The Sovereignty of God: Appointed Times of Festivals & the Hour and Timing of the Messiah

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the apostle John. More specifically, today’s passage is found inverses twenty-give through thirty-six of the seventh chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find the continued account of Jesus of Nazareth being found in the city of Jerusalem during the time of the Jewish feat of the tabernacles. It’s actually quite intriguing and interesting to consider the words which are found in this passage, for when the apostle John begins and opens up the passage he does so with Jesus continuing to walk in Galilee. What’s more, is that when you read the words found in this passage you find the reason why Jesus would no longer walk in Jewry—namely, because those present within Jewry sought to slay and kill Him. We dare not miss this incredibly crucial point concerning the life and ministry of Jesus, for while the apostle John wrote concerning Jesus the Christ that He came unto His own, he also wrote concerning Jesus that His own received Him not. If you read the words which are found in the New Testament gospel of John you will quickly discover that what the apostle John sets forth in the opening chapter of the gospel is in essence a portrait and picture of that which the reader would encounter concerning and regarding Jesus’ life and ministry in the midst of the public within the land of Judaea. If and as you study the words which are found in the New Testament gospel of John you will find two distinct realities—at least this far within the first seven chapters of the gospel. The first reality you will notice and discover within the gospel which the apostle John wrote is the incredible emphasis the apostle placed on the Jewish feasts which took place within the land of Judaea. As you read the words which this beloved apostle of Jesus the Christ wrote you will find that on multiple occasions the apostle John directly linked the activity of Jesus the Christ to the Jewish feasts which took place within the land of Judaea. In fact, when you read the words found within this gospel you will find that the main feast the apostle John wrote and spoke about was the feast of the Passover. With that being said, however, you will also notice the mention of the feast of Tabernacles which is found within this particular passage which is found before us. There are other mentions of the Jewish feasts found within the first seven chapters of the gospel, thus directly linking the activity of Jesus the Christ to the feasts which were still celebrated and observed by the Jews within the land of Judaea. It’s actually quite important that we recognize and pay close attention to this, for it helps us understand the activity of Jesus Christ within the gospel.

As you continue reading this particular gospel you will notice that in addition to the skiffle John emphasizing the Jewish feasts, he also took a great amount of time emphasizing the geography of the ministry of Jesus the Christ. It is true that Jesus went up to Jerusalem in order that He might come during the time of the feasts, and it is true that Jesus taught a great deal in the city of Jerusalem, however, with the exception of the man whom He healed at the pool of Bethesda, much of the miracles and works which Jesus did took place within the land and region of Galilee. If and as you study the geography of the land of Israel during the time of Jesus’ public ministry you will quickly find that almost immediately Jesus began walking in Galilee where He not only proclaimed the arrival of the kingdom of heaven, but also called men to repentance. The apostle Matthew places a great amount of emphasis on the fact that when Jesus emerged from the wilderness after being tempted of the devil forty days, He returned in the power of the Spirit and came into the land of Galilee. It would be in Galilee where the hometown of Jesus would be found, as well as places such as Cana and Capernaum. If you study the layout of the land of Israel during the days and time of Jesus the Christ you will find that Judaea was located in what could and would most likely be considered the southern kingdom of Judah, which was created when the nation of Israel split during the days of Solomon’s son Rehiboam. Galilee was located apart from Judaea and could most likely be considered to be part of what we would know to be the former northern kingdom of Israel. I’d you were to look at the map of the land of Israel during the days and times of Jesus you will find that while Judaea was situated in what would be the former southern kingdom of Judah, Galilee would be situated in what would be the former northern kingdom of Israel. What’s more, is that the land and region of Samaria would be located in between Galilee and Judaea—a reality which helps us understand why in the fourth chapter when Jesus left Judaea to travel into Galilee, He must needs pass through in Samaria. In all reality, if one wanted to journey and travel from Judaea to Galilee it vice versa, they would need to journey through Samaria. When the apostle John wrote how Jesus must needed pass through Samaria—not only was it a statement of purpose and intention within the life and ministry of Jesus, but it was also a statement of geography since Samaria was between the two.

If you read and consider the words which are found within the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ which the apostle John wrote you will find that while Jesus would spend much—if not most—of His time in Galilee, He would divide time between Galilee and Judaea. The opening chapters of the gospel of John bring us face to face with the activity and ministry of Jesus the Christ, and their direct connection to the Jewish feasts which took place within and among Jewry. In all reality, if almost seems and appears that that the activity of Jesus the Christ was directly linked to the Jewish feasts—at least as it pertained to His activity within Judaea, as well as Jerusalem. We cannot and would not declare that the Jewish feasts dictated the ministry of Jesus the Christ, but we can state that the Jewish feasts played a crucial part in the movement of Jesus the Christ—particularly and especially as it pertained to His walking among Jewry and walking in the midst of Jerusalem. From what we find and what we read within the gospel which the apostle John wrote we can most certainly deduce and conclude that Jesus’ trips into Judaea and into the city of Jerusalem were in direct alignment with the work and will of the Father, but also with the Jewish feasts which took place during those days. In order for us to understand the New Testament gospel of John and the activity of Jesus the Christ within it we must underdone and view Jesus’ movement as taking place between Judaea and Galilee with much of His works taking place within the land of Galilee. In fact, the apostle John emphatically wrote that when Jesus learned that the Pharisees heard that He made and baptized more disciples than John the Baptist, He left Judaea and entered into Galilee while passing through Samaria. The New Testament gospel of John is in essence a wonderful and powerful picture of Jesus the Christ journeying unto Jerusalem during the times of the Jewish feasts such as the Passover and the various other feasts. In all reality, I can’t help but wonder if it isn’t worthwhile, and perhaps even necessary to read and at least consider the words which Moses wrote in the Law concerning the Jewish feasts which the children of Israel were to celebrate. Through the gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ which the apostle John wrote we come face to face with the fact that Jesus’ activity within Judaea and within the city of Jerusalem took place at specific and appointed times—namely, during times of the Jewish feasts which Moses had ordained within the Law given unto him by the living God while atop the mountain. Pause for a moment and consider that reality—the reality that there were appointed times and seasons during the year when the Jewish people would celebrate the feasts of Israel which were ordained and appointed by the living God while Moses was atop the mountain in the wilderness.

It is quite interesting and intriguing to think about and consider the reality that while there were appointed times during the year when the Jews would celebrate the feasts which were ordained by the living God and found within the Law which he delivered into the children of Israel, Jesus’ activity and movement during these times—at least as it pertained to walking in Judaea and Jerusalem—appeared to be directly linked to these appointed times of celebration. If you are going to understand the activity of Jesus the Christ as it is found within the New Testament gospel of John—particularly and especially as it pertains to His movement within the land of Judaea and the city of Jerusalem—you must recognize and understand the reality and concept of the Jewish feasts which Moses commanded in the Law which was given unto him by the living God while atop the mountain of God in the wilderness. You cannot read the New Testament gospel of John and not come face to face with the reality of the Jewish feasts in Judaea at the time, and the Jews’ celebration of the feasts within the city of Jerusalem. At one point within the history of the Jewish people the feasts would be celebrated in the wilderness, and would be celebrated for a period of forty years before they were finally permitted to enter into the Promised Land, while once the children of Israel entered into the land of Canaan they would celebrate the feasts in Shiloh, which was the place of the Tabernacle of Moses during the early years of the children of Israel in the land. It wouldn’t be until David king of Israel would capture the city of Jerusalem and transform it into the capital city of the nation and kingdom of Israel that the feats would shift from being celebrated in the Tabernacle in Shiloh to being celebrated in the city of Jerusalem. What’s more, is that once Solomon David’s son built the Temple and house of the Lord on the Temple Mount within the city of Jerusalem, the Jewish feasts would be celebrated in Jerusalem at the Temple, as the Jewish people would make a pilgrimage unto the city that they might celebrate the feasts which were ordained and appointed by the living God through His servant Moses while atop the mountain of God in the wilderness. By the time Jesus was born in Bethlehem, the Jewish people were still celebrating the feasts which were commanded in the Law of Moses, and were still making their journey from wherever they lived and dwelt in order that they might come to the city of Jerusalem. Even in the second chapter of the New Testament gospel which the beloved physician Luke wrote we find Jesus’ parents journeying from Nazareth unto Jerusalem at the time of the feast of the Passover in order that they might celebrate it.l What’s more, is that the believed physician Luke wrote and recorded how Jesus’ parents went up to Jerusalem every year at the feasts of the Passover in order that they might observe this particular feast. What’s quite interesting to think about and consider is that it was at least a day’s journey from Nazareth in Galilee to the city of Jerusalem, for when Mary and Joseph left Jerusalem to travel back to Nazareth, they went a full day’s journey before realizing that Jesus wasn’t with them. This is quite interesting and unique, for it gives you somewhat of an idea of the journey that would need to be made in order for someone from Galilee to journey and travel from Galilee to Jerusalem in order that they might celebrate the feasts ordained and commanded by the living God.

As you read and study the New Testament gospel which the apostle John wrote concerning the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ you will quickly come face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that Jesus’ movement within and among Jewry took place at specific times during the year—specifically and particularly during and around the times of the Jewish feasts which were ordained and appointed by Moses while atop the mountain of God in the wilderness. It was true that Jesus did many of His mighty works and miracles in the land of Galilee, as well as in the surrounding area, however, the ministry of Jesus was not limited to Galilee alone, for Jesus would journey and travel into Judaea, and specifically into the city of Jerusalem at the time of the appointed feasts of Israel. Pause for a moment and consider the tremendous reality that Jesus’ movement within and among Jewry, and even within the city of Jerusalem took place at what would appear to be specific times within the year when the Jewish people would celebrate the feasts ordained by Moses centuries earlier in the wilderness of Sinai. If you turn and direct your attention back to the portion of the Old Testament known as the Pentateuch—the first five books of the Old Testament—you will find in the twenty-third chapter of the Old Testament book of Leviticus the account of the feasts which were ordained and appointed by the living God as Moses stood before Him in His presence atop the mountain of God in the wilderness. The twenty-third chapter of the Old Testament book of Leviticus brings us face to face with the awesome and incredible reality of the Jewish feasts which were ordained and appointed by the living God through His servant Moses—feasts which would be celebrated by the Jewish people from those days throughout their history within and upon the earth. The twenty-third chapter of the Old Testament book of Leviticus brings us face to face with each of the Jewish feasts which were commanded by the prophet Moses, which were to be celebrated by the children of Israel from that time forward. If we are going to truly understand the movement and ministry of Jesus the Christ as it is presented before and unto us in the New Testament gospel of John, it is absolutely necessary that we at least consider the Jewish feasts which were ordained by the living God, for not only were those feasts ordained for a specific time and season within and through the year, but so also did Jesus move within Judaea and within the city of Jerusalem at appointed times and seasons—namely, during the Jewish feasts which were celebrated by the people of Israel. Consider if you will the words which are written and found within the twenty-third chapter of the Old Testament book of Leviticus concerning the Jewish feasts which were ordained by the living God in the Law which Moses the servant of God delivered unto the children of Israel:

“And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, Concerning the feasts of the Lord, which ye shall proclaim to be holy convocations, even these are my feasts. Six days shall work be done: but the seventh day is the sabbath of rest, an holy convocation; ye shall do no work therein: it is the sabbath of the Lord in all your dwellings. These are the feasts of the Lord, even holy convocations, which ye shall proclaim in their seasons. In the fourteenth day of the first month at even is the Lord’[s Passover. And on the fifteenth day of the same month at even is the feast of unleashed bread unto the Lord: seven days hue must eat of unleavened bread. In the first day ye shall have an holy convocation: ye shall do no servile work therein. But ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord seven days: in the seventh day is an holy convocation: ye shall do no servile work therein. And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, When ye be come into the land which I give unto you, and shall reap the harvest thereof, then ye shall bring a sheaf of the firstfruits of your harvest unto the priests: and he shall wave the sheaf before the Lord, to be accepted for you: on the morrow after the sabbath the priest shall wave it. And ye shall offer that day when ye wave the sheaf an he lamb without blemish of the first year for a burnt offering unto the Lord. And the meat offering thereof shall be two tent deals of fine flour mingled with oil, an offering made by fire unto the Lord for a sweet savour: and the drink offering thereof shall be of wine, the fourth part of an hin. And ye shall eat neither bread, nor parched corn, nor green ears, until the selfsame day that ye have brought an offering unto your God: it is hall be a statute for ever throughout your generations in all your dwellings. And ye shall count unto you from the morrow after the sabbath, from the day that ye brought the sheaf of the wave offering; seven sabbaths shall be comple: even unto the morrow after the seventh sabbath shall ye number fifty days; and ye shall offer a new meat offering unto the Lod. Ye shall bring out of your habitations two wave loaves of two tent deals: they shall be of fine flour; they shall be baked with leaven; they are the firstfruits unto the Lord. And ye shall offer with the bread seven lambs without blemish of the first year, and one young bullock, and two rams: they shall be for a burnt offering unto the Lord, with their meat offering, and their drink offerings, even an offering made by fire, of sweet savour unto the Lord. Then ye shall sacrifice one kid of the goats for a sin offering, and two lambs of the first year for a sacrifice of peace offerings. And the priest shall wave them with the bread of the firstfruits for a wave offering before the Lord, with the two lambs: they shall be holy to the Lord for the priest. And ye shall proclaim on the selfsame day, that it may be an holy convocation unto you: ye shall do no servile work therein: it shall be a statute for ever in all your dwellings throughout your generations. And when ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not make clean riddance of the corners of thy field when thou reapest, neither shalt thou gather any gleaning of thy harvest: thou shalt leave them unto the poor, and to the stranger: I am the Lord your God. And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, in the first day of the month, shall ye have a sabbath, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, an holy convocation. Ye shall do no servile work therein: but ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord. And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, Also on the tenth day of the seventh month there shall be a day of atonement: it shall be a holy convocation unto you; and ye shall afflict your souls, and offer and offering made by fire unto the Lord. And ye shall do no work in that same day: for it is a day of atonement, to make an atonement for you before the Lord hour God. For whatsoever soul it be that shall not be afflicted in that same day, he shall be cut off from among his people. And whatsoever soul it be that doeth any work in that same day, the same soul will I destroy from among his people. Ye shall do no manner of work: it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations in all your dwellings. It shall be unto you a sabbath of rest, and ye shall afflict your souls: in the ninth day of the month at even, from even unto even, shall ye celebrate your sabbath. And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, Pseak unto the children of Israel, saying, The fifteenth day of this seventh month shall be the feast of the tabernacles for seven days unto the Lord. On the first day shall be an holy convocation:O ye shall do no servile work therein. Seven days ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord: on the eighth day shall be an holy convocation unto you; and ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord: it is a solemn assembly; and ye shall do no servile work therein. These are the feasts of the Lord, which ye shall proclaim to be holy convocations, to offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord, a burnt offering, and a meat offering, a sacrifice, and drink offerings, even thing upon his day: beside the sabbaths of the Lord, and beside your gifts, and beside all your bows, and beside all your free will offerings, which ye give unto the Lord. Also in the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when ye have gathered in the fruit of the land, ye shall keep a feast unto the Lord seven days; on the first day shall be s abbath, and on the eighth day shall be a sabbath. And ye shall take you on the first day of the boughs of goodly trees, branches of palm trees, and the boughs of thick trees, and willows of the brook: and ye shall re juice before the Lord your God seven days.k And ye shall keep it a feast unto the Lord seven days in the year. It shall be a statute for ever in your generations: ye shall celebrate it in the seventh month. Ye shall dwell in booths seven days; all that are Israelites born shall dwell in booths: that your generations may. Know that I made the children of Israel to dwell in booths, when I brought them out of the land of Egypt: I am the Lord your God. And Moses declared unto the children of Israel the feasts of the Lord” (Leviticus 23:1-44).

Now on the surface it might not seem all that necessary—perhaps not even at all relevant and important—to consider the words which Moses commanded the children of Israel concerning the feasts of the Lord while in the wilderness, however, I would dare say that there is something incredibly significant concerning the feasts which the children of Israel were to celebrate according to the command of the Lord. If there is one thing we must understand and recognize, it’s that even during the days of Jesus the Christ the Jewish feasts were still being celebrated, and the words which Moses had commanded all those millennia earlier were still being heartened unto and obeyed during the days and times of Jesus. If and as you read the words which the apostle John wrote in this particular gospel, you will quickly notice that the movement of Jesus the Christ—at least within Jewry and within the city of Jerusalem—seemed to directly coincide with the Jewish feasts which had been ordained and appointed centuries earlier by Moses. You cannot read the New Testament gospel of John and not encounter the incredible reality that Jesus’ movement within Judaea and the city of Jerusalem seemed to directly coincide with specific times and specific seasons—namely, the Jewish feasts which were celebrated by the children of Israel. You cannot read the first seven chapters of the New Testament gospel which the apostle John wrote and not come face to face with the movement of Jesus the Christ within Judaea and Jerusalem being intrinsically linked and connected to the Jewish feasts which had been ordained and appointed through Moses by the living God while he stood in the presence of God atop the mountain in the wilderness. Within the first seven chapters of the New Testament gospel of John you will find Jesus spending much of His time in the region of Galilee, and performing many of His mighty works in the midst of that region, however, you will find that there were certain and specific times during the year and during the months when Jesu would travel and journey unto Jerusalem in order that He might teach and speak unto the people. What’s more, is that as you read the words which the apostle John wrote you will get the strong sense that Jesus went up unto Jerusalem—perhaps not solely to celebrate the feasts which had been ordained by Moses all those centuries earlier, but also in order that He might teach and speak unto the people when countless Jews would make their journey and pilgrimage from where they lived and dwelt in Judaea and the surrounding regions. There is within the New Testament gospel account of the apostle John countless references to the feasts of Israel, and Jesus’ movement within the city of Jerusalem during these times—during times of celebration. In fact, when you come to this seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel of John you will find Jesus walking in Galilee rather than Jewry because the Jews sought to kill Him. What’s more, is that within the seventh chapter you will find that at this particular time the Jewish feast of Tabernacles was at hand—a time when countless Jews from all throughout the surrounding region would make their way to Jerusalem in order that they might celebrate the feast.

The Jewish feast of Tabernacles was one of the final feasts mentioned by Moses in the twenty-third chapter of the Old Testament book of Leviticus, and was a feast when the people of God were to offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord. On the eighth day of the feast there was to be another offering made by fire unto the Lord, and a time when there would be no servile work performed and completed by the children of Israel. It would be at this particular time—beginning with the fifteenth day of the seventh month—when Jesus would originally begin in Galilee, and yet as His brethren would urge Him to go up to the feast in order that He might manifest and make Himself known unto the world. According to an article within Wikipedia, the Feast of Tabernalces (or Sukkot) was also known as the Festival of Ingathering, and was one of the three pilgrimage festivals which were ordained and appointed by Moses, and where the children of Israel would journey unto the city of Jerusalem. What’s so incredibly intriguing about that which we find within the seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel of John is that the Feast of Tabernacles or the Sukkot was the Festival of Ingathering, and was a time when countless Jews would make a pilgrimage from their homes and dwelling places, and would journey unto Jerusalem in order that they might celebrate and remember the forty years in which the children of Israel wandered in the wilderness. What’s more, is that the Feast of Tabernacles was a feast in which the Jewish people were to remember how their ancestors and forefathers dwelt in tents while journeying in the wilderness those forty years before finally entering into the Promised Land of Canaan. It would be during this particular feast when the Jewish people would make for themselves booths where they would dwell for a period of seven days according to the command of Moses. How incredibly interesting is to think about and consider the fact it would be during a time when the Jewish people were dwelling in tents—perhaps within the city of Jerusalem, and perhaps outside the city of Jerusalem—in order that they might remember how their ancestors dwelt in tents and booths in the wilderness. It would be during this time when Jesus’ brethren would urge Jesus to journey down to Jerusalem—not only in observance of the feast, but also that others might see the works which He performed. Jesus had done countless works in the land and region of Galilee, and His brethren were now urging Him to journey and travel to Jerusalem, in order that He might demonstrate and manifest the works which He did in Galilee. Even their very statement and words illustrated and revealed the incredible reality that Jesus performed many of His works in the land of Galilee, as Galilee seemed to be the central hub for much of His ministry of healing and miracles. In all reality, we might very well conclude that Jesus’ brethren were urging Him to journey unto Jerusalem during the time of this great feast of the Jews in order that he might work the same works among the Jews in Jerusalem as He did in the land and region of Galilee.

What’s so incredibly interesting about what we find in the seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel which the apostle John wrote is that it appears to be directly and intrinsically linked to the fifth chapter, and the previous visit which Jesus made unto Jerusalem. In fact, when you read the words which Jesus spoke after journeying down to Jerusalem at the time of this great feast of Tabernacles, you will find Him speaking and declaring the following words unto those within Jewry: “My doctrine is not mine, but His that sent me. If any man will do His will, He shall know of the doctrine, whether it be of God, or whether I speak of myself. He that speaketh of himself seeketh his own glory: but he that seekethh his glory that sent him, the same is true, and no unrighteousness is in him. Did not Moses give you the law, and yet none of you keepeth the law? Why go ye about to kill me?” (John 7:16-19). What’s more, is that if you move forward just one two more verses you will find Jesus Himself linking that particular visit to Jerusalem to His previous visit in Jerusalem when He healed the man at the pool of Bethesda on the sabbath day. Beginning with the twenty-first verse of the seventh chapter you will find the following words spoken by Jesus the Christ in response to the Jews asking whom was seeking to kill Him: “I have done one work, and ye all marvel. Moses therefore gave unto you circumcision; (not because it is of Moses, but of the fathers;) and ye on the sabbath day circumcise a man. If a man on the sabbath day receive circumcision, that the law of Moses should not be broken; are ye angry at me, because I have made a man every whit whole on the sabbath day? Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment” (John 7:21-24). With these words Jesus directly links this particular journey to the city of Jerusalem with His previous journey to Jerusalem when He healed the man at the pool of Bethesda, and did so on the sabbath day. If you journey back to the fifth chapter of this same gospel you will find that when the Jews realized that Jesus had healed this man on the sabbath day, they sought to kill Him. What’s more, is that when Jesus spoke of God as His Father, and how He must work the work of His Father, they sought all the more to kill Him—not only because He had broken the sabbath, but also because He had called God His Father, thus making Himself equal with God. The words which Jesus spoke on this particular occasion are actually quite intriguing, for the words which He spoke point back to His previous journey unto Jerusalem, and how He had healed a man at the pool of Bethesda, and did so on the sabbath day. The last time Jesus was in the city of Jerusalem the Jews sought to kill Him—not only because He had healed a man on the sabbath, but also because he had called God His Father, thus making Himself equal to and with God. Pause for a moment and consider the fact that Jesus not only returned to Jerusalem, but also returned to the very place where men and women sought to kill and put Him to death because of a work which He had done, as well as because of the words which He spoke concerning God as His Father.

What I absolutely love within the seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel of John is the incredible and tremendous emphasis that is placed on the timing of the Father, and the timing of the living God. If and as you read the words which are found within this passage of Scripture you will first encounter this reality of timing when Jesus was speaking unto His brethren concerning His time not yet coming to pass. In verses six through eight you will find the following words: “My time is not yet come: but your time is always ready. The world cannot hate you; but me it hateth, because I testify of it, that the works thereof are evil. Go ye up unto this feast: I go not up yet unto this feasts; for my time is not yet full come” (John 7:6-8). If you continue reading in the seventh chapter you will find a great dispute rising up among the Jews concerning Jesus, for some said of Jesus, “Is not this he, whom they seek to kill? But, lo, He speaketh boldly, and they say nothing unto Him. Do the rulers know indeed that this is the very Christ? Howbeit we know this man whence He is: but when Christ cometh, no man knoweth whence He is.” Jesus being aware of the words which they spoke, as well as the thoughts within their hearts and minds responded by declaring unto them how they both knew Him, and knew where He was, and how He did not come of Himself, but the One who sent Him was true whom they did not know. What we find in the seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel of John is actually quite unique and quite astonishing, for within this chapter we find a great dispute arising within Jerusalem concerning Jesus, for there were those who thought and perceived Him as being a great teacher, and perhaps even as the Christ and Messiah. There were a great many others who could not accept that Jesus was the Christ and the Messiah, and perceived Him as being one who had a devil and went about deceiving the people. What we find within this passage as we continue reading is an additional reference concerning the timing of the Lord, and the specific hour, for the apostle John wrote how many within Jerusalem sought to take Him, but no man laid hands on Him, because His hour had not yet come. Thus, there is within this passage of Scripture a truly awesome and remarkable picture of the timing of the Lord, and how all things must operate within the timing and appointed times of the Lord. This is quite significant when you consider that all this took place during an appointed time within the year—during the seventh month of the year beginning with the fifteenth day. At a time which was itself appointed by the living God, the apostle John placed a great deal of emphasis on the timing of God, for the apostle John declared concerning Jesus that His hour had not yet come, and how because His hour had not yet come, no man could take Him or put Him to death. Oh that we would recognize and realize the direct connection and link between the appointed time of the feast of Tabernacles which was taking place at this time, as well as the declaration that the hour and time had not yet come for Jesus the Christ, and that because of that very reality—no man could lay hands on Him, nor could they put Him to death and kill Him. Oh that we would understand the providence and sovereignty of the living God, and that we would not only understand the appointed times and seasons which the Father ordained within and throughout the year, but also the appointed times and seasons which He had and has ordained concerning and regarding our lives. Oh that we would read the words which are found within this passage of Scripture and come face to face with the awesome and wonderful timing of the Lord, and His sovereign and complete control over time and seasons—not only concerning days, weeks, months and years, but also concerning our lives.

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