Lay It All Down & Let It All Go: Are You Willing to Walk With Jesus Without Distraction or Idols

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the beloved physician Luke. More specifically, today’s passage begins with the twenty-fifth verse of the fourteenth chapter and continues through to the tenth verse of the fifteenth chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find some of the most intense words spoken by Jesus concerning discipleship contained within the four gospels. Within the final portion of verses found in the fourteenth chapter of the gospel which Luke wrote we find a great multitude of people walking with and journeying with Jesus. This is actually quite significant for when we read the words which are found here in this passage we must recognize and understand that they weren’t spoken to the twelve disciples whom Jesus had chosen and appointed. We oftentimes consider the words which are found in this set of verses—as well as the same words which are found elsewhere in the gospels—and we assume that they were spoken unto the twelve disciples who walked with and followed Jesus everywhere He went for the full three and a half year’s He walked upon the earth. The truth of the matter is that if you truly read the words which are found within this passage you will understand that the words were spoken not simply unto the twelve disciples who walked with and followed Jesus, but unto a great multitude of people who walked with and followed Jesus. As you read the words found in this passage of scripture you will find that while it was true the twelve disciples absolutely and without a doubt walked with, followed and went with Jesus, there was also a great multitude of people who also walked and went with Jesus. There was a great multitude of people who didn’t merely gather themselves unto Jesus in order that they might behold the mighty works which He performed among men, but a group of people who actually walked with Jesus and went with Him as He journeyed. I actually find this quite intriguing and astounding when you take the time to think about it, for it brings us face to face with the tremendous reality that throughout and during the ministry of Jesus, there weren’t just twelve disciples who walked with and followed Him, but there were also a great number of those who made the decision to walk with and follow Him wherever He went. There were actually great multitudes of people who made the deliberate and conscious decision to walk with Jesus and to follow Him whenever He went within and throughout the region of Judaea.

We would like to think, and we have perhaps long believed that Jesus was followed by the two e disciples whom He chose and appointed, and those were the only ones who walked with and followed Him. The truth of the matter is that this simply is not correct, for this passage before us clearly indicates that there were great multitudes of people who journeyed with, walked with and followed Jesus. There were great multitudes of people who made the deliberate and conscious decision to perhaps leave and forsake all they had known in order that they might walk with and follow Jesus. We have often thought and believed that it was the twelve disciples who themselves forsook all and left everything they had known in order that they might walk with and follow Jesus. We have thought and even believed that it was the twelve disciples who walked with and followed Jesus, and who forsook everything you follow Jesus, and those crowds of people who perhaps walked with and followed Jesus did not make the same decision or commitment. As I read and consider the words which Jesus spoke unto the disciples in this passage of scripture I can’t help but think that they were words which were spoken unto men and women who had made the deliberate and conscious decision to forsake everything they knew and everything they loved in order that they might walk with and follow Jesus. I’m sitting here this morning and I can’t help but be reminded of three distinct passages of scripture that point to and indicate the incredible reality that Jesus was followed by more than simply the disciples. There are three specific passages which come to my mind which seem to indicate and point to the reality that while it is true the twelve disciples left, abandoned and forsook everything they knew and loved to walk with and follow Jesus, there were other individuals who made the same decision. While such individuals might not have had the same level of intimacy and fellowship with Jesus as the twelve did, they nonetheless made the conscious and deliberate decision to walk with and follow Jesus. Despite the fact that they were not part of the trove who were closest to Jesus, they nonetheless made the decision to walk with Him. In fact, I would dare say that within and throughout the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ, there were a great number of men and women who walked with and followed Him—despite the fact that they knew it would require them to abandon and forsake everything they knew and loved.

As I sit here this morning thinking about and considering this passage of scripture I can’t help but be reminded of certain passages within scripture which help point to the tremendous reality of those who made the decision to walk with and follow Jesus, as well as what that decision meant. I can’t help but be reminded of the parables which Jesus spoke and told unto the people concerning the master of the house who prepared and made a great supper and invited a great many people, however, those who were initially invited with one voice and one consent began making excuses as to why they would not come to the supper. I am reminded of the words which are found in the sixth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John concerning many of the disciples who walked with and followed Jesus departing from Him and no longer walking with Him because of the words He spoke. What’s more, is that I can’t help but also be reminded of the call which the Lord issued and spoke unto Abraham when He called him forth from Ur of the Chaldeans. What’s more, is that I can’t help but also be reminded of the words which are found in the Old Testament books of Samuel and Chronicles describing David’s mighty men—those men who not only walked alongside him, those who not only served him, but also those who fought alongside him in battle. What’s more is that I am thoroughly convinced that there is something about those who are not only willing to walk with and walk alongside us, but also those who are willing to fight alongside us in battle. There is something about those who are willing to take up sword and shield and fight alongside us in the battles we face within and throughout the course of our daily lives. With that being said, I invited you to consider the various passages which I have already alluded to in this writing—those passages which describe the excuses we make and the lies we tell ourselves as to why we cannot walk with and follow Jesus, those passages which not only describe the reality that there were others who walked with and followed Jesus, but also chose to depart from Jesus and no longer walk with Him. I invite you to consider the passage found in the Old Testament book of Genesis—specifically in the twelfth chapter—for within this chapter you will find the call of Abram from and out of Ur of the Chaldeans and both into and unto a land which the Lord would show unto Him. I invite to consider the twin passages found in the Old Testament books of Samuel and Chronicles concerning David’s mighty men, and those men who fought alongside him in battle:

“And when one of them that sat at meat with Him heard these things, he said unto Him, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God. Then said He unto him, A certain man made a great supper, and bade many: and sent his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidder, Come; for all things are now ready. And they all with one consent began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go and see it: I pray thee have me excused. And another said, I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to prove them: I pray thee have me excused. And another said, I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come. So that servant came, and shewed his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind. And the servant said, Lord, it is done as thou hast commanded, and yet there is room. And the Lord said unto the servant, Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled. For I say unto you, That none of those men which were bidden shall taste of my supper” (Luke 14:15-24).

“Then said they unto Him, What shall we do, that we might work the works of God? Jesus answered and said unto them, This is the work of God, that ye believe on Him whom He hath sent. They said therefore unto him, What sign shewest thou then, that we may see, and believe thee? What dost thou work? Our fathers did eat manna in the desert; as it is written, He gave them bread from heaven to eat. Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Moses gave you not that bread from heaven; but my Father giveth you the true bread from heaven. For the bread of God is He which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world. Then said they unto Him, Lord evermore give us this bread. And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst. But I say unto you, That ye also have seen me, and believe not. All that the Father giveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out. For I came down from heaven, not to do mine own will, but the will of Him that sent me. And this is the Father’s will which hath sent me, that of all which He hath given me I should lose nothing, but should raise it up again at the last day. And this is the will of Him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and believeth on Him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day. The Jews then murmured at Him, because He said, I am the bread which came down from heaven. And they said, Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know? How is it then that He saith, I came down from heaven? Jesus therefore answered and said unto them, Murmur not among yourselves. No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him: and I will raise him up at the last day. It is written in the prophets, And they shall be all taught of God. Every man therefore that hath heard, and hath learned of the Father, cometh unto me. Not that any man hath seen the Father, save He which is of God, He hath seen the Father. Verily, verily I say unto you, He that believeth on me hath everlasting life. I am that bread of life. Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness and are dead. This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die. I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live forever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world. The Jews therefore strove among themselves, saying, How can this man give us His flesh to eat? Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you. Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day. For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed. He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwellers in me, and I in him. As the living Father hath sent me, and I live by the Father: so he that eateth me, even he shall live by me. This is that bread which came down from heaven: not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead: he that eateth of this bread shall live for ever. These things said He in the synagogue, as He taught in Capernaum. Many therefore of hHis disciples, when they had heard this, said, This is an hard saying; who can hear it? When Jesus knew in Himself that His disciples murmured at it, He said unto them, Doth this offend you? What and if ye shall see the Son of man ascend up where He was before? It is the Spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life. But there are some of you that believe not. For Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that believed not, and who should betray him. And he said, Therefore said I unto you, that no man can come unto me, except it were given unto him of my Father. From that time many of His disciples went back, and walked no more with him. Then said Jesus unto the twelve, Will ye also go away? Then Simon Peter answered Him, Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life. And we believe and are sure that thou art that Christ, the Son of the living God. Jesus answered them, Have not I chosen you twelve, and one of you is a devil? He spake of Judas Iscariot the son of Simon: for he it was that should betray him, being one of the twelve” (John 6:28-71).

That which we find within these two passages not only point to the lies and excuses we tell ourselves and God as to why we cannot walk with and follow Him, but they also point to the tremendous reality of those who made the decision to walk with Jesus, and yet who were offended with the words Jesus spoke, and as a result of their offense, they chose no longer to walk with Him. This passage which we find in the New Testament gospel of John is quite unique and powerful when you think about and consider it, for within this passage we not only find more than just the twelve disciples whom Jesus chose and appointed walking with and following Jesus, but we also find another group of those who walked with and followed Jesus. Within the sixth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John we find it mentioned and spoken off concerning many who might have made the conscious and deliberate decision to walk with and follow Jesus, and yet at some point they became offended with the words which He spoke unto them, and could not get past that offense. It’s worth noting that beginning with the sixtieth verse of this particular chapter we find the disciples—not the Jews—saying and speaking among themselves how the words which Jesus the Christ was speaking was a hard saying, and who among them could hear it. This is actually quite unique and interesting when you think about and consider it, for the apostle John wasn’t speaking of and referencing the Jews as a whole who took issue and took offense with the words which Jesus spoke, but rather His own disciples. What’s more, is that when we read concerning the disciples in this particular passage of Scripture, we must understand it as a much larger group of individuals besides the twelve whom Jesus chose, ordained and appointed. The disciples whom the apostle John wrote about and referenced in this passage of Scripture who believed within their heart that this was a hard saying could not understand the words which Jesus spoke, and felt that it was indeed a hard saying which none were able to handle and bear. What’s more, is that when Jesus perceived within Himself that which they were thinking, His words unto them were centered upon the tremendous reality of them being offended at the words which He spoke unto them. Jesus knew the thoughts that were present within the hearts and minds of the disciples who were present in the synagogue in Capernaum, and how they murmured against it. As a direct result of His perceiving their thoughts and complaining, Jesus asked them as straightforward as He could whether or not this saying did in fact offend them. Furthermore—in addition to Jesus asking the disciples if this saying offended them—He would go on to declare unto them that there were some among them which believed not. The apostle John writes and records how Jesus knew from the beginning who they were which believed not, and who they were which believed Him.

There is not a doubt in my mind that when we read concerning disciples within this passage of Scripture, we are reading about more than simply the twelve disciples and apostles whom Jesus called, chose and ordained, but rather a greater number of men and women who walked with and followed Jesus. When we read concerning the disciples who were present within the synagogue there in Capernaum, we must recognize and understand it to be a reference to a much larger group of men and women who walked with and followed Jesus, and those who made the conscious and deliberate decision to walk with and follow Jesus. What makes this passage so incredibly interesting and challenging is that if you continue reading it you will find that from that time many of His disciples went back, and walked with Him no more. MANY OF HIS DISCIPLES WENT BACK, AND WALKED NO MORE WITH HIM! WENT BACK! WALKED NO MORE! Please don’t miss the tremendous significance of what is found within these words, for when you read them you can’t help but ask yourself and wonder what it was they went back to. The apostle John wrote concerning many of the disciples who walked with and followed Jesus, and how they not only went back, but also walked no more with Jesus. The question that I can’t help but ask and wonder is what these disciples went back to. When they made the decision that they could no longer walk with Jesus, and when they made the decision that walking with and following Jesus was too much for them to handle and bear, they would go back to where they were before they made the decision to walk with and follow Jesus. What did these individuals who decided to walk back and go back actually go back to? Did husbands go back to their wives? Did wives go back to their husbands? Did children go back to their parents? Did men and women go back to their jobs? Did they return back to their homes and to the towns, villages, and cities they were from? What did these men and women who made the decision to go back and walk no more with Jesus actually do when they chose to no longer walk with Jesus? What’s more, is that I can’t help but wonder what it was like when they walked away from Jesus, and when they walked out of His presence? What was it like for these men and women who felt within their hearts they could no longer walk with Jesus, and needed to go back to where they came from? There is a part of me that can’t help but wonder what it was like for such men and women to have walked with and followed Jesus, and to reach the point in their walking with and following Him that they could no longer walk with and follow Him. What’s more, is that the reason many of the disciples chose to go back, and to walk no more with Jesus was because of the words which Jesus spoke unto them. The words which Jesus spoke unto all those who were present within the synagogue were of such an explosive nature that it actually offended them, and caused them to murmur within themselves and against Jesus concerning that which was too difficult for them to handle and bear.

I have often wondered what it was like when the disciples heard the call of Jesus to walk with and follow Him, and what it was like to make the decision to abandon and forsake everything to walk with and follow Him wherever He Himself went. While I can’t help but wonder what it was like for the disciples to make the conscious and deliberate decision to walk with and follow Jesus, and to forsake everything they knew and loved, I can’t help but wonder what it was like to have walked with Jesus, to followed Him wherever He went, to witness and behold His mighty works, to hear the words of life, and yet to make the decision within themselves to walk no more with Him. What is the journey away from and out of the presence of Jesus like? What is the journey away from the presence of love, and mercy, and grace, and compassion actually like for those who spent a considerable amount of time walking with it actually like? How easy was it for men and women who walked with Jesus the Christ to make the decision—not only to go back, but also to no longer walk with Jesus? What was it like when they left the presence of Jesus—perhaps never to return into that presence again? Just thinking about this causes me to think back to the rich young ruler who came unto Jesus and asked him what he needed to do to inherit eternal life. Through the example, account and life of this rich young ruler we come face to face with the tremendous and incredible reality that it is possible to enter into the presence of love, and to enter into the presence of Jesus, to hear what Jesus requires and asks of you, and to somehow still leave and walk out of the presence sad and grieved within your heart. Consider if you will the words which are found within the nineteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew which describe a certain rich young ruler who entered into the presence of Jesus asking what he must needs do to inherit eternal life, and yet how this same man left and went out of the presence of Jesus sorrowful and grieved within himself:

“And, behold, one came and said unto Him, Good Master, what good thing shall I do, that I may have eternal life? And he said unto him, Why callest thou me good? There is none good but one, that is God: but if you wilt enter into life, keep the commandments. He saith unto Him, Which? Jesus said, Thou shalt do no murder, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love they neighbor as thyself. The young man saith unto him, All these things have I kept from my youth up: what lack I yet? Jesus said unto him, if thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come and follow me. But when the young man heard that saying, he went away sorrowful: for he had great possessions. Then said Jesus unto His disciples, Verily, verily I say unto you, That a rich man shall hardly enter into the kingdom of heaven. And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God. When His disciples heard it, they were exceedingly amazed, saying, Who then can be saved? But Jesus beheld them, and said unto them, With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible” (Matthew 19:16-26).

This rich young ruler left the presence of Jesus—not only because he had many possessions, but because Jesus declared unto him that if he desired to be perfecto, he would go and sell which he had, give to the poor, and would have treasure in heaven. What’s more, is that Jesus then went on to declare that after he had gone and sold all he had, once he had given to the poor, and once he had treasure in heaven, then he should come and follow him. This man left the presence of Jesus sorrowful because he had many possessions, and his heart could not part with his possessions. Rather than selling his possession in order that he might have treasure in heaven, and rather than selling his possessions in order that he might walk with and follow Jesus, this man instead chose to leave and depart from the presence of Jesus sorrowful because of that which he was unwilling to let go of. Perhaps the single greatest question we must ask ourselves is what within our hearts, and what within our lives are we unwilling to let go of and release our grip on within our lives in order that we might come after and follow Jesus? What are we willing to abandon and forsake in order that we might walk with and follow Jesus the Christ? WALKING WITH JESUS WITHOUT DISTRACTION! FOLLOWING JESUS WITHOUT IDOLS! If I am being honest with you who are reading the words of this writing, I would declare unto you that one of the hardest things to do is to walk with Jesus free from all distractions, and to walk with Jesus without any idols within our heart. The rich young ruler left the presence of Jesus and chose not to walk with Him because he was unwilling to live his life separate from and independent of distractions and idols. Many of the disciples who were present within the synagogue in Capernaum went back and chose no more to walk with Jesus because the words which He spoke were too difficult for them to handle and bear. Was it that they simply didn’t understand the words which Jesus spoke, or was it perhaps because they weren’t willing to do that which Jesus had commanded and spoken unto them? Regardless of what the reason was within their hearts—many of the disciples who were present in the synagogue in Capernaum chose to go back, and chose to no more walk with Jesus. Those who once walked with with Jesus and once followed Him wherever He went made the conscious and deliberate decision to go back and to walk no more with Jesus. Oh, I can’t help but wonder what it was like for these men and women to exit the presence of Jesus and to no more walk with and follow Him. What was it like as they departed out of and from the presence of Jesus, and made their way back to the lives they once knew, and to the people they once knew and perhaps still loved?

Which is the harder of the two journeys? Is the journey away from that which we loved and knew the hardest journey, or is the journey back to what we left, abandoned and forsook harder once we have walked with and followed Jesus? This decision is one that I can’t escape and can’t seem to get away from—particularly and especially when I think about and consider the call of Abram out of Ur of the Chaldeans. I mentioned earlier that I could not help but be reminded of the words which are written and recorded within the Old Testament book of Genesis concerning the call of Abram out of Ur of the Chaldeans, and I feel it necessary at this point to present you with the encounter Abram had with the living God there in the land of the Chaldeans. In fact, I am convinced that the account of Abraham must journey back further than simply the twelfth chapter of the Old Testament book of Genesis, and must begin in the eleventh chapter of the same Old Testament book. Consider if you will the words which are found in this Old Testament book beginning with the twenty-seventh verse of the eleventh chapter:

“Now these are the generations of Torah? Terah began Abraham, Nahor, and Haran: and Haran begat Lot. And Haran died before his father Terah in the land of his nativity, in Ur of the Chaldeans. And Abram and Nahor took wives: the name of Abram’s wife was Sarai; and the name of Nahor’s wife, Micah, the daughter of Haran, the father of Micah, and the father of Iscah. But Sarai was barren; she had no child. And Terah took Abram his son, and Lot the son of Haran his son’s son, and Sarai his daughter in law, his son Abram’s wife; and they went forth with them from Ur of the Chaldeans, to go into the land of Canaan; and they came unto Haran, and dwelt there. And the days of Terah were two hundred and five years. And Terah died in Haran. Now the Lord had said unto Abram, Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thy father’s house, unto a land that I will shew thee: and I will make of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and make thy name great; and thou shalt be a blessing: and I will bless them that bless thee, and curse him that curseth thee: and in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed. So Abram departed, as the Lord had spoken unto him; and Lot went with him: and Abram was seventy and five years old when he departed out of Haran. And Abram took Sarai his wife, and Lot his brother’s son, and all their substance that they had gathered, and the souls that they had gotten in Haran; and they went forth to go into the land of Canaan; and into the land of Canaan they came” (Genesis 11:27-12:5).

As you read these words you will find the Lord appearing unto Abram in the land of Haran, and instructing him to get out of his country, and from his kindred, and from his father’s house, and unto a land which He would show him. In all reality, the call which the Lord gave unto Abram to leave his country, to leave his father’s house, and to leave his kindred was the same call which Jesus issued to His disciples when He called them to follow Him. The same call which the Lord gave unto Abram while still in Ur of the Chaldeans is essentially the same call which Jesus spoke unto and gave to those whom He called, for Jesus called those whom He had chosen to forsake and abandon everything in order that they might walk with and follow Him. What adds even more weight and substance to this is when you come to the twenty-sixth chapter of the fourteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Luke, for within this particular set of verses you will find Jesus making three separate statements, but all with the same end point, and all with the same conclusion. When you read the words which are found and contained within this particular portion of Scripture you will find Jesus ultimately arriving at the same point—the point where men and women “cannot be His disciple.” If you read the words which are found within this passage you will find that there were certain and specific realities within the lives of men and women which would prevent and prohibit them from being disciples of Jesus. What’s more, is that there wasn’t simply a single mention of being unable to be a disciple of Jesus, but there was in fact three distinct and three different statements which Jesus made concerning those who could not be His disciples. Consider if you will these three statements which Jesus made and spoke unto the great multitudes of people who went with Him:

“If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple” (Luke 14:26).

“And whosoever doth not bear His cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple” Luke 14:27).

“So likewise, whosoever he be of you that forsaketh not all that he hath, he cannot be my disciple” (Luke 14:33).

Please don’t miss the tremendous significance of what is written and contained within these words, for Jesus makes it very plain and very clear that there were certain things that would and could keep us from being a disciple of His. What’s more, is the words we find written within this passage of Scripture weren’t merely spoken unto the twelve disciples whom Jesus had called, chosen and appointed as apostles. The words which Jesus spoke on this particular occasion were words which were spoken unto the great multitude of those who walked with and followed Jesus. Jesus made it perfectly clear that if did not, and if you could not hate your father, and your mother, and your wife, and your children, and your brethren, and your sisters, and even your own life, you could not be His disciples. Moreover, Jesus would go on to declare that whoever did not bear His cross and come after Him could not be His disciple. Furthermore, Jesus would make one more statement and declare that whoever did not forsake all that they had, they could not be his disciple. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand this, for it brings us face to face with what it takes to truly be a disciple of Jesus the Christ. In all reality, I am convinced that we must come face to face with the awesome and incredible reality of what it truly means and what it truly takes to be a disciple of Jesus the Christ, and what is required to carry on and continue walking with Him as one of His disciples. The rich young ruler could not be a disciple of Jesus because he had great possessions and was not willing to let them go and release them from his hands. Many of the disciples within the synagogue in Capernaum chose to no longer be disciples of Jesus—to no longer walk with Him—because they were unwilling to accept the words which He spoke, nor could they understand them. The call which Jesus issued unto those whom He called to walk with and follow Him was the same call which the Lord issued unto Abram when he was in Ur of the Chaldeans—a call to forsake land, family, father’s house, and everything that was comfortable and convenient within his life. We dare not and must not miss the tremendous and incredible significance of this call, for Jesus held no punches when He stated that we could not be His disciples if we did not forsake all we have, if we do not bear our cross and come after Him, and if we do not hate father, mother, brother, sister, wife, children, and even our own lives. The question we must ask ourselves is whether or not we are willing to let go of everything we have held on to, and release everything we feel as though we have to keep under our control and in our possession in order that we might walk with and follow Jesus. The question we must ask ourselves is what in our hearts and what in our lives is keeping us from truly being a disciple of Jesus, and from truly walking with and following Him. What in your life is holding you back from being a true disciple of Jesus? What in my life is holding me back from truly being a disciple of Jesus the Christ? What do we need to let go of and release in order that we might once and for all be a true disciple of Jesus the Christ in this generation?

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