When God Makes Haste to Wait For You to Show Up: God Knows Your Schedule

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the apostle John. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the first twenty-six verses of the fourth chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find the apostle John transitioning away from the account of Nicodemus and Jesus and their evening exchange, as well as away from John the Baptist correcting the thinking of his disciples when they approached him regarding Jesus baptizing others at the same time, and all men coming unto him. When the third chapter of the New Testament gospel of John concludes, it does so with words spoken by John the Baptist unto his disciples concerning Jesus whom he spoke of and testified, and how Jesus was baptizing at the same time as him, and all men coming unto him. It is actually quite interesting and unique to think about and consider that which is found and recorded within the third chapter of the New Testament gospel of John for it actually leads into and segways into that which we find in the fourth chapter of the same gospel. The third chapter of the gospel which the apocalypse John weote describes John the Baptist’s response to his disciples speaking unto him—not only concerning Jesus the Christ whom he testified of baptizing, but also that all men were going and coming unto Him. The words which we find in the third chapter of the gospel which was written by the apostle John are actually quite remarkable, for they essentially provide a wonderful transition into what we read in the opening verse of the fourth chapter. If you take the time to read the words which are found in the opening verse of the fourth chapter you will find that when the Lord heard and knew that the Pharisees were aware of the fact that He baptized as well, He departed from that place and journeyed to another. What’s more, is that in he opening two verses of the fourth chapter we find and discover that when it was written in the third chapter that Jesus baptized and all men came unto Him, it was not Jesus who actually did the baptizing, but rather His disciples. It’s actually quite intriguing to read and consider the words which are found in the opening verses of the fourth chapter, for not only do they directly link and tie into that which was written in the previous chapter, but they also point to and link to the words which come thereafter. In all reality, I would dare say that in order to understand that which was written in the previous chapter, as well as understanding that which is found in the fourth chapter, it is necessary that we understand what is written and recorded in the opening two verses of the fourth chapter.

As you approach and come to the fourth chapter found within the New Testament gospel of John you will find the apostle John writing concerning the Pharisees hearing that Jesus was baptizing during those days, and how Jesus learned and knew of their awareness of His baptizing. This is quite unique when you take the time to think about it—particularly and especially when you consider the fact that the New Testament gospel authors wrote how the Pharisees and Sadducees came unto the baptism of John, and how John the Baptist cried out against and rebuked then. The gospel authors wrote and recorded that when John the Baptist saw the Pharisees and Sadducees coming unto his baptism he cried out against them and not only proclaimed and declared of them that they were a brood of vipers, but he also cried out unto them asking them who had warned them to flee the wrath to come. What’s more, is that John the Baptist would then rebuke them even further by inviting and calling them to bring forth fruits meet of repentance in light of the coming of the messiah. This is actually something which is quite remarkable and astonishing when you truly take the time to think about and consider it, for it helps us understand that which we find and that which we read in the opening verses of the fourth chapter. The opening verse of the fourth chapter brings us face to face with the Pharisees hearing about and knowing that Jesus was also baptizing, and how Jesus heard of their knowledge and awareness of His baptizing. This is worth noting and mentioning, for it’s almost as if the apostle John is seeking to call and draw our attention to the knowledge the Pharisees had with Jesus baptizing during those days, and baptizing all men who came unto Him. What’s more, is that the Pharisees hearing about Jesus baptizing would have produced thoughts and concerns within their hearts and minds—especially after having already come into John the Baptist’s baptism and asking questions concerning his identity. In fact, if you turn and direct your attention back to the opening chapter of the gospel which the apostle John wrote you will find the apostle writing concerning the Pharisees and Sadducees coming unto the baptism of John and asking—not concerning his baptism necessarily, but concerning his identity and who he was. Please don’t miss and lose sight of this reality, for the baptism which John the Baptist engaged in didn’t necessarily speak anything to the Pharisees and Sadducees anything excerpt for who he was. The fact that this man clothed in camel’s skin who ate locusts and wild honey emerged from the wilderness baptizing men and women produced some serious questions concerning the identity of who he truly was, and even who he proclaimed himself to be.

It’s actually quite significant to read and consider the reality of Jesus the Christ hearing of the Pharisees learning that He too was baptizing, for the apostle John writes concerning this that when He heard that the Pharisees knew that He was baptizing, He departed from that place. What we must also recognize and consider within the opening verses of the fourth chapter is that the apostle John doesn’t merely write that the Pharisees heard that Jesus was baptizing, but that it wasn’t Jesus who was baptizing, but rather His disciples. This is an important piece of information, for when we think about the baptism of John we think about and consider the fact that it was just John who was baptizing in the waters of Judaea. When we come to the baptism of Jesus—not only do we find it written that Jesus was baptizing, and that all men came unto him, but we find that it wasn’t Jesus show who actually did the baptizing, but rather His disciples. Pause and consider the fact that if the Pharisees had questions concerning the identity of John the Baptist when he baptized in the waters of Judaea, so also would they have questions concerning Jesus when they heard and discovered that He too was now baptizing. What must have gone through the hearts and minds of the Pharisees when they heard that there was now another who was also baptizing in the waters of Judaea. We don’t yet find the Pharisees taking offense with and finding fault with Jesus at this point in time, but we do know and we do learn that they heard about Jesus baptizing, and that when Jesus learned that they were aware of their knowledge of Him baptizing, He departed from that place with His disciples. What an incredibly interesting thought and concept it was to think about and consider the fact that first came John the Baptist—not only baptizing in the waters of Judaea, but also preaching and crying out concerning the kingdom of heaven. Baptism of course was not something that was spoken of in the Old Testament prior to the ministries of John the Baptist and Jesus the Christ, and perhaps the closest thing that came to baptism was Naaman in the Old Testament during the days of the prophet Elisha being instructed by the prophet to go and duo himself seven times in the waters of the Jordan. What’s more, is that while baptism isn’t specifically spoken of in the Old Testament outside or possibly the account of Naaman, we find the great flood which took place during the days of Noah being considered in light of and connected to baptism by the New Testament authors and writers. It was during the days of Noah when the whole face of the earth was baptized, consumed and covered with water, and how right souls were saved in the midst of the deluge. What’s more, is that you might also consider the fact that it was during the days of Noah when all flesh and every living thing save eight souls and two of every kind of species was preserved upon the ark. Even more than this, we also find the concept of baptism typified in the miracle of the Red Sea, for while its parting meant salvation for the children of Israel, it meant the death and destruction of their enemies.

Before we get into the account of Jesus in Samaria, and His encounter with the woman at Jacob’s well within the town of Sychar, I would like to just draw your attention to the Old Testament realities of baptism, and although these accounts don’t specifically speak to baptism as we know and understand it in the New Testament, they nonetheless give us an understanding of what takes place in baptism, and what truly does happen when we enter into the waters. I am convinced that if we are to truly understand that which takes place when we enter into and emerge from the waters of baptism, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand the Old Testament accounts of the children of Israel at the Red Sea, the great flood which took place during the days of Noah, and even the amount of Naaman the Syrian general who was instructed by the prophet Elisha to dip himself seven times in the waters of the Jordan. Consider if you will each of these accounts beginning first with the account of the great deluge and flood which took place during the days of Noah and continuing through to the days of the prophet Elisha:

“And it came to pass after seven days, that the waters of the flood were upon the earth. In the six hundredth year of Noah’s life, in the second month, the seventeenth day of the month, the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened. And the rain was upon the earth forty days and forty days and forty nights. In the selfsame day entered Noah, and Noah’s wife, and the three wives of his sons with them, into the ark; they, and every beast after his kind, and all the cattle after their kind, and every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind, and ever fowl after his kind, ever bird of every sort. And they went in unto the Noah into the ark, two and two of all flesh, wherein is the breath of life. And they that went in, went in male and female of all flesh, as God had commanded him: and the Lord shut him in. And the flood was forty days upon the earth; and the waters increased, and bare up the ark, and it was lift above the earth. And the waters prevailed, and were increased greatly upon the earth; and the ark went upon the face of the waters. And the waters prevailed exceedingly upon the earth; and all the high hills, that were under the whole heaven were covered. Fifteen cubits upward did the waters prevail; and the mountains were covered. And all flesh died that moved upon the earth, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of beast, and of every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth, and every man: all in whose nostrils was the breath of life, of all that was in the dry land, died. And every living substance was destroyed which was upon the face of the ground, both man, and cattle, and the creeping things, and the fowl of the heaven; and they were destroyed from the earth: and Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the ark. And the waters prevailed upon the earth an hundred and fifty days” (Genesis 7:1-24).

“And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and the Lord caused the sea to go back by a strong east wind all that night, and made the sea dry land, and the waters were divided. And the children of Israel went into the midst of the sea upon the dry ground: and the waters were a wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left. And the Egyptians pursued, and went in after them to the midst of the sea, even all Pharaoh’s horses, his chariots, and his horsemen. And it came to pass, that in the morning watch the Lord looked unto the host of the Egyptians through the pillar of fire and of the cloud, and troubled the host of the Egyptians, and took off their chariot wheels, that they drove them heavily: so that the Egyptians said, Let us flee from the face of Israel; for the Lord said unto Moses, Stretch out thine hand over the sea, that the waters may come again upon the Egyptians, upon their chariots, and upon their horsemen. And Moses stretched forth his hand over the sea, and the sea returned to his strength when the morning appeared; and the Egyptians fled against it; and the Lord overthrew the Egyptians in the midst of the sea. And the waters returned, and covered the chariots, and the horsemen, and all the host of Pharaoh that came into the sea after them; there remained not so much as one of them. But the children of Israel walked upon dry land in the midst of the sea; and the waters were a wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left. Thus the Lord saved Israel that day out of the hand of the Egyptians; and Israel saw the Egyptians dead upon the sea shore. And Israel saw that great work which the Lord did upon the Egyptians: and the people feared the Lord, and believed the Lord, and His servant Moses” (Exodus 14:21-31).

“So Naaman came with his horses and with his chariot, and stood at the door of the house of Elisha. And Elijah sent a messenger unto him, saying, Go and wash in Jordan seven times, and thy flesh shall come again to thee, and thou shalt be clean. But Naaman was wroth, and went away, and said, Behold, I thought, He will surely come out to me, and stand, and call on the name of the Lord his God, and strike his hand over the place, and recover the leper. Are not Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? May I not wash in them, and be clean? So he turned and went away in a rage. And his servants came near, and spake unto him, and said, My father, if the prophet had bid thee do some great thing, wouldest thou not have done it? How much rather then, when he saith to thee, Wash, and be clean? Then went he down, and dipped himself seven times in Jordan, according to the saying of the man of God: and his flesh came again like unto the flesh of a little child, and he was clean” (2 Kings 5:9-14).

Each of these passages found within the Old Testament—though they don’t specifically speak to baptism as we know and understand it within the New Testament—paint a wonderful and powerful picture of what actually takes place in baptism when we enter into and emerge from the waters as an outward profession and declaration of our faith in the Lord Jesus the Christ. It is when we enter into the waters of baptism where not only are those things which stand against and oppose the living God within our lives destroyed beneath the waters, but so also do we find and receive cleansing from that which has plagued us. When we think about and speak of baptism, it is absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand that baptism is not only about the work of destruction beneath the waters—the destruction of flesh and the destruction of that which opposes God—but also the work of cleansing and restoration. The outward profession and declaration of baptism carries with it so much more than simply repentance unto the remission of sins, but it carries with it a wonderful and tremendous work that is performed both beneath the waters, as well as when we emerge from the midst of the waters. When the waters of the flood and great deluge covered the face of the whole earth all living creatures and everything which had breath perished beneath the waters, save Noah, his family, and all that was in the ark. When the waters of the Red Sea were parted they provided salvation for the children of Israel as they passed through on dry ground, and when those waters were returned and restored to their original and proper place, it meant destruction and judgment upon the Egyptians, their horses and chariots. Essentially, both the great flood, as well as the returning of the waters of the Red Sea spelled out judgment and destruction of that which opposed God, as there was a work which took place beneath the waters. What’s more, is that through each of these accounts we find salvation taking place—salvation for Noah, his family and all that were in the ark, as well as salvation for the children of Israel who passed through on dry ground. When Naaman dipped himself seven times in the waters of the Jordan, he received cleansing and restoration from his leprosy, and his flesh was restored unto him as that of an infant. When we think about and consider the cast of baptism, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand that it not only involved the act of destroying flesh and anything which opposes the living God, but it also involves salvation for those who give themselves to the waters of baptism, and are willing to make that outward profession and declaration in the sight of the living God. Furthermore, baptism is also about a tremendous work of cleansing and restoration which takes place when we choose to enter into the waters of baptism as an outward profession and declaration of an inward reality.

When we come to the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John we find it beginning and opening with the apostle writing concerning Jesus baptizing men (although Jesus Himself did not baptize, but His disciples), and how when the Pharisees heard He was making and baptizing more disciples than John, He left Judaea, and departed again into Galilee. Please don’t miss this incredible reality and concept, for that which caused Jesus to depart from Judaea and enter into Galilee was the Pharisees hearing that He made and baptized more disciples than John the Baptist. It was this knowledge that Jesus was making and baptizing more disciples than John that undoubtedly caused the Pharisees to have questions concerning Jesus, and perhaps even begin to wonder at who this man was who seemed to be making and baptizing more disciples than John the Baptist did. This is something that is worth noting and mentioning, for as you continue reading the words which are found within this passage of Scripture you will find that when Jesus departed from Judaea and returned again to Galilee, He must needs go through Samaria. Upon journeying unto and coming into Samaria, Jesus entered into a city of Samaria called Sychar, which was near the parcel of ground which Jacob gave to his son Joseph. It was in this particular location within Samaria where Jacob’s well was present—a sign which pointed to the twelve tribes of Israel, and to Jacob whose name was changed to Israel, and his twelve sons. When Jesus departed from Judaea and returned again to Galilee, He must needs journey through Samaria, and deliberately and intentionally came to this city called Sychar. It was in this city called Sychar where Jesus came to Jacob’s well being wearied from the journey, and sat down at and upon that well. What’s more, is that the apostle John writes and records—not only that Jesus sat down at the well, but also that it was about the sixth hour when Jesus came unto the well and sat down. Now I have to admit that the living God whom we serve is a God who is concerned with and pays attention to the details. I am convinced that the living God whom we worship and serve is a God who is genuinely concerned with dates, and seasons, and even specific times, and uses specific dates, times, seasons, and the like to accomplish his purposes. There is not a doubt in my mind that while the living God exists outside of time as we know and understand it, He nonetheless chooses to operate within the realm of time in order that He might accomplish His plans and His purposes. When I read the words which the apostle John wrote in this passage of Scripture concerning it being the sixth hour, I cannot help but be convinced that there was something very specific about the time of day when Jesus came to the well within the city of Sychar. In fact, is it possible that in addition to Jesus needing to go through Samaria, He also needed to make haste in His journey to Samaria in order that He might arrive at the well in time to meet this Samaritan woman who would come unto it to draw water from the well.

THE GOD WHO MAKES HASTE TO MEET YOU WHERE YOU ARE! THE GOD WHO MAKES HASTE TO MEET YOU IN THE PLACE OF YOUR NEED! THE GOD WHO MAKES HASTE TO MEET YOU IN THE PLACE OF ROUTINE! As I sit here this morning I cannot help but read the words which are found within this passage and consider the tremendous significance of the apostle John writing that it was the sixth hour when Jesus finally sat down at the well there in the city of Sychar. What’s more, is that I am convinced that it is also significant to read the words which the apostle John wrote concerning Jesus being wearied from His journey, for I cannot help but think about and consider the fact that in addition to Jesus needing to go through Samaria, he also needed to make haste to this specific city within Samaria—this city of Sychar—in order that he might make it to the well for and by the sixth hour. In all reality, it’s almost as if Jesus was on a schedule and was on a time table within Samaria. While it is true that the living God operates outside of time, we must recognize and understand that it is possible for the living God to operate on a schedule—to operate in such a place where He needs to arrive at just the right time and at just the right moment in order that He might not only accomplish His purposes, but also meet us where we are. When Jesus walked among us within and upon the face of the earth, He moved and operated in the realm of time and space, and therefore lived, moved, existed and operated according to and within the hours that were within the day. In fact, I would dare say that this was perhaps what was so significant about what Jesus would speak unto His disciples later on in this passage concerning His working while it was still day, and concerning the hours in a day with which to work and minister. When I read the words which are written and recorded within this passage of Scripture, I cannot help but be confronted with the fact that Jesus was willing to weary Himself, and was willing to exhaust Himself in order that He might make it to Samaria, and make it to the city of Sychar, and even make it to this particular well for and by the sixth hour in order that He might make it just in time for this woman from Samaria to arrive. As I sit here this morning I can’t help but be utterly and completely captivated with and by the fact that if the Holy Spirit didn’t intend on teaching and speaking something to us within the details of the time of day, and even concerning the details of Jesus’ being wearied from His journey, it would not have been penned within this gospel by the apostle John. There is not a doubt in my mind that if the Holy Spirit did not intend on including the details regarding the time of day, and even Jesus’ being wearied from the journey, it would not have been written and recorded within this passage of Scripture!

I wrote concerning the God who makes haste in order to meet us where we are, however, I would also add to that the additional reality of the God who is willing to weary and exhaust Himself in order that He might show up at just the right time to find us where we are. GOD KNOWS YOUR SCHEDULE! Would it shock and surprise you to read and consider the fact that God knows your schedule and knows your routine? What would you say, and what you think if I spoke and declared unto you that not only does God know your schedule, but God also knows your routine—that routine which you so carefully guard and meticulously plan and seek to keep at all costs? There is not a doubt in my mind that not only did the Father know the schedule of this woman from within Samaria, but Jesus the Christ knew the schedule of this woman from within Samaria, and from this city called Sychar. I am completely and utterly convinced that not only does God know our schedule, but He is willing to insert Himself into our schedule in order that He might meet us right where we are. We dare not, we cannot and must not ignore and neglect this single reality, for it is absolutely and incredibly important to consider in order for us to understand the tremendous lengths the living God is willing to go to and take in order to not only find us where we are, but also meet us where we are. I am thoroughly convinced that the living God knows and is very much aware of our schedule, and is very much aware of the routine we keep within our daily lives, and is willing to insert Himself into the midst of that schedule in order that we might encounter Him in a way we were neither anticipating, nor expecting. I would dare say that this woman was not expecting anything when she made her way to the well on this particular day, and she perhaps considered this day to be just like any other day. Undoubtedly this woman had journeyed to this well time and time again, and had drawn water from the well on numerous occasions, and when she made her way to the well today, she expected it to be just like any other day. What I so love about this particular passage of Scripture is not only did this woman find Jesus at the well which she had undoubtedly drawn water from on numerous occasions, but she also showed up to the well to find Jesus waiting for her. Of course when she first saw this man sitting at the well she had no idea and no clue who He was, and in fact, it wasn’t until the end of their conversation when He finally and actually revealed Himself as the Messiah. What so amazes me about this particular scenario and encounter within the New Testament gospel of John is that not only did Jesus make haste in order to make it to this well, and not only did Jesus make haste in order that He might make it to the well in order to be there when this woman came unto the well, but He also made haste to make it to this well in order that he might sit down and wait for her there at the well.

THE GOD WHO WEARIES HIMSELF TO WAIT FOR YOU! THE GOD WHO MAKES HASTE TO WAIT FOR YOU! Pause for a moment and think about and consider the reality that it is possible for the living God to make haste in order that He might wait for you. When I sit and read the words which are found within this passage of Scripture, I can’t help but be drawn to the awesome and incredible reality that not only did Jesus make haste in order to make it in time to meet this woman, but Jesus also made haste and was willing to weary Himself in order that He might sit there and wait for this woman to arrive. THE GOD WHO WAITS FOR YOU TO SHOW UP! Please don’t miss the incredible significance and importance of this reality and concept, for it speaks to the great lengths and measures the living God is willing to take in order that He might show up at just the right time. What I find so incredibly intriguing about this passage is that Jesus could have shown up while this woman was drawing water from the well, or He could have even shown up at the same time this woman came to the well to draw water. Jesus could have even shown up as this woman had finished drawing water from the well, and was preparing to depart from the well. None of these realities are at all what happened, for instead of Jesus showing up at the same time this woman arrived at the well, or while this woman was drawing water from the well, He showed up at the well before this woman even arrived. THE GOD WHO SHOWS UP BEFORE YOU EVEN ARRIVE! How absolutely wonderful and powerful it is to think about and consider the fact that the Lord knows your schedule so well that He shows up before you arrive at your intended place in order that He might be there waiting for you. When I read the words which are found in this passage of Scripture I can’t help but be captivated with and by the fact that not only did Jesus make haste to arrive at the city of Sychar, but He also made haste in order that He might arrive to this city in order that he might sit down at the well before this woman even arrived. When this woman awoke from her slumber this morning she did not anticipate, nor did she expect anything out of the ordinary to take place, and she didn’t expect anything different to take place. This woman woke up this morning fully expecting the day to be like any other day, and had absolutely no clue that when she made her way to the well there would be someone there waiting for her. What’s more, is that she had absolutely no clue that not only would there be someone waiting for her at the well, but that someone who was waiting for her would be the Messiah Himself. Imagine waking up one morning and not expecting anything out of the ordinary, and yet you have absolutely no clue that in a specific place within your route, and at a specific time within your schedule there is someone waiting for you—and not just someone waiting for you, but also the Messiah waiting for you. Pause for a moment and consider the awesome and incredible thought and concept that it is possible for Jesus to not only insert Himself into your schedule, but also to so insert Himself into your schedule that He actually waits for you in one of your usual spots.

Perhaps the best way to explain this as it pertains to my own life is when I consider my morning routine each day before I start my work day. When I sit down to write these writings I actually begin on the platform while waiting for the train to take me into Boston, I continue writing while I am on the train heading into the city, and I finish the writing sitting in a local Starbucks within Boston. What if before I even arrive at the train station in the morning the Messiah is present there at the train station waiting for my arrival? What if before I sit down in my seat on the train the Messiah is there sitting on the train waiting for me in order that I might encounter Him? What if when I arrive at this local Starbucks the Messiah is there waiting for me? Perhaps the single greatest question I can’t help but ask myself is whether or not I have room and space within my life for the Messiah to not only insert Himself into my schedule, but also interrupt my routine? What if those things which take place within my day which I view as inconveniences and interruptions in and of my routine are actually the way of the Messiah inserting Himself into my schedule in order that He might meet me where I am? What if those things that irritate us when they seem to interrupt our routine and schedule are actually the means of the Messiah inserting Himself into our schedule because He is very much aware of our routine and seeks to meet us in the place where we are? I cannot help but get the strong sense while I am sitting here that just as Jesus made haste and even wearied Himself in order that He might make it to this well for and by the sixth hour in order that he might encounter this single woman, so also Jesus is willing to make haste in order that He might arrive at the appointed time within our schedule in order that He might meet us where we are. There is not a doubt in my mind when reading the words which are found and contained within this passage of Scripture that not only did Jesus make haste in order that He might arrive and make it for the sixth hour, but Jesus was also willing to weary Himself in order that He might make it in time to encounter this woman. What’s more, is whether or not it is possible for Jesus to make haste and weary Himself in order that He might position Himself in a place of need in order that He might ask this woman for a drink of water. The apostle John made it perfectly clear that Jesus was tired and weary from the journey, and undoubtedly He might have placed Himself in a position of thirst and need in order that He might ask this woman to draw some water for him. In all reality, it reminds me of the Old Testament account of Abraham’s servant who made a similar journey in order that he might find a wife for Isaac his lord’s son. If you turn and direct your attention to the Old Testament book of Genesis you will find it written and recorded how Abraham’s’ servant made his way to a very specific place in order that he might find and bring back a wife for his lord’s son Isaac. What’s is actually quite interesting and unique about this particular account is the petition he put before the living God to find a wife for Isaac—and not only the request he put before the living God, but also the place where he would find a wife for his lord’s son:

‘And the servant took then camels of the camels of his master, and departed; for all the goods of his master were in his hand: and he arose, and went to Mesopotamia, unto the city of Nahor. And he made his camels to kneel down without the city by a well of water at the time of the evening, even the time that women go out to draw water. And he said, O Lord God of my master Abraham, I pray thee, send me good speed this day, and shew kindness unto my master Abraham. Behold, I stand here by the well of water; and the daughters of the men of the city come out to draw water: and let it come to pass, that the damsel to whom I shall say, Let down thy pitcher, I pray thee, that I may drink; and she shall say, Drink, and I will give thy camels drink also: let the same be she that thou hast appointed for thy servant Isaac; and thereby shall I know that thou hast shewed kindness unto my master. And it came to pass, before he had done speaking, that, behold, Rebekah came out, who was born to Bethuel, son of Milcah, the wife of Nahor, Abraham’s brother, with her pitcher upon her shoulder. And the damsel was very fair to look upon,a. Virgin, neither had any man known her: and she went down to the well, and filled her pitcher, and came up. And the servant ran to meet her, and said, Let me, I pray thee, drink a little water of thy pitcher. And she said, Drink, my lord: and she hasted, and let down her pitcher upon her hand, and gave him drink. And when she had done giving him drink, she said, I will draw water for thy camels also, until they have done drinking. And she hasted, and emptied her pitcher into the trough, and ran again unto the well to draw water, and drew for all his camels. And the man wondering at her held his peace, to wit whether the Lord had made his journey prosperous or not. And it came to pass, as the camels had done drinking, that the man took a golden earring of half a shekel in weight, and two bracelets for her hands of ten shekels weight of gold; and said, Whose daughter art thou? Tell me, I pray thee: is there room in thy father’s house for us to lodge in? And she said unto him, I am the daughter of Bethuel the son of Milcah, which she bare unto Nahor. She said moreover unto him, We have both straw and provender enough, and room to lodge in. And the man bowed down his head, and worshipped the LROd. And he said, Blessed be the Lord God of my Master Abraham, who hath not left destitute my master of his mercy and his truth: I being in the way, the Lord led me to the house of my master’s brethren. And the damsel ran and told them of her mother’s house these things” (Genesis 24:7-28).

I can’t help but see a wonderful similarity between Jesus coming unto the well in Sychar in the region of Samaria, and the account of Abraham’s servant coming unto the well in Mesopotamia, and how what we find in the New Testament gospel of John is not only a picture and shadow of a God who is willing to make haste in order that He might meet us where we are, but it is also a picture and type of a God who is willing to make haste in order that he might find a bride for His Son. In fact, there is a connection between that which we find in the Old Testament book of Genesis and what we find in the New Testament gospel of John, for Jesus Himself even asked this woman to go and call her husband, to which she responded that she has no husband. Jesus emphatically declared unto her that she had rightfully said, for she had had numerous husbands, and the man whom she was now with was not her husband. There is a strong connection between that which we read and find in the Old Testament book of Genesis, and that which we find and read in the New Testament gospel of John, and how the Father will do what He needs in order that He might find a bride for His Son. I am convinced that what we find at the well which was located in Sychar in Samaria is a wonderful and powerful picture of the bridegroom looking for a bride, and is a type and shadow of such a reality. What we must understand is that Jesus didn’t go to the well looking for a literal and physical bride in this natural life, but rather went and came unto this well as a type and shadow of Him as the bridegroom looking for a bride for Himself—the bride of Christ. Oh that we would read the account of Jesus and this woman at the well in Samaria and would understand it in direct connection to Jesus being willing to make haste in order that He might meet us right where we are. We must read the words which are found within this passage of Scripture and understand that Jesus is willing to weary Himself in order that He might arrive at just the right time to wait for us to arrive in order that we might encounter and experience Him. What’s more, is that we must recognize and understand this passage as being a wonderful and powerful picture of the Father who is looking for a bride for His Son, and a bridegroom who is looking for a bride for Himself. Oh that we would read the words which are found within this passage and would understand that which the living God is willing to do in order that He might insert Himself into our schedule and routine in order to encounter and experience us in a way we neither anticipated nor expected. Oh that we would recognize and understand that the living God knows and is very much aware of our schedule and routine, and knows where we will be at what time, and is actually willing to make haste in order to arrive in that place before we ourselves arrive so He can encounter and experience us in a great way we were not looking for, nor even expecting.

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