Seeing the Triumph of the Son & Singing Its Song

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the beloved physician Luke. More specifically, today’s passage begins with the forty-first verse of the twentieth chapter and continues through to the fourth verse of the twenty-first chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find the beloved physician Luke writing and recording something that was previously recorded by the apostle Matthew in his gospel, as well as the gospel which was written by John Mark. As you come to and approach this passage of scripture you will find and discover Jesus continuing in His interactions with the religious system and community which began at the outset and beginning of the chapter. If you take the time to read the words which are found in these verses you will discover Jesus presenting yet another question to those who wishes to tempt, trap and ensnare Him. This is actually quite interesting when you think about and consider it, for although the chapter doesn’t open with Jesus asking a question of the Pharisees, it includes Jesus responding to the Pharisees question with one of His own. As the chapter begins and opens it does so with Jesus being confronted by the Pharisees and asked by what authority He did such things—the things they were referencing and speaking about was cleansing the Temple by overturning the tables.of money, driving out the money changers, driving out those who bought and sold, and even driving out the merchandise which was being sold in the courts of the Temple. I find it absolutely and incredibly interesting and astounding to think about and consider the fact that when Jesus cleansed the Temple He didn’t simply drive out the money changers, but drove out absolutely everything that was present within the courts of the Lord. When Jesus cleansed the Temple He did so by casting and driving out not only those who sold the merchandise, but also those who bought the goods and merchandise. What’s more, is that Jesus didn’t even allow the merchandise itself to remain in the courts of the Lord but instead drove it out of the Temple. Please don’t miss the significance and importance of this, for there would be some who would argue that at least the merchandise should have been permitting to remain in the courts of the Lord and offered as a sacrifice or multiple sacrifices unto the living God join the altar. The truth of the matter is that Jesus wasn’t even willing to allow the merchandise itself to remain in the courts of the Lord but drove it out—much like Saul should have done to the best of the sheep, the best of the oxen, and the best of the cattle and herd that was present in Amalek. It’s absolutely astonishing to think about and consider the fact that through Jesus we see a clear picture and representation of what Saul king of Israel should have done during the day’s he served as king over the nation of Israel.

As you begin reading the words which are found at the beginning of this passage of scripture you will find it building upon that which was found in the preceding verses, as the Pharisees and religious system or that day questioned the authority and essentially the right Jesus though He had to perform the actions He did in the courts of the Temple. It is absolutely necessary and important that we recognize and understand this, for when Jesus was asked about the authority He possesses to engage in such actions and behavior, He presented a question unto the Pharisees—one which I am convinced He knew they would and could not answer. If you read the words which are found in the opening verses of this chapter you will find Jesus asking the Pharisees a question concerning the baptism of John and whether or not the baptism of John came from heaven, or whether or not it came from and originated with man. This is actually quite astonishing and remarkable when you think about and consider it, for what you find in this passage is Jesus countering the question which the Pharisees asked Him concerning the authority He possesses with a question Himself—one that centered upon the reality of Johns baptism. Please mark and make note of this fact and reality, for to miss on this particular point would be to miss out on that which Jesus was doing in the company and presence of the Pharisees. The Pharisees asked and demanded of Him by what authority He performed such actions in the courts of the temple, and Jesus responded not with an answer to their question but with a question of His own. What’s more, is that if they answered—if they were willing to answer His question—He would speak unto them concerning the authority which He had to perform such actions in the courts of the temple, and. The manner He actually did. If you read the text you will find that in response to Jesus’ question the Pharisees reasoned among themselves how to answer the question, for if they declared they johns baptism was from heaven, He would ask why they didn’t believe Him. If, however, johns baptism was of men, and they admitted it as such, they risked the anger of the people, for the people esteemed John as a prophet among men. Ultimately the Pharisees reasoned and purposes not to answer Jesus’ question and to instead remain silent. What’s more, is they actually declared unto Jesus they they did not know whether the baptism of John came from heaven, or whether it came from the earth. Jesus took their indifference and silence and declared unto them that He would not declare unto them by what authority He engaged in such actions and behavior.

The entire twentieth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Luke is actually one giant interaction between Jesus and the religious community, for not only do we find Jesus confronting the Pharisees, but you also find Jesus confronting the scribes, the chief priests and elders of Israel. What’s more, is that within this chapter you will find Jesus also dealing with and confronting the Sadducees concerning matters of resurrection. The entire twentieth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Luke is centered upon Jesus’ interaction with the religious system, and speaking unto and addressing matters such as what authority He spoke by and performed such actions, and even concerning the resurrection. What is also quite astonishing and remarkable concerning that which we find in this chapter is that interspersed within its verses we find Jesus speaking a parable concerning and directed at the Pharisees, the scribes, the chief priests and elders of Israel, as well as closing it out with His indictment of the scribes, the chief priests, and the elders of Israel. In fact, what you find at the end and conclusion of this chapter is actually a snapshot of the much larger presentation of Jesus’ words which Matthew himself presented in his gospel account. What is worth noting concerning and within this chapter is that before Jesus spoke His words of indictment to the scribes, and the teachers of the Law, and the Pharisees, He presented yet another question unto the them which Scrioture is unclear whether or not He expected an answer. As you read the words which are found towards the latter portion of this chapter you will find Jesus asking the Pharisees yet another question, however, the question which Jesus asked the Pharisees this time around was one that was completely and entirely different from the first one. The first question which Jesus asked the Pharisees dealt with the baptism of John and whether it came from and originated from man or whether it came from heaven. The question which Jesus asked the Pharisees this time around was one that dealt with Himself—one that dealt with Him being known as and called The Son of David. This second question which Jesus presented unto the Pharisees was one that centered not around and not upon John the Baptist and his baptism, but rather Himself and what those during that generation called Him during those days. Consider if you will the words which Jesus presented unto those who were present on this particular occasion:

“Then certain of the scribes answering said, master, thou hast well said. And after that they durst not ask Him any question at all. And He said unto them, How say they that Christ is David’s son? And David himself saith in the book of Psalms, The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit you on my right hand, Till I make thine enemies thy footstool. David therefore calleth him Lord, how is he then his son?” (Luke 20:39-44).

The words which we find written and recorded on this particular occasion are actually found and located in two other places within the four gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ, and were written and recorded by both the apostle Matthew, as well as John Mark. In fact, I am convinced that in order to get a true and proper understanding of that which is found within this particular set of verses within the New Testament gospel of Luke we must journey into each of these two gospels and consider how these two authors presented this reality within their own gospels. If there is one thing we must recognize and understand concerning the gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, it’s that they are known as “the synoptic gospels,” and are built incredibly similarly to each other. While the gospel which was written by John Mark is in fact the shortest of the three gospels, and while the gospel written by the apostle Matthew is in fact the longest of the three gospels, with the gospel of Luke in the middle, they nonetheless contain language that is very much similar to each other. In fact, you will be hard pressed to find something in the New Testament gospel of Matthew that is not also in the New Testament gospel of Mark, or the New Testament gospel of Luke, and vice verse. What we read in one of these gospels should be read and interpreted through the lens of what we find in the other two gospels, for all three gospels present us with a clear and concise picture of what is actually taking place within the days of Jesus the Christ. With that being said, consider if you will the words which are written and recorded in the New Testament gospel of Matthew first, which is followed by the words which are written and recorded in the New Testament gospel of Mark:

“While the Pharisees were gathered together, Jesus asked them, saying, What think ye of Christ? Whose son is he? They say unto him, The Son of David. He saith unto them, How then doth David in spirit call him Lord, saying, The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, till I make thine enemies thy footstool? If David then call Him Lord, how is He his son? And no man was able to answer him a word, neither durst any man from that day forth ask him any more questions” (Matthew 22:41-46).

“And Jesus answered and said, while He taught in the Temple, How sat the scribes that Christ is the Son of David? For David Himself said by the Holy Ghost, The Lord said to my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, till I make thine enemies thy footstool. David therefore himself calleth Him Lord; and whence is he then his son? And the common people heard him gladly” (Mark 12:35-37).

This particular occurrence within the New Testament gospel of Luke was not only written and recorded within the gospel account which he wrote, but it was also written and recorded by both the apostle Matthew, as well as the Gentile John Mark. What I find to be so incredibly interesting and intriguing about the words which are found within this passage of Scripture is that the question which Jesus presented unto the Pharisees was a question that centered around whose son they said, and whose son they believed him to be. The question which Jesus asked the Pharisees was a question that was in a way similar to the question which He asked the disciples in Caeserea Philippi. If you journey back to the sixteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel which was written by the apostle Matthew you will quickly come to the place in the sixteenth chapter where he writes and records Jesus asking the disciples whom men said that He the Son of David was. As you read the words which are found within this passage of Scripture you will find that the first question which Jesus the Christ asked the disciples was one that centered around whom others said that He the Son of man was, and what the opinions of others were concerning who He was and His identity. Upon hearing their responses and what they had heard spoken by others before and around them, Jesus then proceeded to ask them whom they themselves said and believed that He the Son of man was. This entire interaction between Jesus and His disciples in Caeseara Philippi was centered around the tremendous concept of identity, and who the disciples themselves believed Jesus the Christ to be. What’s truly astonishing is the fact that Jesus first asked them concerning whom others said that He the Son of man was in order to get the opinions of others out of the way before taking it and transitioning it to something that was more personal and something that hit closer to Him. While Jesus did in fact ask the disciples whom they said that He the Son of man was, He wasn’t concerned with the opinions of others were as much as He was concerned with what they believed concerning Him, and what they believed concerning His identity and person. If you begin reading with and from the thirteenth verse of the sixteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of the apostle Matthew you will find the following words which were written concerning this interaction and encounter between Jesus and the disciples:

“When Jesus came into the coasts of Caeserea Philippi, He asked His disciples, saying, Whom do men say that I the Son of man am? And they said, Some say that you art John the Baptist: some, Elias; and others, Jeremias, or one of the prophets. He saith unto them, But whom say ye that I am? And Simon Peter answered and said, Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. And Jesus answered and said unto him, Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-Jona: for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven. And I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. And I will give unto thee the Keyes of the kingdom of heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. Then charged He His disciples that they should tell no man that He was Jesus the Christ” (Matthew 16:13-20).

This particular interaction which was found within the New Testament gospel of Matthew brings us face to face with an interaction which took place between Jesus the Christ and His disciples in the coasts of Caesera Philippi, as Jesus first asked His disciples whom others said that He the Son of man was, and then transitioned to asking them whom they themselves said that He the Son of man was. What we find in this particular portion of Scripture is actually quite astonishing and remarkable—particularly and especially when you consider it in light of that which was written and recorded in the twentieth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Luke, as well as in the gospels of both the apostle Matthew, as well as Mark. While it was true that Jesus asked the disciples whom others said that He the Son of man was, and while Jesus then transitioned to asking the disciples whom they said, believed and declared Him to be, He would ask the Pharisees an entirely different question. If you read the New Testament gospel which was written concerning Jesus Christ by the beloved physician Luke you will find that one of the popular titles for Jesus within the gospel was in fact “Son of David.” It is this reality of Jesus being the Son of David that prompted Jesus to then present a question unto the Pharisees concerning whose Son Jesus was, for He knew and understood that many in that generation referred to Him as the Son of David—probably and most likely because of His family lineage being born into the house of Mary and Joseph. It is true that Jesus was in fact called and known as the Son of David because of what was spoken concerning Him by those in that generation given His lineage and heritage being born into the house of Mary and Joseph. The question which Jesus presented unto the Pharisees on this particular occasion centered around whose Son He was truly, and I am convinced that this question wasn’t merely a question intended on dealing with Jesus as the Son of David, but rather their willingness to admit that Jesus was in fact the Son of the living God. All throughout the gospels you will find and read example after example of the Jews, as well as the scribes, the chief priests, and even the elders of Israel taking great offense to Jesus’ words—particularly and especially when it came to Him referring to Himself as the Son of God, and calling God His Father. There were countless individuals during that generation who took great offense to the words which Jesus spoke concerning His identity, and there were many who could not handle and deal with His associating Himself with God the Father who was in heaven. In fact, there were countless interactions and altercations if you will between Jesus and those during that generation over who He truly was, and over His identifying Himself with God. As if this weren’t enough, Jesus would even refer to Himself as the Son of God, and would claim God as His Father—a reality which was much too difficult for the scribes, the Pharisees, the chief priests, the elders of Israel, and even many of the Jews to accept during that generation. What’s interesting and worth noting is that the words which Jesus spoke and quoted in this passage of Scripture were actually quoted from the Old Testament book of the Psalms, and specifically the one-hundred and tenth chapter of the book. Consider if you will the words which are found in this particular chapter within the Old Testament book of the Psalms, which was written by David—king of Israel, shepherd, warrior, poet, musician, etc.:

“The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool. The Lord shall send the rod of thy strength out of Zion: rule thou in the midst of thine enemies. Thy people shall be willing in the day of thy power, in the beauties of holiness from the womb of the morning: thou hast the dew of thy youth. The Lord hath sworn, and will not repent, Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek. The Lord at thy right hand shall strike through kings in the day of His wrath. He shall judge among the heathen, He shall fill the places with the dead bodies; he shall wound the heads over many countries. He shall drink of the book in the way: therefore shall He left up the head” (Psalm 110:1-7).

The words which are found within this passage of Scripture within the Old Testament book of the Psalms are actually quite extraordinary when you think about and consider them, for they are essentially New Testament realities penned and written on the pages of the Old Testament. The words which we find within this passage of Scripture are realities concerning Jesus the Christ which were spoken by David centuries and millennia before Jesus the Christ would ever enter into this world and take on the form of human flesh. In all reality, I can’t help but find the words which are written and recorded within this passage to be incredibly prophetic, and the words contained therein are most likely what we would know as Messianic prophecies, and those words and those passages which point directly to the reality of Jesus the Christ as and when He would walk upon the face of the earth. What’s more, is that the words which David wrote and spoke within this particular Psalm were not only mentioned and quoted by Jesus the Christ when speaking unto the Pharisees, but they were also mentioned on two other occasions—first by the apostle Peter on the Day of Pentecost after the Holy Spirit descended upon the one-hundred and twenty in the upper room, and the apostle Peter stood up to deliver his powerful Day of Pentecost sermon unto those who supposed the one-hundred and twenty in the upper room to be drunk with wine. Moreover, the words which we find in this Old Testament book of the Psalms are also referenced and quoted by the author of the epistle which was written unto the Hebrews in what are known as the “General Epistles” of the New Testament. Consider if you will how the words of David were used—both by the apostle Peter on the Day of Pentecost to preach Jesus Christ, as well as by the author of the epistle which was written unto the Hebrews concerning Jesus the Christ and the beauty and reality of who He was. Beginning with the words which the apostle Peter spoke unto all those who would hear and listen to him within the city of Jerusalem on the Day of Pentecost, consider how the words of David would be quoted by at least two others aside from Jesus the Christ:

“Ye men of Israel, hear these words: Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signed, which God did by Him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know: Him, being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain: whom God hath raised up, having loosed the pains of death: because it was not possible that He should be Holden of it. For David speaketh concerning Him, I foresaw the Lord always before my face, for He is on my right hand, that I should not be moved: therefore did my heart rejoice, and my tongue was glad; moreover also my flesh shall rest in hope: because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. Thou hast made known to me the ways of life; thou shalt make me full of joy with thy countenance. Men and brethren, let me freely speak unto you of the patriarch David, that he is both dead and buried, and his sepulcher is with us unto this day. Therefore being a prophet, and knowing that God had sworn with an oath to him that of the fruit of his loins, according to the flesh, eh would raise up Christ to sit on his throne; he seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his flesh did see corruption. This Jesus hath God raised up, whereof we all are witnesses. Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, He hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear. For David is not ascended into the heavens: but he saith himself, The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, until I make thy foes thy footstool. Therefore let all the house for Israel know assuredly, that God hath made that same Jesus, whom ye have crucified, both Lord and Christ” (Acts 2: 22-36).

“God who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets, hath in these last days spoken unto us by His Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also He made the worlds; who being the brightness of His glory, and the express image of His person, and upholding all things by the word of His power, when He had by Himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high; being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they. For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to Him a Father, and He shall be to me a Son? And again, when He bringeth in the first begotten into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him. And of the angels he Saith, Who maketh His angels spirits, and His ministers a flame of fire. But unto the Son He saith, Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a scepter of righteousness is the scepter of thy kingdom. Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows. And, Thou, Lord in the beginning hast lad the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands: they shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment; and as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail. But to which of the angels said He at any time, Sit on my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool? Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation” (Hebrews 1:1-14).

I find it absolutely amazing that the words of David would be so wonderfully and mightily used—not merely by the apostle Peter on the Day of Pentecost in order that He might preach Christ, but also by the author of the epistle which was written unto the Hebrews in order that they too might preach the supremacy of Christ above angels and everything that has been created by the living God. What’s more, is that the words which David wrote in the Old Testament book of the Psalms are words which were used and even spoken by Jesus the Christ when speaking unto and confronting the Pharisees and religious system during His day and generation. It’s interesting and worth noting that the apostle Peter used the words written by the psalmist David to preach Christ on the day of Pentecost, the words of David were used by the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews to present Christ as supreme over the angels in heaven, and were used by Jesus Christ to speak to the incredibly reality of the Pharisees calling Him the Son of David, and yet David in the Spirit spoke concerning Christ how He was Lord, and how the Lord was instructed to sit on the right hand of the throne of God in heaven until He make His enemies His footstool. What I so absolutely love about the words which David wrote in the Old Testament—words which were used and spoken by Jesus the Christ—is that these words speak to the supreme authority and supremacy of Jesus the Christ over angels, over authorities, over principalities, over rulers, over spiritual wickedness in high places, over everything that has been created and everything that has been made. What’s more, is that Jesus quoted the words written by David king of Israel knowing that such words were spoken and prophesied by him concerning Himself, and concerning the ultimate authority and ultimate victory He would have in the end. It’s actually quite astonishing and remarkable to think about and consider the fact that David himself wrote these words, for David himself was a man who experienced the reality of having all his enemies being put under his feet. If you read the eighteenth chapter of the Old Testament book of the Psalms, as well as the twenty-second chapter of the Old Testament book of Second Samuel you will find a song and psalm which David wrote after the Lord had delivered him out of the hand of all his enemies, and had delivered him out of the hand of Saul who sought to lay hold of and destroy his life. It is imperative that we recognize and understand this particular reality, for not only did David write prophetically concerning Jesus the Christ and how the Lord would in fact make all His enemies His footstool, but David Himself would experience and walk in this reality as the Lord delivered him out of and from the hand of all his enemies. David king of Israel would engage the enemies of Israel, and the enemies round about the nation of Israel in combat and battle in order that he would completely and utterly subdue them. All you have to do is read the eighteenth chapter of the Old Testament book of the Psalms and you will come face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that the Lord delivered David out of the hand of all His enemies, and even out of the hand of Saul who sought to lay hold of him and kill him. It is absolutely wonderful and remarkable to think about and consider the fact that David who himself would experience the Lord making all his enemies his footstool would write concerning Christ—the One who would sit upon His throne—how the Lord would not only instruct Him to sit on His right hand, but would also subdue and crush all His enemies, and place them under His feet. Consider if you will specific references in Scripture which deal with the reality of the Lord subduing and making all the enemies of Jesus the Christ His footstool, and placing them all under His feet:

“But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ’s at His coming. Then cometh the end, when He shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when He shall have put down all rule and all authority and power. For He must reign, till He hath put all enemies under his feet. The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death. For He hath put all things under His feet. But when He saith, all things are put under him, it is manifest that He is excepted, which did put all things under Him. And when all things shall be subdued unto him, then shall the Son also Himself be subject unto Him that put all things under Him, that God may be all in all” (1 Corinthians 15:23-28).

“…And what is the exceeding greatness of His power to us-ward who believe, according to the working of His mighty power, which He wrought in Christ, when He raised Him up from the dead, and set him at his own right hand in the heavenly places, far above all principality, and power, and might, and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come: and hath put all things under his feet, and gave him to be the head over all things to the church, which is His body, the fullness of him that filleth all in all” (Ephesians 1:19-23).

“For unto the angels hath He not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man that thou art mindful of him? OR the son of man, that thou visitest him? Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing that is not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste of death for every man” (Hebrews 2: 8-9).

What I so love about the words which David wrote in the Old Testament book of psalms is that David was the king who established Israel as a nation and according to the power of God working in his life, was able to defeat, conquer and subdue all his enemies round about Israel. It was David who with the army of Israel conquered the nations round about Israel and helped usher in the peace which his son Solomon would enjoy and experience. It would be David who would experience the Lord delivering him out of the hand of all his enemies and would be able to write and testify that the Lord has truly made his enemies his footstool. In all reality, I am convinced that we cannot truly understand and appreciate the fact which David wrote in the one hundred and tenth chapter of the book of the psalms without and apart from understanding his song of deliverance, triumph and victory in the eighteenth chapter. What’s more, is that it is fitting that David would be the one to write these prophetic and messianic words concerning Jesus the Christ, for it would not only be Jesus Christ who would sit upon his throne. But it would be Jesus the Christ who would also experience the ultimate and final victory over all His enemies—the last of which is death itself. How absolutely wonderful and incredible it is to think about and consider the fact that David would write such amazing words about his own triumph and victory within his life, and would go on to see the triumph and victory of the eternal Son of God. It is absolutely wonderful and remarkable to consider the fact that David would not only see the final triumph of the Son, but would in fact sing about it in one of his own psalms which he wrote. SEEING THE VICTORY OF THE SON AND SINGING ITS SONG! How truly wonderful it is to consider the fact that David would prophesy and foresee the triumph of the Son, would write and sing about it, and those words would be referenced by Jesus Christ Himself as He once more spoke of and described His relationship as the Son of God, as well as His final victory and triumph over each and every one of His enemies. The question we need to ask ourselves is whether or not we are seeing the victory and triumph of Christ who is seated at the right hand of the Father and can sing about it joyfully and jubilantly within our own hearts and lives.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s