The Attitudes, The Righteousness of the Kingdom: Making Room for the Red Letters

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ which was written by the apostle Matthew. More specifically, today’s passage is found in verses thirty-one through forty-eight of the fifth chapter. When you come to this particular passage of scripture you will find the first or three chapters within the gospel of Matthew drawing to a close. What’s more, is that within this chapter we find the first of three chapters that were dedicated and devoted solely to the teaching of Jesus Christ. What is quite interesting and unique about this particular section of chapters is that they are one of at least three other distinct sections of scripture where multiple chapters were given and devoted to the teaching and words of Jesus. If you continue to work your way through the New Testament gospel of Matthew you will find that in chapters twenty-three, twenty-four and chapter twenty-five of the book we have three chapters which were entirely devoted and committed to the words and teaching of the Lord Jesus Christ. As you read and study this particular set of chapters devoted to the words and teaching of Jesus, however, composed a little differently. Within these three chapters we find in the first of the three chapters Jesus’ words which stand out as an indictment of the Pharisees and religious system of His day. The entire twenty-third chapter of the gospel of Matthew is devoted and dedicated to a powerful indictment against the Pharisees and their legalism, religion and hypocrisy. As you transition to the next two chapters you will find that Jesus shifts His speech to now speaking and teaching concerning the last times and the end of days. Based on His disciples coming to Him inquiring about the end of days, Jesus spends a considerable amount of time teaching them concerning, and preparing them for the ability to understand the end of times, as well as to be prepared for when they come. Within these two chapters—twenty-four and twenty-five—we find the Lord Jesus Christ speaking and teaching concerning the last days and not only preparing His disciples, but also preparing us in this generation for the last days.

If you continue reading the four gospels within the New Testament concerning the life and ministry of Jesus Christ, you will come to the fourth and final gospel which was written by the apostle John. What is so interesting and unique about this particular gospel is that there is a point directly in the middle of it where the apostle devotes a considerable amount of time to the words and teaching of Jesus Christ. What began with Jesus washing the disciples’ feet would eventually culminate and lead to a wonderful and powerful teaching of Jesus concerning preparation for His departure. What is so interesting and unique about this particular section of scripture is that it is entirely centered around Jesus walking His disciples through His departure, and preparing them for their lives after He returned to His Father. Chapters fourteen, fifteen, and sixteen of this particular gospel account of Jesus life were devoted exclusively and entirely to the words and teaching of the Lord Jesus Christ. It is within this passage and portion of scripture where we also find a great deal of teaching concerning the Holy Spirit, and how the Holy Spirit will play an exclusive and primary role in the hearts and lives of the disciples upon Jesus departure. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we do not lose sight of this reality, for to do so would be to miss the tremendous significance and importance of the words which Jesus spoke. It’s worth noting that in chapters twenty-four and twenty-five of the gospel of Matthew we find Jesus preparing His disciples for the last days and end of time, and in chapters fourteen, fifteen and sixteen of the gospel of John He prepares them for His departure and return to His Father. In all reality, I am convinced that these two sections of scripture are entirely linked and intrinsically connected, for while we speak about preparing for Jesus departure, we must also prepare for the end of days and the last of times. We cannot talk about the end of time without also talking about the absence of Jesus, as well as the person and presence of the Holy Spirit.

What I so love about the series of three chapters towards the end of the gospel of Matthew, as well as the set of three chapters that are found in the gospel of John, is that there is an apparent link between preparing for the absence and departure of Jesus, and how intrinsically linked and connected this is with the last days and the end times. In fact, I am convinced that we cannot speak to the absence and departure or Jesus without also talking and speaking about the end times and the events that will take place during that time. What I so love about this apparent link, is not only the person and presence of the Holy Spirit—not only in the absence of Jesus, but also in the last days—but also the wonderful and powerful prayer of the Lord Jesus Christ. In addition to what we find in chapters fourteen, fifteen and sixteen of the gospel of John we find in the seventeenth chapter Jesus praying and interceding for His disciples . This is actually quite remarkable and wonderful, for not only do we have the person and presence of the Holy Spirit, but we also have the confidence and assurance knowing that Jesus Christ has already prayed for us. The words we find in the seventeenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John are absolutely remarkable and astounding, for within that chapter we not only find Jesus praying for the twelve disciples who would later become apostles after His departure, but we also find Jesus praying for all those who would come after the disciples and apostles. Consider the fact that nearly two millennia have passed since Jesus prayed that prayer and issued those words in the hearing of His Father, and how those words were prayed for each and ever disciple who walks with and follows the Lord Jesus Christ. Tell me dear brother and sister—do you know that not only did Jesus pray and intercede for you, but the apostle Paul also wrote that the Holy Spirit makes intercession for us, and does so especially when we don’t know what we ought to pray. In light of the fact that we are living in the last days, and in light of the fact that we are waiting for the arrival and return of the Messiah, we have as our confidence the fact that Jesus has already prayed for and interceded for us, as well as the intercession of the Holy Spirit in these days in which we are living.

The question that I must first ask you who are reading this—although I am first asking it of myself—is how much room do we truly make in our lives for the words of Jesus Christ. If we are truly being honest with ourselves, as well as with the Lord, how much room are we truly making for the words of Jesus Christ within the every day practice of our lives? How much time, how much space, how much room are we making in the regular routine of our lives for the words of Jesus? Do we even allow any room for the words in red found within the four gospels of the New Testament within our regular practices throughout each and every day. When we come to the fifth chapter of the New Testament gospel we come to the first major portion of teaching which Jesus made while He walked among us and dwelt in the midst of us. I am utterly and completely convinced that before we can even entertain the words which are found within this chapter—and even the words which are found in the next two chapters—we must commit ourselves to finding room and making space within our hearts and lives for the red letters. FINDING SPACE FOR THE RED LETTERS! MAKING ROOM FOR THE RED LETTERS! FINDING ROOM AND MAKING SPACE FOR THE RED LETTERS! Tell me dear brother, tell me dear sister—are you presently making room for the red letters within your heart and life? Are you waking up each and every morning making it your sole ambition, your passion and your desire to make room for the red letters within your heart and life? Are you even concerned with the impact the red letters can even have within your life, and upon your daily life? I am utterly and completely convinced that we would be absolutely stunned and amazed at how drastically our lives would be changed and transformed if we took and made room and time for the words in red found within the New Testament gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. In fact, I would dare say that to the degree and measure we find and make room for the words found in red in the four gospels of the New Testament, we cannot and must not expect true and lasting change and transformation within our hearts and lives. Only to the degree and measure we allow the red letters, and the words which are found therein to directly impact our hearts and lives can we truly experience change and transformation. What’s more, is that even when Jesus was speaking about the Holy Spirit in the upper room with His disciples, He spoke concerning the Holy Spirit, and how the Holy Spirit would not speak of His own accord, and own initiative, but would remind us of the words which the Lord Jesus Christ spoke.

One of the main and primary roles and functions of the Holy Spirit is to teach and remind us of the words which Jesus spoke while He walked upon the earth among us. If we are to truly understand the ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ while He walked upon the earth, as well as the ministry of the Holy Spirit, we must recognize and understand that the Holy Spirit works to teach and remind us concerning the words which the Lord Jesus Christ spoke while He was upon the earth. I can’t help but be reminded of specific instances and occurrences found within chapters fourteen, fifteen and sixteen of the New Testament gospel of John, and how within these chapters we find specific mentions of the Holy Spirit, and the ministry of the Holy Spirit within and upon the earth. Consider if you will the words which are found in the seventeenth verse of the fourteenth chapter of John’s gospel: “Even the Spirit of truth; whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth Him not, neither knoweth Him: but ye know Him; for he dwelleth with you, and shall be in you” (John 14:17). If you continue reading in the New Testament gospel of John you will come to the following words found within the twenty-sixth verse of the fifteenth chapter: “But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, [even] the Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, He shall testify of me” (John 15:26). IN the thirteenth verse of the sixteenth chapter of this gospel we find the following words which were written concerning the Holy Spirit who would come upon the earth in the wake of the absence of Jesus: “Howbeit when He, the Spirit of truth, is come, He will guide you into all truth: for He shall not speak of Himself; but whatsoever He shall hear, [that] shall He speak: and He will shew you things to come” (John 16:13). Concerning the wonderful and powerful ministry of the Holy Spirit, it is absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand that one of His main and primary roles and functions is to remind us of the words which the Lord Jesus spoke while He was upon this earth. If you study the Scripture, you will find that the person of the Holy Spirit can and will continually bring to our remembrance, and bring to our minds the words which Jesus spoke, thus emphasizing the tremendous importance of those words. I am convinced that this reality is evident in the epistles which were written by the apostles John and Peter, for their epistles were heavily governed by the words which Jesus spoke. There is not a doubt in my mind that when these two apostles sat down to pen their individual epistles, the Holy Spirit brought back to their remembrance the words and teaching of Jesus Christ, and it was that memory of His words which allowed them to provide the teaching and instruction that we find within their epistles.

If you transition to the New Testament book of the Acts of the apostles, you will find that the ministry of the apostles during the days immediately following Jesus’ departure were entirely dedicated and devoted to furthering the ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ. If you study the book of Acts, you will find that the apostles’ lives were governed and regulated by the words and teaching of the Lord Jesus Christ, and that the Holy Spirit was continually reminding them and bringing to their remembrance the words which the Lord Jesus spoke unto them. Time and time again the apostles’ teaching was heavily governed and influenced by the words which Jesus spoke and taught, and I would dare say that they preached nothing less than the gospel of the kingdom, and the gospel concerning the life and ministry of Jesus Christ. Consider if you will that immediately after the resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ, the first words that began to be published and proclaimed is that He was risen. Eventually, Jesus Himself would appear and manifest among them, and would not only confirm that He had raised from the dead, but would also declare unto them how He rose from the grave exactly as He said He would, and exactly as the prophets foretold in days of old. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand the importance of the words of Jesus Christ which are found within the four gospels of the New Testament, for within those red letters is an incredible source of life, an incredible source of instruction, an incredible source of teaching, and an incredible source of encouragement. Before we delve into the words which are found in the fifth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we confront the reality of whether or not we are willing to make room, and whether or not we are willing to make time within our lives for the words and teaching of Jesus Christ. I firmly believe that only to the degree and measure we are willing to give ourselves to the words and teaching of Jesus Christ within our hearts and lives, it will be to that degree and measure that we will truly be transformed and radically changed from the inside out. There are those among us—myself included—who have a great and desperate need to make room and allow space for the red letters to influence and impact their hearts and lives. I am finding myself needing to confront whether or not I am truly willing to make room and make space for the influence and impact of the red letters within my heart and life. I find myself asking whether or not I have been good at allowing the words which are found in red in the four gospels to directly influence and impact my life, and how I conduct myself in the earth, and before others all around me. One of the greatest needs, and one of the greatest desires of our lives should be to make room and allow space for the words written in red in the New Testament to infiltrate, impact and influence our hearts and lives, for to fail to do so would be to deprive ourselves of that which the Spirit of the Lord—and even Jesus Christ—desires to do within our hearts and lives on a continually and daily basis.

When I come to the fifth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew, I can’t help but find myself needing to pause and spend a decent amount of time in the first twelve verses of the fifth chapter. It is within the first twelve verses of the fifth chapter that we are confronted with what has widely become known as “The Beatitudes.” The more I consider the words which are found in the first twelve chapters, the more I can’t help but think about how these words—while they are considered as “beatitudes”—are not merely “beatitudes,” but are actually “be-attitudes.” What I mean by this, is that the word which we find in this particular passage of Scripture must be recognized and understood as the attitude of being that is found within our hearts and lives on a daily basis. One of the single greatest realities within our hearts and lives is the attitude of being—the attitude, the action, the art, the practice of being before the Lord Jesus Christ, and among men within the earth. If we are going to understand that which is found in the first twelve verses of this chapter—as well as everything that comes after in the remaining portion of the fifth chapter, as well as chapters six and seven—we must begin at this starting point, which is the attitude of being. We must recognize that the attitude of being is a conscious and deliberate decision we make to allow ourselves to be and to become that which the Lord Jesus desired for us to be. It is absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand that this attitude of being requires constant care and constant nurturing, for without and apart from it, we cannot hope to fulfill anything that comes thereafter in this particular Sermon on the Mount. I find it absolutely incredible and wonderful that Jesus began this teaching by bringing us face to face with very specific attitudes—attitudes which I am convinced are the very core and foundation of our existence and relationship with the Father who is in heaven. It’s worth noting that within this passage of Scripture—not only does Jesus speak of being called the children of God, but Jesus also speaks of inheriting the kingdom of heaven, and seeing God. If we are truly honest with ourselves, and with the living God, we must admit that the single greatest aim and desire we have within our hearts and lives is to be called the child of God, to inherit the kingdom of heaven, and to see God. Pause for a moment and ask yourselves if this reality describes you within your every day life. Are you one who desperately desires to see God? Are you one who desperate desires to inherit the kingdom of heaven? Are you one who desperately desires to be called the child of God? It was John the apostle who declared that unto those who believed, to them Jesus gave the power, the right, the authority, the ability to become sons of the living God. What we find in this particular section of Scripture is a wonderful and powerful picture of the those who allow and position themselves to not only see God, but to also become His children. What’s more, is that within this first set of verses—that which comprises and makes up the very core and foundation of our witness and testimony within the earth—we find the attitude of being, and the deliberate and conscious effort we make to bring ourselves into the state of being before the Lord Jesus Christ. Consider if you will the words which are found in the first twelve verses of this New Testament gospel of Matthew, beginning with the first verse:

“And seeing the multitudes, He went up into a mountain: and when He was set, His disciples came unto him: and he opened his mouth, and taught them, saying, Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted. Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth. Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy. Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God. Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God. Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you” (Matthew 5:1-12).

Within the first twelve verses of this chapter, we find the core and foundation of everything that would come thereafter in this passage of Scripture, and all the instruction which the Lord Jesus Christ provided for His disciples and followers. Jesus began teaching by speaking of those who were poor in spirit, those that mourned, those which were meek, those which did hunger and thirst after righteousness, those which were merciful, those which were pure in heart, this which are peacemakers, those which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, and those who are reviled, and persecuted by men. This is quite the list of “attitudes of the kingdom,” which completely and utterly set the stage for what comes thereafter in the Sermon on the Mount. If you continue reading the fifth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew, you will find Jesus transitioning from speaking of “The attitudes of the kingdom,” to speaking of the tremendous need for His disciples and followers to be the light of the world and the salt of the earth. What’s more, is that Jesus went on to describe and declare how unless our righteousness exceeded that of the Pharisees and Sadducees, we will not in any way inherit and/or enter into the kingdom of heaven. I am absolutely and utterly convinced that if we are to live our lives and conduct ourselves in the manner in which Jesus spoke as this chapter progresses, we must firmly commit and give ourselves to the attitudes of the kingdom, for it is these attitudes of the kingdom which are the core of establishing the kingdom of heaven within the kingdoms and empires of men. ESTABLISHING THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN WITHIN THE EMPIRES OF THE EARTH! If there is one thing I can’t help but recognize and understand concerning the kingdom of heaven, it’s that when Jesus Christ came to the earth nearly two thousand years ago, He came in order that He might establish the kingdom of heaven within the empire and kingdoms of men. How absolutely incredible and wonderful it is to think about and consider how Jesus came to establish and set up a kingdom in the earth among the kingdoms and empires of men. What’s more, is that if you study Scripture, you will find that when Jesus came the first time, He came to establish a kingdom among men and within the kingdoms and empires of men. When Jesus comes the second time, and when He returns, He will not come to set up and establish a kingdom within the kingdoms and empires of men, but He will come to set up and establish a kingdom over all kingdoms—a kingdom that will completely overshadow and bring into non-existence the kingdoms of the earth, and the kingdoms of men. This reality is found and emphasized in the eleventh chapter of the New Testament prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ after the seventh angel sounded, and great voices were heard. Consider if you will the words which are found in this particular chapter after the seventh angel sounded:

“And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of His Christ; and He shall reign for ever and ever. And the four and twenty elders, which sat before God on their seats, fell upon their faces, and worshipped God, saying, We give thanks, O Lord God Almighty, which art, and wast, and art to come; become thou hast taken to thee thy great power, and hast reigned. And the nations were angry, and thy wrath is come, and the time of the dead, that they should be judged, and that thou shouldest give reward unto thy servants the prophets, and to the saints, and them that fear thy name, small and great; and shouldest destroy them which destroy the earth” (Revelation 11:15-18).

What we find, and what we read in this particular passage of Scripture is a wonderful and powerful picture of that day when the kingdoms of this world have and will become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of His Christ, and how He will reign for ever and ever. It’s necessary that we recognize and understand that when Jesus Christ came to the earth the first time, He came to establish and set up a kingdom within men among the kingdoms and empires of the earth—a kingdom that was not revealed and made manifest to the natural eyes of men, but a kingdom that was found within the hearts, the souls, and the minds of men. This first kingdom which Jesus Christ came to set up and establish would not be a kingdom of force and authority as we understand it in connection with the various kingdoms and empires of the earth—i.e. the Egyptian Empire, the Assyrian Empire, the Babylonian Empire, the Medo-Persian Empire, the Grecian Empire, the Roman Empire, and the various other kingdoms and empires which have been in existence within and upon the earth. This kingdom which Jesus began to set up and establish was not an external kingdom that would rival the kingdoms and empires of the earth through violence, through warfare, and through force, but would be a kingdom that would be found within the hearts and spirits of men. These “attitudes of the kingdom” bring us face to face with the wonderful and powerful reality that the kingdom of heaven is founded upon a set of attitudes which we allow ourselves to cultivate and develop on a consistent and daily basis. The question we must ask ourselves is whether or not we are taking the words which Jesus spoke in the first twelve verses of this fifth chapter, and are allowing ourselves to be engaged in the attitude of being. Are we being, and are we becoming everything the Lord Jesus Christ desired and destined us to be according to and through the attitudes He presented us with in this opening chapter of the Sermon on the Mount? Are we committing ourselves to being and become poor in spirit in order that we might obtain the kingdom of heaven? Are we committing ourselves to mourning in order that we might be comforted by the Holy Spirit? Are we committing ourselves to being meek in order that we might inherit the earth? Are we committing ourselves to hungering and thirsting after righteousness in order that we might and shall be filled? Are we committing ourselves to being merciful in order that we might obtain mercy, and to being pure in heart that we might see God? Are we committing ourselves to being peacemakers in order that we might be called the children of God? How we answer these questions can and will bring us face to face with whether or not the kingdom of heaven can be established and set up within our hearts and lives. It is what we read, and what we find in the first twelve verses of this chapter that positions us to be the salt of the earth and the light of the world—that which brings savor and flavor to situations and circumstances around us, and that which illuminates and shines in the darkness which is all around us.

Immediately after presenting us with the attitudes of the kingdom, Jesus immediately transitions to the point where He emphatically declares that we are the salt of the earth, and the light of the world. It is in this place where He instructs and encourages us to so let our lights shine before men in order that those around and before us might see our good works, and glorify our father which is in heaven. As you continue reading, you will find that Jesus came not to abolish to destroy the law, but to fulfill and complete it. With that being said, Jesus declared unto His disciples that unless their righteousness exceeded that of the scribes and the Pharisees, they would in no wise enter into the kingdom of heaven. What we find immediacy after that is what I believe is a powerful comparison between the righteousness of the Pharisees and scribes, and the righteousness of the kingdom. As I am sitting here right now, I can’t help but be completely and utterly gripped and captivated by the fact that there is a righteousness of the Pharisees and scribes—a righteousness which is according to the law—and a righteousness of the kingdom, which is according to the words of the Lord Jesus Christ. Found within the remaining portion of the fifth chapter is Jesus taking the law which was given unto Moses, flipping it on its head, and interpreting it in light of the kingdom of heaven. For instance, the law of Moses revealed that whoever killed his brother or neighbor would be in danger of judgment, for the commandment was given to abstain and refrain from killing our brother. What Jesus did was take the commandment that was given at Sinai, flipping it on its head, turning it upside down, and drilling down to the core of any murder and violence done in the earth—anger and hatred. The righteousness of the Pharisees says and declares that we should not kill, but the righteousness of the kingdom declares that we should not even be angry at or hate our brother without a cause. What’s more, is that Jesus takes the commandment to not commit adultery, and flips it on its head by declaring that whosoever looks on a woman to l use after her has already committed adultery with her in their heart. That which Jesus did was take the law which was given unto Moses—the commandment to not commit adultery—and interpret it in light of the the righteousness of the kingdom. The righteousness of the law would tell us not to commit the external and outward act of adultery, yet the righteousness of the kingdom tells us that we should not even look with lust upon another, for by doing so, we have already committed adultery within our hearts. Jesus goes on to reveal the righteousness of the law by speaking of an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, but then presents us with the righteousness of the kingdom by instructing us to allow ourselves to be defrauded, allowing ourselves to be wronged, and allowing ourselves to have ill done against and toward us.

This reality in and of itself is completely contrary to how we act and how we operate, for there is absolutely no one among us who would willingly and deliberately allow themselves to be defrauded and wronged—that is, unless the righteousness of that individual exceeded the righteousness of the Pharisees of the kingdom. The single greatest question we must ask ourselves is whether or not we are willing we commit ourselves first to the attitudes of the kingdom, and then to the righteousness of the kingdom. We must ask ourselves whether or not we are willing to first give ourselves to the attitudes of the kingdom—that which positions us to be the salt of the earth and the light of the world—and then commit ourselves to the righteousness of the kingdom. There is within this passage of Scripture a wonderful and powerful discernment and discerning of the righteousness of the Pharisees—a righteousness that is of the law, and a righteousness that is of works and deeds before God and men. Conversely, there is also within this passage of Scripture a powerful discourse and treatise concerning the righteousness of the kingdom—a righteousness which is completely different from the righteousness which is manifested according to the law of Moses. The Pharisees committed themselves to the righteousness of the law, and yet they did not recognize and understand that there was a deeper righteousness that was asked of them—a righteousness of the kingdom. It was the apostle Paul who wrote of this righteousness of the law, and how there is a righteousness according to the law, and a righteousness that is found in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ. It is necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand that we have been called to walk in this righteousness which is according to the law of Christ, and not this righteousness which is according to the law of Moses. I leave you with the words which the apostle Paul wrote in the third chapter of the epistle which was written unto the saints which were at Philippi, beginning with the seventh verse:

“But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ. Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the lost of all things, and count them but dung, that I may win Christ, and be found in Him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith: that I may know Him, and the power of His resurrection, and the fellowship of His sufferings, being made comfortable unto his death; if by any means I might attain unto the resurrection of the dead. Not as though I had already attained, either were already perfect: but this I follow after, if that I may apprehend that for which also I am apprehended of Christ Jesus. Brethren, I count not myself to have apprehended: but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 3:7-14).

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