Pouring Out the Oil of Worship and the Water of Love

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the apostle John. More specifically, today’s passage is found in verses eighteen through thirty-eight of the thirteenth chapter. When you come to this particular set of verses you will find the narrative and context of the thirteenth chapter drawing to a close. Within this particular set of verses you will a continuation of the words and language which the apostle John wrote concerning Jesus and the disciples together partaking in fellowship in the upper room. In all reality, that which we find written and contained within these verses is actually quite unique and remarkable when you consider it in the context of fellowship. What’s more, is that as you read the words found within this passage you will notice a string similarity between what we find in the opening verses of the twelfth chapter. I am convinced that in order for us to truly understand what is found and contained within this passage we must first be willing to turn and direct our attention o that which is found in the beginning of the twelfth chapter, for its what we find in the beginning of this chapter we encounter a different supper and dinner taking place. As the twelfth chapter opens and begins it does so with a supper and dinner being prepared for Jesus in a certain house, and Jesus and His disciples being present at the dinner, as well as Mary, Martha and Lazarus also being present at this supper. In all reality, that which we find in the twelfth chapter of the gospel written by the apostle John helps set the tone and helps set the stage for the context of fellowship—not because it is somehow greater in nature and scope, but because it has direct implications and connection to the burial of Jesus the Christ. If you come to and approach the twelfth chapter of this New Testament gospel you will find that at this supper there were essentially three unique and different expressions of love demonstrated and manifested within the house and in the presence of Jesus. I have to admit that in my years of reading and studying the scripture I didn’t see and/or notice this reality until I read and came to this passage recently. There is within the opening verses of the twelfth chapter a wonderful and powerful picture of the demonstration and manifestation of expressions of love in the presence of Jesus, as was our on display before the disciples, and others who might have been present at this supper and meal. Reading the words which are found and contained within this passage will bring you face to face with three distinct and three unique demonstrations and manifestations of love which not only take place and occur within the presence of Jesus and in the company of His disciples and saints, but also in the sight of others. There is not a doubt in my mind that there might very well have been others who were present at this supper and meal and who witnessed the events which unfolded before their very eyes.

As I stand here this morning I can’t help but be gripped by the narrative and language that is found and contained within this passage of scripture, for it takes place on the heels of a tremendous work of Jesus the Christ according to the will of the Father and by the power of the Spirit. The events which we find in the opening verses of the twelfth chapter are in all reality a direct response to what Jesus has done for Mary, Martha, and their brother Lazarus. What we find in the twelfth chapter is a wonderful and remarkable response to Jesus not only calling Lazarus forth from the grave, but also raising him from death to life. The events and expressions we find located at the beginning and opening of the twelfth chapter are the responses of these three individuals to that which Jesus the Christ had wrought within their lives—and specifically within the life (and death) of Lazarus. In fact, I would dare say that what we find in the twelfth chapter is not necessarily a response to what had taken place and occurred within life, but rather within death. In the previous chapter Jesus stood before the occupied grave of one of His friends whose body lie within the tomb and cave four days already. Upon arriving at the grave and observing the tremendous display of emotion and grief Jesus Himself groaned in Himself and ultimately called for the stone to be rolled away and removed. Upon the stone being rolled away and removed, Jesus would then with a loud voice command Lazarus to come forth from the grave. Immediately, he who had previously been dead emerged from the place where his body lie within that tomb, and walked forth from the grave bound hand and foot with grave clothes and with his face covered with a napkin. The final commands and instructions Jesus gave at the tomb and grave of Lazarus was for him to be looses of his grave clothes and let go. LOOSED AND LET GO! It was precisely because of what Jesus had done in death and had done in the face of death that prompted and caused the expressions and manifestations of love to be demonstrated and manifested within the lives of Mary, Martha and their brother Lazarus. We ought not and must not miss and lose sight of what we find in the twelfth chapter, for what we find within its verses and context is a truly wonderful and remarkable picture of our own expressions of love which we manifest and demonstrate in the presence of Jesus and in the sight of the living God. What is found within the opening verses of the twelfth chapter provide us with a wonderful context and narrative for our own expressions of love within the presence of Jesus and in the company of His disciples and saints.

I sit here this morning and before I delve once more into that which is found in the thirteenth chapter of the gospel written by the apostle John, I feel it necessary and imperative to consider that which is found in the twelfth chapter. It’s in the twelfth chapter and in the context of a meal and fellowship we find three different and three distinct expressions of love. Upon reading the words you find within this chapter you will notice and come to the first expression of love being demonstrated and manifested through labor and service, as evidence through the life of Martha. As you read the words found within this chapter you will notice that to this supper and at this meal Martha engaged herself in serving, and undoubtedly serving the needs of all those who were present in the house and at this supper. This is of course reminiscent of what we find in the New Testament gospel which was written by the beloved physician Luke, as Luke wrote of Martha inviting Jesus into her home. It was while Jesus was present within her home that she was cumbered about with much labor and much serving and felt as though Jesus didn’t care that her sister had left her to do all the serving and laboring. What we find within this passage is also a precursor to what we find in the twelfth chapter of the gospel written by John, for in the twelfth chapter of the gospel of John we again find Mary at the feet of Jesus—this time with previous ointment which was very costly. In the narrative found in the gospel written by the physician Luke we find Martha cumbered about with much labor and serving, while we find Mary simply sitting at the feet of Jesus gearing and listening to His word. In the twelfth chapter of the gospel written by John we find Martha’s expression of love being manifested through service—not only service unto and before Jesus, but also unto her own siblings and unto the disciples of Jesus. As you continue reading this passage you will find a second expression of love demonstrated and manifested in the house as it is written of Lazarus that he was among those who sat at the table with Jesus. If Martha’s expression of love was demonstrated in serving and serving in the company and presence of others, then I would dare say that Lazarus’ expression of love was demonstrated in fellowship. What we must recognize concerning this is that this expression of love manifested within hand through fellowship is not only demonstrated through fellowship with Jesus the Christ, but also fellowship with His disciples and those who were present at this meal and supper. Speaking of fellowship we must recognize and come to terms with the fact that true fellowship is a two sided coin which doesn’t merely include fellowship with Jesus the Christ while excluding fellowship with those who are before and around us. When we speak of fellowship it is absolutely imperative and necessary that we understand that true and authentic fellowship cannot merely be fellowship with Jesus alone and not also fellowship with the saints of God and disciples of Jesus the Christ. It would be the apostle John who would later write concerning how we can say we love God whom we can’t see and haven’t see if we don’t love our neighbor and brother whom we do we. Within this context we come to the great realization that true fellowship is not only manifested within the realm of fellowship with Jesus, but also fellowship with the disciples of Jesus the Christ and saints of God alike.

Moving along even further within this chapter you will transition from the expression of love through labor, works and service, and from the expression of love through fellowship to a third and completely different expression of love as evidenced and out in display within the life of Mary who was also present at this supper. There would be a thud demonstration and manifestation of an expression of love which would take place and would be manifested at this supper which would be put on display through the life of Mary who was the third member of this trio of siblings. After you read of Martha serving at the supper, and after you read of Lazarus sitting at the table in fellowship with Jesus and those who were present on this particular occasion you will come to the account of Mary who neither labored and served in the midst of the super, nor sat at the table with Jesus and those who were also at the table, but rather you will find her once more at the feet of Jesus. In the gospel which was written by the beloved physician Luke you will find Mary at the feet of Jesus simply hearing and listening to the words which He spoke, however, on this particular occasion you will find Mary once more at the feet of Jesus. This time while Mary was at the feet of Jesus, however, we find her at the feet of Jesus with a pound of pure ointment which was very costly. It would be this pound of ointment Mary would take and pour out at and pour out upon the feet of Jesus, which would precede her secondary action of drying and wiping the feet of Jesus with her hair. What would begin with her anointing the feet of Jesus with this very costly ointment and perfume would continue with her wiping and drying the feet of Jesus with the very hairs of her head—the very hairs of her head which Scripture reveals are not only numbered, but also known by the living God. Pause for a moment and consider the tremendous reality that not only our the very hairs of our head numbered and known by the Father, but every single one of these hairs which were known by the Father were used in a tremendous display and expression of love at the feet of Jesus in the midst of fellowship and community. What we find within this passage of Scripture is truly astonishing and remarkable, for while we find Martha serving and Lazarus fellowshipping, we find Mary worshipping through the expression of ointment and oil and the hairs of her head. We ought not miss and lose sight of this absolutely wonderful and incredible reality, for to do so would be to miss and lose sight of that which would later come in the thirteenth chapter of the same New Testament gospel. It would be in the midst of this supper and in the midst of community that Mary would fill the entire house with the fragrant aroma of her worship as undoubtedly the aroma and fragrance of the ointment she poured out upon the feet of Jesus would have filled the entire room.

Before we get into that which is written and that which is contained within the thirteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John, I feel it absolutely necessary and imperative to consider a different context of a woman at the feet of Jesus, as there is a different account of a woman at the feet of Jesus with an alabaster jar which she poured out at and poured out upon the feet of Jesus. If you turn and direct your attention to the seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel which was written by Luke you will again find a different woman at the feet of Jesus with a very costly perfume which was poured out upon the feet of Jesus. WHEN THE OIL OF WORSHIP IS POURED OUT IN THE HOUSE OF RELIGION! As you read the words which are written and contained within this passage you will quickly discover that what is found within it is a narrative of a woman who dared show up to a supper in the house of a Pharisee, and would show up uninvited. Within the context and narrative found in the supper which was prepared for Jesus in the house of one of the Pharisees a woman who was a sinner dared show up uninvited that she might simply fall down at the feet of Jesus and pour out the contents of her alabaster jar at his feet. What’s more, is that it is in the context of supper at a religious man’s house that a sinner would dare show up uninvited in order that she might pour out the contents of her alabaster jar upon the feet of Jesus in a truly wonderful and powerful expression of love and worship. If you begin reading with and from the forty-fourth verse of this chapter you will come face to face with the awesome and incredible expression this women put on display in the sight and presence of Simon the Pharisees, and all those who were present on this particular occasion. Consider if you will the words which make up this narrative beginning with and from the thirty-sixth verse of the seventh chapter of the gospel written by Luke:

“And one of the Pharisees desired Him that He would eat with him. And He went into the Pharisee’s house and sat down to meat. And, behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee’s house, brought an alabaster box of ointment, and stood at His feet behind Him weeping, and began to wash His feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed His feet, and anointed them with the ointment. Now when the Pharisee which had hidden him saw it, he spake within himself, saying, This man, if He were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of woman this is that toucheth Him: for she is a sinner. And Jesus answering said unto him, Simon, I have somewhat to say unto thee, And he saith, Master, say on. There was a certain creditor which had two debtors: the one owed five hundred pence, and the other fifty. And when had nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me wherefore, which of them will love him most? Simon answered and said, I suppose that he, to whom he forgave most. And He said unto him, Thou hast rightly judged. And He turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for my feet: but she hath washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. Thou gavest me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet. My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment. Wherefore I say unto thee, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little. And He said unto her, Thy sins are forgiven. And they that sat at meat with Him began to say within themselves, Who is this that forgiveth sins also? And He said to the woman, Thy faith hath saved thee; go in peace” (Luke 7:36-49).

What we find within the seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel written by Luke is yet another account of a woman at the feet of Jesus—this time it was not Mary who was the sister of Martha and Lazarus, but rather a woman whom the only thing we know concerning her was that she was a sinner. Oh, please don’t miss and please don’t lose sight of this incredibly intriguing and powerful reality, for to do so would be to miss out on what can and will help shine a great amount of light on what we find in the thirteenth chapter of the gospel which was written by John. If you read the words which are found within the seventh chapter of the gospel written by Luke you will find a sinner showing up uninvited to the house of a Pharisee and there within the house this woman stood behind the feet of Jesus weeping as she anointed His feet with her tears, wiped the feet of Jesus with the hairs of her head, and then anointed them with the ointment which she had brought with her. WHEN SIN POURS OUT OIL IN THE HOUSE OF RELIGION! WHEN A SINNER POURS OUT THE OINTMENT OF WORSHIP IN THE HOUSE OF RELIGION! That which is contained within this passage of Scripture is truly astounding and remarkable, for it bears a strong similarly to what we find in the twelfth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John with the exception that in the gospel written by John we know the woman’s name who anointed the feet of Jesus with the precious ointment which was very costly. In the twelfth chapter of the gospel written by John we know that it was Mary the sister of Martha and Lazarus who anointed the feet of Jesus with a very costly and precious ointment, while in the seventh chapter of the gospel written by Luke the only thing we know of this woman was that she was a woman of the city who was a sinner. We know nothing of her name, we know nothing of her past, we know nothing of the struggles she faced within and through her life, we know nothing of what she had gone through within and throughout her life. The only thing we know about this woman was that she was a woman of the city, and she was a sinner. What actually makes this incredibly unique is that despite the fact we know nothing of this woman—save that she was a woman of the city and was a sinner—the Father knew absolutely every single one of the hairs which were upon her head. Despite the fact that this woman was a sinner, and despite the fact that we aren’t given any information other than that which woman was from the city, we must based on scripture conclude that there is significance with her using the hairs of her head to wipe and dry the feet of Jesus, for Scripture reveals that the very hairs of our head our numbered. Luke might have written concerning this woman that she was a sinner, and even Simon the Pharisee might have known that she was a sinner, however, no one but Jesus and the Father knew the very hairs upon her head which were numbered. This woman used the many hairs upon her head to wipe and dry the feet of Jesus, and this woman would later hear from Jesus that her sins—though they were also many—would be forgiven her. How absolutely wonderful and powerful it is to think about and consider the awesome and incredible reality that this woman’s sins were many just as the hairs upon her head were many, and yet those many hairs were used in worship of Jesus, and her many sins had been forgiven unto her.

Transitioning back to the twelfth chapter of the New Testament gospel written by the beloved physician Luke we find Mary the sister of Lazarus and Martha kneeling at the feet of Jesus and anointing His feet with the precious ointment which was very costly, and drying His feet with the hairs of her head. Here we have a second example of a woman who used the very hairs of her head which are numbered and known by the living God using those hairs to wipe and dry the feet of Jesus. After anointing the feet of Jesus with a very costly and precious ointment, this woman would use the very hairs of her head to wipe and dry the feet of Jesus. How absolutely unique and captivating it is to think that in the opening verses of the twelfth chapter of the gospel written by the apostle John we find a woman anointing the feet of Jesus with a very costly ointment, and then drying those feet with the very hairs upon her head. It is this expression of love and this act of worship which is found in the chapter immediately preceding words which were written concerning Jesus Himself kneeling down at the feet of others—the noticeable difference being that Jesus did not anoint the disciples’ feet with ointment, nor did He wipe and dry them with the hairs of His head. What we find in the thirteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel written by the apostle John is Jesus laying aside His garments, taking up the towel which He girded Himself, and filling a basin with water which He would use to wash the feet of the disciples. As you read the words written and contained within the thirteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John you will find Jesus at the feet of the disciples rather than individual women at the feet of Jesus. It is actually quite astounding and quite fascinating to now find Jesus at the feet of the disciples after having just experienced Mary the sister of Lazarus and Martha at His feet anointing them with very costly ointment and wiping and drying them with the hairs of her head. Here within the thirteenth chapter of the gospel written by John we find Jesus willing to lay aside the garments He was wearing in order that he might take up the towel and gird Himself as He would prepare to wash the feet of His disciples. What’s worth noting concerning the actions which Jesus performed at the feet of His disciples before them in the upper room is that His actions were meant to be an example which they were to take, observe and demonstrate unto and within the lives of others. Jesus kneeling down at the feet of the disciples and washing their feet with water from the basin he had filled was a powerful example—not only of humility and service, but also of worship in the sight and presence of the living God. We dare not and must not think about and consider the fact that the example of washing the feet of others is not just as much an act of worship as it is an expression of love in the sight of others, and in the sight of Jesus the Christ and the Father. Mary’s actions of anointing the feet of Jesus with the very costly ointment, and drying those feet with the very hairs of her head was in all reality an expression of love through worship, however, we must not think or even consider for a moment that the washing of others’ feet is not just as much an expression of love and an act of worship. There is the tendency and temptation to think and consider the fact that washing the feet of others is somehow not an act of worship, nor an expression of love, and yet I couldn’t disagree with this statement and sentiment more strongly.

When we consider the actions which Jesus performed in the upper room—actions which took place in the context of community, the context of fellowship, the context of the breaking of bread—we must consider them in light of friendship and neighbors, as well as in the context of denial and betrayal. What I find to be so incredibly captivating and intriguing about that which is found and contained within this passage of Scripture is that the washing of the disciples’ feet took place in the context of of the denial of Peter before the cock crowed, and in the context of betrayal as Judas would betray Jesus into the hands of His enemies and adversaries. There is not a doubt in my mind that the context and narrative of Jesus washing the feet of Jesus doesn’t have and take on an even greater degree and measure of humility, love, and fellowship when you consider it in light of how all the disciples would abandon and forsake Him in the garden, one of His most trusted disciples would deny Him three times as He stood falsely accused by His adversaries, and as another disciple would betray Him into the hands of His adversaries and enemies. The context of Jesus washing the disciples’ feet has the ability to take on an entirely different meaning when you take and consider it in light of what is found written and contained within the same chapter—namely, that Jesus not only spoke of and revealed that one of His own would betray Him, but He also spoke unto Peter and declared that he would deny Him three times. The reality and context of washing the feet of the disciples is one that I find absolutely astounding and captivating, for the context of Jesus washing the feet of the disciples takes place in the context of an expression of love and as an example of how they should live their lives, but also in the context of betrayal and denial. In fact, I would dare say there is an intrinsic link and connection found between Jesus washing the feet of the disciples as an example unto them, and one of those disciples betraying Him into the hands of His enemies and adversaries, and another disciple denying fellowship with and knowing Him. It’s not enough for us to understand the example of washing the feet of others, and even washing the feet of others as an act of worship and expression of love, for we must understand it in the context of friendship, and even in the context of enemies. When we think about and consider the narrative of Jesus washing the feet of the disciples we must recognize it as taking place in the context of an expression of love and an example of humility, but also taking place in the context of betrayal and denial. Jesus would wash the feet of His disciples, yes, however, Jesus would wash the feet of those who would abandon and forsake Him, the feet of that one who would betray Him, and that one who would deny Him. Immediately following Jesus girding Himself once more with the garments He laid aside we find Him emphatically declaring unto them that if He as their Lord and Master washed their feet, so such an act was an example unto them that they should do as He did and wash one another’s feet. Jesus made it very clear that the washing of their feet was intended to be an example unto them that they would wash the feet of others—even those who would deny them, even those who would betray them, and even those who would abandon and forsake them.

If you continue reading the words which are found in this chapter you will not only be confronted with the reality of one of the disciples of Jesus betraying Him, but you will also be confronted with the reality of one of His disciples—Simon also called Peter—denying Him before the cock crowed the following morning. Within verses twenty-one through thirty we find the context and narrative of Judas betraying Jesus into the hands of His enemies and adversaries, and it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand this context, for if we fail to do so we might very well miss out on the absolutely wonderful reality and example of washing the feet of others. There is not a doubt in my mind that when we read the words written concerning Jesus washing the feet of the disciples it must be universally understood—not only in the context of merely washing the feet of our friends and our neighbors, but also washing the feet of our enemies. Even more than this, we must understand the context of washing the feet of others as taking place in the narrative of washing the feet of friends and neighbors who might very well betray us within this life. Even more than this, the washing of the feet of the disciples is an example of washing the feet of friends and neighbors who would even deny us, and would even deny fellowship and relationship us. Furthermore, the context of washing the feet of the disciples takes place in the narrative and context of washing the feet of those friends and neighbors who might very well abandon and forsake us in our moment(s) and hour(s) of trial and trouble. If there is one thing we must understand concerning Jesus washing the feet of Jesus, it’s that He washed the feet of the disciples knowing full well that they would all abandon and forsake Him, and that one would betray Him, and another would deny Him. Consider if you will the words which are found in verses twenty-one through thirty concerning the announcement of the betrayal of Judas—despite the fact that none at the table that night knew and understood that it would be Judas who would betray Jesus the Christ. Beginning with the twenty-first verse you will find the following words recorded within the gospel written by John concerning Jesus’ announcement that one of His own would betray Him:

“When Jesus had thus said, He was troubled in spirit, and testified, and said, Verily, verily, I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me. Then the disciples looked one on another, doubting of whom he spake. Now there was leaning on Jesus’ bosom one of His disciples, whom Jesus loved. Simon Peter therefore beckoned to him, that he should ask who it should be of whom he spake. He then lying on Jesus’ breast saith unto Him, Lord, who is it? Jesus answered, He it is, to whom I shall give a sop, when I have dipped it. And when He had dipped the sop, He gave it to Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon. And after the sop Satan entered into him. Then said Jesus unto him, That thou doest, do qjuickly. Now no man at the table knew for what intent He spake this unto Him. For some of them though, because Judas had the bag, that Jesus had said unto him, But those things that we have need of against the feast; or, that he should give something to the poor. He then having received the sop went immediately out: and it was night” (John 13:21-30).

With all of this being said there is something which we must also understand concerning Jesus’ washing the feet of the disciples—in addition to understanding it as an example of humility and service and as an expression of love. As you read the words which are found within this passage of Scripture concerning Jesus washing the feet of the disciples you must also understand it in the context of identity. Before we even get into the context of denial, betrayal and abandonment, we must first understand the context and narrative of identity, for only to the degree and measure that we truly understand and recognize our identity in Jesus Christ, and in the sight of the Father can we truly be able to wash the feet of others—regardless of whether they abandon us, regardless of whether they deny us, and regardless of whether they betray. Us. If you begin reading the opening verses of this chapter you will find the apostle John writing concerning Jesus: “Now before the feast of the Passover, when Jesus knew that His hour was come that He should depart out of this world unto the Father, having loved His own which were in the world, He loved them unto the end. And supper being ended, the devil having now put into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray Him; Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into His hands, and that He was come from God and went to God” (John 13:1-3). You will notice in this passage of Scripture that not only did Jesus know that His hour was come that He should depart out of this world unto the Father, but Jesus also knew that the Father had given all things into His hands, and that He was come from God, and went to God. Please do not miss and dismiss the tremendous implications of these words, for these words have the ability to dramatically alter and shape our concept of washing the feet of others—even the feet of those who might deny and betray us. We have been given an example to wash the feet of others—even the feet of those who would deny, betray and abandon us—however, we must understand this concept of washing the feet of others as taking place in the context of our recognizing and understanding who we are in Christ, and who we are in the sight of the Father. Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart unto the Father, and Jesus knew that He was come from God and would return to God, and it was in this context that He laid aside His garments, girded Himself with a towel and washed the feet of the disciples. What’s more, is that it is in the context of Jesus loving His own which were in the world, and loving them unto the end that Jesus laid aside His garments and washed their feet. The act and example of washing the feet of the disciples was performed in the context of Jesus loving His own and loving them unto the end, and His understanding and recognizing His identity before and in the sight of the Father. If we are to speak about and understand this reality of washing the feet of others, we must understand it in terms of loving others and loving them unto the end, and understanding our identity in Christ and before the Father. Even more than this, we must understand the reality and concept of love as not being this casual, trivial and menial love, but a true and authentic love which lasts until the end—regardless of whether we will be betrayed, denied, forsaken and abandoned. Jesus could wash the feet of the disciples, for He loved them unto the end, and loved them deeply and completely. The question is not only whether or not we are willing to follow in the example of Jesus in washing the feet of others, but whether or not we are willing to love and love fully and completely unto the end, or whether we will and are willing to give up on love. The choice is yours and the question is yours, and only you can answer this question, and make the decision, for no one else can, and no one else will make it or answer it for you.

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