Casual Observer or Active Participant: Invited Into the Place of Conflict and Struggle

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the the apostle John. More specifically, today’s passage is found in verses nineteen through forty of the eighteenth chapter of the gospel. FROM THE GARDEN OF BETRAYAL TO THE HALL OF ACCUSATION! WHEN THE SNAKE ENTERS INTO THE GARDEN ONCE MORE! THERE’S A SNAKE IN THE GARDEN! WHEN THE SERPENT LEADS AN ENTOURAGE INTO THE GARDEN! INVADING THE QUIET PLACE! When you come to this particular passage of scripture you will find the eighteenth chapter of the gospel which the apostle John wrote drawing to a close. If and as you begin reading this chapter from the first verse you will find that after Jesus finished speaking with the disciples in the upper room, as well as speaking unto the Father, He led them into the garden where He oftentimes resorted with His disciples. It’s actually quite interesting to think about and consider the fact that at the end of the fourteenth chapter you will find Jesus instructing and inviting the disciples to arise from the upper room and to move forward to their next destination. Coincidentally there next destination would be the garden of Gethsemane, which was a place the disciples were very familiar with as Jesus most likely brought them into the garden for periods of rest, periods of refreshment, as well as periods of prayer and communion with Himself and with the Father. It’s important to recognize and understand that when Jesus led the disciples from the upper room and a place of instruction and intercession, He led them straight into the place of temptation. What’s more, is that you get the sense from reading the words found in the various gospel accounts that the garden was not only a place of temptation when Simon also called Peter, James and his brother John were invited to join Jesus a little further in the garden away from the other eight disciples. It would be there in the garden where Jesus would invite Peter, James and John to join Him in the intense struggle and travail which His soul faces and experienced on this night as He would be betrayed by Judas who was one of His own. In all reality, I find it interesting and intriguing that Jesus would invite the disciples from the place of community and fellowship with Him and with each other into the place of struggle, and even unto the place of conflict and warfare. We oftentimes think that the reverse is true and that Jesus usually leads us from the place of struggle and conflict and into a place of community and fellowship. More often than not we think that Jesus leads us from the place of trial and trouble and into a place of rest, instruction, as well as prayer intercession, and more often than not we are shocked to discover that the reverse is true. We find ourselves not having a context or framework within ourselves to handle and deal with the reality that Jesus May very well lead us from the upper room of fellowship and communion into the garden of struggle and conflict. What’s more, is that it is there in the garden where Jesus invites us to join together with Him in the struggle of prayer, of watching and of intercession.

As I stand here this morning I can’t help but be drawn to and captivated by the incredible reality that Jesus the Christ would lead the disciples from the place of quietness, from the place of community and fellowship, and from the place of prayer and intercession, and directly into the place of struggle and conflict. What we must understand is that Jesus invited each of the disciples to the garden of gethsemane, yet only Peter, James and John would He invite to join Him further in the garden. Once deeper into the garden, Jesus would instruct the three who accompanied Him there to watch and to pray, and to do so that they might not enter into temptation. Once given this instruction the disciples would remain in that place where Jesus left them as Jesus would journey deeper into the garden where He would experience a great travail within His soul. It would be there three disciples whom Jesus would invite deeper into the garden—not to be spectators of His struggle and of the travail of His soul, but as participants who would give themselves to prayer and watching. Oh how we must carefully consider the awesome and incredible reality that when Jesus invited these three disciples to accompany Him further into the garden, He was inviting them to join Him and participate in the struggle He knew He would face there in the garden. Jesus invited the remaining eleven disciples to the garden and to the place He had brought them before, and yet only to those select three would she invite further into the garden and invite them to join Him in the struggle. It is quite astonishing and remarkable to think about and consider the fact that when Jesus invited the disciples to the garden, He invited them all to the place of prayer and to the place of struggle, and yet it would only be those three who were closest to Him whom He would invite to join Him further and deeper into the garden. Oh I cannot escape the reality that when Jesus invited the disciples further into the garden, He did not invite them deeper into the garden to be spectators of His struggle, but rather to be active participants of the struggle which He would face and experience there in the garden. When Jesus invited Peter, James and John further into the garden, that which He was doing was actively inviting them into the place of struggle, into the place of conflict, into the place of prayer, into the place of intercession, into the place of watching, and even the place of temptation. We would be incredibly of wise to understand and recognize that when Jesus invited these three into the garden with Him, He invited them to join Him in His struggle and into the conflict within His soul, but also to watch and to pray lest they themselves enter into temptation.

The more I sit here this morning and think about and consider the words which are found within this particular passage of scripture the more I can’t help but think that Jesus invited the disciples to join Him in the upper room where they would not only celebrate the Passover, but would also enjoy and experience fellowship, communion, as well as instruction and teaching. Once the experience and encounter of the upper room would be finished and completed, Jesus would then invite the disciples to the garden and to the place of prayer and intercession and fellowship with the true and living God. What marked the garden as a turning point for the disciples was that while the disciples were invited to join Jesus at the garden, it would be the garden where the disciples would face their greatest temptation and their greatest struggle. It would be the garden where the disciples would face the temptation to stand with Christ and to remain with Him, or to flee from the midst of it. The garden would be a decisive experience for the disciples, for it would be in the garden the disciples would find themselves facing Judas the betrayer and those whom He brought with him into the garden to seize and lay hold of Jesus. It would be there in the garden where the disciples would face the overwhelming and incredible struggle to remain steadfast and abide with Christ—even in that hour of conflict and struggle—or flee from the presence of Christ, and abandon and forsake Him. The garden would be a turning point and ultimate testing ground for the disciples, for when Jesus was seized and laid hold of, they were faced with the choice of whether or not that would remain and abide with Christ, or whether they would abandon and forsake Him. We know from the gospel accounts of what took place in the garden that Simon Peter would be the most aggressive of all the disciples, for Simon Peter would draw them sword and would cut off the ear of one of the servants of the high priest. Of course we know from the gospel accounts of what took place there in the garden that after Simon Peter drew the sword and cut off the ear of one of the servants of the high priest—not only did Jesus command and instruct him to put away the sword, and not only did Jesus declare unto him that those who lived by the sword would die by the sword, but Jesus would also go on to heal the ear of the servant of the high priest. Ultimately, many of the disciples would flee from the presence and sight of Christ, and would abandon and forsake Him. A duo tire makes it quite clear that the apostle John would follow from a distance to see what would become of Christ, and even Simon called peter would also follow Jesus the Christ to the place of His trial, and ultimately to the place of His suffering and death. What’s quite unique and interesting to think about and consider is the fact that while Simon called peter followed Jesus to the place where He would be tried, he would in and from that place deny Jesus—not once, not twice, but three times according to the word which was spoken by Christ. Even though Simon called Peter would follow Jesus to the place where He would be tried, it would be in that place where he would deny knowing Jesus on three separate occasions. How incredibly interesting and intriguing it is to think about and consider the fact that although Simon would follow Jesus to the place where He would be tried, He would find himself facing the temptation which Jesus instructed him to watch and to pray lest he fall into and succumb to that temptation. What makes this even more interesting and unique is when you think about the fact that the same disciple who drew the sword in the garden to smite the ear of one of the high priests would be the same one who would deny knowing Jesus on three separate occasions there in the place where Jesus would be tried and falsely accused.

I am convinced that in order to truly recognize and understand that which is found in the eighteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John—and more specifically that which took place in the location where Jesus would be tried before Pontius Pilate—it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we turn and direct our attention to what we find and what we read in the previous gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written by the various New Testament authors. It is necessary that we turn and direct our attention first to the words which are found in the New Testament gospel of Matthew, and then transition to the words which are found in the gospels which were written by John Mark and Luke. It is in those gospels where we come face to face with what took place in the garden, and gain an even greater picture and insight than what is provided in the New Testament gospel of John. One of the most important things we need to think about and consider concerning the garden of Gethsemane is that Jesus invited the disciples with Him to the place of conflict, to the place of struggle, and even to the place of betrayal, and He would invite three further into the place of conflict, further into the place of struggle, further into the place of travail and prayer which He faced and experienced in the sight and presence of the Father. One of the most important realities we must learn and recognize concerning the invitation to follow Jesus to the garden, and more so the invitation the join and follow Jesus further and deeper into the garden is that it was an invitation to come unto and enter into the place of struggle, into the place of conflict, and into the place of warfare—and even temptation itself. What’s more, is that I am convinced that we oftentimes think of the garden as a place where Jesus alone experience travail within the depths of His soul, and the garden itself was a place where only Jesus struggled and faced conflict within Himself. The truth of the matter, however, is that the garden wasn’t simply about Jesus and the struggle which He would face in the presence and sight of the Father. As you read the gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ you will find and discover that the garden was also a place of prayer, a place of watching, and a place of intercession for those disciples whom Jesus invited deeper and further into the garden with Him. We cannot, we must not and should not think about the garden solely in terms of Jesus alone entering into a place of conflict, into a place of struggle, and into a place of travail, but He also invited the disciples into a place of conflict, struggle and travail with Him. What’s more, is that not only did Jesus invite Simon called Peter, James and his brother John deeper into the garden with Him where He would experience a deep travail of soul, but He invited them to watch and to pray lest they enter into temptation themselves in that hour. The words we find in the gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ point to and reveal the incredible reality that the disciples were themselves invited into the place of conflict and struggle, and within and from that place of conflict and struggle, they were to engage themselves in diligent watching and praying, lest they themselves enter into temptation. Consider if you will the words which were written and recorded within the gospel accounts which were written by the apostle Matthew, the physician Luke, and John Mark:

“Then cometh Jesus with them unto a place called Gethsemane, and saith unto the disciples, Sit ye here, while I go and pray yonder. And He took with Him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to be sorrowful and very heavy. Then saith he unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death: tarry ye here, and watch with me. And he went a little further, and fell on His face, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me: nevertheless not as I will, but as thou wilt. And He cometh unto the disciples, and findeth them asleep, and saith unto Peter, What, could ye not watch with me one hour? Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak. He went away again the second time, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if this cult may not pass away from me, except I drink, it, thy will be done. And He came and found them asleep again: for their eyes were heavy. And He left them, and went away again, and prayed the third time, saying, the same words. Then cometh He to His disciples, and saith unto them, Sleep on now, and take your rest: behold, the hour is at hand, and the Son of man is betrayed into the hands of sinners. Rise, let us be going: behold, he is at hand that doth betray me” (Matthew 26:36-46).

“And they came to a place which was named Gethsemane: and He saith to His disciples, Sit ye here, while I shall pray. And He taketh with Him Peter and James and John, and began to be sore amazed, and to be very heavy; and saith unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death: tarry ye here, and watch. And He went forward a little, and fell on the ground, and prayed that, if it were possible, the hour might pass from Him. And He said, ABBA, Father, all things are possible unto thee; take away this cup from me: nevertheless not what I will, but what thou wilt. And he cometh, and findeth them sleeping, and saith unto Peter, Simon, sleepest thou? Couldest thou not watch one hour? Watch ye and pray, lest ye enter into temptation. The spirit truly is ready, but the flesh is weak. And again He went away, and prayed, and spake the same words. And when He returned, He found them asleep again, (for their eyes were heavy,) neither wist they what to answer Him. And He cometh the third time, and saith unto them, Sleep on now, and take your rest: it is enough, the hour is come; behold, the Son of man is betrayed into the hands of sinners. Rise up, let us go; lo, he that betrayeth me is at hand” (Mark 14:32-42).

“And He came out, and went as He wont, to the mount of Olives; and His disciples also followed Him. And when He was at the place, He said unto them, Pray that ye enter not into temptation. And He was withdrawn from them about a. Stone’s cast, and kneeled down, and prayed, saying, Father, if thou be willing, remove this cup from me: nevertheless not my will, but thine, be done. And there appeared an angel unto Him from heaven, strengthening Him. And being in agony He prayed more earnestly: and His sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground. And when He rose up from prayer, and was come to His disciples, He found them sleeping for sorrow, and said unto them, Why sleep ye? Rise and pray, lest ye enter into temptation” (Luke 22:39-46).

It’s worth noting when reading each of these passages of Scripture that while it was true that Jesus invited the remaining eleven disciples to the garden of Gethsemane, and while He led them to this place of prayer, this place of travail, this place of struggle and conflict, there was a certain responsibility that they bore while in that place. We tend to think about the garden as a place of struggle and conflict for Jesus the Christ alone, and that the disciples did not place a part in what took place there in the garden. We tend to think that the garden was solely about the disciples, and that there was absolutely no responsibility, nor was there any burden which the disciples themselves would bear while there in the garden with Jesus the Christ. The truth of the matter, however, is that this simply isn’t true, nor is it the case, for all the disciples were invited to the place of prayer, to the place of watching, to the place of struggle and conflict, yet it would be Simon, James and John whom He would bring further into the garden where He would invite them to watch and pray lest they enter into temptation. There is actually something interesting and unique about Jesus’ invitation to these three disciples to join Him further into the garden and to pray and watch lest they enter into temptation, for there are certain people whom we invite with us into the place of conflict and struggle whom He want by our sides while we are present in that place. There are certain individuals whom we entrust to join and accompany us in the place of struggle and conflict, and whom we ask and invite to join us in the place of struggle and conflict through prayer and intercession. Jesus the Christ not only invited these three disciples with Him into the place of conflict and struggle, but He also invited them to participate together with Him in that struggle through prayer and watching. Please don’t miss the tremendous significance and importance of this, for there are certain individuals whom we want by our sides and whom we want with us when we are entering into our hour of trial, conflict, struggle, trouble and temptation. There are certain individuals whom we entrust to not only join and accompany us into that place of struggle and conflict, but whom we also invite to pray and watch lest they enter into temptation. I firmly believe that Jesus invited Simon called Peter, James and his brother John further and deeper into the garden in order that they might join and participate in and with the struggle which He faced in that hour. Jesus knew all things that would befall and come upon Him, and Jesus knew that His hour had come, and in that moment He invited three of His closest companions to join Him deeper into the garden. What we must recognize and realize—that which I am aware I have already mentioned—is that when Jesus invited these three disciples to join Him further in the garden, He didn’t invite them to be spectators, but invited them to be active participants in the struggle and conflict which He Himself would face and experience. The disciples were not invited to join Jesus deeper and further into the garden simply to watch and observe Himself in His own struggle and travail, but to watch and pray lest they find themselves entering into temptation. Simon called Peter, James and John were invited to accompany and join Jesus further in the garden, for they were invited into the place of watching and praying with Jesus. Pause for a moment and consider the awesome and incredible reality that Jesus would trust these disciples enough to invited them into the place of conflict and struggle, and would invite them to join Him in the struggle through prayer and intercession. It was true that Jesus Himself would enter into prayer and fellowship with the Father there in the garden, but Jesus also invited the disciples to join and participate with Him in prayer and watching during that same hour.

What we find in the account of Jesus and the disciples coming unto the garden of Gethsemane is the disciples being led from the place of instruction and the intercession of Jesus before the Father and into and unto the place of conflict, struggle and travail where they would be invited to participate and join in the struggle together with Jesus. It’s intriguing to think about and consider the fact that the disciples were led from the quietness and relative peacefulness that was found in the upper room and into the garden—that place where they would find themselves thrust into a place of temptation, conflict and struggle. After hearing and listening to the words which Jesus spoke unto them there in the upper room, and after hearing the words which Jesus spoke unto them as He led them to the garden of Gethsemane, and after hearing the words which Jesus would pray in the sight and presence of the Father, the disciples would be led unto the place of conflict and struggle. What’s more, is that this garden was most likely a private and personal place of retreat and rest for Jesus and the disciples where He would quite possibly speak to them in a personal manner, and where they would engage themselves in prayer and communion with the Father. Undoubtedly the garden of Gethsemane was a place that was personal and private for the disciples, for they had oftentimes resorted there for quiet times of prayer, fellowship, communion and rest. What makes this so incredible unique and interesting is when you think about and consider the fact that a personal and quiet place of prayer, of rest, and of fellowship would be transformed into a place of conflict, struggle, turmoil and temptation as the snake would once more enter into the garden. If you journey to the Old Testament book of Genesis you will find that the serpent was in the garden and enticed, deceived and tempted Eve to eat of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, and did so completely alone without the help and assistance of anyone or anything else. There is no mention of any other being or beings in the garden of Eden other than the serpent who beguiled Eve and tempted her to eat of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. When we come to the account of Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane, however, we find the serpent once more entering into the garden. This time, however, the serpent would not enter into, nor would he be in the garden alone, but would be accompanied by officers and soldiers with torches, lanterns and weapons in order that they might take and lay hold of Jesus. Now there might be those of you reading the words of this writing who would question the reality and concept of the serpent entering into the garden, and yet in two of the New Testament gospel accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ we find it written how Satan not only put it into the heart of Judas to betray Jesus, but we also read how Satan actually entered into Judas in order that he might carry out the act of betrayal against Jesus the Christ. Scripture is clear that Satan did put it into the heart of Judas to betray Jesus the Christ, yet Scripture is also very clear that Satan did in fact enter Judas in order that Judas might carry out the betrayal of Jesus there in the garden. Consider if you will the words which are written and recorded within the gospels concerning Judas, and the activity of Satan within his life:

“Now before the feast of Passover, when Jesus knew that His hour was come that He should depart out of this world unto the Father, having loved His own which were in the world, He loved them unto the end. And supper being ended, the devil having now put into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray Him; Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into His hands, and that He was come from God, and went to God” (John 13:1-3).

“When Jesus had thus said, He was troubled in spirit, and testified, and said, Verily, verily I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me. Then the disciples looked one on another, doubting of whom he spake. Now there was leaning on Jesus’ bosom one of His disciples, whom Jesus loved. Simon Peter therefore beckoned to him, that he should ask who it should be of whom he spake. He then lying on Jesus;’ breast saith unto Him, Lord, who is it? Jesus answered, He it is, to whom I shall give a sop, when I have dipped it. And when He had dipped the sop, He gave it to Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon. And after the sop Satan entered into him. Then said Jesus unto him, That thou doest, do quickly. Now no man at the table knew for what intent He spake this unto him. For some of them thought, because Judas had the bag, that Jesus had said unto him, But those things that we have need of against the feast; or, that he should give something to the poor. He then having received the sop went immediately out: and it was night” (John 13:21-30).

“Now the feast of unleavened bread drew night, which is called the Passover. And the chief priests and scribes sought how they might kill Him; for they feared the people. Then entered Satan into Judas surnamed Iscariot, being of the number of the twelve. And he went his way, and communed with the chief priests and captains, how he might betray Him unto them. And they were glad, and covenanted to give him money. And he promised, and sought opportunity to betray Him unto them in the absence of the multitude” (Luke 22:1-6).

These passages bring us face to face with the reality that, yes it is true that Satan put it into the heart of Judas to betray Jesus into the hands of His enemies and adversaries, however, it is further true that Satan actually entered into Judas after Jesus had given him the sop at the table in the upper room. This is quite astonishing and remarkable, for Judas was still in the upper room with Jesus and the disciples when Satan entered into him. Thus we get the sense that Jesus and the disciples weren’t the only ones who were there together in the upper room, but Satan was also present there watching and observing the events which would unfold on this night. It would be after the sop was received from the hand of Jesus that Satan would actually enter into Judas, and would enable Judas to betray Jesus into the hands of His enemies and adversaries. It’s important for us to think about, recognize and understand this, for when Judas entered into the garden it might very well be said that it was more than just Judas who entered into the garden, but Satan himself entered into the garden—entered into the place of prayer and intercession where Jesus was with His disciples. When we read of Judas entering into the garden of Gethsemane, we must understand this is a clear reality of Satan himself entering into that place of prayer and fellowship and transforming it into a battle ground where men armed with weapons would seize and lay hold of Jesus the Christ. We must understand and recognize that when Satan entered into the garden accompanied by officers and men armed with weapons, he sought to lay hold of seize Jesus the Christ in order that he might once and for all put Him to death and be rid of Him. It wouldn’t merely be Judas who would turn and transform the garden of Gethsemane into a place of tremendous and intense struggle and conflict. Before Judas entered into the garden it would be a place of travail, a place of prayer, a place of intercession, a place of wrestling, a place of struggle, and even a place of sorrow and despair, for Luke writes how the disciples slept the sleep of sorrow on this particular night. The beloved physician writes concerning the disciples that there eyes were heaven and they were tired because of sorrow and despair, as Jesus had not only told them that He would be betrayed by one of His own, but also that He would be handed over into the hands of His enemies and adversaries, and would be killed. What we find in the garden of Gethsemane is the disciples who were invited into the place of prayer and watching sleeping instead of praying, for they were given to much sorrow and despair in that moment and in that hour. Although Simon called Peter, James and John were invited to participate and accompany Jesus in the place of prayer and watching, they could not watch with Him one hour because their eyes were heavy due to sorrow and despair. The disciples were invited into the place of prayer and watching, and yet instead of watching and praying they gave themselves to sleep and slumber there in the garden because their hearts were overtaken with sorrow. Oh we must recognize and understand that the garden was about more than just the struggle and conflict Jesus would face as He prepared Himself for suffering, and ultimately death. The garden was indeed a place of testing, a place of conflict, a place of struggle, and a place of temptation for the disciples, as Simon called Peter, James and John would be invited to watch and pray lest they enter into temptation. While it is true that they were invited to join and accompany Jesus in the place of struggle and conflict, they were invited into that place that they might watch and pray, and to watch and pray lest they enter not into temptation in that hour.

As I read the words which are written and recorded concerning the garden of Gethsemane, I can’t help but think about the tremendous reality that once more there was a snake in the garden, and that it was that snake who entered into the garden accompanied by officers and soldiers who were armed with weapons that they might seize and lay hands on Jesus. We have already established that after receiving the sop from the hand of Jesus, Satan entered into Judas, thus indicating and pointing to the reality that when Judas entered into the garden on this particular night, the serpent once more entered into the garden—this time, however, he did not enter to beguile Eve to eat of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, but rather to lay hold of and seize Jesus the Christ in order that He might be put to death. When Jesus invited Simon called Peter, James and John to watch and pray with Him lest they enter into temptation, He knew that the hand of His betrayer was nigh, and that the serpent would once more enter into the garden. In all reality, it’s quite interesting when you take and consider the concept of the serpent once more entering into the garden, and the direct link and connection between the serpent entering into the garden and the need to watch and pray lest the disciples find themselves entering into temptation. What’s more, is that there wasn’t an invitation in the garden of Eden to watch and pray lest Adam and Eve enter into temptation, however, when we come to the garden of Gethsemane, we find the disciples being invited into the place of conflict and struggle together with Jesus, and given the instruction to watch and pray lest they enter into temptation. It’s quite astonishing to think about the direct connection that seems to be in existence between the serpent once more entering into the garden, and the disciples being given an invitation to watch and pray lest they enter into temptation. It’s worth noting and point out that in addition to the invitation to participate in the struggle and conflict Jesus would find Himself experiencing in the garden, the disciples would also be instructed and invited to watch and pray lest they enter into temptation there in the garden. Oh we must grasp and we must lay hold of this incredible reality, for not only were they invited to be active participants on this night in prayer and watching, but they were also warned and instructed to pray and watch lest they find themselves entering into temptation with the serpent on his way into the garden once more. Upon the entrance of the serpent into the garden the disciples would be faced with the decision whether or not they would stand fast with Christ, or whether they would forsake Him and run. Of course we know and understand that Simon was the only one who seemed to show some type of resolve in standing with and standing by Christ, as He drew a sword and smote off the ear of the one of the servants of the high priest. Ultimately, however, nine of the remaining eleven disciples would abandon and forsake Christ in that moment and in that hour, as Simon called Peter would follow Jesus while denying Him three times in the place where Jesus would stand trial. THE TEMPTATION TO SLUMBER IN THE PLACE OF WATCHING AND PRAYER! THE TEMPTATION TO DENY JESUS IN THE PLACE OF TRIAL AND ACCUSATION! Oh that we would read the words which are found within these passages of Scripture and that we would come face to face with our own invitation to watch and pray lest we ourselves enter into temptation, and that we would become active participants in the struggle and conflict rather than simply those who would causally observe as spectators.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s