The Testimony and Joy of Making Your Bed: Can You Spare 5 Minutes?

Today’s selected reading continues in the scriptural account of the spiritual body of Jesus the Christ which is the church as it was written and recorded by the beloved physician Luke in the book of Acts. More specifically, today’s passage is found in verses thirty-two through forty-three of the ninth chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find the scriptural account and introduction of Saul coming to a close. Within the first twenty two verses of the ninth chapter we find the beloved physician Luke writing concerning the miraculous and supernatural conversion of this man Saul—that one who wreaked havoc on the church, and that one who entered in houses and homes hauling men and women and women to commit them into prison. This same Saul was the one whom we read of in the opening verses of the ninth chapter who was still breathing out threatenings and slaughter toward and against the church, and who had obtained letters and documentation to journey unto Damascus in order that if he found any of this way he would bring them bound unto Jerusalem. Of course as you read the words written and found within the ninth chapter you will find that the living, resurrected and ascended Jesus the Christ had different plans, for He gloriously appeared unto him while traveling on the road to Damascus. It’s actually quite unique and astounding when you take the time to think about and consider the encounter which Saul had while journeying on the road to Damascus, for it was while he was traveling and journeying on the road that he encountered and experienced the resurrected, ascended and glorified Jesus the Christ. What makes this so astonishing is that Saul would be the third individual whom Jesus would encounter along the road to a very specific destination. If you read the beloved physician Luke’s previous treatise you will find that he again wrote of an encounter along the road—except the first encounter he wrote about on the road was not one which took place within the life of Saul, but rather that which took place as two men traveled and journeyed from Jerusalem to a small town called Emmaus. In the final chapter of the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Luke you will find him writing about two men who were of the way, and who even after hearing that Jesus had risen from the grave felt compelled to leave Jerusalem and travel unto a town and place called Emmaus. This is quite interesting to think about and consider, for while traveling and journeying away from Jerusalem they encountered the risen Christ—despite the fact that they initially did not know that it was Him, for their eyes were held that they could not see and recognize him for who Hw truly was. Luke goes on to write that not only did Jesus meet these men along the way, but He also expounded unto them the truth concerning Himself and how He must suffer and die and be resurrected beginning with Moses and continuing through to the prophets.

If there is one of the things I absolutely love about each of the treatises which the beloved physician Luke wrote within the New Testament its that within each of the treatises he brought forth and conveyed an account with the resurrected Jesus the Christ. In the gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ Luke wrote and recorded how two men were actually traveling and journeying away from the place of promise and power in order that He might restore them unto that place. RESTORED AND RETURNED! I absolutely love what I find in the final chapter of the gospel which Luke wrote, for within that passage we find Jesus not only meeting two men as they journeyed from Jerusalem, but also as He walked with them unto and to that place which they were traveling. What has always fascinated me about this passage is that Jesus didn’t show up and appear unto these men, rebuke them for their unbelief and then command them to return unto Jerusalem. What we find instead is Jesus meeting them along the way and walking with them in the midst of their confusion, in the midst of their questions and in the midst of their disillusionment. It is truly wonderful to think about and consider the fact that Jesus could have met them along the way, upbraided and rebuked them for their unbelief and for leaving Jerusalem, commanding them to return to the place they left, and then vanished from their sight. It’s worth nothing that Jesus didn’t rebuke and upbraid them for their unbelief, their doubts and their questions, and although their eyes with held from recognizing Him, He proceeded to walk with them in and through that place until they reached where they were going. THE JESUS WHO NOT ONLY WALKS WITH US BUT WHK ALSO WALKS WITH US TO WHERE WE ARE GOING! Jesus walked with these men along the way to Emmaus, and even walked with them all the way to that place where He would agree to sup with them. It was in the house and in the breaking of bread that Jesus was made known unto and manifested unto them before He vanished from their sight. Oh how wonderful it truly is to think about and consider the fact that these two men encountered the resurrected Christ along the way, and ultimately in the breaking of bread they would know and discern Christ and that He was truly raised from the dead and resurrected. Luke writes how immediately after the eyes of these men were opened they rose at once, returned unto Jerusalem and unto the apostles, and not only declared unto them that Jesus had risen from the dead, but also how He appeared unto them along the way and appeared unto Simon called Peter.

When you read the words which are written and found within the New Testament book of Acts you will find the same physician Luke writing how the resurrected Jesus the Christ once more appeared unto one who was traveling and journeying along the road to a specific place. In the ninth chapter of the book of Acts we find that as Saul and those men who were traveling with him came nigh unto Damascus there appeared a great light which shone right about Saul and his men, and in fact caused Saul to be thrown from his horse. On this particular day the risen and exalted Jesus the Christ appeared unto and manifested Himself unto Saul. What’s more, is that when Jesus appeared unto Saul He not only called Him by name but proceeded to ask why he perceived Him. When Saul asked who it was that was speaking unto him the Lord Jesus the Christ responded by declaring that He was Jesus whom He was persecuting. How absolutely wonderful it is to think about and consider how the living God cares enough to find and meet us in our place of running and in our place of wandering from that place we were perhaps never meant and intended on leaving. This is a regular theme and occurrence within scripture for you will find how the Lord appeared unto Hagar—not once, but twice—as she was running from her mistress and from the house of her master. On the first occasion she was instructed to return and submit while on the second occasion she was permitted to remain apart from the house of her master, and promised that the Lord would make from her son a great nation and people. If you continue reading in scripture you will also find how the Lord appeared unto Elijah as he ran from the murderous threats of Jezabel who threatened to kill and make him like the prophets of Baal whom he had killed. Ultimately the Lord instructed Elijah to return to the place he had left—and not only return, but also anoint specific individuals for the purposes of God, which would include his successor. Further in the Old Testament you will find the account of Jonah and how Jonah attempted to run from the presence and calling of the living God—all the while not realizing that there was no place he could run from the presence of the living God. There upon the sea the Lord encountered Jonah before he was cast into the sea and before Jonah spent three days and three nights in the belly of a great fish. Oh how replete and how chalk full of accounts and examples the Bible truly is with men and women who attempted to run, and how the living God encounters them along the way. With the example and account of Saul, however, he was not necessarily running from something as much as he was running toward something. Saul was journeying along the road from Jerusalem to Damascus in order that he might continue his onslaught and persecution of the early church. How absolutely wonderful and incredible it is to think about and consider the fact that Saul was permitted to make the journey toward Damascus, however, as he came near and approached Damascus the risen and exalted Jesus the Christ met and encountered him. The Lord waited until he was nigh unto the city before appearing and manifesting Himself unto him, and before revealing that He was Jesus whom Saul had been persecuting. What a truly wonderful and remarkable encounter this truly was with Jesus the Christ, for Saul would spend three days unable to see, and would spend them praying and fasting before Ananias would appear unto him according to the word and command of the Lord, lay hands on him and pray for him that he might receive his sight and receive the Holy Spirit

The ninth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts begins with Saul breathing out threatening and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, and obtaining letters from the high priest in Jerusalem in order that if he found any who belonged to the way In Damascus he might bring them bound and bring them back unto Jerusalem. While traveling along the way, however, Saul encounters and experiences the resurrected and exalted Jesus the Christ who would reveal and speak unto him that he was actually persecuting Jesus the Christ rather than simply persecuting the church. The beloved physician Luke goes on to write and record how Saul would arise from the place of encounter blind and unable to see, how he would spend three days without sight as he would commit himself to prayer and fasting. It would be during those three days the Lord would appear unto a man by the name of Ananias and would instruct him to rise up from his own place within the city and to go and lay hands on and pray for Saul that he might receive his sight as well as the Holy Spirit. Initially Ananias was timid and fearful at the request of the Lord, for he had heard what it was Saul had come to Damascus to do. What’s more, is that Ananias had also heard how Saul had wreaked havoc within the city of Jerusalem and upon the disciples of the Lord—committing countless men and women into prison. After the Lord had revealed unto Ananias that He would show Saul how much he must suffer for the sake of His name, and how Saul was His chosen vessel unto the Gentiles, unto kings, and unto the house and children of Israel, Ananias agreed to make the journey unto the place where Saul was staying, and found him praying. The beloved physician writes and records how Jesus spoke unto Ananias how Saul had seen in a vision a man coming and laying his hands on him that he might receive his sight, and that he might receive the Holy Spirit. Upon finding Saul praying exactly as the Lord Jesus had declared unto him, Ananias laid his hands upon Saul and prayed for him that he might receive his sight and receive the Holy Spirit. Immediately there fell from the eyes of Saul what appeared to be scales, and he not only received his sight, but also received the Holy Spirit. Immediately Saul rose from that place, ate and drank, and was baptized. Because of the obedience of one single man named Ananias Saul not only received his sight, but also received the promise of the Holy Spirit, and was even baptized. Oh how absolutely wonderful and remarkable it is to think about and consider this absolutely wonderful reality that not only did Saul receive his sight, but he also received the Holy Spirit and was completely and utterly transformed by the person of Jesus the Christ and the person of the Holy Spirit who had indwelt and filled him completely. There in the city of Damascus Saul would receive the Holy Spirit, would be baptized in water and in the name of the Lord Jesus the Christ, and would experience a wonderful and remarkable transformation in the presence of both the Spirit, as well as Jesus the Christ.

If you continue reading within the ninth chapter of the book of Acts you will find how Saul would increase more in strength, and how he would confound the Jews which dwelt at Damascus, proving that this was indeed the very Christ. What’s so intriguing and captivating, however, is that Luke would go on to write and reveal how almost immediately after Saul had been converted to the Lord Jesus the Christ, and almost immediately after Saul had received the Spirit and was baptized and began preaching, the Jews—the same Jews who were his own people and his own kinsmen—sought to kill and put him to death. What a tremendous turn of events as Saul came to Damascus seeking to bind men and women who were of the way and bring them back to Jerusalem bound, and yet here we find the Jews taking counsel against him in order that the might kill him. Luke writes and records how day and night they watched the gate in order that they might kill him, but also how the disciples took Saul by night and let him down by the wall in a basket. It’s worth noting that immediately after Saul had been rescued and delivered by the disciples within the city of Damascus from the hands of those that would kill him, he would return unto Jerusalem—return unto the very place where he wreaked havoc upon the church and sought to completely and utterly destroy it. After being delivered and rescued by the hands of the disciples within the city of Damascus Saul would return unto Jerusalem, and assayed to join himself to the disciples of Jesus the Christ, however, they were all fearful and afraid of him. Pause for a moment and consider the fact that this same one who had previously sought to destroy the church of Jesus the Christ, and this one who previously breathed out threats and slaughter against the church, and this one who had previously sought to imprison all those who were of the way had now returned from Damascus preaching that Jesus was indeed the Christ and the Messiah. Consider for a moment if you will the incredible and tremendous reality that Saul would eventually return unto the very place where he had received his education and training under Gamiliel, and how when he returned he did so completely changed and transformed after experiencing and encountering the risen and exalted Jesus the Christ on the road to Damascus. What’s more, is that despite the fact that many disciples of the Lord were afraid and fearful of Saul upon his return to Jerusalem, a man by the name of Barnabas sought to come alongside him and bring him unto the apostles. Please don’t miss the incredible and wonderful significance of this reality, for not only was Barnabas willing to come alongside Saul, but he was also willing to advocate for him that he might find and experience redemption before the disciples and apostles of the Lord Jesus the Christ there in Jerusalem. Luke writes and records how Barnabas not only took and presented Saul unto the apostles, but also how he had advocated for him declaring that he had seen the Lord in the way, that the Lord had spoken unto him, and that he had boldly preached Jesus the Christ in Damascus unto the Jews who were present there. The introduction to the life of Saul would conclude with the Jews in Jerusalem seeking to kill and put him to death, but how when the brethren knew and were made aware of their intentions, brought Saul down to Caeserea, and sent him forth unto Tarsus where he was originally from.

As you come to the thirty-second verse of the ninth chapter you will find the beloved physician Luke shifting gears from writing concerning the conversion of this man named Saul, to writing concerning the apostle Peter. It’s quite interesting to think about and consider the fact that the apostle Peter was not mentioned from the fifth chapter of this New Testament book, and how here we are in the ninth chapter and we are once more experiencing and encountering the apostle Peter. The final verses of the ninth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts transition away from the account of Saul of Tarsus who was miraculously and supernaturally converted by Jesus the Christ to now bringing us face to face with an additional account and record of the apostle Peter. What’s more, is that when the beloved physician Luke picks up the account of the apostle Peter we don’t find him present within the city of Jerusalem, but instead we find him passing through all the quarters of Jerusalem and Judaea, and coming down to the saints which dwelt at Lydda, which was the ancient city of Lod. It was there in Lydda the apostle Peter found a man named Aeneas which had kept his bed eight years, and was sick of the palsy. The beloved physician Luke goes not o write how when the apostle Peter came unto this certain man who was sick with the palsy, he declared unto him that Jesus the Christ made him whole, and then instructed him to rise and make his bed. Immediately this man rose from his place completely and utterly healed and made whole by the Lord Jesus the Christ. It’s quite wonderful and truly amazing to consider this particular encounter, for when the apostle Peter spoke unto this man who was sick of the palsy, he declared unto him without any hesitation that the Lord Jesus Christ had made him whole. There was nothing else that was said unto this man other than the instruction to rise from the place where he had been lying, and to make his bed. Please pay close attention to that which is written and found within this passage, for not only had this man been made whole, but this man was also instructed by the apostle Peter to rise from his place, as well as to make his bed. I am convinced there is a truly wonderful significance in the command and instruction to make his bed—particularly and especially when you think about and consider the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ, and how throughout His life and ministry He caused men and women to be made whole of their infirmity, and caused them to rise from the place where they were laying. What’s more, is that Jesus would instruct those whom He encountered to rise from the place where they were lying, and to take up their mat and walk completely whole and restored by the power of the Spirit and presence of the living God. What we find in this particular passage is the apostle Peter not only instructing this man to rise from the place where he was lying, but also to make his bed.

As I sit here this morning I can’t help but think to myself and consider the absolutely incredible instruction and words which the apostle Peter had spoken unto this man, for it would have been one thing for Peter to declare unto this man that Jesus the Christ had made him whole. It would have been another thing for the apostle Peter to instruct this man to rise from his place. The truth of the matter, however, is that the apostle Peter didn’t simply instruct and command this man to rise from the place where he had been lying for eight years, but to make his bed. I can’t help but be absolutely and wonderfully gripped and captivated by the words which we find in this particular passage, for there is something truly significant and remarkable in what was spoken unto this man. There is something truly gripping and truly captivating in the instruction to make the bed—to make the bed he had been confined to for eight years—for in making the bed he would never again be confined to that place of sickness and palsy. The instruction which the apostle Peter spoke unto this man was truly remarkable, for there is something about making the bed rather than simply rising from that place whole, healed and restored. It was true that this man would in fact rise from that bed and from that place whole, healed and restored, but there was something additional this man was instructed to do that made this healing and restoration so much more captivating and telling. Think about and consider for a moment what it was like for this man—not only to rise from the bed he had been lying for eight years, but also to make the bed. Think about and consider the fact that when this man made his bed—the bed he had been confined to for eight years—he would make that bed completely healed and made whole knowing he would never be confined to it again. MAKE YOUR BED! RISING TO MAKE YOUR BED! I have to admit there is something about making your bed that takes the process of healing and being made whole to an entirely new level, and to even greater depths and heights. There is something about being confined to a bed for eight years, and never making that bed, but simply lying in it—perhaps wondering, waiting, and hoping that something would change and would transition within his life. There was something about the instruction to rise from the place he had been confined—and not only rise from that place, but also to make the bed in which you have been lying for eight years. There is something truly powerful in the making of the bed that demonstrates and wonderfully reveals the healing and work which Jesus the Christ had done and wrought within your life. Within and throughout the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ we find Him speaking unto men and declaring unto them that they were whole, and instructing them to rise from their place and to take up their met and move forward healed, made whole and restored. Time and time again you will recall how Jesus the Christ instructed those who were sick with the palsy, and those who were lame and confined to a bed to rise from their place of confinement, and to pick up their mat and go their way. In some cases, it was in the carrying of the mat that found those who had been healed and made whole at odds with the Jews and with the religious system and community of that day, for Jesus had performed the healing and work on the Sabbath.

Here in the ninth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts we find the apostle Peter walking in the same manifestation of power and healing Jesus the Christ walked in, and not only instructing this man to rise from the place he had been lying, but also to make his bed. Oh, I can’t help but wonder what it was like for this man to know within his heart and physical body that he had been made completely whole and had been completely healed, and making the bed which he had been lying for eight years. What was it like for this man to stand—perhaps even kneeling there—as he would make the bed he had been lying upon for eight years. Oh how absolutely astonishing and captivating it is to think about the testimony of making the bed house have been lying in for eight years—something about doing something as trivial and meaningless as making the bed knowing that you have been made whole, knowing that you have been completely healed, and knowing that you have been completely restored. Think about how more often than not we view making the bed in the morning as a chore and perhaps even as a burden, and how this man who had been confined to a bed for eight years undoubtedly found great delight in making the bed he had been lying in, for he knew that in making that bed he would no longer and no more be confined to it. There was something about making this bed that was a testament, a testimony and a witness unto this man that he had indeed been fully and completely healed and made whole by the name of Jesus the Christ, and by the power of the Holy Spirit which was at work within the life of the apostle Peter. THE TESTIMONY OF MAKING THE BED! THE WITNESS OF MAKING THE BED! Oh stop for a moment and think about how you might find it completely and utterly cumbersome to make your bed in the morning—perhaps even making your bed at all—and how you view it as a burden and chore that is neither enjoyable nor pleasurable. Now consider the instruction this man was given to rise from his bed—and not only rise from his bed, but also make his bed—and how in the making of the bed there was a wonderful testimony and witness of healing and restoration. I wonder what it was like for others who were present in Lydda to watch and witness as this man was not only healed and made whole, but also as he made the bed which he had lied upon for eight years. What was it like for those who were present in this city to watch this man making the same bed he had been confined to for eight years—a seemingly insignificant and meaningless task and chore that many would shirk and balk at. For this man, however—making the bed he had been lying in for eight years was a truly and wonderful testimony and witness to the fact that he had indeed and had in fact been healed by Jesus the Christ and would no longer be confined to that bed. In the making of his bed he was not only demonstrating the fact that he had been healed and made whole, but also that he would never again be confined to that bed—perhaps never again begging and asking for alms.

THE TESTIMONY AND WITNESS OF MAKING THE BED! I am going to transition right now to a place that might seem somewhat insignificant—perhaps even insane to the natural mind—however, I feel compelled to journey to this place. I am sitting here this morning and I can’t hep but think to myself how even to and for us who are whole, and even unto us who have never been confined to a bed as this man who was sick with the palsy was, making the bed might seem like a cumbersome chore and cumbersome task which we more often than not seem to shy away from. What if instead of viewing something as small and as insignificant as making the bed would actually be a wonderful and powerful witness and testimony to the fact that we are in fact whole. Over the past few weeks I have been looking upon and thinking about pain and how pain is more often than not viewed in a negative light and context, but how pain actually has a wonderful testimony and witness that is directly linked and connected to it. More often than not we have a difficult time with pain in our lives—whether it’s a physical pain, an emotional pain, a spiritual pain, or whatever other type of pain we can think about and imagine—and we view it as something which is cumbersome and as something which we have no tolerance for. Consider how there are those who are said to have a high tolerance and a high threshold for pain, and how there are certain types of pain which don’t seem to phase or bother them. There are those who have a high tolerance and high threshold for pain, while there are others who perhaps don’t have the same predisposition to pain within their lives. What I am finding myself looking at and experiencing within my life is how pain is actually a silent witness and testimony of two very distinct realities within our hearts and lives. The first witness and testimony of pain is that we are indeed and are in fact alive, while the second witness and testimony of pain is that we can and do indeed feel. While pain might not be pleasant within our lives, and while we may look upon it as something that is negative and unpleasant to deal with, handle and bear, I would dare say there is a wonderful and powerful witness in pain, for through pain we not only come face to face with the fact that we are alive, but also that we are able to feel. I can’t help but be reminded of my own father who has struggled with Type II diabetes for years, and has spent a considerable amount of time struggling and fighting with what is called neuropathy, which impacts and affects your ability to feel anything. That place he has struggled the most with neuropathy is in one of his feet, and it is so far advanced that he could step on something that would cause others a considerable amount of pain, and yet for him he doesn’t feel a single thing. Pause for a moment and consider the fact that neuropathy impacts and affects your ability to feel, and how you could even experience something that would be painful to others, and yet for you yourself you don’t experience any pain.

I sit here this morning and I can’t help but think to myself that there is something truly wonderful and truly marvelous about pain—despite and regardless of what type of pain we are actually experiencing. There is something inside me this morning that thinks about and considers the reality and concept of pain, and how pain is more often than not a wonderful testimony that we are indeed and are in fact alive, and that we are in fact able to feel within our hearts and lives. There are those among us today who may very well view pain in a negative light and may very well have a negative impression of pain, and yet pain has the incredible ability to not only demonstrate that we are in fact alive, but also that we are able to feel. I realize that pain is neither pleasant, nor is it enjoyable, however, there is something truly wonderful about pain, for it has the ability to demonstrate and prove to us that we are indeed alive, and that we are in fact able to feel. Regardless and despite the fact that when we experience pain—whether it’s physical pain, whether it’s emotional pain, whether its spiritual pain, or whatever other type of pain we feel—we have to admit that there is something truly wonderful about pain that demonstrates that we are alive, and that we have the ability to feel. I am reminded of the apostle Paul who was given a thorn in the flesh, and how he prayed earnestly three times unto the Lord to have this thorn removed, and how on each of the occasions he prayed unto the Lord he was given the declaration that His grace was sufficient for him. IN other words—not only does pain reveal that we are alive, and not only does pain reveal that we have the ability to feel, but pain also demonstrates the grace of Jesus the Christ being sufficient for us in any and every situation and circumstance we face within our lives. This reality and concept of pain demonstrating and proving that we are alive, demonstrating and proving that we are able to feel, as well as demonstrating and proving the grace of God is sufficient for us can be directly and intrinsically linked to the concept of this man who was previously sick with the palsy making his bed, for there was something about making the bed he had been confined to for eight years that stood and served as a wonderful and powerful testimony to those who were before and all around him. Think about what it must have been like for this man to rise from the bed he had been confined to for eight years, and how as he made that bed he knew he would never have to be confined to it again. Think about and consider the fact that as this man made the bed he had been lying in for eight years he was completely healed and had been made completely whole. Think about and consider how great and how wonderful the testimony of making the bed was for this man, for in the making of the bed he was demonstrating that he had been healed and had been made whole. Think about the testimony those whom Jesus healed of the palsy, and those lame men and women whom Jesus healed and made whole had when they not only rose from the place they had been lying, but also as they carried that mat and that bed they had been confined to for years. Think about the man whom Jesus encounters at the pool of Bethesda, and how after spending most of his life being confined to a bed waiting for the waters to be be stirred and his chance to step down into them, he was healed and made whole by Jesus the Christ. What’s more, is that this man was not only able to rise from the place he had been lying in disappointment and frustration, but was also able to carry his mat with him as a testimony and witness of the healing of Jesus the Christ.

THE TESTIMONY OF CARRIED MATS AND BEDS BEING MADE! As I sit here this morning and think about the apostle Peter and the words which he spoke to this man who was sick with the palsy, as well as to consider the words which Jesus the Christ spoke unto those who were sick with the palsy, as well as those who were lame. I can’t help but think about the awesome and incredible witness and testimony that exists—not only in the picking up and carrying of the mat, but also in the making of the bed, and how there is within these two realities a witness and testimony that is often overlooked. When I think about and consider those whom Jesus healed, made whole and restored, and how they were instructed to pick up and carry their mats, I can’t help but think about the wonderful witness and testimony of carrying their mats, and how carrying those mats demonstrated and proved the reality that they had encountered Jesus, and that they had indeed been made whole and had been restored by Jesus the Christ. Even if and even though there were times when carrying the mat offended and upset the religious community, system and establishment during the days of Jesus because He healed on the sabbath, there was still the incredible witness and testimony of the carried mat, for it demonstrated and proved the awesome and wonderful reality that Jesus had indeed and had in fact healed and made them whole. There was something about this man making his bed—a task which we deem as trivial, cumbersome, meaningless and rote—for in making his bed he was demonstrating that he had been healed, that he had been made whole, and that he had been restored in the name of Jesus the Christ, and had been completely healed and made whole. Oh, how absolutely wonderful it is to think about and consider the fact that in the making of beds we ourselves demonstrate that we are indeed alive, and demonstrate the grace and goodness of our lives. We might never be sick with the palsy, and we might never be lame in one or both of our feet, and we may never be confined to a bed, yet in making our beds each morning we have a wonderful and powerful witness and testimony of the goodness and grace of the living God, and what He has indeed done within our lives and for us. What if each morning we rose from our bed a little earlier than we normally do and made our beds, and in making our beds we thank God with an attitude and heart of gratitude and thanks fullness for what He has done within our hearts and lives? What if we rose from our beds five minutes before we normally would and as we our making our beds we silently or audibly pray before and pray unto the living God and thank Him for wholeness and thank Him for His goodness within our lives? We might never know what it is like to be confined to a bed, or to be lame, or to be sick with the palsy, and yet each time we make our beds we are demonstrating the goodness and grace of the living God within our hearts and lives, and what He has done for us. THE TESTIMONY AND JOY OF MAKING YOUR BED! THE TESTIMONY AND JOY OF RISING EARLY AND THANKING GOD THROUGH THE MAKNG OF BEDS! .

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s