel which would move upon the earth.

Oh, I can’t help but wonder what it was like in heaven when all heaven watched as the Lord took the dust of the ground and began forming something from the dust of the ground. What was it like in heaven when the Lord took the dust of the ground and began moving it in a such a way that it would begin to take on the shape and form of something completely different from anything else which was created? What’s more, is that up until that moment everything which had been created came forth from the spoken word of the living God, as He spoke and brought into existence everything that was present—both in the heavens, as well as in the earth. This part of creation would take on a different form from the rest of creation, for this part of creation would require the careful attention of the living God as He took from the dust of the ground and formed and fashioned something with His own hands. It was this part of creation when the Lord sought to bring into existence something completely different from everything else which was present upon and within the earth. The Lord was not satisfied with the beasts of the field, the fowl of the air, the fish in the sea, and that which moved upon the face of the earth, for the Lord desired something else to be be present within and upon the earth. In fact, I would dare say that all of creation—everything that was made within the first six days was preparation for that which would come forth within the earth on the sixth and final day of creation. It would be on this sixth and final day of creation that the living God would form something from the dust of the ground which would put on display so much more than simply His divine power and creative ability. When the Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground, what He sought to accomplish was placing something within and upon the earth that would put on display and would be the expression of His nature, His character and His image. When man was formed from the dust of the ground, man was created in the image and likeness of the living God, and at the end of creation the Lord God had present upon the earth an expression of Himself—an expression heart, mind, body, soul and spirits. Once Adam was formed from the dust of the earth, and once the breath of life was breathed into his nostrils, the Lord had on the earth a wonderful and powerful expression of Himself—one that would exercise His own dominion and authority upon the earth over everything that was created. As Adam was brought forth from the dust of the ground, he would be that which the Lord God would have as the ultimate expression of Himself within and upon the earth—of His divine nature, His divine image, His divine likeness, his divine character. How truly wonderful and remarkable it is to think about and consider that when man was created and formed from the dust of the ground, man was created to reflect the divine nature and image of the living God, for man was to be the ultimate expression of the living God within and upon the earth.

Of course we know and understand that through sin, transgression and rebellion against the commandment of the living God, man would compromise this image and likeness upon the earth. We know from Scripture that man would partake of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, and as a result, would lose the covering which he had from the time of his creation. Up until that moment man was naked and unashamed in the garden, and I am convinced that it was the divine glory of the living God which clothed man there in the garden. Once man sinned and transgressed the commandment of the living God, that which clothed him was effectively removed, and he sought to make a covering for himself using fig leaves front the earth. What’s more, is that not only did man make an attempt to cover himself using fig leaves from the earth, but he also attempted to hide from the presence of the living God. Thank God that He was not willing to allow man remain hidden among the trees in the garden, nor continue with his feeble attempt to cover himself with the figs leaves upon the earth. The Lord called out to the man, and although He would ultimately drive them from the garden, and cut them off from the tree of life, the Lord would make clothing from them from the skin of an animal which he slaughtered himself. The underlying issue which faced the earth at that point in time was that the expression and image of the living God had been compromised, and the Lord would work throughout the generations to come to maintain an expression of His divine image, His divine character, his divine likeness, His divine nature upon the earth. From Abel, to Seth, to Enoch, to Noah, to Job, to Abraham, to Isaac, to Jacob, to Moses, to Samuel, to David, to Solomon, to Hezekiah, to Josiah, and various other men and women, the Lord would seek to establish His nature, His character, His image, his likeness within and upon the earth. The Lord would not allow Himself to be without an expression of His nature, His character, his image and His likeness within and upon the earth, and this would eventually and ultimately lead up to the Word becoming flesh and walking among men for a period of thirty-three and a half years. Of this thirty three and a half years, only three and a half years were spent in public view, and it would be during those three and a half years where Jesus Christ would put on display the wonderful and awesome nature, character and image of the living God. I can’t help but be reminded of the words which the apostle John wrote in the first chapter of the gospel he wrote describing and detailing the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ. Consider if you will the words which are found in this first chapter, beginning with the first verse of the chapter:

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All thing were made by Him; and without Him was not any thing made that was made. In Him was life; and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not. There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through Him might believe. He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light. That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made by Him, and the world knew Him not. He came unto His own, and His own received Him not. But as many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on His name: which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. John bare witness of Him, and cried, saying, This was He of whom I spake, He that cometh after me is preferred before me: for He was before me. And of His fulness have all we received, and grace for grace. For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. NO man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, He hath declared Him” (John 1:1-18).

What is so incredibly interesting and intriguing about what we find in the first chapter of the New Testament gospel which was written by the apostle John, is that when we come to the first chapter of the second epistle which the apostle Peter wrote, we find the apostle Peter writing concerning the glory and honor which the eternal Son possessed within Himself. In fact, when you read the second half of the first chapter of this second epistle of the apostle Peter, you will find the apostle writing concerning a very specific event which occurred during the life and ministry of Jesus. What’s more, is that the apostle Peter wrote concerning this event—not as one who was merely told about it, and made aware of it by someone else, but as one who actually witnessed, experienced and partook of it. The event which the apostle Peter wrote about was the transfiguration of the Lord Jesus Christ atop the mount when Jesus took with Him Peter, James and John. The account of the transfiguration of Jesus Christ is first found in the seventeenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew beginning with the first verse of the chapter:

“And after six days Jesus taketh Peter, James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into an high mountain apart, and was transfigured before them: and His face did shine as the sun, and His raiment was white as light. And, behold, there appeared unto them Moses and Elias talking with Him. Then answered Peter, and said unto Jesus, Lord it is good for us to be here: if thou wilt, let us make here three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. While he yet spake, behold, a bright cloud overshadowed them: and behold a voice out of the cloud, which said, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him. And when the disciples heard it, they fell on their face, and were sore afraid. And Jesus came and touched them, and said, Arise, and be not afraid. And when they had lifted up their eyes, they saw no man, save Jesus’s only. And as they came down from the mountain, Jesus charged them, saying, Tell the vision to no man, until the Son of man be risen from the dead” (Matthew 17:1-9).

It’s interesting and worth noting that when we come to the first chapter of this second epistle written by the apostle Peter we find him writing concerning this event which took place within the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ. What began with the apostle Peter seeking to put into remembrance those things which he had previously written, would eventually and ultimately culminate in the apostle writing concerning this particular event and occurrence within the life and ministry of Jesus Christ. It’s one thing to read Matthew, Mark and Luke writing about this event having been made aware of it by the apostles Peter, James and John, but it’s something else altogether to read about it several years later by one who was actually present atop the mountain when Jesus was transfigured before their eyes. Beginning with the sixteenth verse of this chapter we find the apostle Peter writing unto his audience and readers that they had not followed cunningly devise fables, when they made known unto them the power and coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. The apostle Peter would go on to write how they were eyewitnesses of His majesty, and how they actually partook of the glory which Jesus had with the Father before He took on the form of human flesh. There atop the mountain Jesus was transfigured before these three apostles, and had on display the glory which He had with the Father in heaven before He took on flesh, and walked among us. In the first chapter of this second epistle written by the apostle Peter, we find the apostle recalling this particular event which took place and occurred atop the mountain where not only was Jesus transfigured before these three apostles, but He also appeared with Moses and Elijah, as He was found talking among them. Consider if you will that which is found and recorded in this passage beginning with the sixteenth verse:

“For we have not followed cunningly devised fables, when we made known unto you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but were eyewitnesses of His majesty. For He received from God the Father honour and glory, when there came squash a voice to Him from the excellent glory, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. And this voice which came from heaven we heard, when we were with Him in the holy mount” (2 Peter 1:16-18).

I have to admit that I absolutely love what I read in the first chapter of this second epistle written by the apostle Peter, for I am convinced that we cannot write about—much less speak about—being partakers of the divine nature without coming to a clear understanding concerning Jesus Christ as the ultimate expression of the divine nature of the the living God. I am convinced that we cannot, we must not, we should not attempt to have any conversation concerning and regarding our being partakers of the divine nature of the living God without understanding it in direct connection with our encountering the person and presence of Jesus Christ Himself. It is true that we have been given everything pertaining to life and godliness, and it is true that we have been called to glory and virtue, but to think that we can remotely experience that without and apart from experiencing the glory and presence of Jesus Christ within our lives is completely and utterly absurd. It is true the apostle Peter wrote how we are partakers of the divine nature of the living God, but if we attempt to understand that divine nature without and apart from the person of Jesus Christ within our lives, we do ourselves a great disservice. This divine nature which is to be formed in us is an expression of the divine nature and glory which was found in the person of Jesus Christ, and only to the degree and measure we experience and come in contact with the divine nature of Jesus Christ can we truly experience the divine nature within and upon our own lives. The apostle Paul writes concerning this reality within his second epistle which he wrote unto the Corinthian congregation. If you turn and direct your attention to the third chapter of this second epistle you will find the apostle Peter writing about being ministers of the New Testament, which was not written of the letter, but of the spirit, for the letter kills, but the spirit gives life. The apostle Paul then went on to write concerning an encounter Moses Himself had with the glory of the Lord atop the mountain in the wilderness, for when Moses was atop the mountain there in the wilderness, he spent forty days and forty nights in the glory and presence of the living God. In the third chapter of the second epistle written by the apostle unto the Corinthian congregation he writes concerning this event when he pens the following words: “But if the ministration of death, written and engraved in stones, was glorious, so that the children of Israel could not steadfastly behold the face of Moses for the glory of his countenance; which glory was to be done away: how shall not the ministration of the spirit be rather glorious? For it the ministration of condemnation be glory, much more doth the ministration of righteousness exceed in glory. For even that which was made glorious had no glory in this respect, by reason of the glory that excellent. For if that which is done away was glorious, much more that which remaineth is glorious. Seeing then that we have such hope, we use great plainness of speech: and not as Moses which put a vail over his face, that the children of Israel could not steadfastly look to the end of that which is abolished: but their minds were blinded: for until this day remaineth the same vail untaken away in the reading of the Old Testament; which vail is done away in Christ. But even unto this day, when Moses is read, the vail is put upon their heart. Nevertheless when it shall turn to the Lord, the vail shall be taken away. Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. But we all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord” (2 Corinthians 3:9-18).

When you come to the second half of the first chapter of the second epistle written by the apostle Peter you will find him not only seeking to put into remembrance those things which he had written, but we also find the apostle seeking to stir them up with the words which he wrote. As I bring this particular writing to a close I can’t help but want to bring you to the place where you are stirred up within the depths of your soul, and where you are stirred up within your heart, and mind and spirit. It is my prayer that when you read concerning the divine nature that is made available to you as a saint of God and disciple of Jesus Christ, you would recognize and understand that this divine nature can only be found and experienced to the degree and measure we associate ourselves with the person of Jesus Christ. Just as when Moses came down from atop the mountain and his face shone bright because of the glory of the Lord which radiated from his being, so also are we called to a life where we are a reflection of the glory of the person of Jesus the Christ. We have been given everything pertaining to life and godliness, and we have been called to partake of the divine nature, but we can only partake of the divine nature of the living God to the degree and measure we are willing to engage ourselves with the person of Jesus Christ within our lives. We dare not think for one moment that we can experience the divine nature of the living God without and apart from experiencing the person of Jesus Christ, for Jesus Christ is the ultimate expression and manifestation of the glory of the living God. In fact, I am convinced that had the disciples Peter, James and John spent a considerable amount of time with Jesus atop the mountain in the glory and presence of the Lord, they too would have come down from the mountain with their faces shining bright because of the reflection of the glory of the living God. If there is one thing I would leave you with from this writing, it’s that you would not only seek to partake of this divine nature, but also that you would enter into and abide in the presence of Jesus on a daily and consistent basis. We have been called to a life of glory and virtue, and the only way we can truly experience that glory and virtue is by devoting ourselves to encountering and experiencing the divine presence and glory of the risen Christ on a continual and daily basis. Oh that we would do everything and anything we need to in order that we might experience this divine nature of the living God in order that we might be wonderful and powerful expressions of the living God within and upon the earth in our generation in these last days.

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