When Resurrected Hope & Restored Confidence Propels You Into the Place of Presence & Power

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament account of the spiritual body of the Lord Jesus Christ which He left upon the earth after He ascended unto the right hand of the Father as written and recorded by the beloved physician Luke. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the first thirteen verses of the second chapter. When you come to this particular passage of scripture you will find what is perhaps one of the most noted passages of scripture in the entire bible. It is is in this passage of scripture where you come face to face with events which took place exactly fifty days after the Passover. As you draw near and approach the words found in the second chapter of the New Testament book of Acts it is necessary and imperative that you understand them—not only in the context of the Passover, but also in the context of the resurrection and ascension of Jesus the Christ. What’s more, is that if you are truly going to understand the words which are found within this portion of scripture it is necessary that you pay close attention to that which comes before it—namely, that which is found in the first chapter of this second treatise which was written by the beloved physician Luke. Upon coming to the opening verses of the New Testament book of Acts which Luke wrote you will quickly notice that this was the second document and treatise he wrote unto a very specific individual named Theophilus. The first treatise written unto this particular individual described all that Jesus began to do and to teach from the time of His baptism in the river Jordan by John the Baptist. What’s more, is this first treatise which was written by the beloved physician Luke was written concerning the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ and began with His birth which took place in Bethlehem in a manger as he was laid in swaddling clothes. The New Testament gospel of Luke presents us with a strong and powerful picture of Jesus the Christ from the time He was born of a virgin until the time He ascended unto the right hand of the Father after rising from the dead and merging from the tomb and grave. In order for us to understand that which is found in the book of Acts it is necessary that we turn and direct our attention to the previous treatise written by Luke, for it was that first treatise which set the stage for the events that took place upon and after the ascension of Jesus the Christ. Even when opening this second treatise the beloved physician Luke writes unto this particular individual that the first treatise was designed and intended on revealing Jesus the Christ and all that He began to do and to teach, and how He not only suffered and was crucified, but also that He was buried in a borrowed tomb, was raised from death to life on the third day, appeared unto and manifested Himself unto the disciples and certain others at that time over a period of forty days. Towards the end of the gospel of Luke you find that just prior to Jesus being taken up and ascending unto the right hand of His Father He proved and demonstrated that He had indeed risen from the grave and was very much alive.

The opening verses of the New Testament book of Acts brings us face to face with the reality that the first treatise and document which Luke wrote centered upon the incredible reality that Jesus did in fact—as the apostle John wrote—“come in the flesh and dwell among us.” At the very outset and beginning of this new treatise Luke writes that his first document was designed and intended to point to and reveal the Christ, and all that He began both to do and to teach from the time He was publicly revealed and manifested until the time of His death and crucifixion. What’s more is that in the opening verses of this first chapter of the book of Acts we find Luke writing and speaking of the passion of Jesus, which was a pointed reference to the week leading up to His betrayal, His trial, His torture, and ultimately His crucifixion on the cross outside of Jerusalem. The beloved physician Luke took the time to speak of the passion of Jesus the Christ, as well as His resurrection, and then presented and painted the picture that not only did Jesus rise from the grave in the third day, but even after He rose from the grave on the third day, He showed Himself as being very much alive over a period of forty days. Pause for a moment and think about that reality—the reality that even after Jesus was raised from the dead He didn’t immediately ascend unto the right hand of the Father. To this day I find it absolutely incredible and astonishing that even after Jesus rose from the dead and emerged from the grave He did not leave His disciples without a resurrection and restoration of their own. In all reality and for all intents and purposes I would dare say that the entire reason and purpose for Jesus revealing Himself and showing Himself unto the disciples over a period of forty days after His resurrection was to resurrect their hope and to restore their faith, their trust and their confidence. There is not a doubt in my mind that the entire reason and purpose for Jesus revealing Himself unto the disciples and upwards of five hundred at one time was not only to prove and demonstrate that He was very much alive and had risen from the grave, but to cause them to experience a resurrection and restoration of their own. I firmly believe that when Jesus demonstrated and proved with many signs and infallible proofs that He was indeed risen from the grave, He did so for He and the Father knew that it wasn’t enough for Him to rise from the dead, emerge from the tomb and ascend unto His glory in heaven. I believe and am wonderfully and powerfully convinced that it was the divinely ordained and appointed will and plan of the Father that the Son probe, demonstrate and manifest Himself as alive after He had indeed risen from the grave.

I find it absolutely incredible and amazing that after Jesus rose from the dead and emerged from the grave He both demonstrated and proved that He was very much alive and had indeed risen from the grave. What’s more is that it was over a period of forty days that Jesus would remain and abide with and among the disciples proving and demonstrating that He was indeed alive and had indeed risen from the grave. Think about what that must have been like for the disciples to think and even believe that all Hope was gone and had died with Jesus when He was crucified upon that cruel Roman tree outside the city of Jerusalem. Think about how necessary and invaluable it would be for Jesus to demonstrate and prove Himself as being alive after He had been crucified, buried in a borrowed tomb, and raised from death to life on the third day. Oh the gospels only give us a glimpse of what those forty days were like after Jesus had risen from the grave and before He had ascended unto the right hand of the Father. We know and understand from scripture that He appeared unto and manifested Himself unto the disciples at least three times during that period of time—twice as they were hiding behind closed doors, and once as they were at the sea of Tiberius. What’s more, is that you will also find and read within the final chapter of the gospel written by Luke that He appeared unto two men as they traveled and journeyed from the city of Jerusalem unto a village and town called Emmaus. The four gospels point to and reveal the absolutely incredible reality that there were certain and specific instances and occurrences when Jesus did in fact reveal Himself unto the disciples and demonstrate that He was indeed alive and had risen from the grave. It is the beloved physician Luke who points to the fact that after Jesus had risen from the grave He did indeed and did in fact show Himself alive with many infallible proofs unto those unto whom He appeared. Even the apostle Paul alludes to and mentions this reality when writing unto the Corinthian congregation concerning the resurrection of the saints and its direct connection to the resurrection of Jesus the Christ. In all reality, we cannot truly understand our own resurrection without and apart from understanding the resurrection of Jesus the Christ. With that being said, the apostle Paul wrote unto the fifteenth chapter of the first epistle which was sent unto the Corinthian congregation that Jesus did in fact rise from the dead and emerge from the grave, and manifest Himself unto certain individuals over a period of forty days. The apostle Paul wrote and mentioned how Jesus demonstrated and manifested Himself as being alive as He appeared unto Simon called Peter, as He appeared unto James, as He appeared unto the disciples, as He appeared unto upwards of five hundred at one time, and as last of all He appeared unto the Woodrow Paul himself well one born out of due time. In essence—not only do the gospels, and not only does the book of Acts, but so also does the first epistle written by the apostle Paul point to the incredible fact that after Jesus rose from the dead on the third day, He wonderfully and powerfully demonstrated the reality that He was indeed risen and that He was very much alive. We dare not, we cannot and must not miss and lose sight of this reality, for to do so would be to miss out on the awesome and wonderful reality of the resurrection of Jesus, as well as the resurrection of hope and confidence which was manifested in the hearts and lives of the disciples.

RESURRECTION AND ASCENSION! As I sit here this morning I can’t help but come face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that not only did Jesus demonstrate that He was alive with many infallible proofs, but He also brought His disciples and followed unto the mount called Olivet where He allowed them to witness and behold His ascension unto the right hand of the Father. Think about how absolutely remarkable it must have been for Simon called Peter, James and John to not only see the transfigured Christ, but to also see the resurrected Christ, and even the ascended Christ. Perhaps one of the most astonishing realities is when you think about the experience Simon called Peter, James and his brother John had considering they not only saw and witnessed the transfigured Christ atop the mountain—perhaps Mount Hermon north of Caeserea Philippi—as well as witnessed and beheld the resurrected Christ, and even the exalted Christ. It’s even more astonishing to think about and consider the fact that it could very well be said that the apostle John also witnessed the crucified Christ, for the gospel account which He wrote wonderfully demonstrates and reveals the fact that he was standing there at the foot of the cross with Mary the mother of Jesus. In fact, it was unto the apostle John whom Jesus spoke and declared “Behold your mother,” and it was unto Mary whom He had spoken and declared, “Behold your son.” Essentially, that which Jesus was doing was establishing an intrinsic bond and relationship between the apostle John and Mary His mother after He ascended unto the right hand of the Father. It is quite clear and quite obvious from reading the gospel account which the apostle John wrote that he was in fact there at the cross as Jesus hung there suspended between earth and sky, and was there with Mary the mother of Jesus, and certain other women of their company. What marks and makes this as being even more interesting and intriguing is when you think about and consider the fact that the apostle John not only saw the transfigured Christ, he not only saw the crucified Christ, he not only saw the resurrected Christ, and he not only saw the ascended Christ, but later on in the New Testament—in fact at the end of it when you come to the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus the Christ—you will find that the apostle John even sees the exalted Christ who appeared unto him while he was banished to the isle of Patmos. How absolutely incredible and intriguing it is to think about and consider the fact that not only did the apostle John see, witness and behold the transfigured Christ, but he also beheld and witnessed the crucified Christ, the resurrected Christ, the ascended Christ, and finally the exalted Christ.

There is not a doubt in my mind that we cannot truly understand and even appreciate the events which took place in the second chapter of the New Testament book of Acts without first encountering and coming face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that the events which took place on that day could only be made possible because Jesus departed from this world and ascended unto the Father. If you read the words which the apostle John wrote and recorded in chapters fourteen through sixteen you will find that Jesus actually declared that it was expedient for Him to go away and to return unto His Father, for if He did not go away and return unto His Father, He would and could not send the promise of the Holy Spirit. When speaking unto the disciples as He prepared them for His departure from this world and His subsequent return unto the right hand of the Father, Jesus emphatically declared unto the disciples that it was necessary that He ascend unto the right hand of the Father, for if He did not go unto the Father the promised Holy Spirit who would be the Comforter and Counselor would and could not come into and unto the earth and be manifested among men. What I so absolutely love about the promise of the Father and the person and presence of the Holy Spirit is that when you study the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ you will find that when Jesus dwelt among us in the form of human flesh, He did so absent His omnipresence. What this essentially means is that so long as Jesus dwelt in the flesh and dwelt among man within and upon the earth, He could only be in one place at one time. Thus, wherever Jesus was—not only was the expression and image of the Father manifested in that place, but so also was the very presence of Almighty God manifested in that place. It was the ancient Hebrew prophet Isaiah who prophesied and foretold of the birth of Jesus Christ as being born of a virgin and even being Immanuel, which literally means God with us. Consider this in light of the words which the apostle John wrote at the very outset of his gospel account when he wrote and declared that in the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. Consider the awesome and incredible reality that when Jesus dwelt among us in the form of human flesh, He did so as the physical and tangible expression of the manifest presence of God within and upon the earth. Please don’t miss the awesome reality that wherever Jesus the Christ was there also was the divine presence of the Father as it was present and evident among men upon the earth. With that being said, however—one thing we must recognize and understand is that even though Jesus the Christ was indeed and was in fact God in the flesh, He was God in the flesh at one time and in on place. So long as Jesus Christ was in the earth, the presence of God was limited to a single place at a single time, as the presence of the living God could not be manifested or evidenced anywhere else apart from Jesus the Christ and His physical person.

As you begin reading the words which are found within the second chapter of the New Testament book of Acts you will come face to face with the fact that when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they—they meaning the apostles, the women who were with them among their company, and others who engaged in fellowship with them (a total of one hundred and twenty)—were all with one accord in one place. This is actually worth noting, for if you turn and direct your attention to the previous chapter of the New Testament book of Acts you will find the beloved physician Luke writing concerning the apostles, concerning the women who were present among them, as well as the others who were there in the upper room that they all continued with one accord in prayer and supplication. I cannot help but be absolutely gripped and captivated with and by the fact that not only were all these who were gathered together of one accord, but they also committed themselves to prayer and supplication. Oh, there is a part of me that can’t help but wonder what those prayer times were like as they who were present in the upper room had not only understood that Jesus the Christ had risen from the grave, but had also witnessed Him ascend into heaven and unto the right hand of the Father. I can’t help but wonder how many were actually present at the mount called Olivet when Jesus ascended into heaven and unto the right hand of the Father, for we know from the words of the apostle Paul when writing unto the Corinthians that after He had risen from the grave Jesus appeared to upwards of five hundred at one time. I have long been fascinated and puzzled at the fact that if Jesus the Christ revealed Himself as being alive, and manifested Himself as such in the company and presence of upwards of five hundred at one time—how come there are only one-hundred and twenty present in the upper room? Where were the other three-hundred and eighty who had witnessed and experienced the resurrection of Jesus the Christ, and perhaps even witnessed His ascension? Is it possible that while there were three hundred and eighty who witnessed and beheld the resurrected Christ, there were three hundred and eighty who did not also witness the ascension of Jesus the Christ unto the right hand of the Father? Is it possible that the one-hundred and twenty who were in the upper room not only beheld the resurrected Christ within and upon the earth, but they also witnessed and beheld the ascended Christ as He ascended unto the right hand of the Father in heaven? There is something very gripping and very telling about the fact that Jesus the Christ did in fact demonstrate and manifest Himself as being alive unto five hundred at one time, and yet when the day of Pentecost had fully come, there were only one-hundred and twenty who were gathered together in one accord in prayer and supplication. THE MISSING THREE-HUNDRED AND EIGHTY! It could very well be said that had Jesus not met and encountered the two men on the road to Emmaus and revealed Himself in the breaking of bread that they not only would not have been in the city of Jerusalem, but also would potentially not have been in that upper room with the apostles, the various women of the company, and the various other individuals who made up the one-hundred and twenty. While there is no scriptural evidence that conclusively points to the fact that Cleopas and his traveling companion on the road to Emmaus were present among the one hundred and twenty in the upper room, I would strongly suggest that they most certainly present given their emphatic and bold declaration unto the apostles that Jesus was in fact risen and had appeared unto them.

What I find to be so wonderful and powerful about what we find and read in the New Testament book of Acts is not only that these one hundred and twenty were gathered together in one accord and continued in prayer and supplication, but when the day of Pentecost had fully come—ten days after the ascension of Jesus the Christ—they were still in one accord and were still given to prayer and supplication. I would contend that there is Scriptural evidence that supports the fact that the day of Pentecost was a full fifty days after the Passover when Jesus the Christ was killed and crucified, and over a period of forty days Jesus showed and demonstrated Himself as being alive and resurrected from the grave. If the day of Pentecost was actually fifty days the Passover, and if Jesus was buried in the grave for three days, and if after He rose from the grave He proved and demonstrated Himself as being alive over a period of forty days, then one might come to the conclusion that there were essentially seven days front he time Jesus ascended unto the right hand of the Father until the day of Pentecost was fully come. I have heard some argue that there were exactly ten days between the time Jesus ascended unto the Father and when the day of Pentecost, however, I would strongly suggest and state that it is more likely and more probable that there were seven days which were found between the time when Jesus ascended unto the right hand of the Father, and when the day of Pentecost had fully come. With that being said—pause for a moment and consider that for a period of seven days straight these one hundred and twenty gave themselves continually to prayer and supplication and were even of one accord. Think about and consider the fact that there were one hundred and twenty who were in one accord—not for one hour on Sunday morning, not for an hour and a half during a midweek service, nor even for a few hours during a prayer meeting and prayer gathering. When the beloved physician Luke writes and records that they were all in one accord and that they were still in one accord when the day of Pentecost had fully come, it naturally holds true that they were all in one accord from the time Jesus ascended unto the right hand of the Father until the day of Pentecost. Of course none of them knew when the promise of the Father would come—only that Jesus instructed them to tarry in Jerusalem and to wait until they be endued with power from on high. In fact, in the opening chapter of this New Testament book you will find Luke referencing the words which Jesus spoke unto those who were present with Him at the mount called Olivet, and how he declared unto them, saying, “But ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judaea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth” (Acts 1:8). What’s more, is that in the final verses of the New Testament gospel of Luke we find the beloved physician writing and recording the following words which were spoken by Jesus the Christ unto the disciples prior to His ascension unto the right hand of the Father in heaven: “Thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day: and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in His name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. And ye are witnesses of these things. And, behold, I send the promise of my Father upon you: but tarry ye in the city of Jerusalem, until ye be endued with power from on high” (Luke 24:45-49).

If there is one thing that so absolutely captivates me when I read the first and second chapters of the New Testament book of Acts, it’s that not only were the one-hundred and twenty in one accord committing themselves to prayer and supplication immediately following the ascension of Jesus Christ into heaven and unto the right hand of the Father, but they were still in one accord seven days later when the day of Pentecost had fully come. Oh, there is something to be written and something to be said about sustained unity, and sustained community and fellowship. We might find it necessary, and even worthwhile to brag and boast about our being in one accord for two hours on a Sunday morning, or even for a few hours during a prayer service during the week, and yet the underlying question always comes back to what happens when the company and fellowship is broken up and everyone goes their own way. What happens when Sunday morning service comes to an end and the doors are shut and everyone goes unto their own homes? There is something that is quite interesting and unique when you consider this concept of the one-hundred and twenty being in one accord and giving themselves to prayer and supplication, for if you turn and direct your attention to the twentieth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John you will find something that is actually quite intriguing. I am convinced that if we are to truly understand how vital and critical this concept of being of one accord truly is, it is necessary for us to turn and direct our attention to the twentieth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John beginning with the first verse of the chapter. There is something that is written and something that is found within the opening verses of this chapter which I believe sets the stage and sets the context for the disciples being of one accord in one place given to prayer and supplication. Beginning to read with and from the first verse of the twentieth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John you will find the following words which were written by this beloved apostle:

“The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre. Then she runneth, and cometh to Simon Peter, and to the other disciple, whom Jesus loved, and saith unto them, They have taken away the Lord out of the sepulchre, and we know not where they have laid Him. Peter therefore went forth, and that other disciples, and came to the sepulchre. So they ran both together: and the other disciples di outrun Peter, and came first to the sepulchre. And He stooping down, and looking in, saw the linen clothes lying; yet went into the sepulchre, and seeth the linen clothes lie, and the napkin, that was about his head, not lying with the linen clothes, but wrapped together in a place by itself. Then went in also that other disciples, which came first to the sepulchre, and he saw, and believed. For as yet they knew not the scripture, that he must rise again from the dead. Then the disciples went away again unto their own home” (John 20:1-10).

Did you catch that? Did you see what was written there towards the end of that particular passage? After Simon called Peter and John came unto the tomb and not only saw it empty, but also the grave clothes which were upon Jesus’ body still present within the tomb with the stone rolled away, they believed in their hearts and spirits that Jesus did in fact rise from the grave. What is so incredibly interesting and intriguing, however, is that which you find in the tenth verse, for in the tenth verse you will find that even after coming unto the tomb, even after seeing the tomb empty, and even after seeing the grave clothes lying in the tomb and believing that Jesus had in fact risen from the grave, the disciples went away again unto their own home. Please don’t miss and lose sight of this concept of the disciples going again unto their own home, for in this particular instance we find the disciples going unto their own home, and yet when we come to the opening chapter of the book of Acts we find one-hundred and twenty gathered together in one place in once accord. In all reality there are certain glimpses of this reality manifested and evidenced in the New Testament gospel of John, for when you come to the latter part of the twentieth chapter you will find two separate occasions—eight days apart—when the disciples were gathered together behind closed doors, and Jesus appearing and manifesting Himself among them. Within the twentieth chapter you begin to see and notice a shift and transition among the disciples, for what begins with the disciples going unto their own home after coming to the tomb would eventually transition to the disciples being gathered together in an upper room behind closed doors. In verses nineteen through twenty-three of the twentieth chapter, as well as in verses twenty-four through twenty-nine we find two different and two separate accounts of the disciples being gathered together behind closed doors—perhaps and undoubtedly due to fear, due to terror and dread concerning the Jews. Consider if you will the words which are written and found in these two sections of the New Testament gospel of John and how they begin to set the stage for what we find and encounter when we come unto the first and second chapters of the New Testament book fo Acts:

“Then the same day at evening, being the first day of the week, when the doors were shut where the disciples were assembled for fear of the Jews, came Jesus and stood in the midst, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you. And when He had so said, He shewed unto them His hands and His side. Then were the disciples glad, when they saw the Lord. Then said Jesus to them again, peace be unto you; as my Father hath sent me, even so send I you. And when He had said this, He breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost; Whose soever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and who’s soever sins ye retain, they are retained” (John 20:19-23).

“But Thomas, one of the twelve, called Didymus, was not with them when Jesus came. The other disciples therefore said unto him, We have seen the Lord. But he said unto them, Except I shall see in His hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into His side, I will not believe. And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them: then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you. Then saith He to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side; and be not faithless, but believing. And Thomas answered and said unto Him, My Lord and my God. Jesus saith unto Him, Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet believed” (John 20:24-29).

With each of these passages we find a certain transition taking place among the disciples, for what we first read as the disciples going unto their own home would transition to the disciples being gathered together in one place. Of course we know from the first description and account that they were gathered together behind closed doors for fear of the Jews, but we notice a second time when the disciples were once more gathered together behind closed doors. It’s interesting and worth noting that on both occasions Jesus came and stood in the midst of them. What’s more, is that not only did Jesus come and stand in the midst of them, but Jesus also manifested and demonstrated that He was alive by showing unto them the print of the nails in His hands, as well as the print and scar from the spear which was thrust into His side while on the cross. How absolutely wonderful and astonishing it is to think about and consider the fact that even though Jesus had risen from the grave He still chose to carry the print of the nails, and even the scar from the spear which was thrust in His side in order that He might show and manifest it in the sight and presence of the disciples. With all of this being said and written, we can clearly see and find the disciples being gathered together behind closed doors for fear of the Jews, yet on both occasions Jesus not only came and appeared unto them, but He also showed unto them the print of the nails and the print of the spear that was thrust into His side. By the time we come to the New Testament book of Acts we find the disciples, as well as one-hundred and nine other individuals present with them in an upper room where they were gathered together in one accord in prayer and supplication. What began with the disciples being gathered together behind closed doors for fear of the Jews would transition to one-hundred and twenty being gathered together in an upper room being of one accord continuing in prayer and supplication. What a marked and noticeable transition took place from the disciples cowering in fear behind closed doors to them being gathered together with one-hundred and nine others continuing in prayer and supplication being of one accord. What a powerful transition took place from being gathered together in fear to being gathered together in unity, in prayer and supplication. How absolutely astonishing it is to think about and consider that what began with gathering together in fear would eventually reach the point and place when they would be gathered together in unity, in prayer and in supplication. By the time we come to the New Testament book of Acts we don’t find the disciples gathered together behind closed doors for fear of the Jews, for not only had they seen and experienced the resurrected Jesus over a period of forty days, but they had also witnessed Him ascend into heaven and unto the right hand of the Father. You might ask what happened and what took place that would cause such a shift and transition to take place in the midst of the disciples, and I would dare say that it was the manifestation of the resurrected Jesus Christ, as well as witnessing and beholding Him ascending into heaven and unto the right hand of the Father that so charged their faith, so charged their trust, so charged their confidence, and brought them to the place where they were able to not only be in one accord, but also in prayer and supplication.

THE TRANSITION FROM INDIVIDUAL HOMES TO GATHERING TOGETHER AS ONE IN THE UPPER ROOM! The more I think about the events which took place when the day of Pentecost had fully come, the more I come face to face with the fact that what allowed the Holy Spirit to be manifested in such a way on the day of Pentecost—the sound as of a mighty rushing wind filling the house, cloven tongues of fire abiding upon them, and their being filled with the Holy Spirit and speaking in other tongues—was the wonderful and noticeable transition that took place from going unto their own homes and transitioning unto a place where they were gathered together in one accord in prayer and supplication. What’s more, is that it wasn’t simply their gathering together in one accord for a specific period of time in a single day, but it was a continual and abiding unity that helped facilitate the events which took place on the day of Pentecost. When the day of Pentecost the one-hundred and twenty were still in one accord, and were undoubtedly still in prayer and supplication. Oh, we dare not miss and lose sight of this awesome and incredible reality, for to do so would be to undermine that which is necessary to facilitate the manifestation of the Holy Spirit in our midst. I would dare say that it isn’t enough to be of one accord for a couple hours on a Sunday morning, and perhaps even for a few hours during a prayer meeting during the week.k I am convinced that there is something to be said about a lasting and sustained unity—a unity in prayer and supplication—that creates and fosters the environment and atmosphere the Holy Spirit can manifest Himself in our midst. The question we must ask ourselves is what type of environment are we fostering and creating within our Christian circles and relationships. Are we willing to give ourselves to prayer and supplication and to being in one accord with others in order that we might allow the Holy Spirit to move and manifest in our midst as He desires and longs to do? We might very well cry out and call out for the manifestation fo the Holy Spirit, and yet the question we must ask ourselves is whether or not we are actively doing that which is necessary to create an environment and atmosphere where the Holy Spirit can indeed and can in fact manifest Himself in our midst.

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