THE I AM THAT I AM OF DELIVERANCE: In the Absence of Presence & In the Silence of the Voice

Today’s selected reading begins the Old Testament book of Exodus which was written and recorded by Moses the servant of the Lord. More specifically, today’s reading is found in the first four chapters of this Old Testament book. THE DEATH OF JOSEPH! THE MULTIPLICATION OF THE PEOPLE! THE ARRIVAL AND EMERGENCE OF A NEW KING! AFFLICTION BREEDS GROWTH! AFFLICTION BREEDS INCREASE! THE GREATER THE AFFLICTION, THE GREATER THE GROWTH! THE OBEDIENCE AND FEAR OF THE HEBREW MIDWIVES! THE BIRTH OF MOSES! STANDING UP BEFORE YOU’RE APPOINTED! STANDING UP BEFORE YOU’VE BEEN APPOINTED! MOSES STANDS UP TO BE JUDGE! THE FLIGHT OF MOSES! FLEEING INTO THE WILDERNESS! MOSES’ JOURNEY INTO THE WILDERNESS BEFORE ISRAEL’S JOURNEY INTO THE WILDERNESS! MOSES FLEES INTO THE WILDERNESS AND FINDS A WELL! HAGAR FEELS INTO THE WILDERNESS AND FINDS A WELL! MOSES WAS A STRANGER IN A STANGE LAND! THE PLIGHT OF THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL! THE LORD HEARS YOUR CRY! THE LORD SEES YOUR AFFLICTION! GOD HEARD, GOD REMEMBERED, GOD LOOKED UPON, GOD HAD RESPECT! GOD HEARS, GOD REMEMBERS, GOD LOOKS, GOD REGARDS! THE VISITATION AT THE MOUNTAIN OF GOD! THE FIRST MENTION OF HOLY GROUND! THE LORD KNOWS YOUR AFFLICTIONS AND SEES YOUR SORROWS! I HAVE SEEN, I HAVE HEARD! I KNOW AND I AM COME TO DOWN TO DELIVER! THE EXCHANGE BETWEEN THE LORD AND MOSES! MOSES TRIES TO CONVINCE GOD HE’S NOT THE MAN FOR THE ASSIGNMENT! When you come to this particular portion of Scripture you will come to the beginning of the generations of the children of Israel after Joseph and his brethren were all together in the land of Egypt! In fact, in the final verse of the final chapter of the book of Genesis you read how Joseph died being an hundred and ten years old, while in the opening verses of the first chapter of the book of Genesis you not only read of the death of Joseph, but also that his brethren, and that entire generation died in the land of Egypt! The book of Genesis concludes with the children of Israel still abiding within the land of Egypt—even though Joseph had died and gone the way of his fathers. The Old Testament book of Exodus begins and opens with the names of the children of Israel which came with him down into the land of Egypt—and not only the names of the children of Israel, but also how the children of Israel died in the land of Egypt, and that entire generation with them. By the time we come to the seventh verse of the first chapter—not only do we find the generation of Joseph and his brethren dying in the land of Egypt, but we also find the growth and increase of the children of Israel and the emergence and arrival of a new king! The account and narrative of the children of Israel as found within the Old Testament book of Exodus begins and opens with a new king rising to the throne within the land of Egypt—a new king which did not know Joseph. What’s actually quite interesting when you think about and consider the opening chapter of the book of Exodus is that not only was there a new king who rose up which knew not Joseph, but I would also dare say there was a people who rose up who did not know their God.

A KING WHO KNOWS NOT JOSEPH & A PEOPLE WHO KNOW NOT THEIR GOD! The more I think about and consider the account of the children of Israel within the land of Egypt the more I can’t help but come face to face with the incredible reality that with the death of Israel before Joseph, with the death of Joseph, and even with the death of that first generation which dwelt in the land of Egypt the stage was set for a people who did not know their God and a people who perhaps did not even speak concerning Him. I would dare say that when you read the beginning of the Old Testament book of Exodus and read the opening chapter of this book you will encounter and come face to face with a reality that was very similar to that which is found in the opening chapters of the Old Testament book of Judges. In the beginning and opening chapter of the book of Exodus you will find a king who did not know Joseph, but you will also find a people who did not know their God—the God of their fathers. This is perhaps why I am convinced it is so incredibly significant when you come to the third and fourth chapters of this Old Testament book that you find the Lord—not only introducing Himself as THE I AM THAT I AM, but also introducing Himself as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. I firmly believe that when we come to the third and fourth chapters of the Old Testament book of Exodus we find the Lord speaking unto Moses and first revealing Himself unto him as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob—a revelation which would be the very foundation of the deliverance of the children of Israel from their bondage and affliction within the land of Egypt! This reality of the children of Israel who knew not the God of their fathers, and who did not know the God who had first appeared unto Abraham, and then appeared unto Isaac, and also appeared unto Jacob was the living God who would look upon their affliction, would look upon their sorrows, and would look upon their struggle and conflict within the land of Egypt. Before we can even get into the account of the slavery, the bondage, the affliction and the anguish and sorrow that was found within the land of Egypt we must first recognize that the people in bondage were a people who did not know the God of their fathers—perhaps even a people who had not heard about Him and who had not heard from Him. I am wonderfully convinced that within the opening chapters of the book of Exodus—not only do we encounter a people who desperately need to be delivered out of their slavery bondage and affliction, but also a people who desperately needed to encounter and know the God of their fathers. With that being said, I am convinced that it is both necessary and imperative that we consider that which is found in the opening chapters of the Old Testament book of Judges, for it is in these chapters where we again encounter a people who did not know the Lord their God—the God who had not only delivered their ancestors and forefathers out of the land of Egypt, but also a generation who did not know how the Lord had led the children of Israel through the wilderness, and led them into the Promised Land where they would drive out and overcome their enemies. Consider if you will the words which are found in the opening chapters of the Old Testament book of Judges:

“And when Joshua had let the people go, the children of Israel went every man unto his inheritance to possess the land. And the people served the Lord all the days of Joshua, and all the days of the elders that outlived Joshua, who had seen all the great works of the Lord, that he did for Israel. And Joshua the son of Nun, the servant of the Lord, died, being an hundred and ten years old. And they buried him in the border of his inheritance in Timnath-heres, in the mount of Ephesian, on the north side of the hill Gaash. And also all that generation were gathered unto their fathers: and there arose another generation after them, which knew not the Lord, nor yet the works which he had done of Israel. And the children of Israel did evil in the sight of the Lord, and served Balaam: and they forsook the Lord God of their fathers, which brought them out of the land of Egypt, and followed other gods, of the gods of the people that were round about them, and bowed themselves unto them, and provoked the Lord to anger. And they forsook the Lord, and served Baal and Ashtaroth” (Judges 2:6-13).

For years I have studied the Scripture and have read the narrative and account of the exodus of the children of Israel from the land of Egypt, and yet in all the years I have read the words concerning their exodus and deliverance from the land of Egypt I have to admit that I have never seen or beheld this particular truth. As you read the words which are found in the opening verses of the book of Exodus you will encounter the truth that after Joseph and all his brethren and that entire generation died in the land of Egypt there arose a new king who did not know Joseph. I am convinced that while this truth is in and of itself significant, it is only part of the picture which we find within this Old Testament book. We do in fact read of a new king rising up within the land of Egypt—one who knew not Joseph, nor in fact the great significance and impact Joseph had within the lan. With that being said, however, I would dare say that there is something that is of even more importance to the narrative of the children of Israel within the land of Egypt than a king emerging into the scene who knew not Joseph. I included at the very outset of this writing a passage that was pulled directly from the second chapter of the book of Judges, and there is not a doubt in my mind that this passage helps serve as the foundation and background for what we have before us in this account of the children of Israel. As I sit here this morning and think about and consider how there arose a king who rise up who knew not Joseph, there is and there was also the tremendous truth that there also emerged within the land of Egypt—perhaps side by side with the king who knew Joseph—a generation of the children of Israel who knew not the God of their fathers. If you read the words which are found within the second chapter of the book of Genesis you will undoubtedly find and discover the tremendous reality that the children of Israel serves the Lord faithfully during the days of Joshua and during the days of the elders and leadership of that generation. Once, however. Joshua died and went the way of his fathers, and once that generation perished in the land of Canaan there would arise a generation which not only knew not the Lord, but also which knew not the wonders the Lord had done within the m Egypt, nor how the Lord had delivered them out of their slavery, bondage and oppression, nor had brought them through the Red Sea, nor had led them through the wilderness, nor even how the Lord had led them across the Jordan River and in conquest over nations and enemies within the land of Canaan which were stronger and mightier then they themselves were. The narrative of the children of Israel within the land of Canaan after Joshua and that generation died is one that is quite tragic, for while it is true that we find a nation and people that knew not the Lord, and a nation which knew not the wonders and works of the Lord, there also rose up a generation which began doing what was right in their own eyes, and winning against the Lord through their idolatry. What’s more, is that we also find and read the account of how the children of Israel failed to completely drive out the inhabitants of the land completely and permitted some of them to remain within the land.

Now you might be wondering and thinking within yourself why I would include the words and narrative of the children of Israel in the land of Canaan after Joshua had died and that entire generation had perished along with him, however, I am convinced there is a tremendous significance that is found in the words we find within this passage and how well and how closely it relates to that which is before us in the book of Exodus. There is not a doubt in my mind that what we find and what we read in the Old Testament book of Judges is a tremendous and wonderful picture of what we find within the narrative and account of the children of Israel in the land of Egypt. We know that Joseph died in the land of Egypt, we know that his brethren died, and we know that that entire generation died, and while it is true there arose a new king who knew not Joseph, I would also dare say that there also arose generations—in fact I would dare say generations—who not only perhaps did not know Joseph, but also who knew not the Lord. Pause and think about it for a minute, for not only had Israel died first in the land Egypt, but eventually his death would be followed by Joseph in the land, as well as his brethren and that entries generation. With the death of Joseph and with the death of that generation came that first generation which perhaps not only knew not Joseph and the provision and protection he provided the children of Israel in the land of Egypt, but also how through him he helped sustain the children of Israel. Eventually and ultimately there arose a generation within the land of Egypt who perhaps did not know Joseph, but more importantly than them knowing not Joseph, they also knew not the living God—the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. I believe with everything inside of me that what we find when we come to the opening and beginning chapter of the Old Testament book of Exodus is not only a picture of a king who rode up who knew not Joseph, but we also find a generation and people who rode up in the land who knew not the Lord—particularly and especially not as their fathers had known Him in the land of Canaan, and even in the land of Egypt. While it would be the emergence and arrival of a new king within the land of Egypt who knew not Joseph that would set the stage for the beginning of the slavery, the bondage and oppression of the children of Israel, I would also dare say the was mixed together with a generation and series of generations which would rise up and emerge in the land who knew not the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob. In fact, I am convinced that one of the single greatest reasons why the Lord spoke of and introduced Himself unto Moses this way was not only to remind Moses and the children of Israel concerning the covenant and promise He made unto and with their fathers in the land of Canaan, but also to bring them face to face with the incredible reality that the God who heard their cries and saw their groaning was the same God who their fathers walked with in the land of Canaan. There is not a doubt in my mind that there would arise within the land of Egypt a generation within the land of Egypt which not only perhaps knew not Joseph, but also which perhaps knew not the Lord and the living God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob.

I have to admit that in all the times I have read and studied the narrative and account of the children of Israel in the land of Egypt and their intense slavery, bondage and oppression, I have never thought about, nor even considered the fact that while the main focal point of this narrative is their deliverance out of their slavery, bondage and oppression—it is not the main, nor is it even the underlying focal point which needs to be spoken of and addressed. I sit here this morning and think about the tremendous reality of how the children of Israel did in fact need to be delivered out of and from their slavery, bondage and oppression within the land of Egypt, but even more importantly than this they needed to learn and discover who the Lord their God was. In fact, when you come to the account of Moses speaking with the Lord who appeared to him in the midst of a bush that was burning with fire yet not consumed you will find the Lord speak unto him concerning the children of Israel coming forth out of the land of Egypt, and how they would come unto the mountain of God where they would worship Him. What’s more, is that if you read the exchange which took place between the Lord and Moses you will find that when He was speaking unto him concerning that which he would speak in the company and presence of Pharaoh, He declared unto him that he would speak unto Pharaoh, saying the following words: “The Lord God of the Hebrews hath met with us: and now let us go, we beseech thee, three days’ journey into the wilderness, that we may sacrifice to the Lord our God.” Please don’t miss and please don’t lose sight of this absolutely incredible reality and truth, for within it—not only do you find an incredible reality concerning the identity of the living God, but you also find that which the Lord was concerned with when He brought the children of Israel out of the land of Egypt and into the wilderness. Within this single statement which on the surface seem simple enough you not only find the Lord referring to Himself as the God of the Hebrews—thus directly connecting Himself to the people which were enslaved within the land of Egypt—but you will also find the main and underlying reason why the Lord sought to deliver the children of Israel out of their slavery and bondage within the land of Egypt. We tend to think that the main purpose the Lord delivered the children of Israel out of the slavery, bondage and oppression within the land of Egypt was to bring them into the Promised Land, and yet if that were the case you would find Him immediately bringing them straight up into the land of Canaan. At the risk of getting ahead of myself you will find that the Lord could have in fact brought the children of Israel into the land of Canaan, and He could have brought them up through a much shorter path through the land of the Philistines, however, the Lord was concerned that if they saw war they would turn back into the land of Egypt. What’s more, is that there was something of great significance and great importance within the wilderness which was perhaps the single most important reason the living God brought the children of Israel up out of the land of their slavery, bondage and oppression—namely, to come unto the mountain of God within the wilderness.

I am sitting here this morning and I find myself being absolutely and incredibly captivated by the fact that not only did the living God reveal Himself unto Moses as THE I AM THAT I AM, and declare unto him that when the children of Israel asked what His name was, he was to reveal it as I AM, but also how the living God revealed Himself unto Moses as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. Even more than this, you will find the living God revealing Himself unto Moses as the God of the Hebrews, and how as such He desired that the children of Israel journey three days into the wilderness in order that they might sacrifice before and unto Him. It is absolutely astounding and remarkable that when the living God revealed Himself unto Moses He revealed Himself in essentially three different lights. As you read and study the words which are found within these chapters you will first find the living God revealing Himself unto Moses as THE I AM THAT I AM, as well as simply I AM. What’s more, is that if you continue reading you will find that the living God revealed Himself as “the Lord God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.” Even more, you will find the living God revealing Himself as “the God of the Hebrews.” Oh please don’t miss and please don’t lose sight of this absolutely incredible reality, for while it was in fact true there arose a king in the land of Egypt who knew not Joseph, there also arose a generation and generations within the land of Egypt who knew not the God of their fathers. It is very easy to get caught up in the narrative of the children of Israel needing to be delivered out of and from their slavery, their bondage and oppression, and to completely miss the underlying reality that there is something of even greater significance of something even greater than slavery, bondage, and oppression. We read the narrative and account of the children of Israel living as slaves within the land of Egypt and the tremendous burden, suffering, affliction, bondage and oppression they were under, and yet there was something of even greater importance and significance than simply their living as slaves within this land in which they once lived as free people. It was true that their rights and their freedoms were taken away, stripped and removed by a king who rose up and knew not Joseph, however, there arose and emerged a generation and subsequent generations who did not know the God of their fathers, and who did not know the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. We tend to get caught up in the affliction of the children of Israel within the land of Egypt, and yet we forget the undeniable reality that running side by side and parallel with their affliction and oppression was their lack of knowledge concerning the God of their fathers—the God who had appeared unto Abraham in Ur of the Chaldeans, and the God who appeared unto Abraham and Isaac in the land of the Canaan, and even unto Jacob in the land of Canaan, as well as in the land of Padan-Aran in Haran, which was found in what is modern day Syria. We see to allow ourselves to get caught up in the reality that a king rose up within the land of Egypt and began subjugating the children of Israel to harsh and cruel labor and enslaved them within the land of Egypt, however, what happens when slavery, harsh labor, bondage and affliction runs parallel and side by side with a lack of knowledge concerning the God of their fathers?

If you begin reading with and from the twenty-third verse of the second chapter you will find the children of Israel beginning to cry and groan within the land of Egypt, and yet with this reality being absolutely undeniable, I would dare say that one thing we can be absolutely certain of concerning their cries and their groans was that it was not before and unto the God of their fathers. Beginning with the twenty-third verse of the second chapter you will find the following words concerning the children of Israel—“And it came to pass in the process of time, that the king of Egypt died: and the children of Israel sighed by arson of the bondage, and they cried, and their cry came up unto God by reason of the bondage. And God heard their groaning, and God remembered His covenant with Abraham, with Isaac, and with Jacob. And God looked upon the children of Israel, and God had respect unto them.” As you read the words which are written and found within this passage of Scripture you will find that while still living in the midst of their slavery, while still living in the midst of their bondage, and while still living in the midst of their oppression, they sighed by reason of the bondage, “and they cried.” It’s worth noting the tremendous significance of these words, for when Moses wrote and spoke of their crying, I would very much suggest the tremendous reality that the children of Israel did in fact cry, however, they did not cry unto, nor did they cry before the living God. There is not a doubt in my mind that when you read the words which are found within this passage of Scripture that you do in fact find the children of Israel crying out by reason of their slavery, bondage and oppression in the land of Egypt, however, we must conclude and deduce that they did not cry out unto the living God on account of their slavery, their bondage, nor their affliction within the land of Egypt. Oh I do believe they were overwhelmed with and by the tremendous slavery, bondage and oppression within the land of Egypt, and I do believe that they were completely and totally overwhelmed as a direct result of it, however, I would also dare say that when they cried out on account of their bondage, they did not cry unto the living God. I believe they might very well have voiced their cries one to another, or perhaps even at night upon their beds and their pillows, or perhaps even within themselves during the day when they were engaged in the physical, manual and harsh labor which their taskmasters had subjected them to. What’s so absolutely wonderful and incredible about that which we find within this verse is that even though it’s possible and very likely the children of Israel cried, yet did not cry out unto the God of their fathers—that didn’t mean their cry didn’t come before and ascend unto the living God. In fact, as you read the words which are found within this section of the second chapter you will find that God heard their groaning, and God remembered His covenant with Abraham, with Isaac, and with Jacob, and how God looked upon the children of Israel, and how God had respect unto them. GOD HEARD! GOD REMEMBERED! GOD LOOKED! GOD HAD RESPECT!

The narrative of the children of Israel within the land of Egypt is one that is absolutely and incredible intriguing and astounding, for while many of us think about and consider their slavery, their bondage and their oppression within the land of Egypt as the underlying tragedy within their hearts and lives, I would dare say that this is only what we see and find on the surface. I read the words which are found within the opening chapters of the Old Testament book of Exodus and I can’t help but encounter rand come face to face with the incredible reality that the children of Israel—in addition to being subjected to slavery, bondage and oppression, also found themselves in a place where they knew not the God of their fathers. I believe there is an absolutely wonderful and incredible significance that is found within the revelation of the living God unto Moses in the midst of the bush which burned with fire, and yet was not consumed. I happen to believe with all my heart that there is a truly wonderful and remarkable significance in what we find within this passage of Scripture, for not only do we find the Lord revealing Himself unto Moses, but we find Him revealing Himself unto him using very specific language. When and as the living God appeared unto Moses at the mountain of God and revealed Himself unto him, He first revealed Himself unto him as “the God of their fathers.” This is quite significant, for with these words we find the tremendous reality that the God who was appearing unto Moses was directly linked and connected to their fathers, and to those whom the promises and covenant had been made. What’s more, is that you will find that in addition to the Lord revealing Himself as “the God of their fathers,” He would go on to reveal Himself as “the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob,” thus directly and intrinsically linking and connecting Himself to the promises, to the covenant, and to the patriarchs and fathers of the Hebrew people. As if this weren’t enough, you will also find the living God revealing Himself unto Moses as the God of the Hebrews, which is an absolutely and incredible statement concerning His identity, for His identity was not bound up in Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, but so also was His identity wrapped up and bound in the Hebrew people. Oh please don’t miss, and please don’t sight of this absolutely wonderful and incredible reality, for to do so would be to miss out on the absolutely incredible and wonderful revelation of the living God unto Moses—a revelation which would be carried from the mountain of God unto the people of God through and from the man of God who would be carrying the rod of God. THE MOUNTAIN OF GOD, THE PEOPLE OF GOD, THE MAN OF GOD, THE ROD OF GOD! When Moses returned unto the land of Egypt and unto the elders of Israel, and even unto the people of Israel themselves—not only would he bring with him the revelation of the living God as the God of their fathers, the revelation of the living God as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, but also that the living God was the God of the Hebrews, which was the God of those who were living as slaves within the land of Egypt. When Moses returned unto the land of Egypt, he returned into the land and came unto the people with a word from the God of their fathers—and not only a word from the God of their fathers, but also a declaration that they themselves were His people, and that He was indeed and was in fact their God.

I read the words which are found within this passage of Scripture—words which are found within these first four chapters of the Old Testament book of Exodus—and I can’t help but encounter and come face to face with the tremendous reality that the single greatest mission and purpose of Moses as he returned unto the children of Israel within the land of Egypt was not necessarily to speak unto them concerning their deliverance from their bondage and oppression, but also speaking unto them concerning the God of their fathers. Moses would bring unto Pharaoh a word of release and a warning of judgments, but with that word of release and warning of judgment would also come a word of revelation unto the children of Israel. When Moses returned unto the land of Egypt and returned unto his brethren who were living as slaves under the cruel and harsh rule of their Egyptian taskmasters, he did so with a wonderful and incredible revelation of the living God who was the God of their fathers. It was true that Moses returned unto the land of Egypt with the rod of God in his hand, however, with the rod of God in his hand came a revelation from God concerning His identity—a revelation that would be delivered unto a people who knew not the God of their fathers. Moses would indeed and would in fact come unto the land of Egypt, and upon returning unto the land of Egypt would come unto the children of Israel and declare unto them the words which the God of their fathers had spoke unto them. I find it absolutely amazing and fantastic how the living God revealed Himself unto Moses in the wilderness at the burning bush, and revealed Himself unto him as THE I AM THAT I AM, and then simply as I AM! We must not miss the incredible and wonderful reality surrounding the revelation of God, for it was indeed true that there arose a king in the land of Egypt who knew not Joseph, however, I would also dare say that there arose within the land of Egypt a people who knew not their God—a people who knew not the God of their fathers, and a people who had become detached from the covenant and promises which were spoken unto their fathers while they were in the land of Canaan. For years the children of Israel had been living as slaves within the land of Egypt, and in fact we learn that they were slaves within the land of Egypt for more than four-hundred years. The underlying question I can’t help but ask and wonder to and within myself is what that first generation was that did not know the God of their fathers—the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. I can’t help but wonder when that first generation rose up within the land of Egypt who not only knew not Joseph, but who also knew not the God of their fathers. We learn and discover within the Old Testament book of Judges that there arose a generation after Joshua and the elders who served along with him had perished and gone the way of their fathers which knew not the Lord, nor knew His works which He had done in the land of Egypt, the works which He had done in the wilderness, and the works which He had done within the land of Canaan. The Old Testament book of Judges brings us face to face with the reality that there rose up within the land of Canaan—there arose within the land of promise a people which knew not the Lord, nor which knew the wonderful works which the Lord had done in the land of Egypt, in the wilderness, and in the land of Canaan.

The question I can’t help but ask and wonder to myself is how does a generation rise up within the earth which knows not the living God, nor the mighty and wonderful works which He has performed within the earth on behalf of His people. How does an entire generation emerge within and upon the earth which knows not the the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, and even the wonderful and mighty works which He had performed within the earth? What does it take for an entire generation to rise up and emerge within and upon the face of the earth which knows not the living God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob? Is it simply a matter of men and women simply ceasing speaking concerning the living God, as well as speaking about His wonderful and awesome works? Is it simply a matter of being so far removed from the provision and protection of the living God and seeing any evidence and manifestation of His presence and power that simply causes men and women to cease speaking about the God of our fathers, and THE I AM THAT I AM? Oh, I would dare say when reading the words which are found within these chapters that eventually there rose up within the land of Egypt a generation which not only did not hear from the living God—the God of their fathers—but also a generation which did not see his mighty hand, nor His mighty power. I believe that it is very easy to cease speaking of and to cease believing in the God of our fathers in the silence of His voice and in the absence of His presence. IN THE SILENCE OF HIS VOICE, IN THE ABSENCE OF HIS PRESENCE! What do you do when there is no evidence, nor any manifestation of the presence, the power, and the provision of the living God within your life? How do you handle and how do you respond when you find yourself in the place where you are living in the absence of the presence of the living God, and in the place where you are living in the silence of His voice? This is a place I would dare say the children of Israel found themselves living in within the land of Egypt in the days after Joseph died, in the days after his brethren died, and in the days after that first generation died. Eventually there would rise up within the land of Egypt a generation which knew not the promises and covenant within the land of Canaan, nor even the story and account of Joseph and how Joseph had been elevated and exalted by the living God to preserve a posterity for the children of Israel within the earth in order that they might become an exceeding great people which would ultimately and eventually enter into the land which was promised unto them by the God of their fathers.

I am absolutely and completely convinced that when we read the words which are found within the opening chapters of the Old Testament book of Exodus we do in fact encounter a people who have been subjected to harsh labor, slavery, bondage and oppression within the land of Egypt, but even more important than that was a people who did not know the God of their fathers. There was within the land of Egypt a people who found themselves living in the absence of the presence of the living God, and even the silence of the voice of the living God. What makes this perhaps even more tragic is that I would even dare say they didn’t even realize they were in this state to begin with. Pause for a moment and think about and consider the tremendous reality that it is possible to find yourself living in the absence of the presence of the living God, and even living in the silence of the voice of the living God, and yet not be aware of that reality. It’s worth noting and pointing out that when the living God was speaking unto Moses and seemingly giving Him every reason and every excuse in the book as to why he should not and could not go unto pharaoh within the land of Egypt, he asked of the living God one very important question which I believe confirms this reality of the children of Israel not knowing the God of their fathers. If you begin reading with and from the thirteenth verse of the third chapter you will find Moses speaking before and speaking unto the Lord and asking Him, saying, “Behold, when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say unto them, The God of your fathers hath sent me unto you; and they shall say to me, What is his name? What shall I say unto them?” Please don’t miss the tremendous significance and importance of Moses’ question before and unto the living God, for it was both an honest and sincere question. This question which Moses seemed to ask the living God there at the mountain of God at the burning bush was a question that seemed to reveal and suggest that the people which dwelt in the land of Egypt and which lived as slaves under cruel taskmasters—not only did not know the God of their fathers, but also did not know the name of the God of their fathers. There seems to be every indication within the opening chapters of the Old Testament book of Exodus that the children of Israel who were living as slaves under the cruel oppression and affliction of their Egyptian taskmasters did not know the God of their fathers, and did not know His name, nor perhaps even who He was. While it would be very easy to get caught up in the tremendous need of deliverance for the children of Israel from their slavery, their bondage and oppression, I would dare say that there is something else which stands at the forefront and is the foundation of their slavery, bondage and oppression. In fact, I would dare say that their deliverance from and out of their slavery, bondage and oppression would flow forth and come from a place of revelation of the God of their fathers—the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.

REVELATION: THE VERY HEART AND FOUNDATION OF DELIVERANCE! If we read and study the the account of Moses at the burning bush at the mountain of God in the wilderness we encounter and come face to face with the tremendous and incredible reality that at the very heart and foundation of deliverance is the revelation of the living God unto His people. The Lord’s deliverance of the children of Israel from and out of their slavery, bondage and oppression was not only a revelation unto the children of Israel concerning the God of their fathers, but also a revelation unto Pharaoh and the people of Egypt concerning the God of the Hebrews. The revelation of the living God within the land of Egypt was not merely one-sided, for on the one hand we find a revelation unto the children of Israel as the God of their fathers, and on the other hand we find a revelation unto Pharaoh and the people of Egypt as the God of the Hebrews. Through their deliverance the Lord would not only reveal Himself unto the Hebrews as the God of their fathers, but through the plagues which were brought upon the land of Egypt we find the Lord revealing Himself unto the people of Egypt as the God of the Hebrews. Oh that we would recognize and come face to face with this reality, for only to the degree and measure that we come face to face with this reality will we indeed learn and understand that at the very heart of the deliverance of the children of Israel was the revelation of the God of their fathers—the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. We must understand and comprehend within our hearts and spirits that at the very heart and foundation of deliverance is the manifestation of revelation, and that of the revelation of the God of the Hebrews and the God of our fathers. Oh how such a manifestation would be found within this generation and within these days as the living God reveals Himself as the God of our fathers—the founding fathers of this nation, which were men of faith—as well as the revelation of the living God as the God of the Hebrews. Let us not get confused on the matter and concerning the reality that the living God is first and foremost the God of the Hebrews and the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and is after that the God of our fathers which founded this nation on Christian principles and truths fo9und and contained within the word of God. Oh that we would encounter and come face to face with the absolutely wonderful and incredible truth that while we can in fact speak of deliverance, must not forget that at the very heart and foundation of deliverance is the revelation of the Father, and the revelation of the God of the Hebrews who is the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob. The Lord sent Moses unto pharaoh and unto the people of Egypt with the revelation that He was the God of the Hebrews, but he was also sent unto the children of Israel as the God of their fathers, and as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob. Oh that we would encounter and recognize this tremendous reality, and that we would understand how the Lord would in fact deliver his people from their slavery, bondage and oppression, but through that deliverance would flow the manifestation of revelation concerning Himself, as He is indeed and is in fact the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob.

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