What Type of Man Will You Be?

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus as recorded by Matthew. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the first seventeen verses of the fourth chapter. When you come to this particular passage of scripture you find the apostle Matthew transitioning away from the scene of Jesus’ baptism and to a different scene which unfolded within His life. As the third chapter of the gospel according to Matthew drew to a close, it does so with Matthew writing how Jesus came unto Hohn the Baptist to be baptized by him in order that all righteousness might be fulfilled. When Jesus comes unto John the Baptist in order that He might be baptized, John thx Baptist first resists Him, saying and declaring unto Him that he has need to be baptized of him. Upon relenting and agreeing to baptize Jesus John the Baptist is there to witness and behold that as Jesus emerges from the waters there at the Jordan river, not only were the heavens opened up, but the Holy Spirit defended on Jesus in the bodily form of a dove, and a voice was heard from heaven declaring that Jesus was His beloved Son in whom He was well pleased. This scene is actually interesting—particularly and especially when you consider the fact that it was revealed unto John the Baptist that upon Him whom the Holy Spirit would descend and rest upon—upon that individual would be the coming messiah whom all Israel waiter patiently and expectantly to witness and behold. There at the Jordan river John the Baptist watched as the waters were broken, and upon the waters being broken by Jesus Christ, so also were the heavens opened. Upon the heavens being opened, not only did the Holy Spirit descend upon Jesus, but so also did the voice of the Father break forth on that day.

I find it to be absolutely and incredibly interesting to read the third chapter of the gospel according to Matthew, for within this chapter we find Jesus coming unto the waters of the Jordan in order that He might be baptized of John. It would be there at the Jordan river where a similar experience would take place as that which took place later on during the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ. You will recall in the seventeenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew that Jesus took peter, James and John with Him up into a high mountain away from the other disciples, and away from the crowds and scene which was unfolding at the base of the mountain. It would be there at the mountain where Jesus would be transfigured before them, and would radiate with the glory which He had with the Father from the beginning. There atop the mountain Jesus would shine in radiance and brilliance before the disciples, as His appearance was changed before them. What’s more, is that He appeared to be speaking with Moses and Elijah atop the mountain as well. How absolutely wonderful that also atop the mountain the voice of the Father broke the heavens a second time, and declared unto the disciples that this was His beloved Son in whom He was well pleased. Moreover, it would be there atop the mountain where Jesus heard the voice of the Father a second time. This second time, however, was incredibly different from the first time, for on this second occasion the Father not only declared that this was His beloved Son, but the Father also instructed the disciples to hear and listen to Him. How absolutely wonderful and amazing it is that not only once, but twice, Jesus heard the voice of the Father break forth from heaven and declare unto Him that He was His beloved Son. On the one occasion Jesus heard the pleasure and delight of His Father, and on the other hand, the disciples heard the Father instruct them to hear and listen to Him.

When we come to the fourth chapter of the gospel which was written according to Matthew we find the apostle transitioning to a scene which unfolded immediately after the baptism of Jesus. Once Jesus emerged from the waters of the Jordan and the Spirit descended upon Him Scripture describes how Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness where He would be tempted of the devil. How incredibly intriguing it is that after fulfilling all righteousness, and after being baptized in the Jordan, and after hearing the voice of the Father speaking directly unto Him, and after experiencing the Holy Spirit descending upon Him, Jesus would then be led by the same Spirit into the wilderness where He would spend forty days and forty nights being tempted of the devil. It would be there in the wilderness where Jesus would engage Himself in fasting, and after fasting forty days and forty nights, we read how He was afterward an hungered. One of the most important realities surrounding the temptation of Jesus in the wilderness is that the temptation came when Jesus was at His weakest. When the tempter came unto Jesus there in the wilderness, he came unto Jesus when He was in a weakened state, and when He was perhaps at his most vulnerable moment. I do not believe it is any coincidence that Matthew recorded how Jesus had fasted forty days and forty nights, and when those forty days were completed—afterward, Jesus was an hungered. This small phrase concerning Jesus being hungry is a powerful statement—not only concerning the humanity of Jesus as compared to and set against His divinity, but also of the tremendous needs Jesus faced just as we do on a consistent and daily basis. I have to admit that I absolutely love how Matthew recorded Jesus growing and being hungry after fasting forty days, for it brings jus face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that Jesus was as much human, and was as much a man as He was the Son of God and divine. I think more often than not the humanity of Jesus gets lost in the fact that He was in fact the Son of God, and that as the Son of God He was the eternal and living Word of life which took on flesh and dwelt among us. More often than not, it is very easy to get lost in the fact that Jesus was just as much human as He was divine, and it would be incredibly wise for us to recognize and understand this reality.

The temptation which Jesus faced and experienced there in the wilderness can only make sense to our natural minds when we recognize and understand the humanity of Jesus, and how Jesus experienced human and physical needs just as we do on a consistent and daily basis. What’s more, is that not only did Jesus experience hunger as a result of fasting, but it also reveals unto us that by being in the form of human flesh, He needed some of the same things we did—i.e. food, water, sleep, etc. Of courses we read in the Scripture how not only did Jesus regularly and routinely wake up while it was still dark outside to pray to His Father who was in heaven, but we also read that Jesus was hungry after fasting forty days and forty nights. These realities which we find in the Scripture must be carefully examined and considered, for they bring us face to face with the awesome reality that Jesus was as much human as He was divine. In all reality, I am convinced that if we are going to truly understand the life and ministry of Jesus Christ here on the earth, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize that it only makes sense as a direct result of His being one hundred percent human in addition to being one hundred percent divine. The life, the ministry, the temptation, and even the death and crucifixion of Jesus Christ only makes sense in the context that He was Himself one hundred percent human. In fact, there are specific references within Scripture that point us to the fact that although Jesus was in fact eternal, and although Jesus was in fact divine, He was still human and came in the form of human flesh. I can’t help but be reminded of the words which John the apostle wrote in the first chapter of his gospel account concerning the life and ministry of Jesus Christ. I can’t help but also be reminded of the words which the author of the epistle which was written unto the Hebrews wrote concerning Jesus Christ and His humanity while here on the earth. What’s more, is that I can’t help but be reminded of the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the Philippians in the epistle which was written and sent unto them. Consider if you will the various references that are found in each of these places within Scripture in order that we might be confronted and brought face to face with the reality that Jesus Christ was one hundred percent human in addition to being one hundred percent divine. Each of these passages points to and brings us face to face with the awesome and incredible fact that Jesus’ life and ministry only makes sense in the context that He himself was human, and as such, experienced similar needs as we as men and women do. Consider if you will the words which are found in each of these passages of Scripture, and how they point us to the incredible reality and truth that Jesus Christ was as much human as He was divine:

“There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through Him might believe. He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light. That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made by Him, and the world knew Him not. He came unto His own, and His own received Him not. But as many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name: which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. John bare witness of him, and cried, saying, This was He of whom I spake, He that cometh after me is preferred before me: for He was before me. And of His fulness have all we received, and grace for grace. For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. NO man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the Boston of the Father, He hath declared Him” (John 1:6-18).

“If there be therefore any consolation in Christ, if any comfort of love, if any fellowship of the Spirit, if any bowels and mercies, fulfil ye my joy, that ye be likeminded, having the same love, being of one accord, of one mind. Let nothing be done through strife or vainglory; but in. lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves. Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others. Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus?: who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: but made Himself of no reputation, and took upon Him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: and being found in fashion as a man, He humbled Himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. Wherefore God also hath highly exalted Him, and given Him a name which is above every name: that at the name of Jesus ever knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. Wherefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling” (Philippians 2:1-12).

“For unto the angels hath He not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man, that thou art mindful of him? Or the son of man, that thou visitest him? Thou made him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing that is not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man. For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren, saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee. And again, I will put my trust in him. And again, Behold I and the children which God hath given me. Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, He also Himself likewise took part of the same; that through death He might destroy Him that had the power of death, that is the devil; and deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but h took on him the seed of Abraham. Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God to make reconciliation for the sins of the people. For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succour them that are tempted” (Hebrews 2:1-18).

Each of these passages brings us face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that although Jesus was the eternal Son of God, and although Jesus was the divine representation of the living and holy Father within and upon the earth, so also was Jesus one hundred percent human. It is necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand this, for until and unless we understand the humanity of Jesus the Christ, we cannot and will not be able to comprehend all that Jesus went through during the thirty plus years He was alive upon the earth. It is absolutely necessary that we recognize that Jesus Christ came as the eternal Son of the living God, and that Jesus who was the Word in the beginning with God, and was God, but also that Jesus took on the form of human flesh. It was the apostle John who wrote in his gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ that He was the eternal Word of life which took on flesh and dwelt among us. It was the author of the epistle which was written unto the Hebrews who wrote and declared that Jesus did not take on the seed of angels, nor did Jesus take on himself the form of angels, but rather, He took on Him the form of man and the seed of Abraham. When Jesus came to the earth, He came—not as the eternal and divine being with all His glory which He had with the Father before time began, but He came unto His own in the likeness and form of human flesh. When Jesus walked upon the earth, He came unto His own in the fulness and likeness of human flesh—human flesh which was subject to the same limitations and restrictions that we ourselves are subject to on a regular and consistent basis. In fact, it was written that although Jesus was tempted in all ways as we were, He was without sin at all. Please don’t miss the tremendous truth that is found and contained within the fact that Jesus—when He came to the earth—He not only came unto His own, but He came unto His own in the likeness and form of human flesh. Jesus didn’t come to the earth bearing the eternal glory that He had with the Father in eternity, and in fact, that glory was only seen on one occasion by Peter, James and John. It was only on the mountain of transfiguration where Jesus was transfigured before these three disciples, and where His appearance was changed, as He shone with the same radiance, the same brilliant, the same glory, the same splendor He had with the Father from eternity before the beginning of time.

While the fourth chapter of the gospel according to Matthew brings us face to face with the fact that Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness where He would be tempted of the devil, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand how Jesus’ temptation only makes sense, and is only made possible if He was just as much human as we ourselves our. If you think about it—the devil and tempter could and would not have been able to come against Jesus with temptation the way he did if Jesus was not fully and completely human. The devil could not have come unto Jesus and tempted him with certain temptations which he brought against him if Jesus Himself was not one hundred percent and fully human. The temptation of Jesus in the wilderness only makes sense when we recognize and understand that Jesus Christ was in fact human, for if Jesus had come one hundred percent divine and did not take on the form of human flesh, He would not have been able to understand that which we face, and that which we go through on a daily and consistent basis. What I so absolutely love about the temptation of Jesus Christ is that it points us to the fact that Jesus was in fact human just as each and every one of us are. Through the temptation of Jesus Christ we can clearly see how Jesus could be impacted and affected the same way we as men and women can on a consistent and daily basis. Through the temptation of Jesus the Christ we encounter the tremendous and wonderful reality that Jesus came to this earth engaging himself in the same struggles, the same limitations, the same restrictions, the same temptations we face on a constant and continual basis. We dare not miss the awesome and incredible importance of this reality, for to do so would be to miss out on the awesome magnitude of the temptation of Jesus there in the wilderness. It is through the temptation of Jesus there in the wilderness where we are not only confronted with His humanity, but we are also confronted with the fact that He faced and experienced similar needs as we have faced throughout our lives, and continue to face on a consistent and daily basis. Through the temptation which Jesus faced and experienced in the wilderness, we see firsthand the humanity which Jesus Christ shared with us, and the fact that He faced and experienced similar limitations and restrictions as we do each and every day. In fact, it is through Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness where we encounter firsthand the humanity of Jesus, and as a direct result of His being human, He experienced the same struggles, the same needs, and the same realities we face on a daily basis.

THROUGH TEMPTATION WE SEE HUMANITY! THROUGH TEMPTATION WE SEE WEAKNESS! THROUGH TEMPTATION WE SEE VULNERABILITY! THROUGH TEMPTATION WE SEE LIMITATIONS! THROUGH TEMPTATION WE SEE RESTRICTIONS! It’s worth noting and point out that more often through not it is through temptation where were are confronted and brought face to face with the tremendous reality of our humanity and our frailty as human beings. I can’t help but be reminded of the words which both John the apostle wrote in his first epistle unto the saints which were at Ephesus, as well as the words which James the brother of Jesus wrote in his epistle. When writing unto the saints which were at Ephesus the apostle John wrote the following words: “Love not the world, neither the things that are in the world. If any man love the world, the love of the Father is not in Him. For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world. And the world passeth away, and the lust thereof: but he that doeth the will of God abideth for ever” (1 John 2:15-17). When writing in his epistle which was sent unto the Jews which were scattered, James the brother of Jesus wrote the following words concerning temptation: “Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God: for God cannot be tempted with evil, neither tempted he any man: but every man is tempted, when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed. Then when lust hath conceived, it bringeth forth sin: and sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death” (James 1:13-16). It was the apostle John wrote wrote and spoke of the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, and it was James who wrote that every man is tempted when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed. That lust—once it has been conceived—brings forth sin, and sin, when it is finished, brings forth death. Please don’t miss tremendous significance and importance of what is found and contained within each of these passages, for they provide background and context for the temptation which Jesus experienced in the wilderness after He had fasted forty days and forty nights. Matthew records how it was the Spirit who led Jesus into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil—a reality which seems to point to and suggest that the sole purpose for Jesus entering into the wilderness was not only to be tested and tried, but to be tempted of the devil. It’s important to note that it was not the Spirit who tempted Jesus, nor was it the Spirit who led Jesus into temptation, but it was the Spirit who led Jesus into the wilderness where He would be tempted of the devil. It would be there in the wilderness where according to the express purpose and will of the Spirit Jesus Himself would be tempted of the devil.

I have to admit that I am incredibly challenged when I read the words which the apostle Matthew writes concerning Jesus Christ and His being tempted by the devil there in the wilderness. The more I read, and the more I consider the third and firth chapters of the New Testament gospel of Matthew, the more I can’t help but think that before Jesus ever entered into, and engaged Himself in public ministry, He first went through the waters of baptism, and second went into the wilderness where He was tempted of the devil. Oh, there are many men and women who would seek to enter into ministry without and apart from being tested and tried by the eternal and living God. One thing we must understand is that before Jesus ever spoke a single word, and before Jesus performed a single miracle or healing within and upon the earth, the Father already expressed His delight and pleasure in Him. Before Jesus uttered a single word, and before Jesus taught a single sermon or parable, the Father was already pleased with Him. I believe there is a wonderful and powerful truth that is contained here, for there are many of us who think that it is works which pleases the Father. There are many of us who think that good deeds done unto others pleases the Father and brings delight unto His heart. There are many who think that ministry brings pleasure and causes great delight within the heart of the Father. At the baptism of Jesus Christ we encounter firsthand that that which pleases the Father, and that which the Father delights in is obedience before Him, and obedience unto His will. There at the Jordan River Jesus came to be baptized of John in order that all righteousness might be fulfilled. Please don’t miss the incredible significance and importance of this fact, for before Jesus ever engaged Himself in public ministry within the regions of Judaea, Samaria, and the surrounding towns, villages and cities, He already brought pleasure and delight to the heart of the Father. Oh, there are so many men and women who are attempting to bring pleasure and delight before and unto the Father through good deeds, and through various works, and yet they aren’t aware of the fact that obedience to that which the Father has spoken, and obedience to His will is what brings delight and pleasure unto the Father. Before Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil, he not only heard the voice of His Father, but He also heard the voice of His Father affirming His being His beloved Son, and being His beloved Son in whom He was well pleased. It’s worth noting that when Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness, it was after He emerged from the waters of baptism, it was after the Holy Spirit descended and rested upon Him, and after He heard the voice of the Father affirming His identity and expressing His pleasure and delight in Him. When Jesus entered into the wilderness, He not only knew that He was the Son of God, but He also knew and understood that the Father had immense joy, immense delight, and immense pleasure in Him as the eternal Son of God.

Concerning the temptation of Jesus Christ in the wilderness I can’t help but be reminded of the words which the beloved physician Luke wrote concerning this particular event within the life and ministry of Jesus. What we must understand is that before Jesus could be released into public ministry, and before Jesus could be fully manifested within the earth within Judaea, within Samaria, and within the surrounding regions, He first needed to be tempted of the devil in the wilderness. It would be through this temptation where Jesus would come face to face with what kind of Saviour, and what kind of man He would be. You will read concerning the temptation of Jesus Christ that there were three specific ways the devil attempted to entice Jesus, and tempt Him within the earth. There in the wilderness the tempter sought to tempt Jesus based on His own physical and natural needs by tempting Him to take the stones which were before Him, and transform those stones into bread. The first temptation we read about was one that centered unto the most basic need of Jesus Christ, which was physical hunger, and physical thirst. Both Matthew and Luke recorded how Jesus fasted forty days and forty nights, and how after those days were completed, the tempter came unto Jesus tempting Him first to take the stones which were before Him and transform them into bread. The first temptation which the temper came against Jesus was with one that would focus on His physical needs, and whether or not He would use His divinity to fulfill and satisfy His own needs and meet His own desires. This temptation was centered upon the reality of whether or not Jesus would use His divinity to serve Himself rather than serving the needs and lives of those before and around Him. We must understand that through this first temptation, Jesus was brought face to face with whether or not He would allow Himself to be governed by His own physical needs, and whether He would serve Himself and use His divinity to meet His own needs, and His own desires. This first temptation would be directed at whether or not Jesus would use His power to serve Himself and serve His own needs rather than allowing the Lord Himself to provide. I am utterly and completely convinced that this first temptation not only centered upon Jesus’ willingness to allow the living God and Father to provide for Him, but also upon whether or not Jesus would serve Himself and His own needs, thus placing and putting Himself first before and above those who were before and around Him. We dare not, we cannot, we must not miss the tremendous importance of these words, for to do so would be to miss the awesome and incredible significance of this first temptation, which was designed to tempt Jesus concerning what type of man He would be.

If I being honest with you who are reading these words, I would dare say that each and every temptation we face within and throughout the course of our lives is designed to test and reveal what type of man and what type of woman we are truly going to be. It is for this very reason I believe temptation before ministry is so absolutely critical to those who would wish to serve the living God, for before we even think to serve the living God in full-time ministry, we must first be confronted with the tremendous reality of what type of man, what type of woman, and what type of minister we are going to be. You will read how after Jesus resisted the temptation to serve His own needs rather than allowing His Father to provide for Him, the tempter also came to Him tempting Him to cast Himself off the pinnacle of the Temple, for it was written that the Lord would gave His angels charge over Him, and would not allow His feet to dash a stone. The devil would come against the eternal Son of God a third time—this time tempting him around the subject and matter of worship. Whereas the first temptation which Jesus faced there in the wilderness was centered upon whether or not He would use His divinity and power to serve His own needs rather than the needs of others, and whether or not He would place His own needs before the needs of others. The third temptation we read of concerning the life and ministry of Jesus is a temptation to fall down and worship the devil, thus testing Jesus’ loyalty and worship of the living God. Had Jesus agreed to the devil’s temptation to fall down and worship him, Jesus would have allowed something and someone else to emerge into the place where only the Father alone belongs and needs to be. What’s more, is that directly connected to this temptation—both Matthew and Luke record how prior to tempting Jesus to fall down and worship him, the devil showed Jesus all the kingdoms of the world, and all the glory contained within them. The devil offered Jesus all the kingdoms of the world, and offered Jesus all the glory of them without the need to go to the cross, without the need to suffer, without the need to experience pain, without the need to walk in obedience to the word and will of the Father. This third and final temptation was about so much more than worship, and worshipping the devil there in the wilderness, for this third and final temptation was a temptation centered upon whether or not Jesus would seek to bypass the cross, and whether or not He would seek to bypass the suffering and the shame that was directly connected to it. That which the devil offered unto Jesus the Christ was reward without and apart from obedience and faithfulness to the word and will of the Father, for all He had to do was fall down and worship him there in the wilderness.

It’s absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand this fact and reality, for by doing so, we allow ourselves to be confronted with what type of man, what type of woman, and what type of minister we are going to be in this hour. Through the temptations which Jesus faced, experienced and endured there in the wilderness, we are brought face to face with the tremendous question and reality of what type of man, what type of Savior, what type of Messiah, what type of Redeemer He was going to be. What I love about this whole ordeal is the direct connection and the direct correlation of the Holy Spirit to the temptation of Jesus, for Luke not only records how Jesus emerged from the Jordan full of the Holy Spirit, but Luke also records how Jesus returned from the wilderness full of the Holy Spirit. What’s more, is that Luke records how it was according to and by the Spirit that Jesus was led into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil. It is worth paying attention to the person and presence of the Holy Spirit in this passage of Scripture—particularly and especially when you consider the fact that Jesus Christ was one hundred percent human in addition to being one hundred percent divine. By being fully human—not only was Jesus subject to the same limitations, the same restrictions, the same needs, and the same weaknesses we are, but Jesus also needed to rely on the person, the presence and the power of the Holy Spirit just as much as we do. While it is true that Jesus was tempted by the devil in the wilderness, it is also true that He faced and endured the temptation with the person and presence of the Holy Spirit within and upon His life. I am convinced that Jesus faced this temptation according to the power and person of the Holy Spirit which was not only upon Him, but also within Him. When we speak of temptation, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand that we position ourselves to overcome temptation—not according to our own strength, and not according to our own will and power, but according to the person and power and presence of the Holy Spirit. The question we must ask ourselves is whether or not we will allow ourselves to be governed by the person and presence of the Holy Spirit, or whether or not we are going to choose to rely on our own strength, our own power, our own will, and our own intentions. What’s more, is that we must ask ourselves what type of man and what type of woman we are going to be, and whether or not we are going to allow ourselves to be governed by our own needs and serve ourselves, or are going to allow the Father to provide for us, and are going to serve the needs of those before and around us on a continual and daily basis. I leave you with the question one more time concerning and regarding what type of man and what type of woman you are going to be—and not only what type of man or woman you are going to be on an individual basis, but also what type of man or woman you are going to be in ministry. How we answer these questions—something that can only come through being tested, tempted and tried—can and will definite who and what we will be as a man or woman who attempts to serve the living God in ministry within the earth.

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