Do You Feel Like You’re Serving Alone: Entitlement and Complaining In the Place of Serving

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ as written and recorded by the beloved physician Luke. More specifically, today’s passage begins with the thirty-eighth verse of the tenth chapter and continues through to the thirteenth verse or the eleventh chapter. When you come to this particular passage of scripture you will find two of the greatest disciplines and practices found within the life of the disciple and follower of Jesus the Christ. As you read this particular passage of scripture you will find that it begins with a woman named Martha who was willing to have Jesus enter into her home in order that she might make ready a meal for Him. This passage of scripture begins and opens with a woman named Martha in the village of Bethany desiring that Jesus would enter into her home in order that she might entertain Him there in the midst of the house. Before moving any further into that which is found present within this passage of scripture I find it absolutely necessary and imperative that e carefully consider and examine the fact that not only did Martha desire that Jesus enter into her home, but we also find Jesus being willing to enter into the home of this woman. This passage isn’t merely about Martha desiring that Jesus would enter into her home, but it is also about the willingness of Jesus to accept her invitation and to enter into that home. I would dare say that it is no small, nor is it a light thing to invite Jesus into our home—much less Jesus the Christ accept the invitation and agree to enter into it. This passage isn’t merely about the desire of one woman for Jesus to enter into her home, but it is about a willingness of Jesus to take the time to accept the invitation and to enter into the home. Before we move any further into the interaction which took place within the home we must first come to terms with the fact that Jesus was willing to enter into the home of this lowly woman—a reality that is found only a few other times within the four gospel accounts of His life and ministry.

In order to properly understand the context surrounding what took place within the home of Martha on this particular year occasion it is necessary to understand that there are only a few instances and occurrences when we find Jesus entering into the home of another. The four gospels are replete with example after example and account after account of jesu entering into the towns, cities and villages which were present within Judaea, as well as Samaria. With that being said it is something altogether different to read and consider Jesus not merely entering into cities, towns and villages, but also entering into the actual homes of those whom He encountered. As you read the four gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus you will find that there were specific instances and occurrences when He actually entered into the homes of those whom He encountered and interacted with throughout the course of His public ministry. Of course the event which we read and discover in this particular portion of scripture is one example of Jesus being invited into the home of one who followed Him, and accepting the invitation to enter into the home and to engage Himself in fellowship. If you continue reading the scriptures you will find the very first instance of Jesus entering into the home of another is actually jesus’ entering into the home of one of His disciples, for we find Jesus entering the home of Simon who was called Peter, and his wife who remains nameless in the gospels. Upon Jesus entering into the home of Simon we discover that Simon’s mother in law was present there in the home and was sick with a fever. Upon witnessing Simon’s mother in law being sick, Jesus immediately rebuked the fever, healed this woman, and would eventually be served by the one who was previously sick with a fever. As you continue reading the four gospels you will find that Jesus would enter into the homes of another one of His disciples, for if you continue reading you will find that immediately after Jesus called Matthew you to follow Him, and Matthew obeying the call and forsaking everything, Jesus was invited into the home of Matthew there in the land of Judaea. Thus far—very early on in the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ—we find Him entering into the homes of two of His disciples who had invited Him to enter in and fellowship with them. On the one hand we find Jesus entering into the home of Simon called peter and rebuking the fever which plagued his mother in law. On the other hand we find Jesus and His disciples entering into the home of Matthew, and how there in the home of Matthew many publicans and sinners came to dine with Jesus. On the one hand we fine Jesus encountering the sick within the house, while on the other hand we find Jesus encountering the sinner within the house.

If there is one thing I absolutely love about the four gospels, it’s the willingness of Jesus to enter into the homes of certain individuals He encountered throughout His public ministry. The accounts of Jesus entering into the home of Simon called peter, as well as the home of Matthew who was another one of His disciples is actually quite powerful when you consider and think about a Jesus who invites disciples to follow Him, and yet is willing to enter into their homes in order that He might have fellowship and dine with them. How absolutely wonderful and incredible it is to think about and consider the fact that not only did Jesus extend an invitation for His disciples to follow Him, but He also accepted their invitation to enter into their homes and dine with them. I absolutely love that some of the earliest accounts of Jesus being willing to enter into the homes of those He encountered were actually the homes of two of his disciples, as we find Jesus not only entering into the home of Simon called Peter, but we also find Jesus entering into the home of Matthew whom He found sitting at the receipt of custom, and called and invited Him to follow Him. I find it absolutely remarkable and fascinating when reading the four gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ that He was not only willing to invite men to walk with and follow Him, but He was also willing to accept the invitation of those same men to enter into their home and fellowship with them. It is absolutely remarkable and astounding that as much as Jesus was willing to invite these men to walk with and follow Him, He was also willing to accept their invitation to dine and fellowship with them. I love that the gospels don’t merely include accounts of Jesus inviting men to follow and walk with Him, but they also include examples of Jesus accepting the invitation of two of those disciples to enter into their homes. In fact, I would dare say that it is necessary for us to consider the account of these two disciples inviting Jesus into their homes in order that Jesus might dine and fellowship with them. I will begin with the account of Jesus finding Levi also called Matthew at the receipt of custom, Jesus inviting Levi to follow Him, and then Levi inviting Jesus into his home in order that he might partake in fellowship with Jesus. I will then present you with the account of Jesus entering into the home of Simon also called Peter and his wife, and the events which took place within that home. Consider if you will each of these accounts of two of Jesus’ disciples inviting Him into their homes in order that they might engage in fellowship with Him:

“And as Jesus passed forth from thence, He saw a man, named Matthew, sitting at the receipt of custom: and He saith unto him, Follow me. And he arose, and followed Him. And it came to pass, as Jesus sat at meat in the house, behold, many publicans and sinners came and sat down with Him and His disciples. And when the Pharisees saw it, they said unto His disciples, Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners? But when Jesus heard that, he said unto them, They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick. But go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice: for I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance” (Matthew 9:9-13).

While this particular passage indicates that Jesus found Matthew sitting at the receipt of the custom and inviting him to follow Him, and then Jesus entering into the house where He dined with His disciples, as well as publicans and sinners, there is no indication within the passage that the house into which Jesus entered belonged to Matthew. It isn’t until we come to the New Testament gospel of Matthew that we discover and encounter the reality of the house into which Jesus entered actually belonged to Matthew. If you turn and direct your attention to the second chapter of the New Testament gospel of Mark you will find the account of Jesus finding Matthew sitting at the receipt of custom, Jesus inviting Matthew to follow Him, and then Jesus entering into the house where He would dine with His disciples, publicans and sinners alike. Consider if you will that which is found within this passage of Scripture beginning with the thirteenth verse of the second chapter of the New Testament gospel of Mark:

“And He went forth again by the sea side; and all the multitude resorted unto Him, and He taught them. And as He passed by, He saw Levi the son of Alphaeus sitting at the receipt of custom, and said unto him, Follow me. And he arose and followed Him. And it came to pass, that, as Jesus sat at meat in his house, many publicans and sinners sat also together with Jesus and His disciples: for there were many, and they followed Him. And when the scribes and Pharisees saw Him eat with publicans and sinners, they said unto His disciples, How is it that He eateth and drinketh with publicans and sinners? When Jesus heard it, He saith unto them, They that are whole have no need of the physician, but they that are sick: I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance” (Mark 2:13-17).

It is within this passage of Scripture where we learn and discover that the house into which Jesus entered was not just any house, but it was the house which belonged to Matthew whom He had found sitting at the receipt of custom, and invited Him to walk with and follow Him. What I so love about how John Mark writes and recorded this particular event within the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ, is that Mark first writes of Jesus’ invitation of Matthew to follow Him, and then this invitation to follow Jesus was immediately followed with a secondary invitation—one that was not given by Jesus to the disciple, but rather by the disciples to Jesus to enter into his home in order that He might dine and fellowship with Him. We dare not miss the tremendous significance and importance of this fact, for it is not only incredibly fascinating that Jesus would find this tax collector sitting at the receipt of custom collecting taxes from his fellow brothers for the Romans, but we also find this new disciples of Jesus inviting Him into his home in order that he might dine and fellowship with Him. It is within this home where Jesus and His disciples—not including Matthew—would be joined by publicans and sinners alike, and Jesus ate and drank with such individuals. It was Jesus’ actions in the home of Matthew that ignited controversy within the hearts and minds of the Pharisees, for they could not believe that Jesus would entertain publicans and sinners—much less eat and drink with them. Here we find Jesus entering into the home of a publican turned disciples after inviting him to follow Him, and there in that home Jesus and His disciples were joined by publicans and sinners alike. More than likely these individuals were close friends, companions, or even associates of Matthew, and would have had a certain type of relationship with him. It would be the relationship Matthew had with Jesus, as well as the relationship Matthew had with certain of his friends and companions—those who happened to be publicans and sinners—that would bring them all together under one roof. How absolutely fascinating it is that not only would Jesus accept the invitation of Matthew to enter into his home, but there under the roof of that home Jesus would eat and drink with sinners. Matthew’s previous profession would have undoubtedly caused him to become familiar and acquainted with other publicans, and even sinners—those whom the Jews despised and rejected—and there is not a doubt in my mind that Matthew would have had such individuals in his home on other occasions. I do not believe that this was the first time Matthew entertained publicans and sinners under the roof of his home, although now this was the first time Matthew would entertain publicans and sinners under his roof with the presence of Jesus in the house. This particular occasion was truly remarkable and unique, for those who had previously dined and fellowshipped under the roof of Matthew would now eat and drink under that roof in the presence of Jesus. Oh how wonderful and amazing it is that just because Matthew accepted the invitation of Jesus to follow Him, that didn’t mean that he gave up the relationships he had with those who had perhaps been acquaintances, colleagues, and perhaps even friends. Instead, Matthew invited Jesus under the roof of his home, and even invited his companions and colleagues as well—those who were publicans and sinners—to encounter and experience Jesus the Christ whom He agreed to walk with and follow.

Building upon this concept of Jesus entering into the home of those who invited Him in, we must now turn and direct our attention to the account of Jesus entering into the home of Simon also called Peter. If you turn your attention back just a little further in the New Testament gospel account of Mark you will find it written and recorded concerning Jesus entering into the house of Simon called Peter. Beginning with the twenty-ninth verse of the chapter we find the following words which were written to describe this particular event within the life and ministry of Jesus:

“And forthwith, when they were come out of the synagogue, they entered into the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. But Simon’s wife’s mother lay sick of a fever, and anon they tell Him of her. And He came and took her by the hand, and lifted her up; and immediately the fever left her, and she ministered unto them. And at even, when the sun did set, they brought unto Him all that were diseased, and them that were possessed with devils. And all the city was gathered together at the door. And He healed many that were sick of divers diseases, and cast out many devils; and suffered not the devils to speak, because they knew Him” (Mark 1:29-34).

What we find within this passage of Scripture is actually quite astonishing, for we find that when Jesus and His disciples Simon and Andrew, together with James and John came out of the synagogue, they entered into the home of Simon and Andrew. It was there in that particular home of Simon and Andrew that Simon’s wife’s mother lie sick with a fever. Jesus having compassion on Simon’s mother-in-law, came unto her, took her by the hand, lifted her up, and immediately the fever left her. What we find and what we read next is actually amazing, for immediately after the fever left Simon’s mother-in-law, we find her rising up and ministering unto them. There in the home of Simon and Andrew Jesus would heal Simon’s mother-in-law of her fever, and as a result of that healing, she would rise up and minister unto them. The healing of the fever of Simon’s mother-in-law would be followed by all those within that town bringing unto Jesus all that were diseased, and those that were possessed with devils, and the whole city was gathered together at the door. Mark writes and records how Jesus healed many that were sick of divers diseases, and cast out many devils, but suffered not the devils to speak, for they knew who He was. It would be here under the roof of Simon and Andrew’s home that Jesus would heal Simon’s mother-in-law of the fever which gripped her physical body, and would even heal divers manner of diseases within the physical bodies of those who came unto, and those who were brought unto Him. It would be there under the roof of Simon and Andrew that the power of God would be manifested in their midst, as Jesus would not only accept the invitation of Simon and Andrew to enter into their home, but would also work the works of His Father among them in their midst. It would be there under the roof of Simon and Andrew that Jesus would not only heal Simon’s mother in law, but would also heal many who were plagued with divers diseases, and would drive out many devils. How remarkable and astounding it is to think about and consider the fact that one simple invitation of Simon and Andrew to have Jesus in their home would not only lead to the healing of Simon’s mother in law, but it would also open the door—literally—for countless diseases of others to be healed, and many devils to be cast out. It would be the invitation of Simon and Andrew to have Jesus under the roof of their home that would open the door for Jesus to engage Himself in the works of His Father there in that home, as He would heal divers diseases, and would drive out many devils. Oh if we only knew what could happen if we began inviting Jesus into our homes, and desired that Jesus would abide with us under our roof in order that we might have fellowship with Him. Oh that we would consider the tremendous work and ministry that could be present within our homes, and under those roofs when we make the decision to invite Jesus into the home, and allowed Him to be Jesus. It is very critical that although we invite Jesus under the roof of our homes, we allow Him to be Himself, and we allow Him to do what He desires to do without any limitations or restrictions.

As you turn and direct your attention back to the tenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Luke and read the account of Jesus entering into the home of a woman named Martha, you will find that Martha had a sister named Mary. Luke writes and records how as Jesus entered into a certain village, there was a certain woman named Martha who received Him into her house. This woman Martha had a sister named Mary, which also sat at Jesus’ feet, and heard His word. As you read the account of Mary and Martha in this house you will find a stunning and striking contrast between Mary and Martha, for Luke writes and records how while Mary sat at the feet of Jesus with others in order that she might hear his word, Martha was cambered about much serving. There is a stark contrast within this passage of Scripture between sitting at the feet of Jesus and being cambered about with much serving. What we find within this passage is Martha receiving Jesus into her home, and Martha cambered about with much serving while Mary simply sat at the feet of Jesus hearing and listening to His word. As you continue reading this passage you will find that when Martha recognized and realized that she Mary was sitting at the feet of Jesus, she came unto Jesus with a very specific message. Once Martha was in the presence of Jesus, she spoke unto Him and asked Him whether or not He cared that her sister left her alone to serve. What’s more, is that Martha would go on to declare unto Jesus that He bid her sister Mary come and help her in serving. This passage has long been one that has intrigued and captivated me, however, upon reading it last night I was struck by something that I had never seen before. Upon reading this passage last night I realized that Martha wasn’t at all concerned with the need to serve. If you read this passage carefully you will find that Martha’s complaint and argument had absolutely nothing to do with Jesus caring whether or not she was given to serving, or whether or not she had to serve. In all reality, I would dare say that Martha enjoyed serving, and it was most likely in her nature to serve others. I would dare suggest and state that it was in Martha’s nature to focus on the needs of others, and that she was perhaps given to much hospitality. As I read the words which are found within his passage of Scripture, I can’t help but get the sense that Martha enjoyed serving, and didn’t even mind serving Jesus and those who were with Him. Not once did Martha complain about serving, nor even serving those who were present within the house—something we would be incredibly wise to recognize and understand. Far too often we have read this passage and thought that Martha was complaining about serving in general, and yet this simply isn’t the case at all within this passage. A careful reading of this passage will reveal that Martha never once complained about serving in general, but rather complained about serving alone.

ARE YOU TIRED OF SERVING ALONE? DO YOU FEEL LIKE YOU ARE THE ONLY ONE SERVING? DO YOU FIND YOURSELF LOOKING AROUND FOR OTHERS WHO ARE WILLING TO HELP YOU IN SERVING? The more I sit here this morning and read this particular passage of Scripture, the more I can’t help but think about and consider the fact that there is within this passage a powerful picture of many within the church, and many in ministry today who are just like Martha. There are countless men and women present among us in this generation who are cumbered about with much serving, and yet their complaint is not that they are engaged in serving, nor even that they have to serve. These individuals are given to hospitality, and these individuals are given to serving, and don’t mind serving the needs of others. Such individuals have absolutely no issue or concern with esteeming others above themselves, and giving themselves in the service of others in order that they might be taken care of. Where this passage brings to light a particular truth that is present within the lives of countless men and women among us in our midst is men and women who are cumbered with much serving, and upon examining their serving, they recognize and realize that they are serving alone. Martha’s complaint was never that she had to serve, nor even that she had to serve Jesus and those who were with Him, for undoubtedly she enjoyed serving others. If you read Martha’s complaint in the presence of Jesus you will find that she complained to Him—not about serving, but about serving alone. For Martha, she didn’t mind serving, but she didn’t want to serve alone. What’s more, is that Martha didn’t want to serve alone, and felt that her sister Mary should be helping her rather than sitting at the feet of Jesus. Please don’t miss this point, for it shines a tremendous amount of light on what is present before us within this passage. Within this passage we find Martha not only complaining about having to serve alone, but also feeling that Mary should be serving together with her. It wasn’t enough that Martha felt she shouldn’t have to serve alone, but she felt that instead of sitting at the feet of Jesus, Mary should be standing with her and helping her serve those who were present under the roof of their home. Martha’s complaint before and in the presence of Jesus was that she was left to serve alone, and not only felt like she shouldn’t have to serve alone, but also that she didn’t want to serve alone. Martha felt that her sister Mary should have instinctively recognized the need of serving those who were present under that roof, and helped her serve. In all reality, I would dare say that this passage isn’t merely about the concept of serving as we know it, or even the concept of serving as we have thought about in relationship to what is before us in the home of Martha. This particular passage is about Martha serving, and Martha serving alone, and feeling that her own sister should be with her helping her serve.

What I find to be so incredibly unique and powerful about this passage is that what we find and what we see in the life of Martha isn’t really about Martha alone, but actually touches many of us who are in the body of Christ today. I am thoroughly convinced that there are countless men and women within the body of Christ who are given to hospitality, and who enjoy being actively engaged in serving the needs of others, yet despite their willingness, their desire, and their enjoyment in serving, they nonetheless have a complaint in serving. THE COMPLAINT IN SERVING! HAVE YOU COMPLAINED IN SERVING LATELY? I read this passage of Scripture and I can’t help but think about and consider all those men and women among us within the body of Christ who might enjoy serving, yet in the midst of their serving they have a complaint which they voice in the presence of Jesus—a complaint that has to do with their serving alone with no one to help them. There are those among us within the body of Christ who have absolutely no issue or quarrel with serving, yet the one thing they absolutely detest, and the one thing they can’t stand is feeling like they are serving all alone. In fact, I would dare say that one of the most dangerous places to be in within the body of Christ is that place where you are serving the needs of others, and yet in the midst of serving the needs of others you feel as though you are doing it all alone. Martha didn’t mind serving in and of itself, but rather, she took issue with feeling as though she was serving alone. Martha did not complain to Jesus about His caring whether or not she was serving, but rather that she was serving all alone, and that there was no one to help her. Oh, how many men and women among us in the body of Christ are serving, and in all reality they enjoy serving, yet they feel as though they are serving all alone with no one to help them? How many men and women among us within the body of Christ have found room to complain in the midst of serving because they feel like they are serving alone, and there is no one to help them? There is not a doubt in my mind that this reality goes back to the garden of Eden when the. Lord God looked upon man and recognized that it was not good for him to be alone. Upon recognizing that it was not good for man to be alone, the Lord formed from one of his ribs a help mate who would help him in the oversight and care of the garden and all that was present within it. The Lord recognized that it was not good for man to be alone, and even that man needed help for the task and assignment that was before him, and as a result, He formed and created one who would come alongside and help him. What we find in this particular passage within the New Testament gospel of Luke is Martha complaining to Jesus that she had to serve alone, and that there was no one to help her. In all reality, it could very well be said that Martha didn’t feel like there was none to help her, for her sister Mary was present under the roof of that home. In other words, not only did Martha not feel like she should serve alone, but she felt that her sister Mary should be the one to help her in the process of serving. Martha felt as though she shouldn’t have to serve alone, and even felt that her sister Mary should have helped her serve instead of sitting at the feet of Jesus hearing His word.

There have been countless sermons, teachings and messages which have been spoken concerning this passage of Scripture, and the focal point of these teachings is Mary choosing to sit at the feet of Jesus hearing His word rather than being on her feet serving with her sister Martha. Much emphasis has been placed on the words which Jesus spoke unto Martha concerning Mary, and how Martha was careful and troubled about many things. Many have chosen to focus on the fact that Jesus declared unto Martha that only one thing was needful, and how Mary had chosen that good part, which would not be taken away from her. While I am convinced that this particular portion of Scripture warrants strong consideration, I am convinced that it is only part of the actual picture that is found within the verses before us. As you read this passage of Scripture you will find that Jesus declared unto Martha that she was carefully and troubled about many things—words which I find to be absolutely intriguing and captivating. Here Martha complained to Jesus that she was serving all alone, and even how she felt Mary should be serving with her, and in response to her complaint, Jesus declared unto her that was careful and troubled about many things. I am convinced we must focus our attention on the words which Jesus spoke unto Martha, for I am convinced they apply to all those present among us within the body of Christ who feel as though they are serving alone, and feel as though they are entitled to others helping them in the process of serving. Jesus’ words to Martha and Jesus words pertaining to Martha were very specific, for Jesus declared unto Martha that she was careful and troubled about many things. In all reality, I would dare say that Martha’s complaint in the presence of Jesus, and even Martha’s engagement in service was a manifestation of a troubled heart that might very well have been present within her. When speaking unto Martha, Jesus declared unto her that she was careful and troubled about many things, and in all reality, these words describe countless men and women within the body of Christ right now who not only feel as though they are serving alone, but feel as though others should come alongside them and help them serve. ENTITLEMENT IN SERVING! Would it shock and surprise you to know that it is possible to be given to serving and even serving the needs of others, and yet to feel entitled in the midst of that serving? Would it surprise you to think about and consider the fact that it is possible to serve within the body of Christ, and yet feel entitled that others should serve alongside and with you? I recognize and realize that this might come as a shock and surprise to you, however, there is not a doubt in my mind that there are a number of men and women among us within the body of Christ who although they are serving, and although they are “ministering,” have issue and take offense to feeling as though they are serving alone. What’s more, is that such individuals feel entitled that others should help them, and even voice their complaint before and in the presence of Jesus.

I would ask you who are reading the words which are found and contained within this passage of Scripture whether or not you find yourself in the same place Martha was in. Do you enjoy serving, and do you enjoy giving to others in order that you might meet and service their needs, yet you take issue and offense with feeling like you are serving all alone? Are you one who is given to hospitality, and yet despite your being given to much hospitality, you feel as though you are serving alone, and shouldn’t serve alone? Martha undoubtedly enjoyed serving, and might have even felt a sense of obligation in serving, and in that place of enjoyment and obligation, she realized she was serving alone. Oh, I am convinced there is a fine line between enjoyment in serving and obligation in serving, and that it is in this area between obligation and enjoyment that we take offense to serving alone without anyone to help us. It is within this place in between obligation and enjoyment that we complain in the presence of Jesus because of serving alone with no one to come alongside and help us. Oh, there are men and women present among us in this generation within the body of Christ who enjoy serving, and enjoy engaging in hospitality, and yet where they take offense and find fault is when they feel as though they are serving alone. Undoubtedly Martha felt entitled to help, and even felt entitled to her own sister Mary helping her, for certainly she wasn’t going to ask Jesus to bid one of His disciples to come and help her in her serving. Martha asked Jesus to bid her sister Mary to come and help her serve, for she felt it was Mary’s duty and responsibility to rise from her place and help her serve. Oh that we would read the words which are contained within this passage of Scripture and that we would truly examine the condition of our hearts in service and serving, and whether or not we are in that place of serving and complaining. ENTITLEMENT IN THE PLACE OF SERVING AND COMPLAINING! If there is one thing this passage reveals about Martha, it’s not merely that she was serving alone, but there was also something with her heart and soul that caused her to be troubled and careful about many things. In all reality, I am convinced that this process of serving alone helped Martha come to terms with the condition of her heart and recognize that there was something deeper going on here than just serving alone, for she was dealing with a troubled heart. I firmly believe that we must read this passage carefully and not only consider our sense of entitlement in serving alone, but also the condition of our heart and soul and our being troubled about many things. I am convinced that more often than not it is in the presence of serving, and perhaps even serving alone and feeling entitled in the place of serving that we are confronted with the condition of our heart and soul, and how we are troubled about many things. Undoubtedly this particular occurrence within the life of Martha revealed unto her that there was something much deeper going on here—namely, that what she was really contending with was not necessarily serving alone, but dealing with a heart and soul that was troubled and burdened with many things. Oh that we would read this passage of Scripture and would come face to face with our hearts and souls which are burdened and troubled with many things in the presence of Jesus Christ who calls us to sit at his feet and hear His word and enjoy His presence.

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