I See You Even If You Don’t & Can’t See Me

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the apostle John. More specially, today’s passage is found in verses sixteen through thirty-four of the ninth chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find the account of the man born blind whom Jesus gave sight to co my in Hong. I must admit that the account of this man who was blind from birth has such a tremendous impact and affect on me—particularly and especially considering the fact that when you consider the opening verse of this ninth chapter in light of the final verse of the eighth chapter. If and as you come to the final verse of the eighth chapter you will find the Jews and perhaps even a number of Pharisees taking yo stones with which to cast at Jesus. By the time you come to the final verse of the eighth chapter you find the narrative shifting and changing from the scribes and Pharisees calling for the stoning of the woman caught in adultery to now the Jews seeking to take up stones with which to cast against and upon Jesus the Christ. We dare not, we cannot and must not miss and lose sight of this incredible and tremendous reality, for to do so would be to miss the significance and importance of how the ninth chapter of this gospel opens and begins. The final verse of the eighth chapter concludes with Jesus going in the midst of those who would seek to stone Him, and passing by them. When and as the ninth chapter begins and opens up, it does so with the apostle John writing how as Jesus was passing by—as Jesus was passing by those who sought to take up stones to cast at Him—He saw and took notice of this man who had been born blind. The question I can’t help but consider when I examine the account of this man who had been born blind is what about him was noticed first. If you continue reading the words within this passage of a duo fire you will come face to face with the incredible fact that the apostle John makes mention of how Jesus saw, looked upon and took notice of this man who had been born blind. Pause for a moment and consider the fact that even though this man could not see Jesus approaching, or even when Jesus was standing before and in front of Him, that in no way diminished the fact that Jesus the Christ saw and took notice of him. We tend to think and believe within our hearts and minds that simply because we can’t see the living God, or just because we can’t see the Christ, that obviously means that they cannot see and/or haven’t taken notice of us. The truth of the matter is that this simply is not the case and is a misguided mindset that has the ability to discourage us within the very depths of our heart and soul. We ought not think that simply because we cannot see Jesus, that doesn’t mean that He can’t, doesn’t or even won’t see us. It is incredibly discouraging to think and consider the fact that simply because we can’t see the living God, and simply because we cannot feel or even hear Him, that means that He cannot see us.

I can’t help but be reminded of the account of the disciples in the ship in the midst of the storm after the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand. You will recall that after Jesus had fed and provided for the crowd of five thousand people, He dismisses the crowds and then went up into a mountain to pray. While Jesus went up on the mountain to pray and spend time in the presence of His Father, His disciples entered a ship and set sail from the western coast of the Sea of Galilee in order that they might journey and come unto Capernaum. This is actually quite unique and astounding when you think about it, for you will in each of the gospel accounts which were written about this event—despite the fact that a great tempest rose up upon the sea threatening the disciples who were in the midst of the ship, that didn’t mean that Jesus did not and could not see them in the midst of the sea. I absolutely love how one of the gospel authors actually writes and records within their gospel account of this event that Jesus actually looked out upon the sea and not only saw the disciples in the ship, but also saw the disciples laboring and fouling against the wind and the waves. There the disciples were in the midst of the sea caught in the middle of a storm that had come upon the sea, and they might have wondered where Jesus was that He was not in and would not be aware of their struggle in the midst of the sea. It would be very easy for the disciples to think about and consider the fact that Jesus was not aware of their struggle in the midst of the sea and their struggle in the midst of the storm. There in the midst of the sea and there in the midst of the storm the disciples were alone without the presence of Jesus whom they had faithfully walked with and followed up until that point. Please don’t miss and please don’t lose sight of this tremendous and incredible reality, for it would have been very easy for the disciples to think about and consider the fact that even though Jesus wasn’t in the boat with them, He wasn’t very much aware of what was going on in the midst of the ship which was upon the sea in the middle of a storm. I absolutely love how one of the gospel authors writes concerning Jesus that even while He was upon the mountain praying after dismissing the crowds, He was still very much aware of what was going on in the midst of the sea, and what was going in the middle of the storm. We more often then not think about and consider the fact that if we are in the midst of the throes of a storm and cannot see Jesus, nor even sense and feel His presence that He is not with us and is not aware of what we are facing and going through. Though the disciples could not see Jesus upon the mountain, and though the disciples weren’t aware of the fact that Jesus could see them in the midst of the sea struggling against the storm that was upon them, that didn’t mean that Jesus could not and did not see them. Oh dear reader, please don’t miss and please don’t lose sight of this reality, for it has the ability to radically alter our perception—not only of what we go through, but also what we believe about Jesus in the midst of it.

As you read the words which are found within this passage you will find that as Jesus was passing by this man who was blind from birth, He both saw and took notice of Him. This is quite astonishing and remarkable when you take the time to think about and consider it, for it is quite obvious that this man who had been blind from birth could not see Jesus, and might not have even been aware of His presence before and around Him. What’s more, is that on this particular occasion I would dare say that Jesus was not accompanied by a great crowd of people as He normally was. I can’t help but be reminded of the account within the New Testament gospel of Luke when the physician writes and records Jesus, His disciples and a great crowds of people passing by another man who was blind. On this particular occasion this man was very much aware of who as passing by, for not only had he most likely heard the commotion surrounding Jesus, but he also asked who it was that was passing by. Upon hearing that it was Jesus who was passing by, this man who was blind cried out unto Jesus the Son of David asking Him to have mercy on him. This is quite the difference from what is found within the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel account which the apostle John wrote, for on this particular occasion I would dare say that there was no commotion surrounding Jesus the Christ, and it might very well have just been Jesus and His disciples who passed by and came unto this man who had been blind from birth. At the end of the sixth chapter many of His disciples turned back and no longer walked with Him. Within the fifth chapter we find the Jews seeking to kill Jesus because He healed on the sabbath and because He made the claim that God was His Father. In the eighth chapter we find the Jews—perhaps even the Pharisees seeking to take up stones with which to cast at and upon Jesus. This must be carefully understood and considered, for I would dare say that in this particular occasion there was no pomp and circumstance, and there was no commotion or fan fare surrounding Jesus the Christ. The Jews sought to stone and kill Him, and many of His disciples had turned back and no longer walked with Him. By the time we come to the ninth chapter we might find that it was only Jesus and His disciples who were passing by and taking notice of this man who had been born blind. This is quite unique and a founding, not only does it lend to the reality that this man who had been born blind was not aware of the presence of Jesus before Him, but it is also quite obvious that He could not and did not see Jesus as He was approaching him, and as He drew bear to Him. There is not a doubt in my mind that this man who had been blind from birth was not aware of Jesus passing by and passing before him, and quite possibly wasn’t even aware of His presence standing before Him, or kneeling down in front of Him until Jesus actually began speaking unto His disciples and made spittle from the dirt of the ground.

I sit here this morning and I can’t help be reminded of the words which David the king of Israel and psalmist of the Old Testament wrote within the Old Testament book of the Psalms concerning the awareness of the living God. In fact, when you read the words which are found within this passage of Scripture—not only will you become aware of God’s infinite knowledge of our coming and our goings, but also his omnipresence in the earth. Even more than this, you will come face to face with the awesome reality of the manifest presence of God within the earth, and even within our own lives on a continual and daily basis. We cannot have a conversation and discussion about the manifest presence of Jesus the Christ and His being present within our lives without coming to the one hundred and thirty ninth chapter of the Old Testament book of the Psalms. It is within this passage of Scripture we come face to face with the incredible truth of the omnipresence of the living God within our hearts and lives on a daily and continual basis. I feel and believe with all my heart that this passage must be considered in light of what we find written and recorded concerning the man who was blind from birth, for despite the fact that this man who was blind from birth undoubtedly was not aware of the presence and person of Jesus approaching and coming near unto him, that didn’t change the fact that Jesus not only drew near unto him, but also saw and took notice of Him. I feel very strongly within my heart and spirit this morning that within this particular passage of Scripture we come face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that more often than not we allow ourselves to be given over to the misguided belief that just because we cannot and do not see Jesus and aren’t aware of His manifest presence within our lives, that means that He cannot and somehow does not see us. This man was blind from birth and had never seen a single figure of a man, woman or child within and throughout his life, and on this particular day this took on a whole different level as he could not see the One who was drawing near, passing by and approaching Him. I still wonder what was noticed first concerning this particular man—the fact that he was blind and was blind from birth, or the fact that he was relegated to a life of begging because of His blindness. Please don’t miss and please don’t lose sight of the fact that not only was this man blind from birth, but when Jesus and His disciples found him in the place where he was, he was undoubtedly begging for alms and perhaps even begging for bread. We will get into that shortly, but for now and in the interim I feel it necessary to call and draw your attention to the words which we find in the one hundred and thirty-ninth chapter of the Old Testament book of the Psalms. Consider if you will the words which David king of Israel and beloved psalmist and poet wrote beginning with the first verse of this particular chapter:

“O Lord, thou hast searched me, and known me, thou knowest my down sitting and mine uprising, thou understandest my though afar off. Thou compassest my path and my lying down, and art acquainted with all my ways. For there is not a word in my tongue, but, lo, O Lord, thou knowest it altogether. Thou hast beset me behind and before, and laid thine hand upon me. Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high, I cannot attain to it. Whither shall I go from thy spirit? Or whither shall I flee from thy presence? If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: If I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there. If take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me. If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me; even the night shall be light about me. Yea, the darkness hide the not from thee; but the night shineth as the day: the darkness and the light are both alike to thee. For thou hast possessed my reins: thou hast covered me in my mother’s womb. I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made: marvelous are thy works; and that my soul knoweth right well. My substance was not hid from thee, when I was made in secret, and curiously wrought in the lowest parts of the earth. Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being imperfect; and in thy book all my members were written, which in continuance were fashioned, when as yet there was none of them. How precious also are thy thoughts unto me, O God! How great is the sum of them! If I should count them, they are more in number than the sand: when I awake, I am still with thee” (Psalm 139:1-18).

It is quite clear and quite obvious when reading the words which are found within this particular psalm found in the Old Testament that not only is there no place we can go from the presence and awareness of the living God, but the living God is very much aware of where we are—from the moment we rise in the morning until the moment we lie our heads upon our bed at night. How absolutely remarkable and wonderful it is to think about and consider the fact that even though we might not be aware of the divine presence and awareness of the living God, and even though we might not be able to see, sense or feel Him present within our lives—that doesn’t mean that He is neither aware of that which are going through, and isn’t present within our lives. This man who had been blind from birth was undoubtedly unaware of the fact that Jesus the Christ was passing by right in front of him, for up until that moment he had been unable to see a single figure within and throughout his life. Oh dear reader and beloved saint of God—please don’t miss and please don’t lose sight of this awesome and incredible reality, for more often than not we tend to think and feel within our hearts and lives that just because we cannot see the living God, that somehow means that He does not see and is not aware of that which we are going through. I have to admit that I still cannot escape the reality of the disciples in the midst of the sea and caught in the midst of a great storm and tempest that had come upon the sea after entering into a ship. If you turn and direct your attention to the sixth chapter of the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ written by John Mark you will find that he too took to writing concerning this particular event within the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ. In fact, if you begin reading with and from the forty-fifth verse of the sixth chapter you will come face to face with the reality that not only was Jesus atop the mountain praying before and praying unto His Father, but you will also find that He was very much aware of their labor, their toil, and their struggle in the midst of the sea. Oh to you who are reading these words, I feel very strongly within my spirit that the very Spirit of the Almighty God wants to speak directly unto you and declare that He sees your labor, your toil, and your struggle in the midst of the storm. The living God who created the very heavens and the earth sees and is very much aware of your presence upon and in the midst of the sea, and He sees your labor and toil in the midst of the storm. The living God who is omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent sees you in the midst of the storm, and sees you struggling in the midst of the storm, and is very much aware of what is going on within your life—even if you yourself are not aware of such a reality. Undoubtedly the disciples found themselves in the midst of the storm and found themselves laboring, toiling and struggling in the midst of and against the storm, and all the while they were completely unaware of the fact that even though Jesus was not with them in the midst of the storm as He previously was, He was still very much aware of their labor and struggle. Consider if you will the words which are found in the sixth chapter of the gospel written by John mark beginning with the forty-fifth verse:

“And straightway He constrained His disciples to get into the ship, and to go to the other side before unto Bethsaida, while He sent away the people. And when He had sent them away, he departed into a mountain to pray. And when even was come, the ship was in the midst of the sea, and He alone on the land. And He saw them toiling in rowing; for the wind was contrary unto them: and about the fourth watch of the night He cometh unto them, walking upon the sea, and would have passed by them. But when they saw Him walking upon the sea, they supposed that it had been a spirit, and cried out: for they all saw Him, and were troubled. And immediately He talked with them, and saith unto them, Be of good cheer: it is I; be not afraid. And He went up unto them into the ship; and the win ceased: and they were sore amazed in themselves beyond measure, and wondered. For they considered not the miracle of the loaves; for their heart was hardened” (Mark 6:45-52).

Upon reading the words which are found within this passage of Scripture you will not only find the disciples in the throes of a great temptest, wind and storm in the midst of the sea, but you will also find them laboring and toiling in rowing, for the wind was contrary to them. Please don’t miss and please don’t lose sight of that reality that the wind was contrary to them, for it helps bring to light the tremendous reality that while they were in the midst of the sea, and while they were in the midst of the storm, the wind was contrary to them, thus making it incredibly difficult for them to move in the midst of the storm. What I so love and so appreciate about this passage of Scripture is that John Mark takes the time to write and emphasize the fact that when even was come, and the ship was in the midst of the sea, and Jesus was alone on the land, He saw them toiling in rowing, for the wind was contrary unto them. What’s more, is that as you continue reading this passage you will find that not only did Jesus see them toiling in rowing against the wind and storm, but He also came unto them walking upon the sea. Furthermore, is that there is similar language found within this passage of Scripture to that which is found in the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John, for John Mark writes how even as Jesus came unto them walking upon the sea, He would have passed by them. This language of “passing by” is found in the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John when the apostle writes how Jesus passed by those who sought to take up stones to throw at Him, and how as Jesus passed by He saw a man who had been blind from birth. Here in this particular passage of Scripture we not only find Jesus seeing them laboring and toiling in the midst of the storm against the wind, but we also find Jesus coming unto them walking upon the waves of the sea. John Mark is careful to add that Jesus would have passed them by, however, when they saw Him walking upon the sea and supposing Him to have been a ghost or spirit, they cried out—perhaps and undoubtedly in fear. In the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel which was written by the apostle John we encounter and come face to face with the fact that not only did Jesus see, take notice and look upon this man who had been born blind, but Jesus was also willing to heal him by making clay from the spittle He had made, and anointing his eyes. After anointing his eyes, Jesus gave him a single, simple instruction—namely, to go and wash in the pool of Siloam. I absolutely love what is written and recorded within this particular passage, for within it we find that even though this man could not see and was not aware of the presence and person of Jesus the Christ, that didn’t mean that Jesus wasn’t aware of him sitting there begging for alms, and perhaps even begging for bread. Despite the fact that this man could not see Jesus drawing near and approaching him, that in no way diminished the fact that Jesus saw him and was very much aware of his presence before him. Despite the fact that this man did not and could not see Jesus drawing near unto him, and even when and as Jesus drew near, that didn’t mean that Jesus did not see and was not aware of him right where he was at in that particular place. The disciples found themselves in the midst of a great temptest upon the sea, and they labored and toiled against the wind in the midst of that temptest, and all the while they weren’t aware of the fact that Jesus saw them toiling in rowing against the wind which was contrary to and against them.

When you come to the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel of the apostle John you will not only find that as Jesus passed by, He saw a man which was blind from his birth, but you will also find Jesus spitting in the ground, making clay of the spittle, and anointing the eyes of the blind man with the clay. Immediately after anointing the blind man’s eyes with the clay He had made, Jesus instructed Him to go and wash in the pool of Siloam. I absolutely love what the apostle John wrote immediately following this, for the apostle John wrote how this man went his way, and washed, and came seeing. How absolutely astonishing and remarkable it is to think about and consider the fact that this man had absolutely no guarantee that if he departed out of and departed from the presence of Jesus that He would come forth seeing. This man had absolutely no guarantee that if he went and washed in the pool of Siloam as Jesus had commanded and instructed, anything would be different within his life. I can’t help but wonder how long it took for this man to respond to the instruction and command of Jesus to go and wash in the pool of Siloam, and once he had made the conscious and deliberate decision to obey the command and instruction of Jesus the Christ, he would come forth seeing. I absolutely love that which the apostle John writes, for the apostle John writes how this man went HIS way—I emphasize “his way,” for it was not the way of anyone else, and no one else could do it for him—washed, and came seeing. I find it absolutely and incredibly intriguing and interesting to consider how the apostle John wrote concerning this man that he went his way, for the way before him was not the way of anyone else, and there was no else who could have gone this way for him. It is true that this man might have needed assistance from another, or perhaps even others in order that he make it to the pool of Siloam, but the path and journey to the pool of Siloam was his and his alone to make. No one could make this journey for him, and no one could wash for him, for he alone had to do it. Sure there might have been another, or perhaps even others who led him to the pool of Siloam, however, this man not only needed to agree to go to the pool of Siloam, but he also needed to wash in the pool of Siloam himself. We must recognize and understand this concept of “going” and “washing,” for it was only as this man “went” and “washed” that he was able to come forth seeing. We dare not and cannot miss this particular reality, for to do so would be to miss out on something truly astonishing and truly remarkable concerning this man who had been blind from birth. This man went “his way,” for the path before him belonged to him and him alone, as there was no one else who could have made the journey and walked the path for him. Oh, I can’t help but wonder what path lie before you on this particular day which you must walk and travel upon in order that you might come to that place which Jesus the Christ has ordained and appointed for you to receive that which He desires to give you. I can’t help but wonder where Jesus the Christ has sent you and is sending you in order that you might come unto that place where you wash in order that you might come forth seeing. The apostle John wrote concerning this man how he went “his way,” and how he washed, and came forth seeing, thus signifying the tremendous importance—not only of the journey, but also in the washing as well.

As you continue reading the words which are found within the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John you will come face to face with different groups of individuals who were found present within the narrative of this man who had been blind from birth. What initially began with Jesus and the disciples taking notice of this man who had been blind from birth would continue on and include at least four different groups of individuals who would be part of the account and story of his life. If you continue reading the words which are found within this passage of Scripture you will come face to face with the first group of people who found themselves part of this narrative—namely, the neighbors of this man who had previously known him to not only be blind, but also to be one who sat and begged of those who would pass by on a continual and daily basis. In verses eight through twelve you will find the account of what I would like to call “The Neighbors”—those who were confused about the identity of this man, for the one whom they knew to be blind and to sit and beg now came forth seeing. Consider the following words which are found in this passage beginning with the eighth verse of the chapter and continuing through the twelfth verse:

“The neighbors therefore, and they which before had seen him that was blind, said, Is not this he that sat and begged? Some said, This is he: others said, He is like him: but he said, I am he. Therefore said they unto him, How were thine eyes opened. He answered and said, A man that is called Jesus made clay and anointed mine eyes, and said unto me, Go to the pool of Siloam, and wash: and I went and washed, and I received sight. Then said they unto him, Where is He? He said, I know not” (John 9:8-12).

Within this particular set of verses we encounter the neighbors and those who were confused about the identity of this man whom they were now encountering, and whether or not this man was indeed the one who was previously blind and who previously sat and begged. If you continue reading within this chapter you will come to verses thirteen through seventeen, and unto another group of individuals who found themselves as being part of the narrative and story of this man’s life, and particularly a part of the miracle which this man had experienced within his life. In verses eight through twelve we encounter “The Neighbors,” while in verses thirteen through seventeen we encounter “The Pharisees,” as those who had spoken unto this man who had previously been blind and sat and begged brought him unto the Pharisees. If you begin reading with and from the thirteenth verse of this chapter you will come to the thirteenth verse where the apostle John introduces the Pharisees into the mix and into the narrative of this man’s encounter and experience with Jesus the Christ. Consider if you will the words which are written in these verses beginning with the thirteenth verse:

“They brought to the Pharisees him that aforetime was blind. And it was the sabbath day when Jesus made the clay, and opened his eyes. Then again the Pharisees also asked him how he had received his sight. He said unto them, He put clay upon mine eyes, and I washed, and do see. Therefore said some of the Pharisees, This man is not of God, because he keepeth not the sabbath day. Others said, How can a man that is a sinner do such miracles? And there was a division among them. They say unto the blind man again, What sayest thou of him, that He hath opened thine eyes. He said, He is a prophet” (John 9:13-17).

Continuing along in the narrative of this man’s life you will quickly come to the third group of individuals which was introduced into the narrative of this man’s life, which were the Jews and those which were curious as to what had actually taken place within this man’s life. This third group of people which were introduced into the narrative of this man’s life were “The Jews,” and were those who were curious about what had actually taken place within this man’s life. If the neighbors were confused about this man, and if the Jews were curious, I would dare say that the Pharisees were both cautious and condemnatory of Jesus, for the day on which Jesus had made spittle from the ground and given sight unto this man who had been blind from birth was the sabbath. THE NEIGHBORS: THE CONFUSED! THE PHARISEES: THE CONDEMNATORY! THE JEWS: THE CURIOUS. Consider if you will the words which are found and recorded within verses eighteen and nineteen of this particular passage of Scripture concerning this man who had been blind from birth:

“But the Jews did not believe concerning him, that He had been blind, and received his sight, until they called the parents of him that had received his sight. And they asked them, saying, Is this your son, who ye say was born blind? How then doth he now see?” (John 9:18-19).

Within verses eighteen and nineteen of this passage of Scripture we encounter the third group of individuals who were found present within the narrative of this man’s life—namely, the Jews, who were not only curious concerning this man, but who also didn’t believe that this was previously the man who was not only blind from birth, but who also sat and begged. What we must understand concerning this third group of individuals who were introduced into the narrative of this man’s life were also the ones who introduce us to the fourth group of individuals, which are “The Parents.” We are first introduced to “The Neighbors,” we are next introduced to “The Pharisees,” and we are then introduced to “The Jews.” In verses twenty through twenty-three of this chapter we encounter and come face to face with the parents of this man who had been blind from birth and those who not only would know him the most, but those who would be aware of his blindness from the time of birth. Consider if you will that which is found in this passage of Scripture beginning with the twentieth verse:

“His parents answered them and said, We know that this is our son, and that he was born blind: but by what means he now seeth, we know not; or who hath opened his eyes; we know not: he is of age; ask him: he shall speak for himself. These words spake his parents, because they feared the Jews: for the Jews had agreed already, that if any man did confess that he was the Christ, He should be put out of the synagogue. Therefore said his parents, He is of age; ask him” (John 9:20-23).

As I read the words which are found within this narrative I can’t help but be reminded of how one single encounter with Jesus the Christ can introduce a number of different variables and groups of people within our lives—those who might be confused about what has taken place within our lives, those who might be curious about what has taken place within our lives, and those who might be cautious about what has taken place within our lives as were the parents of this man. There will be others who will be introduced into the narrative of what God has done, and what God is doing within our lives, and this particular passage of Scripture brings us face to face with each of these realities. We must understand and come face to face with the reality of those groups of individuals who might very well be introduced into the narrative of what God has done, and what God is doing within our lives, and we must not react in a harsh and/or demeaning manner. This man was forced to speak to that which had taken place within his life, and at one point made the emphatic declaration “Whether he be a sinner or no, I know not: one thing I know, that, whereas I was blind, now I see.” This man knew one thing and one thing for sure—namely, that he had previously been blind and now sees. What we find within this passage of Scripture not only brings us face to face with the presence of the miraculous within this man’s life, but it also brings us face to face with this man’s defense of the work of God within his life, and his declaration of how he had once been blind, but now he sees. Oh that we would read the words which are found within this passage and not only understand the work which Jesus the Christ desires to do within our hearts and lives, but also that which we might very well encounter as a direct result of the work which is done within our lives.

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