Jesus, Why Would You Delay In Meeting My Need to Meet the Need of Another

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ as recorded by the apostle Matthew. More specifically, today’s passage is found in verses eighteen through thirty-eight of the ninth chapter. When you come to this particular portion of Scripture you find the events taking place within it being directly linked and connected to the portion of Scripture which preceded it. I am convinced that in order to truly and properly understand the context surrounding the events which take place in verses eighteen through thirty-eight, it is necessary and imperative to first begin reading with verse fourteen of the same chapter. The context surrounding the events which take place in the latter portion of the ninth chapter of Matthew’s gospel take place while Jesus is still speaking the words which we find and read in the preceding verses. If you begin reading the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew you will find Jesus passing over from the region of the Gergesenes after commanding the devils which possessed two men to leave them and enter into a herd of swine. As a direct result of the devils coming out of the two men and entering into the herd of swine, the herd ran violently down a steep hill and directly into the sea. When the whole city heard what had happened with these two men, as well as with the herd of swine, they all came out unto Jesus and actually besought and implored Him that He might leave their midst. The ninth chapter opens and begins with Jesus departing from the region of the Gergesenes and entering into His own city. In the opening verses of the ninth chapter we find others bringing unto Jesus a man who was sick with the palsy who was lying on a bed. Upon seeing their faith, Jesus declared unto the men that his sins were forgiven, and upon knowing the thoughts that were in the hearts of the scribes, Jesus demonstrated that He had authority on earth to forgive sins by commanding the man to arise, take up his bed, and go unto his house. Immediately, the man arose, took up his bed, and departed unto his own house. After having healed this man, Jesus passed on from that place, and coming upon a man named Matthew sitting at the receipt of custom, He instructed Matthew to follow Him. After Matthew left his post at the receipt of the custom, Jesus entered into Matthew’s house to sit down to meat, and while there many publicans and sinners came and sat down with Him and the disciples. Jesus choosing to not only sit down for dinner with publicans and sinners, but also having fellowship and sharing a meal with them created such a tremendous stir among the Pharisees, that they actually called Him out on it and asked why He would choose to eat with sinners. Jesus completely unmoved by the words which the Pharisees spoke unto Him responded by declaring unto them—not only that those which be whole need not a physical, but those that were sick, but He then also instructs them to go and learn what the Scriptures mean when they say “I will have mercy and not sacrifice: for I man not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.”

As I sit here and read the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew, I can’t help but be directly confronted with and by the fact that not only does healing seem to directly confront the religious spirit, as well as the legalism and hypocrisy in a generation, but so also does Jesus’ choosing to engage Himself in fellowship and relationship with those who would be classified and known as sinners and publicans. The more I read the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel fo Matthew the more I can’t help but see a direct contrast between religion and the power of God, a direct contradiction between religion and the call to follow God, and a direct contradiction between religion and such practices and disciplines as fasting. In the opening eight verses of the ninth chapter we find the religious spirit raising up its ugly head in direct response to Jesus’ encounter with the man who had been brought to Him who was sick with the palsy. It’s interesting to note that the religious spirit didn’t necessarily rear its ugly head in direct response to Jesus healing the man who was sick with the palsy, but in response to Jesus’ words concerning forgiveness. If you read the first eight verses of the ninth chapter you will find that when Jesus saw the faith of those who brought this man unto Him, He didn’t immediately heal the man, but instead declared unto him that his sins were forgiven. It was in response to Jesus’ declaration to this man that his sins had been forgiven that the scribes began to think within their hearts concerning this man who claimed to have authority on earth to forgive sins. In fact, the scribes which were present on that day accused Jesus of blaspheming having just declared unto this man that his sins were forgiven. What I so love about this passage of Scripture is that not only did Jesus ask the scribes why they thought evil in their hearts, but He also asked them a question—What is easier, to say, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and walk?” Jesus would go on to declare unto them that so they might know that the Son of man hath power to give sins, and in the same sentence speaks directly to the man who was sick with the palsy, and commanded him to arise, take up his bed, and go unto his house. How absolutely incredible it is that when he was accused of blaspheming before God and men by declaring unto this man that his sins were forgiven, He responded by commanding this man to rise up from his place, take up his bed, and walk. Jesus responded to their criticism and indictment by healing this man of that which plagued and ailed him.

What is so interesting and unique about the opening verses of the ninth chapter is that in response to Jesus’ speaking of forgiveness of sins, and in response to Jesus fellowship with sinners and publicans, the religious spirit completely engaged itself at that time by directly challenging Jesus, as well as His words and His actions. In verses one through eight the religious spirit accused Jesus of blaspheming concerning forgiveness of sins, and Jesus responded by healing the man and addressing the need brought him into His very presence. When Jesus was indicted within the hearts of the Pharisees, and condemned by the Pharisees for eating with sinners and publicans, Jesus responded by emphatically declaring how those who be whole need not a physician, but those which are sick. Jesus then declared unto and instructed them to go and learn what it means when it is written, “I will have mercy, and not sacrifice: for I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.’ Finally, when coming to the fourteenth verse of the ninth chapter we again find the religious spirit and the religious community of that day directly challenging Jesus, yet not based on what He had said or did, but rather on the actions of His disciples. In fact, it is what we find and read in verses fourteen through seventeen of the ninth chapter that serves as the context and backdrop for the remaining events which take place in the ninth chapter of the gospel of Matthew. It is in verses fourteen through seventeen where we find the backdrop and context for all the events which transpire in the remaining portion of the Scripture. It’s worth at least considering the words which are found in these four verses, for verses eighteen through thirty-eight are so completely and utterly saturated with the activity of Jesus and His ministry within and upon the earth. Before we get into the events which occurred in the latter portion of the ninth chapter, it is necessary and imperative to consider that which is found in verses fourteen through seventeen. Consider if you will the worlds which are recorded in this passage of Scripture beginning with the fourteenth verse:

“Then came to Him the disciples of John, saying, Why do we and the Pharisees fast oft, but thy disciples fast not? And Jesus said unto them, Can the children of the bridechamber mourn, as long as the bridegroom is with them? But the days will come, when the bridegroom shall be taken from them, and then shall they fast. No man putteth a piece of new cloth unto an old garment, for that which is put in to fill it up taketh from the garment, and the rent is made worse. Neither do men put new wine into old bottles: else the bottles break, and the wine runneth out, and the bottles perish: but they put new wine into new bottles, and both are preserved” (Matthew 9:14-17).

It’s necessary that we at least consider what is recorded in verses fourteen through seventeen of this passage of Scripture, for when you begin reading the eighteenth verse you will find that while Jesus spake these things, behold there calmer unto him a certain ruler who worshipped Him and began speaking to Him concerning His daughter. The question that must be asked when reading the eighteenth verse of this chapter is what things? When Matthew records that while Jesus was speaking these things—what specific things was Jesus speaking that is referenced in this particular verse? The answer is actually found in verses fifteen through seventeen, for those things which Jesus was speaking were the words He spoke to the disciples of John who came unto Him asking why they fasted often, but Jesus’ disciples didn’t fast at all. It was while Jesus was responding to their question concerning the disciples’ fasting that this certain ruler came unto Jesus, and falling down and worshipping Him, implored Him that He would come and heal His daughter. As you begin reading the latter portion of this Scripture you will find this ruler declaring unto Jesus that his daughter was dead, and then implored and begged Jesus that He might come and lay His hand upon her, and she would live. The response of this ruler is actually quite interesting—particularly and especially when you consider it in light of the Roman centurion’s response when He came unto Jesus on behalf of His servant. When this ruler came into the presence of Jesus, He implored Him that He might come and lay His hand upon her, and as a result of laying His hand on her, she would live and be whole. I would like to at least present the difference and contrast between the encounter these two men had with Jesus Christ—not to suggest that one’s response, words and actions were somehow different and better than the other, but simply to call your attention to the different responses when men come unto Jesus. If you begin reading with and from the fifth verse of the eighth chapter you will find the account of the Roman centurion who came unto Jesus—perhaps in direct response to hearing the various reports concerning Jesus and what He had done previously in the region of Galilee. There is not a doubt in my mind that this centurion came unto Jesus in direct response to what was written and recorded concerning Him in the final verses of the fourth chapter—just before Jesus sat down to deliver the Sermon on the Mount. Consider first if you will, the words which Matthew recorded unto Jesus in the final verses of the fourth chapter:

“And Jesus went about all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all manner of sickness and all manner of disease among the people. And His fame went throughout all Syria: and they brought unto Him all sick people that were taken with divers diseases and torments, and those which were possessed with devils, and those which were lunatick, and those that had the palsy; and He haled them. And there followed Him great multitudes of people from Galilee, and from Decapolis, and from Jerusalem, and from Judaea, and from beyond Jordan” (Matthew 4:23-25).

There is not a doubt in my mind that this Roman Centurion heard reports about the ministry of Jesus Christ in the earth, and decided within Himself that He was going to come unto Jesus himself, and inquire of Him concerning his servant. When the eighth chapter opens and begins, it does so with a leper coming unto Jesus and worshipping Him, and from that place of worship declaring unto Jesus that if He would, He could make Him clean. Jesus was in fact willing to make this man clean, and stretched forth His hand, and touched Him, saying, “I will; be thou clean.” It was immediately after Jesus healed and cleansed this man of his leprosy that Jesus entered into Capernaum, and it was there in Capernaum where we find the Roman Centurion coming unto him on behalf of His servant who sick of the palsy. Please don’t miss the reference to his servant being sick of the palsy, for this man undoubtedly heard how Jesus had previously healed many who were sick with the same malady and sickness, and as a result of what He had heard, He decided to come unto Jesus on behalf of His servant. Consider if you will the word which are recorded concerning this Roman Centurion and his interaction and encounter with Jesus the Christ after He came into Capernaum, and that beginning with the fifth verse of the eighth ch apter:

“And when Jesus was entered into Capernaum, there came unto Him a centurion, beseeching him, and saying, Lord, my servant lieth at home sick of the palsy, grievously torment. And Jesus saith unto him, I will come and heal him. The centurion answered and said, Lord, I am not worthy that thou shouldest come under my roof: but speak the word only, and my servant shall be healed. For I am a man under authority, having soldiers under me: and I say to this man, Go, and he goeth; and to another, Come, and he cometh; and to my servant, Do this, and he doeth it. When Jesus heard it, He marveled, and said to them that followed, Verily I say unto you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel. And I say unto you, That many shall come from the east and west, and shall sit down with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, in the kingdom of heaven. But the children of the kingdom shall be cast out into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth. And Jesus said unto the centurion, Go thy way; and as thou hast believed, so be it done unto thee. And his servant was healed in the selfsame hour” (Matthew 8:5-13).

The account of the Roman centurion is particularly and especially interesting—especially when we consider it in light of what is found in verse eighteen of the ninth chapter—for both the centurion and this ruler came unto Jesus on behalf of another who wasn’t actually brought into the presence of Jesus. This is actually quite unique and interesting, for there were countless cases within the four gospels where men and women brought those who were sick with various manners of diseases, illnesses and infirmities into the presence of Jesus, and there were those like the centurion and this ruler who could not bring that one who had the need into the presence of Jesus. In the case of the centurion, Jesus was willing to go with him to the place where his servant was lying sick with the palsy, and yet the centurion was not willing to have Jesus under the roof of his home. Instead of allowing Jesus to come under the roof of his house, the centurion responded by speaking of authority—both he authority that he had to issue a command to those under him that would be obeyed, as well as himself who was under authority and obeyed the commands which were given unto him. As a direct result of this man’s understanding of authority, and the power of a command that was given, he declared unto Jesus that if He but spoke the word concerning his servant, his servant would be healed. Jesus was so impressed with the response of this centurion—particularly given that this man wasn’t even Jewish, nor understood the Hebrew Scriptures. Jesus marveled at the faith of this man, and even proclaimed the greatness of this man’s faith to all those who were present before and around Him on that day. Fast forward to the ninth chapter of the same New Testament gospel, and you will find a certain ruler within Capernaum who came unto Jesus, worshipped Him, and declared unto Jesus the need he had—namely, that his daughter was now dead. Despite the fact that his daughter was dead, this man believed that if Jesus came to the place where his daughter was lying, and laid His hand upon her, she would live. In the case of the centurion, he declared unto Jesus that all Jesus needed to do was speak the word and his servant would be healed. IN the case of the ruler, He declared that if Jesus came and laid his hand on his daughter, he knew that she would be healed. Please note and please understand that I am not in any way portraying the centurion over and above the certain ruler which came into the presence of Jesus, worshipped Him, and declared that if Jesus came and laid His hand upon her, she would be healed. Lest you think that there is a difference between these two men, you must consider that Jesus was willing to go with both men to the place where the need was. BRINGING JESUS TO THE PLACE OF NEED! BRINGING JESUS TO THE PLACE OF SICKNESS! BRINGING JESUS TO THE PLACE OF SUFFERING!

IN the case of the centurion, Jesus was willing to come with him to the place where his servant lie, yet the centurion himself wasn’t willing that Jesus should enter his house and come under his roof. Note that despite the fact that this man wasn’t willing that Jesus would come under his roof, he still believed that Jesus could heal his servant, simply by speaking the word and giving the command. This is in direct alignment with what Scripture speaks and declares when it states that “He sent His word and healed their diseases and sickness.” This centurion believed that all Jesus needed to do was speak the word, and as a direct result of the word being spoken from the mouth of Jesus, his servant would be healed. Lest you think for one minute that there was somehow a difference between the centurion and the ruler, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand that in both cases, Jesus was willing to go with them to the point and place of the need. Pause for a moment and consider that in both cases—the case of the centurion, as well as the ruler—they both left the place of the need in order to come unto Jesus. Consider what desperation must have been found within their hearts for them to leave the place of need and make their way unto Jesus. Consider what faith it took for them to leave the place of the need and to make their way unto Jesus in order that they might inquire of Him that He might heal that one who they were interceding for. I have to admit the more I read the gospel of Matthew, the more I can’t help but be struck with the wonderful and powerful ministry of intercession that is present within its pages. I fully realize and recognize that there might be those who are reading the words contained within this writing and would ask how I could possibly state that there are wonderful pictures of intercession found within the gospel of Matthew. To those of you who would consider and wonder how I can state that the ministry of intercession is found in this particular gospel, I would urge you to consider what intercession actually is—the act of bringing before and into the presence of Jesus throw who could otherwise not bring themselves into the presence of Jesus. Each time you read in the gospel of Matthew concerning those who brought others into the presence of Jesus in order that He might heal and touch them—what you are actually reading about is a form and type of intercession, as others are taking the needs of others and bringing them before Jesus. As it pertains to the centurion and the ruler, they both engaged themselves in intercession on behalf of one in need, for the centurion came unto Jesus on behalf of his servant, and the ruler came unto Jesus on behalf of his daughter who had died.

What I so love about the account of the ruler is that Jesus was willing to follow him to the place where he lived in order that he might come unto his daughter and raise her up from the place where she was lying. It would be very easy to look at the account of the centurion—and despite the fact that Jesus marveled at the great faith he had concerning the authority of the word of Jesus, believe that his faith was somehow superior than the faith of this certain ruler. I would caution you against such a belief within your heart and mind, for while the centurion understood authority, and believed that all Jesus needed to do was speak the word and heal his servant with a mere word, the ruler believed that if Jesus came and laid his hand on his daughter, she would be healed. We dare not think or consider that the faith of the centurion was somehow greater than the faith of this ruler, for Jesus was willing to follow this ruler to his home and to the place where his daughter had been laid in order that he might raise her up. I am convinced there are those among us who have faith to believe that all Jesus needs to do is speak the word and our need will be met, and that others will be touched, while there are others among us who believe that if Jesus stretches forth His hand and touches our need, we shall receive what we ask for. When we read verses eighteen and nineteen of the ninth chapter of the gospel concerning Jesus according to Matthew, we find this ruler coming unto Jesus, worshipping Him, and imploring Him that He come and lay His hand upon his daughter who was even now dead, and she would live. When the nineteenth verse concludes, we find Jesus rising up from the place where He was and following this man to the place where his daughter was lying—and not only Jesus, but also His disciples. What’s so interesting about this passage of Scripture is that while Jesus was following this ruler to the place where his daughter was lying, there was a woman, which was diseased with an issue of blood for twelve years who came behind Him and touched the hem of His garment. Matthew records that this woman—after touching the hem of Jesus’ garment—was completely healed and made whole of her issue of blood. In fact, Matthew goes so far as to write concerning the faith of this woman, for Matthew records of this woman that she believed and said within herself that if she may but touch the hem of His garment, she would be whole. Matthew records how after this woman touched the hem or Jesus’ garment, He turned Himself around, and looking directly and intently at her, declared unto her, Daughter, be of good comfort, for her faith had made her whole. What Matthew goes on to record is that from that very instant—from that very moment—this woman who had had this issue of blood for twelve years was made completely whole.

Pause for a moment and consider what it must have been like for this ruler to watch as this woman came unto Jesus and touched the hem of his garment. It would have been one thing for this woman to have touched the hem of Jesus’ garment, be made whole, and then to have gone her way after knowing within herself that she was healed and made whole. Matthew doesn’t record it happening this way, for Mathew records this woman following Jesus and all those that were walking with and following Him—including His disciples—and coming up behind Him and touching the hem of His garment. How incredibly interesting it is to read that while Jesus was on His way to this ruler’s house, someone else who had a need—and a need which was present in their life for twelve years—came up behind Him and touched the hem of His garment. What marks this occurrence and so incredibly interesting is not necessarily that this woman came up behind Jesus and touched the hem of Jesus’ garment, but that Jesus stopped where He was and turned around to find this woman—perhaps kneeling down on the ground in a posture of worship and humility. There are two people’s responses within this occurrence I can’t help but think about—the first being the response of the woman as she not only saw Jesus turn around, but secondly, the response of the ruler who saw Jesus stop dead in His tracks in order that He might speak to and address this woman. I can’t help but consider the response of the ruler on this particular occasion, for after all—Jesus was on His way with him to the place where His daughter lie dead in order that He might touch her and raise her up to life. I can’t help but wonder if this centurion was somehow indignant at the fact that Jesus stopped dead in His tracks in order that He might turn around and speak to and address this woman. After all—wasn’t his need more important? Wasn’t a girl who was lying on her bed dead more important than a woman who had had an issue of blood for twelve years? Is it possible that this man allowed fear, doubt and worry to infiltrate his heart knowing that Jesus was delaying His coming unto his daughter by addressing this woman? Oh, I can’t help but wonder if this man didn’t feel that his need was somehow more important than the need of this woman, and could not have thought within himself, “Jesus, we don’t have time for this. Jesus, don’t you know that my daughter is dead? Jesus, don’t’ you remember that you were on your way to my house to the place where my daughter lies dead? Jesus, why are you stopping to speak with this woman? Jesus, we need to hurry up. Jesus we need to go. We can’t stay here. We can’t allow ourselves to be distracted or sidetracked from that which we are setting out to do and where we are headed.”

Now, Scripture is unclear what went through the heart and mind of this ruler when the procession to his house stoped dead in its tracks in order that Jesus might speak to and address this woman who had just touched the hem of His garment. Though it isn’t recorded in this particular passage of Scripture, Luke records that what caused Jesus to turn around wasn’t merely the fact that the hem of His garment was touched, but that He discerned how power had flowed out and flowed forth from Him. Jesus stopped dead in His tracks because HE perceived and recognized that power (Gk. “Dunamis”) had gone out from Him in that instant. The reason I bring this up and mention it is because I am convinced that it is possible for us to get so caught up in our need(s) that we are completely unwilling to allow for Jesus to touch and minister to the needs of those around us. Though Scripture doesn’t speak to or reveal anything about this ruler and his growing impatient, and perhaps even frustrated with Jesus for stopping in His tracks, I can’t help but see it as a very real possibility. I can’t help but see it is a type and picture of those within the house of the Lord who somehow feel that their need is more important, more pressing and more urgent than the needs of those around them. Think about it—how many of us would be willing to lead Jesus to the place where our need is, and while on His way with us to the place where our need is, someone else enters into the picture and receives their healing before our need is met. Oh, what do you do when someone else receives their healing before our own need is met? How do you respond when the need of someone else is met before your own need is met? Perhaps you or a loved one is lying in a hospital bed waiting for Jesus to bring healing and wholeness, and yet while we are waiting and expecting Jesus to bring that healing and wholeness, someone else entered into the picture and receives their healing before ours is even met. I can’t help but picture Jesus being present within a large hospital, and as He is making His way to the various needs of those who are seeking healing, and perhaps even life from death, someone else seems to enter into the picture and step in front of us as we are waiting for our own need. Matthew doesn’t specifically record this servant growing impatient and frustrated with Jesus for having stopped dead on His tracks to minister to this woman, and yet I am utterly and completely convinced that there are men and women among us today who would grow frustrated and impatient with Jesus for seemingly stopping dead in His tracks while on His way to meet the need we brought before Him. I mean, after all—weren’t we first? Didn’t we bring our need before Him first? Wasn’t He on His way to our house to minister unto and meet our need? Why would and how could Jesus stop His journey to the place of our need in order that He might minister to the need of another? It doesn’t make any sense why Jesus would do such a thing knowing that our need is somehow more urgent and more pressing than this need. Jesus, surely you know and understand that death is more important than an issue of blood—even if the issue has been going on for twelve years.

WHAT DO YOU DO WITH A GOD WHO DELAYS HIS COMING? WHAT DO YOU DO WITH A GOOD WHO STOPS DEAD IN HIS TRACKS TO MEET THE NEED OF ANOTHER? I am absolutely and completely convinced that there is a wonderful and powerful spiritual truth that is found within this particular passage of Scripture—one that might even have direct connection to the account of Lazarus in the New Testament gospel of John. In the eleventh chapter of the New Testament gospel of John you will find Jesus being told that His dear friend Lazarus was sick, and yet what we find taking place is not something we would normally expect, for instead of Jesus rushing directly to Lazarus’ side in the midst of His sickness, we find Jesus tarrying where He was another two full days. It wasn’t until Lazarus had died that Jesus and His disciples made there way to where he was—although they didn’t come to a bedside, but a graveside. Oh, what do you do when Jesus doesn’t come to your bedside, but instead, comes to your graveside? WHEN JESUS DOESN’T COME TO YOUR BEDSIDE, BUT SHOWS UP AT YOUR GRAVESIDE! How do we reconcile a Jesus who doesn’t always come to our bedside, but instead might wait and show up at our graveside? This was the dilemma Mary and Martha had with Jesus’ delay, for in the period and process of His delay, Lazarus had died. Within the account of Lazarus we don’t find a Jesus who shows up at the bedside of Lazarus, but instead showing up at the graveside when it was seemingly too late for Jesus to do anything. IT is this process of delay and waiting that I am convinced is present within the account of this ruler who besought Jesus to come and raise his daughter from death to life. Matthew records how Jesus was indeed on His way to the home of this ruler to raise His daughter up from death to life, and yet how along the way there was a woman with an issue of blood who not only received her healing before his daughter received her life back, but who also stopped Jesus dead in his tracks, thus delaying His arrival at this ruler’s house. There is within this passage of Scripture—not only a wonderful and powerful picture of delay, but also the tremendous need for patience and its relationship with faith, trust and confidence. It would have been very easy for this ruler to immediately lose his patience, and to immediately allow doubt and unbelief to enter into his heart, and while there is no indication within Matthew’s account that this took place, we have to assume that the temptation and struggle was very real for this man. Imagine what it was like for this man to lead Jesus and His disciples to his house expecting Jesus to perform a miracle, and yet along the way Jesus stops to bring healing and wholeness to another who desperately needs it. What I so love about this passage is that although Jesus stopped along the way to minister to this woman, it didn’t prevent Him from continuing on after touching this woman to the place where this young girl was lying in bed. So many times we think that delay is the end of the story, and yet we don’t realize that delay doesn’t stop the process from taking place, but may very well serve two purposes. IN the case of this man and ruler, delay not only allowed for this woman to receive her healing and wholeness, but it also helped to strengthen the faith, the trust and the confidence of this man. Think about it—if in the midst of the delay of Jesus getting to where his daughter was, Jesus still raised her up from her bed to new life, what would that do for his faith, for his trust, and for his confidence moving forward? Oh that we would not grow impatient, fearful, doubtful, or even unbelieving in the process of delay and waiting, but that we would instead learn and grow to trust in a Jesus who is able to bring resurrection at a bedside, as well as resurrection at a graveside. Oh that we would have and maintain such a level of trust in Jesus—one that is not and cannot be shaken by delay, or even someone else seemingly receiving their healing and their touch before we receive ours.

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