The Feast of Tabernacles: Living Outside Comfort to Understand the Thirst Inside You

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the apostle John. More specifically, today’s passage is found in verses thirty-seven through fifty-three of the seventh chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find the apostle John finishing the words which he wrote concerning this particular feast which was taking place within the city of Jerusalem. As you seek to understand that which is found within this passage of scripture it is necessary and imperative that you understand something rather unique about the feasts of Israel which were commanded by the Lord through His servant Moses. If you study each of the Jewish feasts you will notice that of all the feasts which the Lord commanded and instructed though His servant Moses, there were three feasts in particular which were considered to be “pilgrimage feasts”—feasts that would require the people of Israel from within and throughout the entire land to journey unto the city of Jerusalem. The three feasts which were known as the pilgrimage feasts were the Feast of Passover, the Feast of Pentecost, and the Feast of Tabernacles. Because these feasts were considered to be feasts from which men and women from within and throughout all Israel would make the journey to Jerusalem to participate and celebrate in them, this is the reason why most likely when Jesus the Christ was betrayed into the hands of the religious leaders, and later handed over to Pilate and the romans to be executed, there were undoubtedly countless Jewish individuals within the city of Jerusalem. What’s more, is that when you come to the day of Pentecost which is actually in and of itself one of these unique pilgrimage feasts, you will again find the city of Jerusalem filled with countless souls from within the land of Judaea and the surrounding area. What’s more, is that when you come to the day of Pentecost you will find the account of the cloven tongues of fire being so significant, for at that time there would not only be Jews from the areas and regions round about the land of Judaea, Galilee, Samaria and the like, but there would also be countless individuals from other nations, tribes, tongues and languages which were present within the city of Jerusalem. Essentially these feasts were not only feasts of celebration and convocations, but there were feasts of gathering together, as they would draw the presence of Jews and stingers alike unto the city of Jerusalem. When we come to the feast of tabernacles which was found in the seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel which in the apostle John wrote you will undoubtedly find the city of Jerusalem filled with countless Jews from within Judaea, Galilee, and the surrounding areas coming unto Jerusalem in order that they might celebrate the feast.

As you come to the seventh chapter of the gospel which the apostle John wrote you will come face to face with the tremendous reality that there was about to be a great pilgrimage to the city of Jerusalem, as countless men and women from within Jewry, as well as from the surrounding regions, lands and nations would come unto the city of Jerusalem . The seventh chapter of this particular gospel brings us face to face with another one of the feasts of Israel—a common theme that would be present within the first seven chapters of this particular gospel. The seventh chapter of the gospel which the apostle John wrote would find Jesus deliberately choosing to walk and remain in Galilee, and not walking in Jewry, for the Jews sought to kill Him. While I’m Galilee, Jesus’ brethren urged and encouraged Him go journey unto Jerusalem in order that He might go up unto the feast—undoubtedly because they knew and understood that there would be countless souls from within Judaea, Galilee, Samaria, and perhaps other areas round about which would journey and make their way unto the city of Jerusalem. When Jesus’ brethren urged Him to journey down from Galilee unto Jerusalem they did so because they knew and understood that Jerusalem would be filled with the people of Israel from within and throughout the land of Judaea and Galilee. During this time there would be countless men, women, children and families which would have made the journey from their homes unto the city of Jerusalem in order that they might celebrate this third of the three pilgrimage feasts in the city of Jerusalem. Jesus’ brethren urged Jesus to make the journey down unto the city of Jerusalem in order that He might make Himself known and reveal Himself unto the countless souls which would be in the city of Jerusalem. Undoubtedly they were aware of the great and mighty works which He has performed within the region of Galilee, and they urged Him to make the journey into the city of Jerusalem to demonstrate and manifest the same works and miracles within the city as well. Up until that time Jesus has performed most of His works within the region of Galilee rather than among Jewry, and even within the city of Jerusalem. With the exception of the healing of the man at the pool of Bethesda, which took place within the city of Jerusalem, there was very little activity of Jesus which took place among them in their midst. In fact, more often than not Jesus would journey unto the city of Jerusalem during and at times of the different feasts, and would begin teaching and speaking unto the people.

What is so unique and interesting about this reality of Jesus making the journey down from Galilee from the city of Jerusalem is they there would have been at least nine different times when Jesus would have traveled down to the city of Jerusalem. In fact, I would dare say that there was one particular feast which He experienced within the city of Jerusalem more than any of the other feasts—The feast of the Passover. If you study the various feasts of Israel you will notice that there were the spring feasts, and there were the fall feasts. Two of the spring feasts which would take place during these days would be the feast of the Passover and the feast of Pentecost. It is believed that Jesus’ ministry lasted roughly three and a half years which would mean that He would have possibly celebrated each of these pilgrimage feasts at least three times within the first three years. The language we find within the gospel account of the apostle John suggests that Jesus continually made His way down unto the city of Jerusalem in order that He might e in the city during the times of the great feasts which were celebrated by the people of Israel, as well as the strangers. The feast of Passover, however, would be that one feast which Jesus would possibly celebrate a fourth and additional time, because it was at the time of the Passover when Jesus would have been crucified by the romans and nailed to the cross as the sacrificial Lamb of God which would take away the sins of the world. Jesus wouldn’t have celebrated the feast of Pentecost this fourth time and this fourth year, did by that time He was already ascended unto the right hand of the Father. This feast of Pentecost during this fourth year, and following the feast of Passover would be the feast when countless strangers and people of Israel alike would have been present within the city of Jerusalem. It would be this feast of Pentecost when the one hundred and twenty would have been gathered together unto the city of Jerusalem in order that they might in fact celebrate the feast. It would be in the midst of the feast of Pentecost when the Spirit would be poured out and released in that upper room upon the one hundred and twenty and when they would speak the languages of countless men and women which were present in the city at that time. What’s more, is that if you study the account of the feast of tabernacles you will notice that it took place in the seventh month of the year, and specifically beginning in the middle of the month on the fifteenth day. It would be the feasts of Pentecost and tabernacles which would still take place after Jesus had ascended unto the right hand of the Father, yet would be absent the presence of Jesus the Christ, for He would be at the right hand of the Father who was in heaven.

The seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written by the apostle John is actually quite remarkable and astounding when you think about it, for it would be a time when countless souls from within and throughout Judaea, Galilee, and perhaps even Samaria and the surrounding regions would have gathered themselves unto Jerusalem in order that they might celebrate the feasts. In all reality, this feast of tabernacles would have been a time of great ingathering, as men and women from the world during that time would have made their way unto the city of Jerusalem to celebrate this particular feast. As the seventh chapter of the gospel account of the apostle John begins and opens, it does so with a description of Jesus walking in Galilee, for He was unwilling to walk in Jewry, because the Jews sought to kill Him. This is quite unique and intriguing when you consider that these words were written immediately before the apostle John wrote concerning the feast of Tabernacles being at hand— feast in which countless individuals would gather together from round about the surrounding regions and areas in order that they might celebrate this feast unto the Lord. In the first verse of this seventh chapter the apostle John brings us face to face with the reality that Jesus walked in Galilee, and would not walk in Jewry because the Jews sought to take His life. In the second verse of this chapter we find the apostle John writing how the Jewish feast of Tabernacles was at hand—a feast in which the children of Israel would celebrate something very specific before and unto the Lord. The feast of Tabernacles would be a feast which the children of Israel would celebrate before and unto the Lord as they remembered and commemorated the forty years their ancestors wandered in the wilderness. What’s more, is that the feast of tabernacles was a feast which was ordained and appointed by the living God at an appointed time within the year in which the children of Israel would celebrate and remember how their ancestors dwelt in tents for forty years as they were led through the wilderness by the pillar of fire at night and the pillar of cloud by day. The feast of tabernacles was meant to be one of those feasts which looked back upon the history of the Jewish people, and how the children of Israel had not only wandered in the wilderness for forty years, but how during that time they lived in tents, which were temporary shelters. Essentially, the feast of tabernacles was intended to be a time when future generations would look back and remember how their ancestors themselves lived during those forty years wandering in the wilderness, as they were led by the Lord according to the word and leadership of Moses. This particular feast would not only look back to the reality of the children of Israel wandering in the wilderness for forty years and how they lived in tents during that time, but it would also be a time when the children of Israel—together with the strangers round about them—would gather together in Jerusalem to celebrate this feast. It’s actually quite unique and astonishing to think about the fact that strangers were invited to share in and celebrate this feast as well, as the Lord offered and provided specific instruction concerning strangers which dwelt within the land of Israel—not only during the time of the wandering in the wilderness, but also during and throughout their time within the land which was sworn on oath unto Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and give unto them during the days of Joshua as an inheritance.

As you approach the seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel which the apostle John wrote you will find at the beginning of the chapter “the feast of Tabernacles was at hand,” however, when you come to thirty-seventh verse of this chapter you will find that on the last and greatest day of the feast Jesus stood up in the midst of the city and undoubtedly in the midst of the Temple, and cried out with a loud voice something very specific. When the seventh chapter begins and opens up it does so with the feast of Tabernacles being at hand, and yet by the time we come to thirty-seventh verse we find the apostle John mentioning “the last and greatest day of the feast.” Thus, what we find in the thirty-seventh verse of this particular chapter is a progression of at least seven days in which the feast itself would be celebrated. A casual and cursory glance at this passage would not yield such a knowledge, however, one would have to journey back to the Old Testament books of Numbers and Leviticus in order to understand both the timing of the feast, as well as the events which would have taken place within these feasts. We dare not, we cannot and must not miss the awesome and tremendous reality surrounding the feast of tabernacles and what was commanded and instructed concerning it by the living God through His servant Moses during the time the children of Israel wandered in the wilderness. In fact, I would dare say that if we are to truly understand that which takes place within this passage of Scripture we must consider and understand that which was instructed, commanded and prescribed by the living God concerning the feast of Tabernacles. If you turn and direct your attention back to the Old Testament books of Numbers and Leviticus you will find very specific instruction and commands which were given concerning the celebration and observance of the feast by the children of Israel. I would dare suggest and would propose to you the words which were spoken concerning this great feast, which would initially begin as the children of Israel celebrating and commemorating the wilderness wandering and living in tents for forty years, yet would transform into something much greater and much bigger by becoming one of the three pilgrimage feasts in which people would gather together from round about the land of Israel, as well as within the nation of Israel to celebrate the feast. What’s more, is that if you study Jewish history—particularly around the time of Jesus, as well as the time leading up to Jesus’ manifestation—you will notice how this feast would essentially include three different elements. It would be these three elements which would help you understand the significance of what was written beginning with the thirty-seventh verse of this chapter.

Moving forward in this writing I would invite you to consider the words which are written and recorded within the Old Testament books of Numbers and Leviticus, for it would be that which we find within these each of these Old Testament books that provides us with the foundation to understand and recognize what would have undoubtedly taken place within the city of Jerusalem during and at this time. It would be that which we find within two specific chapters found within the Pentateuch that would help us truly understand and appreciate the words we find in this particular passage within the gospel of John—not only as it pertains to the Jewish feasts and the celebration and observance of the feasts, but also concerning and regarding the activity of Jesus during and around the time of these great feasts. Consider if you will the worlds which are found in the twenty-third chapter of the Old Testament book of Leviticus, and the first set of commands and instructions that were given by the Lord unto Moses concerning this feast, as well as the words which are found in the twenty-ninth chapter of the Old Testament book of Leviticus concerning the same feast. In all reality there are two distinct passages found within the Books of Moses which provide us with the backdrop and foundation for this feast which took place around the time the words which were written concerning the seventh chapter took place during the days of Jesus. Consider the following words written by Moses the servant of the Lord concerning this particular feast which was ordained and appointed by the living God, and which would be used by Jesus the Christ in order that He might set forth some very specific teaching:

“And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, The fifteenth day of this seventh month shall be the feast of tabernacles for seven days unto the Lord. On the first day shall be an holy convocation: ye shall do no servile work therein. Seven days ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord: on the eighth day shall be an holy convocation unto you; and ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord: it is a solemn assembly; and ye shall do no servile work therein. These are the feasts of the Lord, which ye shall proclaim to the be holy convocations, to offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord, a burnt offering, and a meat offering, a sacrifice, and drink offerings, every thing upon his day: beside the sabbaths of the Lord, a burnt offering, and a meat offering, a sacrifice, and drink offerings, every thing upon his day: beside the sabbaths of the Lord, and beside your gifts, and beside all your vows, and beside all your free will offerings, which ye give unto the Lord. Also in the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when ye have gathered in the fruit of the land, ye shall keep a feast unto the Lord seven days: on the first day shall be a sabbath, and on the eighth day shall be a sabbath. And ye shall take you on the first day the boughs of goodly trees, branches of palm trees, and the boughs of thick trees, and willows of the brook; and ye shall rejoice before the Lord your God seven days. And ye shall keep it a feast unto the Lord seven days in the year. It shall be a statute for ever in your generations: ye shall celebrate it in the seventh month. Ye shall dwell in booths seven days; all that are Israelites born shall dwell in booths: that your generations may know that I made the children of Israel to dwell in booths, when I brought them out of the land of Egypt: I am the Lord your God. And Moses declared unto the children of Israel the feasts of the Lord” (Leviticus 23:33-44).

“And on the fifteenth day of the seventh month ye shall have an holy convocation; ye shall do no servile work, and ye shall keep a feast unto the Lord seven days: and ye shall offer a burnt offering, a sacrifice made by fire, of a sweet savour unto the Lord; thirteen young bullocks, two rams, and fourteen lambs of the first year; they shall be without blemish: and their meat offering shall be of flour mingled with oil, three tenth deals unto every bullock of the thirteen bullocks, two tent deals to each ram of the two rams, and a several tenth deal to each lamb of the fourteen lambs: and one kid of the goats for a sin offering; beside the continual burnt offering, his meat offering, and his drink offering. And on the second day ye shall offer twelve young bullocks, two rams, fourteen lambs of the first year without spot: and their meat offering and their drink offerings for the bullocks, for the rams, and for the lambs, shall be according to their number, after the manner: and one kid of the goats for a sin offering; beside the continual burnt offering, and the meat offering thereof, and their drink offerings. And on the third day eleven bullocks, two rams, fourteen lambs of the first year without blemish; and their meat offering and their drink offerings for the bullocks, for the rams, and for the lambs, shall be according to their number, after the manner: and one goat for a sin offering; beside the continual burnt offering, and his meat offering, and his drink offering. And on the fourth day ten bullocks, two rams, and fourteen lambs of the first year without blemish: their meat offering and their drink offerings for the bullocks, for the rams, and for the lambs, shall be according to their number, after the manner: and one kid of the goats for a sin offering: beside the continual burnt offering, his meat offering, and his drink offering. And on the fifth day of nine bullocks, two rams, and fourteen lambs of the first year without spot: and their meat offering and their drink offerings for the bullocks, for the rams, and for the lambs, shall be according to their number, after the manner: and one goat for a sin offering; beside the continual burnt offering, and his meat offering, and his drink offering. And on the sixth day eight bullocks, two rams, and fourteen lambs of the first year without blemish: and their meat offering and their drink offerings for the bullocks, two rams, and fourteen lambs of the first year without blemish: and their meat offering and their drink offerings for the bullocks, for the rams, and for the lambs, shall be according to their number, after the manner: and one goat for a sin offering; beside the continual burnt offering, his meat offering, and his drink offering. And on the seventh day seven bullocks, two rams, and fourteen lambs of the first year without blemish: and their meat offering and their drink offerings for the bullocks, for the rams, and for the lambs of the first year without blemish: and their meat offering and their drink offerings for the bullocks, for the rams, and for the lambs, shall be according to their number, after the manner: and one goat for a sin offering; beside the continual burnt offering, his meat offering, and his drink offering. On the eighth day ye shall have a solemn assembly: ye shall do no servile work therein: but ye shall offer a burnt offering, a sacrifice made by fire, of a sweet savour unto the Lord: one bullock, one ram, seven lambs, of the first year without blemish: their meat offering and their drink offerings for the bullock, for the ram, and for the lambs, shall be according to their number, after the manner: and one goat for a sin offering: beside the continual burnt offering, and his meat offering; beside the continual burnt offering, and his meat offering, and his drink offering. These things ye shall do unto the Lord in your feasts, beside your vows, and your free will offerings, for your burnt offerings, and for your meat offerings, and for your drink offerings, and for your peace offerings. And Moses told the children of Israel according to all that the Lord had commanded Moses” (Numbers 29:12-40).

Upon reading and considering the words which are found in these two Old Testament passages we encounter the reality that as it pertained to the feast of Tabernacles, there were essentially seven days in the feast, with the eighth day being a holy convocation and assembly to conclude the feast. When we read in the thirty-seventh verse of this chapter how Jesus on the last day, and on that great day of the feast stood up, and cried out in the hearing of all the people, we must recognize and understand that what the apostle John was referencing was the eighth day of the feast—that day when the Lord through Moses spoke of a holy convocation> You will recall how the Lord commanded and instructed Moss that seven days the children of Israel should offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord, and on the eighth day shall be an holy convocation unto them, and they should offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord. What’s more, is the Lord commanded unto and through Moses that this eighth day was to be a solemn assembly, and there was to be no servile work performed therein. Furthermore, the Lord emphatically declared unto and through Moses that the first day of the feast was to be on a sabbath, while the eighth and final day of the feast was also to be a sabbath. We must recognize and understand the significance of this reality, for by doing so we come face to face with the reality of what the apostle John wrote concerning this last and great day of the feast, which was to be a solemn assembly and convocation before and unto the Lord. By the time we come to the thirty-seventh verse of the seventh chapter we find seven days having passed within and during this feast, and this last and great day of the feast being manifested in Jerusalem. It was on this last and great day of the feast where Jesus stood and cried—perhaps in the midst of the Temple, and undoubtedly within the hearing of all those which were present on this particular day—saying, “If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. He that believeth on me, as the Scripture hath said, out of His belly shall flow rivers of living water” (John 7:37-38). These words which Jesus spoke would actually be quite remarkable and quite astonishing—particularly and especially when you consider the tremendous reality that one of the features of this particular feast was what was called the water drawing and libation. Essentially what this water drawing and libation was was drawing water out of the pool of Siloam and bringing it unto the Temple of the living God. Upon bringing the water which was drawn from the pool of Siloam to the Temple, it would then be poured out before the Lord. This reality and concept of water drawing and libation was quite interesting, for it helps us understand why Jesus would stand up on the last and greatest day of the feast, and why He would cry out speaking about living water, and those who thirst. After watching the acts of water drawing and libation performed at this feast, Jesus would take this as an opportunity to stand up in the midst of the people and speak concerning living water. What’s more, is when you consider the words which Jesus spoke unto those in Jerusalem, for they were words which were reminiscent of those which He spoke unto the Samaritan woman at Jacob’s well in Samaria. Consider the following exchange between Jesus and the Samaritan woman as found in the fourth chapter of this same New Testament gospel:

“There cometh a woman of Samaria to draw water: Jesus saith unto her, Give me to drink. (For His disciples were gone away unto the city to buy meat.) Then saith the woman of Samaria unto Him, How is it that you , being a Jew, askest drink of me, which am a woman of Samaria? For the Jews have no dealings with the Samaritans. Jesus answered and said unto her, If thou knowest the gift of God, and who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink; thou would East have asked of Him, and He would have given thee living water. The woman saith unto Him, Sir, thou hast nothing to draw with, and the well is deep: from whence then hast thou that living water? Art thou greater than our father Jacob, which gave us the well, and drank thereof himself, and his children, and his cattle? Jesus answered and said unto her, Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst again: but whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water sprinting up into everlasting life. The woman saith unto Him, Sir, give me this water, that I thirst not, neither come hither to draw. Jesus saith unto her, Go, call thy husband, and come hither. The woman answered and said, I have no husband. Jesus said unto her, Thou hast well said, I have no husband: for thou hast had five husbands; and he whom thou now hast is not thy husband: in that saidst thou truly” (John 4:7-18).

Pay close attention to the language which is found within this passage of Scripture, for what you find within the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John would be found once more in the city of Jerusalem during the great feast of Tabernacles. What was spoken in private unto a woman of Samaria at jacob’s well as Jesus passed through Samaria unto Galilee would again be spoken in the city of Jerusalem unto all those who would come up to Jerusalem unto the feast. It’s actually quite interesting that on the last and great day of the feast the words which Jesus had previously spoken unto the woman at the well in Samaria would be spoken—not only unto Jews, but also unto all those who would have come unto Jerusalem from the regions round about Judaea, Jerusalem, Galilee, Samaria, and the like. The words which Jesus the Christ spoke unto the woman at Jacob’s well in Sychar within Samaria would be words which Jesus would now speak unto countless men and women—both within Jewry, as well as unto strangers which would come unto Jerusalem to celebrate the feast. The offer which was made in private unto the Samaritan woman would now be made publicly unto both Jew and stranger alike in the city of Jerusalem during a time when men and women would have made the pilgrimage from wherever they lived in order that they might celebrate the feast in the city of Jerusalem. What’s worth noting and pointing is that when speaking unto the woman at the well in Samaria Jesus not only spoke of living water, but Jesus also declared unto her that the water which He provides shall and would be within that person a well of water springing up into everlasting life. When speaking unto the woman at the well in Samaria, Jesus spoke of a well of water which would spring up from within them unto everlasting life, and when speaking on the last day, the greatest day of the feast of Tabernacles, Jesus spoke of out of the belly of those who came unto Him and drank from the water which He provides would flow rivers of living water. The unique thing is that Jesus didn’t speak of everlasting life when speaking at the feast of Tabernacles in Jerusalem, but would speak of rivers of living water which would flow forth from those who came unto Him to drink. What’s more, is that what we read and find in this passage is the apostle John describing these rivers of living water as being representative of and speaking concerning the Holy Spirit, which Jesus would gladly give unto those who believe on Him. This is in direct alignment with the words which John the Baptist spoke concerning Jesus, for John the Baptist spoke how there was coming one after Him who would baptize with fire and with the Holy Spirit. Oh please don’t miss the incredible and tremendous significance of that which is spoken here, for what we find powerful language concerning the giving of the Holy Spirit—a reality which would receive greater emphasis in the fourteenth, fifteenth and sixteenth chapters of this same gospel. Here on the last and great day of the feast of Tabernacles—in the company and hearing of all those who had gathered unto Jerusalem—Jesus not only spoke unto those who thirsted, but also offered unto those who thirsted rivers of living , which would spring and flow forth from them.

It’s actually quite unique and remarkable to consider the words which are found in this passage of Scripture, for while Jesus did in fact speak of those who thirsted, and those who believed on Him could and would come and drink, the apostle John would also write how there was a division which took place in Jerusalem during those days. Despite the fact that Jesus spoke unto those who were present within the city of Jerusalem during and at this time concerning thirst and rivers of living water, there were those who were confused concerning Him, and those who did not and could not understand who He was. There were those who thought He was the Prophet, while others thought and declared that He was the Christ. This is incredibly relevant when you consider the words which are found within this passage of Scripture, for in the midst of the presence of Jesus the Christ, and in the midst of the invitation to all those who were thirsty, there was a division concerning Jesus and who He really and truly was. As we come to this passage of Scripture it’s absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand that the words which are found here are words which not only speak of thirst, but also speak about belief—belief in who Jesus truly was and who Jesus truly is. One cannot truly come to Jesus and drink of and from the living water that He provides until and unless they first believe and receive Him. Oh, I can’t help but wonder how many barren souls Jesus exposed and revealed during and at this time when He cried out unto all those who were thirsty, and invited them to drink. The words which Jesus spoke not only spoke of thirst, but also invited men and women to come unto Him that they might drink, and might be satisfied. What’s more, is the words which Jesus spoke unto all; those who were present at this great feast was an invitation to come unto Him to drink, as well as to come unto Him in order that they might receive the promise of the Holy Spirit which would be given unto all those who believed, and all those who received Him. Oh that we would read the words which are found within this passage and come face to face with the awesome and wonderful reality of that which Jesus offers and provides to those who believe, to those who receive Him, to those who thirst, and to those who have settled in their hearts and spirits who Jesus Christ truly is. The question I must ask you who are reading this is not only one of thirst, but also one of belief and confidence as you settle within your heart and spirit who Jesus truly is within your life.

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