Stand In the Storm: You Have to Stand In the Midst of the Storm Before You Can Speak to the Storm

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the beloved physician Luke. More specifically, today’s passage is found in verses nineteen through thirty-nine of the eighth chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find it beginning with an event which was recorded previously in the gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ. As you approach the nineteenth verse of the eighth chapter you will find a great press of people surrounding Jesus in order that they might catch a glimpse of who He was, in order that they might hear and listen to Him speak, and perhaps even in order that they might receive some healing or miracle from His hand. Within this passage of scripture you will find Jesus being surrounded and pressed on all sides by a great throng and great crowd of people, and so much so that when His mother and his brothers and sisters sought to come near and come unto Him they were unable to do so. It’s actually quite interesting to think about and consider the fact that so great was the press of people which surrounded Jesus the Christ that when His own family sought to come near unto Him they were unable to do so. What’s more, is that what we find taking place within this particular event which took place within the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ is that not only did His mother and his brethren seek to come unto Him, but they also tried sending word unto Jesus that they desired to see and come nigh unto Him. Pause for a moment and consider the fact that so great was the press of people surrounding Jesus the Christ that not even His own mother and brethren could come near Him. Consider the fact that despite the fact that they sought an audience with Jesus, and despite the fact that they desired that they might speak with and be in the presence of Jesus, they were unable to do so because of the great crowd of people which surrounded Him. Imagine trying to come near Jesus and being unable to so because the great crowd of people surrounding Him was too great to even get through to be near Him.

I can’t help but wonder what it was like for the mother of Jesus, as well as His brethren to seek an audience with Jesus, and yet being able to do so because of the press of people which surrounded and thronged Him. In all reality, as you read the four gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ you will find that there were several instances when the throng of people was so great surrounding Jesus that those who sought to come near Him found it incredibly difficult to do so. I can’t help but be reminded of the time when Jesus was in the house, and when the press of people was so great before Jesus that there was no room within the house, nor even any room at the door of the house because of people who desired to hear and listen to Him speak. I am reminded of the four men who brought a man sick with the palsy lying on a mat in order that they might bring him into the presence of Jesus. When these four men saw that they could not being this man unto Jesus through the front door of the house they found another way to get this man—perhaps a friend of theirs—into the presence of Jesus. The gospel authors write and record how these four friends carried the man to the roof of the house and when they had broken through the roof of the house, they lowered the man down in front of and before Jesus lying upon his mat. I can’t help but consider the tremendous determination and resolve that was present within the hearts of these four men, for despite their being unwilling to bring their friend into the presence of Jesus through the front door of the house because of the people, they found another way to get their friend before and in the presence of Jesus. I am also reminded of the woman who had the issue of blood for twelve years, and how she had spent all her money consulting physicians and doctors, but could in no wide be cured, and in fact grew worse. When this woman heard about Jesus, she made her way through the crowd of people because she thought within herself that if she but touched the hem of His garment she would be healed. As she made her way through the crowd of people which were gathered around Jesus as He made His way to the house of Jairus, this woman came from behind and touched the hem of Jesus’ garment and was instantly and immediately healed of the issue of blood which had plagued her for twelve years. Both these four friends as well as this woman saw and noticed the great crowds of people surrounding Jesus, and yet they were determined to experience the power of God within His presence.

The opening few verses of this passage before us today finds Jesus being thronged and pressed by a great crowd of people, and how even when Mary his mother, as well as His brethren sought to see Him, they could not. So great was the press which surrounded Jesus the Christ that not even His own mother and brethren could make their way before Jesus to speak with Him. Pause and think about this if you will, for it is quite interesting to think about the fact that Jesus’ own mother and brethren were unable to enter into His presence because of the great crowd of people which surrounded and thronged Him. It’s interesting to think that so great was the crowd of people which were before and around Jesus the Christ that even when His mother and His brethren came unto Him in order that they might see Him, they were unable to do so. What’s more, is that not only were Jesus’ brethren and His mother unable to see Him because of the great press of people which surrounded Him, but when it was told unto Jesus that they desired to see Him, He responded by declaring unto those who were present on this day that His mother and His brethren are those which hear the word of God, and do it. In a different account of this particular event you will find Jesus initially responding by asking the question regarding who His mother and His brethren were, and then declaring unto those who were present on this day that His mother and His brethren were those who did the will of His Father in heaven. I have to admit that I absolutely love what I find and read within this passage of Scripture, for within this passage of Scripture we find Jesus speaking of those who hear the word of God, and do it, while in a different gospel account of the same event we find Jesus declaring that His mother and His brethren are those who do the will of His Father which is in heaven. Now, on the surface it might seem like the two are altogether and entirely different, and that doing the will of the Father, and hearing the words of God and doing them are somehow not the same thing. This reality is expressed earlier in the New Testament gospel of Luke when we find Jesus speaking unto His disciples as He delivered unto them His famous Sermon on the Mount. While Luke didn’t take a full three chapters to describe and set forth the Sermon as did the apostle Matthew, he nonetheless highlighted some major points within the sermon which were to be read and understood by the most excellent Theophilus who was the audience and reader of this particular gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ. The reason I mention this is because this same reality of doing the will of the Father and hearing and doing the words of Jesus and doing them are used synonymously with each other. Consider if you will the words which are written and recorded in the New Testament gospel of Luke, and then the words which are found in the New Testament gospel of Matthew which describe the same statement and declaration of Jesus the Christ:

“And why call ye me, Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say? Whosoever cometh to me, and heareth my sayings, and doeth them, I will shew you to whom he is like: He is like a man which built an house, and dogged deep, and laid the foundation on a rock: and when the flood arose, the stream beat vehemently upon that house, and could not shake it: for it was founded upon a rock. But he that heareth, and doeth not, is like a man that without a foundation built an house upon the earth; against which the stream did beat vehemently, and immediately it fell; and the ruin of that house was great” (Luke 6:46-49).

“Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven. Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? And in thy name have cast out devils? And in thy name done many wonderful works? And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity. Therefore whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock: and the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock. And every one that heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them not shall be likened unto a foolish man, which built his house upon the sand: and the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell: and great was the fall of it” (Matthew 7:21-27).

It’s worth noting and pointing out that which is found and contained within this particular passage of Scripture in the New Testament gospel of Luke, for within the gospel of Luke we find Jesus stating and declaring that His mother and His brethren are those who hear His words and do them. In the New Testament gospel of Matthew, however, we find the account told a little differently, for when Jesus described who His mother and His brethren were, he emphatically and boldly declared that they were those who did the will of His Father who was in heaven. Consider if you will this same account as it was written and recorded by the apostle Matthew in the final verses of the twelfth chapter of the gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus which he wrote:

“While He yet talked to the people, behold, His mother and His brethren stood without, desiring to speak with Him. Then one said unto Him, Behold, thy mother and thy brethren stand without, desiring to speak with thee. But He answered and said unto them that told Him, Who is my mother? And who are my brethren? And He stretched forth His hand toward His disciples, and said, behold my mother and my brethren! For whosoever shall do the will of my Father which is in heaven, the shame is my brother, and sister, and mother” (Matthew 12:46-50).

Please don’t miss the tremendous and incredible significance of what is found within this passage of Scripture, for within the New Testament gospel of Luke we find Jesus declaring His mother and His brethren are those who hear His words and do them, while in the New Testament gospel of Matthew we find Jesus speaking of and declaring that His mother and His brethren are those who do the will of His Father which is in heaven. What’s more, is that in the New Testament gospel of Luke we find Jesus speaking of those who call Him Lord, Lord, and yet do not the things which He says; while in the New Testament gospel of Matthew we find Jesus declaring that not everyone who calls Him Lord, Lord will enter into the kingdom of heaven, but only those who do the will of the Father which is in heaven. In all reality, there appears to be an apparent disparity and discrepancy between the two gospel accounts, for in one gospel it appears that Jesus is speaking of those who do the will of the Father, while in another gospel it appears that Jesus is speaking of those who hear His words and do them. On the surface of these two gospel accounts it might seem and appear that there is an apparent contradiction between the two—between doing the will of the Father, and hearing the words of God and doing them—and yet I would argue that the two are in no way different, and are in fact synonymous with each other. I would dare argue that it is true that we are called to do the will of the Father which is in heaven, and the will of our Father which is in heaven is revealed within and through the spoken words of Jesus Christ which are found and recorded in the New Testament gospels. I am completely and utterly convinced that if we want to truly understand and know what the will of the Father in heaven is, we must read and seek to understand the words which Jesus the Christ spoke. I am completely and thoroughly convinced that if we truly want to know what the divine will of the Father in heaven is, and if we want to truly understand what the will of the Father is for our lives, we need look at and examine the words which Jesus the Christ spoke—the words which are written and recorded in the New Testament gospel accounts of His life and ministry. With that being said, I fully recognize and realize that the entire counsel of God is wrapped up and contained within the canon of Scripture, and that the entire word of God reveals unto us the heart and mind of the Father for our lives. With that being said, however, I would argue that there is no difference, nor is there any distinction between doing the will of the Father which is in heaven, and hearing and doing the words which Jesus the Christ spoke, for to do hear and do the words which Jesus spoke is to do the will of the Father. What’s more—to do the will of the Father which is in heaven is to hear the words which Jesus the Christ spoke and to do them.

What I so love about how the apostle Matthew presents the statement of those who called Jesus “Lord, Lord,” and yet did not the will of the Father, and those who heard the words which He spoke and did them being likened unto one who built their house upon a rock, and after building the house experienced the rain pouring down from heaven, the winds blowing, and the floods rising against the house, and yet the house withstood the danger of the flood and the danger of the storm. What I absolutely love about these words of Jesus is that while there is a difference between those who build their house upon a rock and those who build their house upon the sand, there is no difference between those who face and experience the storm and those who don’t. As you read the words which Jesus the Christ spoke unto His disciples as written and recorded in the New Testament gospel of Matthew you will find that on the one hand Jesus spoke about those who heard His sayings and did them, and how they were likened unto a man who built his house upon a rock; while on the other hand you find one who heard and did not the sayings of Jesus Christ, and how they were likened unto a man who built his house upon the sand. It’s interesting and worth noting that within these words which Jesus the Christ spoke—not only was there no difference between these two groups of individuals, in that they both heard the sayings of Jesus, but there was no difference between the wise man and the foolish man, for both experienced and encountered the storm. Within this passage of Scripture, Jesus contrasts those who hear His sayings and do them versus those who hear His sayings and do them not, and yet when He speaks of what such individuals are like, He describes how both the wise man and the foolish man faced and experienced a storm which threatened the house they had just built. Notice that when speaking of the wise man who built his house upon a rock “the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house,” and when speaking of the foolish man who built his house upon the sand that “the rain descended, the floods came, and the winds blew.” There is a fundamental difference between the wise and foolish man in that one built their house upon a rock, while the other built their house upon the sand, however, both the wise man and the foolish man shared something in common—namely, that they both faced and experienced a storm which threatened their house. Both the wise man and the foolish man faced and experienced the storms of life, and yet despite the fact that they both faced and experienced the storm, only the house of the wise man withstood the storm which threatened the house. Oh, please don’t miss this, for what is ultimately being stated and declared here is that there is no difference between those who hear the words of Jesus and do them versus those who hear the words and do them not in the sense that they both hear the words of God. Both sets of people hear the words which Jesus the Christ spoke, and I would dare argue that based on the parable which Jesus the Christ spoke concerning the wise man and the foolish man, all who hear the words of Christ can and will face and experience storms within their life.

I can’t help but view this is a tremendous Segway into what is found within this New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ as written and recorded by Luke, for within this passage we find Luke writing concerning one of two storms which the disciples of Jesus Christ encountered while walking with and following Him. Pause for a moment and consider the fact that even though the disciples walked with and followed Jesus the Christ, that didn’t mean that they were exempt and immune from experiencing and facing storms within their lives. Their seems to be this misguided notion that those who walk with and those who follow Jesus the Christ will somehow be immune from storms within this life. There is this misguided illusion and deception that is preached from many pulpits today that when we make the decision to walk with and follow Jesus the Christ we cannot and will not face and experience storms within our lives. The New Testament gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ demonstrates and proves that this type of thinking is false and incorrect, for the disciples—those who walked with and followed Jesus Christ—not only faced one single storm, but they faced a second storm. Please don’t miss and lose sight of this reality, for it has the ability to dramatically alter and shift our thinking when we think about and consider the fact that the disciples of Jesus faced two distinct and two different storms while walking with and following Jesus the Christ. What’s more, is that on both occasion and in both storms the disciples faced, they encountered the storms by obeying the words which Jesus spoke unto them. Consider if you will the fact that Matthew, Mark and Luke wrote concerning the disciples finding themselves in the midst of a storm with Jesus being in the boat. Concerning this first storm which the disciples faced and experienced, it was a storm which they experienced while Jesus was in the boat with them—albeit with Jesus asleep in the midst of the storm. This is actually quite intriguing and captivating when you think about it, for it was according to Jesus’ words and suggesting that the disciples entered into the ship with Him in order that they might cross over to the other side of the lake, and yet while in the boat with Jesus fell asleep. What makes Luke’s account as so incredibly captivating is the progression of events which took place on this particular day, for first we read of Jesus instructing them to go over to the other side of the lake, then we read of the disciples launching out with Jesus in the boat, followed by Jesus falling asleep in the boat, and finally, we find a storm of wind coming down upon the lake, thus threatening their existence. There were the disciples in the midst of the boat with Jesus asleep in the boat with them, and yet they were filled with fear because their lives were in jeopardy because of the storm. What’s more, is the fact that it was Jesus’ idea to cross over the other side of the lake, and yet having entered into the ship and crossing over into the other side of the lake, the disciples found themselves in the midst of a storm which caused the ship to be filled with water, and caused them to be in jeopardy.

As you read this passage of Scripture, however, you will find that when the disciples realized the danger they were in within the storm, they came to Jesus and awoke Him, declaring unto Him that they perish. Luke writes how immediately Jesus arose, and rebuked the wind and the raging of water, and they both ceased, and there was a calm. This particular account of Jesus being in the ship asleep in the midst of the storm while the disciples were awake, fearful and in a frenzy because they believed themselves to be in jeopardy is actually quite unique and powerful, for Matthew, Mark and Luke write and record how when the disciples awoke Jesus out of His sleep, he immediately rose from His place, stood in the midst of the storm, and rebuked the wind, as well as the raging of the sea. STAND IN THE STORM! SPEAK TO THE STORM! I can’t help but be drawn to the fact that while this particular passage begins with Jesus asleep in the midst of the ship while the storm raged all around the disciples, it would eventually transition to the place where Jesus would stand in the midst of the storm and speak to the storm as he would rebuke the winds and the raging sea. I happen to find this to be truly wonderful, unique and powerful, for there are essentially two elements which are found within this particular encounter—first the willingness to stand in the midst of the storm, and secondly the willingness to speak to the storm. Oh, I would love to have been there and watch as Jesus rose from the place of His slumber, stood in the midst of the storm in full authority, in full power, in full strength, and in full control of His emotions and thoughts. I wonder what it was like for the disciples to watch Jesus rise from the place of His slumber and immediately stand in the midst of the storm full of authority and power. What a sight it must have been like for the one who created the wind, the one who created the waters of the seas, lakes and oceans to stand in the midst of the raging storm full of authority and power, full of trust and confidence. I wonder what it was like to be the disciples as they watched Jesus stand in the midst of the storm completely unaffected and unmoved by the wind which blew and the raging of the sea with its waves as they crashed over the boat. What was it like to watch as Jesus stood in the midst of the storm, and not only stood in the midst of the storm, but also spoke to the storm with all authority. I am convinced that there is something which we must recognize and understand when reading this particular passage of Scripture, and that is that before Jesus spoke to the storm, He first had to stand in the midst of the storm. It’s worth noting that Jesus didn’t speak to the storm while still sitting down in the midst of the ship, but he spoke to the storm standing in the midst of the ship. Oh, there is something about a willingness to stand in the midst of the storm—something about standing in the midst of the storm when the winds are raging and the sea is roaring—that truly demonstrates authority and power, as well as trust and confidence. There is something about a willingness to stand in the midst of the storm as the storm rages all around you that exercises a strong trust and confidence in the living God.

STAND IN THE STORM, SPEAK TO THE STORM! As I sit here this morning and think about and consider this particular encounter within the lives of the disciples, I can’t help but be absolutely consumed with the image of Jesus standing in the midst of the storm, and not only standing in the midst of the storm, but also speaking in the midst of the storm, and speaking to the storm. It would have been very easy for Jesus to stand in the midst of the storm, and simply raise His hand before the sea and the wind in order that the storm might cease and a calm might ensue. The gospel writers, however, don’t write and record Jesus doing this, for instead of standing the midst of the storm and merely raising His hand before and against the wind and the waves, Jesus spoke to the storm in order that it might cease and all might be made still. Having once been asleep in the midst of the ship Jesus rose the place of His slumber and immediately stood in the midst of the storm completely unaffected and not impacted by the storm at all. SLEEPING, STANDING, SPEAKING! Notice the progression of Jesus within the storm, for we first find Him sleeping in the midst of the storm—perhaps completely unaware of what was taking place before and around Him. Pause and consider that reality for a moment, and how Jesus was able to sleep in the midst of a storm that raged all around them, and even as the water filled the boat. The water and waves of the sea had to have crashed into the boat and had to have splashed upon Jesus, and yet neither the wind nor the waves awoke Jesus from His slumber. It was only the cry of the disciples that awoke Jesus from His slumber, and once awakened from his slumber, He stood in the midst of the storm and then immediately spoke to the storm. Oh, there is great emphasis that is given to speaking to the storm in this particular passage of Scripture, and yet while there is a great deal to be said about speaking to the storm, I am convinced there is something to be said about standing in the midst of the storm. There is something about a quiet trust and confidence within your heart and spirit that allows you to stand in the midst of the storm completely unafraid and unhinged within your heart and soul because of the storm. There is something about standing in the midst of the storms we face within our lives—standing in the midst of these storms as the wind, waves and waters rage all around us. There is something truly wonderful and spectacular about transitioning from sleeping in the midst of the ship to standing in the midst of the storm full of faith, full of trust, full of confidence in the living God, and knowing and understanding the authority and power of the One who has the ability to calm every raging sea, calm every raging wind, and has the ability to calm the storms which are before us. There is something about those who are willing to stand in the midst of the storm and stand in full assurance and full confidence in the One in whom they believe without being fearful or anxious within their hearts.

Perhaps one of the greatest questions we must ask ourselves when reading this particular passage is not only whether or not we are willing to speak to the storm, but whether or not we are willing to stand in the midst of the storm. It takes great courage, it takes great confidence, it takes great faith and trust to stand in the midst of the storm—particularly and especially standing in the midst of the storm completely unafraid because of the wind and the waves which rage and roar all around and before you. There is something truly remarkable about standing in the midst of the storm as the wind rages all around you, as the waves of the sea crash upon your boat, and as the water of the sea begins to fill your ship. There is something about standing in the midst of the storm rather than sitting in the storm, for standing suggests and speaks of confidence, of trust, of assurance, of faith, and even of authority. I am thoroughly convinced that the living God has not called us to merely sit in the midst of our storms, but has called us to stand in the midst of our storms—even though when we first stand in the midst of the storms neither wind, nor the waves die down and all is brought to peace and calm. I believe with all my heart that we cannot speak to the storm until and unless we are willing to stand in the midst of the storm, for there is something about standing in the midst of the storm that truly demonstrates a confidence we have in the living God which cannot be shaken. Tell me dear brother, tell me dear sister—when was the last time you stood in the midst of the storm? When was the last time you found yourself facing and experiencing a storm within your life, and although you initially were fearful and afraid, you decided to overcome your fear, your anxiety, your terror and your dread, and you arose to stand in the midst of the storm? There is not a doubt in my mind that in these Last Days the Spirit of the living God is seeking to raise up men and women who are willing to stand in the midst of the storms which they face during the course of their lives, and from that place of standing in the midst of the storms, they are able to speak to the storm. I am completely and absolutely convinced that we cannot, we dare not, and must not make any attempt to speak to the storms we face within and throughout the course of our lives until and unless we are willing to stand in the midst of the storm. Standing in the midst of the storm demonstrates courage and confidence, and thus positions us to be able to speak to the storm, for only when we stand in confidence and courage can we then speak with authority and power. I would dare say there are too many among us who are attempting to speak form a place of authority and power, and yet they have not first stood in a place of confidence and courage. There are men and women among us who are attempting to speak with authority and power, and yet they have not made the deliberate and conscious decision to stand in the midst of the storm and demonstrate courage, conviction and confidence before the living God in the midst of that storm. I would caution you against making any attempt to speak to the storm until and unless you are first willing to stand in the midst of the storm in full confidence, with full conviction, and with full courage before the living God knowing that the One who created the wind, the waters and the waves, has the ability to bring all to a place of peace, quietness and calm. There is something about a willingness to stand in the midst of the storm that positions us to be able to speak to the storm, for if not even Jesus spoke to the storm sitting down, we cannot think or hope to speak to the storm sitting down, or even asleep in the midst of the ship.

There is a spoken word found on Life Worship’s album speak to the word which I feel must be contributed to this writing. This spoken word was delivered by Charlotte Gambill and bears the same title as the album—Speak to the Storm. I would be completely and utterly remiss to not include the words of this spoken word within his writing, for the words which are found within it must be carefully considered in light of everything that is written within the gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ, as well as this particular writing. Consider if you will the words which are found within this spoke word found on the album “Speak to the Storm”—words which were spoken by Charlotte Gambill:

Univited

Yet it still arrives

Unapologetic

In the wake of all it will disturb

Its presence seeks an audience

Its power strives to be seen

And its noise demands to be heard

Look at me, it shouts

Be afraid of what damage I may do

Watch as my wind howls

Breaking anything that seeks to stand in its way

This storm intrudes

Invades

Interrupts

It is void of care

It has no intention of cleaning up any of its devastation

The storm we see in the natural

Is only rivaled by the storm that is scent in the spiritual

This storm also roars

But its prey is far more sinister

This storm, the storm of life

Feeds of our fears and seeks to destroy our destinies

These storms are assignments of darkness

To bring adversity and cause upheaval

To disorient and confuse

To kill, steal and destroy

The storms of challenge and conflict

The violent winds of pain and hardship

Storms that threaten relationships

And play on insecurities

No one is immune from the storms of life

From the bad news, the testing times

Loss and abuse

From the betrayal and disappointment

Anxiety or torment

We all have storms

But when did we forget, that we all have a voice?

You have the words to silence the winds

You have the confession to calm the confusion

You have the light to illuminate the dark

Your storm may be on the horizon

Or you may be in its eye

But no matter where this finds you

You must find your voice

Find your song and sing

Find your promise and persist

Find your faith and fight

Find your voice and speak to the storm

There was a time when Jesus and the

disciples found their situation suddenly change

Remeber the story when they were in a storm

The storm ripped through the calm and it began to rage

Out of nowhere the simple boat journey became the most testing trial

The wind blew and the waves grew

The storm threw some into panic

They allowed fear to speak and lost sight of the fight

Others they couldn’t see a way out and so began to [?]

Yet there was one

There was one who was asleep

Asleep in the storm

It did its best to disturb him but He slept

Woken by those, who had let fear take a hold

Jesus spoke

To the storm

He said be still

To the chaos

He spoke calm

To the fearful

He spoke faith

And to the dark

He brought light

Jesus spoke

And the storm surrendered

You have the same power to bring order

And you have the words to advance and take on the warfare

Don’t allow your voice to be silenced by the storm

Wake up

Worship

Declare His goodness

Sing of His faithfulness

Speak His peace

And wage war with the words of life

The greatest miracles can happen in the storm

The miracles of our awakening to the power that is so often [?] within

Miracles happen when you speak to the storm

When we answer back to its threat with boldness and trust

Miracles are found when the word is spoken out loud

Drowning out the lies with the declaration of truth

The miracle is in your mouth

The storm can not withstand the

weapon of worship and the arsenal of prayer

We all have storms

But we all have a voice

So speak to the storm

So sing

Sing until you see the still

Praise

Praise until the promise comes

Believe

Believe until the breakthrough

Declare

Declare until the dawn has come

And fight

Fight with faith until all the fear is gone

Find your voice

Chose your song

We all have storms

But we all have a voice

So speak

Speak

Speak to the storm

The entire premise of this spoken word is centered upon standing in the midst of the storm, and the voice that we have in the midst of the storm to be able to speak to it. I have to admit that the first time I heard these words I was absolutely and utterly amazed and captivated with and by them. There is something wonderful and truly powerful about speaking to the storms which we face that demonstrates a certain degree and measure of authority and power we have been given within this life. With that being said, I am convinced that before we can hope to speak to the storm(s) we face within this life, we must first learn how to stand in the midst of the storm(s) we face within this life. I would dare say that we cannot hope to immediately speak to the storms we face within this life until we are first willing to learn how to stand in the midst of the storm—until we are first willing to demonstrate conviction, confidence and courage in the midst of the storm by not remaining sleeping, and not even remaining sitting, but actually standing up in the midst of the storm—standing up in the midst of the wind and the waves in full assurance and full confidence before and in the living God who created the wind and the waves. I am completely and utterly convinced that there is a great need within our hearts and lives to learn how to stand in the midst of the storms we face—to stand in the midst of those storms with full courage, full confidence and full conviction in the One who is able to bring peace and calm to the raging storm before and all around us. You say you want to speak to the storm, and that is absolutely wonderful, and there is something to be said about being able to speak to the storm(s) we face within our lives. Before we can even make any attempt to speak to the storms which we face within our lives we must first learn how to stand in the midst of the storms, for it is through a willingness to stand in the midst of the storm that we demonstrate the courage, the conviction, and the confidence we have in the One who not only created the wind and the waves, but who also has the ability to bring the peace and the calm. Even when we speak to the storm, we must recognize and understand that it is not us who brings the storm to calm, the winds to still, and the waters to peace—it is the Spirit of the living Christ within us who causes such a still and calm to take place. I am sitting here this morning and I am absolutely and utterly captivated with and by the fact that as much as we have been called to speak to the storms, and as much as we would like to speak to the storms within our lives, we must first be willing, and demonstrate a willingness to stand in the midst of our storms—to stand and face, to stand and confront, and to stand and engage the wind, the waters, and the waves which threaten our very existence. Oh dear brother, oh dear sister—are you willing to learn how to stand in the midst of the storm(s) you face within your life?

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