The Greatest Adversary to Your Faith Is…Yourself

Today’s selected reading begins the Old Testament book of First Chronicles, which is a secondary narrative of the life of David the son of Jesse who would rule and govern the nation of Israel as king from the city of Jerusalem. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the opening two chapters of this Old Testament book. THE PATH FROM SONS TO KINGS! THE PATH FROM SONS TO FATHERS! A NARRATIVE OF GENERATIONS! A NARRATIVE OF SONS AND FATHERS! When you come to this particular portion of Scripture you will find that it begins much like the fifth chapter of the book of Genesis, as well as the opening chapters of both the New Testament gospels of Matthew and Luke. It is actually quite remarkable and astounding to think about and consider just how important genealogies were in Scripture, for even in the Old Testament book of Leviticus we find a genealogy as well. Moreover, there is even genealogy found in the Old Testament book of Numbers when the LORD instructed Moses to take a census of the men of Israel which had emerged from the land of Egypt which were twenty years of age and up. One cannot read the entire narrative of Scripture and not be confronted with genealogies, for even when you come to the other side of the flood during the days of Noah and his three sons you will find an additional mention and reference of genealogies. At the risk of boring you with a list of genealogies I am going to bring you face to face with the different genealogies that are found within the narrative of Scripture, for there is a tremendous amount of truth that is found and contained therein. We dare not, we cannot and must not miss and lose sight of the absolutely remarkable reality of genealogies and the tremendous part they play in telling the story of God’s activity within the earth. I fully realize and recognize that there are many who would read the narrative surrounding genealogies in Scripture, and who would find themselves growing bored as they read name after name, and as they read “begat” after “begat,” and yet the truth of the matter is that there is something powerful that is contained within genealogies, for in all reality, I would dare say that while there is indeed a lineage of physical genealogies which are found within much of Scripture, there is a different genealogy that is found in the eleventh chapter of the Old Testament book of Hebrews. In fact, I would dare say that the genealogies which are written and recorded within Scripture point directly to the lineage and spiritual line of faith that is written and found within the eleventh chapter of the book of Hebrews, for it is upon that foundation of faith and in that context that we come face to face with the context of our own faith and our own walk with the living and eternal God. Before we can get into the genealogy of faith as it is written and recorded in the New Testament epistle which was written unto the Hebrews it is absolutely essential that we consider the various genealogies that are found within Scripture. Consider if you will the different genealogies contained within Scripture beginning in the Old Testament book of Genesis and the fifth chapter:

“This is the book of the generations of Adam. In the day that God created man, in the likeness of God made He him; male and female created he them; and blessed them, and called their name Adam, in the day when they were created. And Adam lived an hundred and thirty years, and begat a son in his own likeness, after his image; and called his name Seth: and the days of Adam after he had begotten Seth were eight hundred years: and he begat sons and daughters; and all the days that Adam lived were nine hundred and thirty years: and he died. And Seth lived an hundred and five years, and begat Eno’s: and Seth lived after he begat Eno’s eight hundred and seven years, and begat sons and daughters: and all the days of Seth were nine hundred and twelve years: and he died. And Eno’s lived ninety years, and begat Cainan: and Eno’s lived after he begat Cainan eight hundred and fifteen years, and begat sons and daughters: and all the days of Eno’s were nine hundred and five years: and he died. And Cainan lived seventy years, and begat Mahalaleel: and and Cainan lived after he begat Mahalaleel eight hundred and forrt years, and begat sons and daughters: and all the days of Cainan were nine hundred and ten years: and he died. And Mahalaleel lived sixty and five years, and begat Jared: and Mahalaleel lived after he begat Jared eight hundred and thirty years, and begat sons and daughters: and all the days of Mahalaleel were eight hundred ninety and five years: and he died. And Jared lived an hundred sixty and two years, and he begat Enoch: and Jared lived after he begat Enoch eight hundred years, and begat sons and Daugherty: and all the days of Jared were nine hundred sixty and two years: and he died. And Enoch lived sixty and five years, and begat Methuselah: and Enoch walked with God after he begat Methuselah three hundred years, and begat sons and daughters: and all the days of Enoch were three hundred sixty and five years: and Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him. And Methuselah lived after he begat Lamech seven hundred eighty and two years, and begat sons and daughters: and all the days of Methuselah were nine hundred sixty and nine years: and he died. And Lamech lived an hundred eighty and two years, and begat a son: and he called his name Noah, saying, This same shall comfort us concerning our work and toil of our hands, because of the ground which the LORD hath cursed. And Lamech lived after he begat Noah five hundred ninety and five years, and begat sons and daughters: and all the days of Lamech were seven hundred seventy and seven years: and he died. And Noah was five hundred years old: and Noah begat Shem, Ham and Japheth” (Genesis 5:1-32).

“Now these are the generations of the song o Noah, Shem, Ham and Japheth: and unto them were sons born after the flood. The sons of Japheth; Gomer, and Magog, and Masai, and Javan, and Tubal, and Meshech, and Tiras. And the sons of Gomer; Ashkenaz, and Riphath, and Togarmah. And the sons of Javan, Elisha, and Tarshish, Kittim, and Dodanim. By these were the isles of the Gentiles divided in their lands; every one after his tongue, after their families, in their nations. And the sons of Ham; Cush, and Mzraim, and Phut, and Canaan. And the sons of Cush; Sheba, and Havilah, and Sabtah, and Ramah, and Sabtecha: and the sons of Ramah; Sheba, and Dedan. And Cush begat Nimrod: he began to be a mighty one in the earth. He was a mighty hunter before the LORD: wherefore it is said, Even as Nimrod the mighty hunter before the LORD. And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar. Out of that land went forth Asshur, and builded Nineveh, and the city Rehoboam, and Calah. And Resen between Nineveh and Calah: the same is a great city. And Mizoram begat Luddism, and Anamim, and LEhabim, and Naphtuhim, and Pthrusim, and Casluhim, (Out of whom came Philistim,) and Caphtorim. And Canaan began Sidon his firstborn, and Heth, and the Jebusite, and the Amorite, and the Girgasite, and the Hittite, and the Arkite, and the Sinite, and the Arvadite, and the Zemarite, and the Hamathite: and afterward were the families of the Canaanites spread abroad. And the border of the Canaanites was from Sidon, as thou comest to Gerar, unto Gaza; as thou goest, unto Sodom, and Gomorrah, and Admah, and Zeboiim, even unto Lasha. These are the sons of Ham, after their families, after their tongues, in their countries, and in their nations. Unto Shem also, the father of all the children of Eber, the brother of Japheth the elder, even to him were children born. The children of Shem; Elam, and Asshur, and Arphaxad, and Lud, and Aram. And the children of Abram; Uz, and Hul, and Gether, and Mash. And Arphaxad begat Selah; and Selah begat Eber. And unto Eber were born two sons: the name of one was Pellegrino; for in his days was the earth divided; and his brothers’ name was Joktan. And Jonathan began Almohad and Sheleph, and Hazarmaveth, and Jeral, and Hadoram, and Uzal, and Diklah, and Obal, and Abimelech, and Sheba, and Ophir, and Havilah, and Joab: all these were the sons of Joktan. And their dwelling was from Mesha, as thou goest unto Sephar a mount of the east. These are the sons of Shem, after their families, after their tongues, in their lands, after their nations. These are the families of the son of Noah, after their generations, in their nations: and by these were the nations divided in the earth after the flood” (Genesis 10:1-32).

As you consider these first two genealogies you will notice that the first one was not only directly linked to Adam who was created in the likeness of God, but also how when God created man, He blessed them, and called their name Adam. What’s more, is that this first genealogical record is also direct linked and directly connected to the days of Seth—days when men would begin to call upon the name of the LORD. In fact, if you read the final two verses of the fourth chapter you will find the following words which were written concerning the birth of Seth, and those days when men began to call upon the name of the LORD: “And Adam knew his wife again; and she bare a son, and called his name Seth: For God, said he, hath appointed me another seed instead of Abel, whom Cain slew. And to Seth, to him also there was born a son; and he called his name Enos: then began men to call upon the name of the LORD” (Genesis 4:25-26). When and as we consider the narrative of genealogies that are written and contained within Scripture, the single most important reality we can and must understand is the purpose for which man was created upon the earth—namely, to call upon the LORD. More aptly and more succinctly put men and women were created upon the earth—not simply to call upon the name of the LORD, but to enjoy and experience fellowship with the living God. There is not a doubt in my mind that what the LORD did and would do through the lineage and life of Seth He desired to do through Abel before he was brutally murdered by his brother Cain. How absolutely remarkable it is to think about and consider the fact that even though Abel would be murdered by his brother, and even though his blood would be the first of much blood that would be shed throughout the centuries and generations—the blood of the faithful, the blood of the righteous, the blood of those who walked with and pleased God—the LORD would raise up another seed in the earth whereby He might fulfill and accomplish His plan and His purpose. While on the surface it might not look like genealogy has much significance, it is imperative that we recognize and understand the absolutely astounding reality that the living and eternal God would raise up for Himself a seed whereby He might fulfill and accomplish His purposes. Despite Cain murdering Abel—perhaps even the enemy and adversary’s attempt to murder the plan of the living God—the LORD would indeed and would in act raise up a new seed in the midst of the earth. It’s worth noting that in the final verses of the fourth chapter we find Moses writing how Adam declared of Seth how the LORD appointed unto him another seed instead of and in the place of Abel. It is absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand this, for not only would the living God raise up another seed in the midst of the earth, but it would be through that seed men would begin to call upon the name of the LORD.

I sit here considering the first two genealogies which are written and recorded in the Old Testament book of Genesis, and I am confronted with the fact that this first genealogical record was directly linked and connected to the LORD raising up a new seed in the midst of the earth whereby He might fulfill and accomplish His plan and purposes, while also raising up a generation whereby men and women would call upon the name of the LORD. What’s more, is that in the final two verses of the fourth chapter we find it written how during the days of Seth and his son Enos men began to call upon the name of the LORD, while generations down the line we find how Enoch walked with God and was not for the LORD took him. What’s more, is that direct linked and connected this genealogy is not only the declaration that during the days of Seth and his son men began to call upon the name of the LORD, but we also find a man by the name of Enoch who walked with God. If you turn and direct your attention down even further you will find concerning Noah that he was named as such because his father Lamech believed that through. Noah those generations would be comforted us concerning the work and toil of their hands because of the ground which the LORD had cursed. Thus, within the genealogy which we find written and recorded within the fifth chapter we find a direct link to man being created in the image and likeness of God, we find a direct connection to man calling upon the name of the LORD in the third generation, and we also find man walking with God. What’s more, is that during the days of Noah man would look for comfort concerning the work and toil of their hands because of the curse which the LORD put upon the ground. Within the first genealogical record we encounter and come face to face with the tremendous reality that not only would the living God continue with His plan in the earth through the seed of Seth. It would be through seed of Seth that men would begin to call upon the name of the LORD, that man would begin to walk with God, and that the LORD would begin to come alongside man in the midst of the curse. It was indeed true that the LORD would curse the ground as a result of the sin and transgression of Adam and Eve, however, it must also be noted that even though the LORD had cursed the ground as a direct of their sin, He would also begin the process of passing a seed along through the generations which would eventually produce and bring forth that which would reverse the curse. We dare not, we cannot and must not miss and lose sight of this particular reality, for despite the fact that the living God would curse the ground as a direct result of the sin of Adam and Eve in the garden, He would also begin the process whereby that curse would be reversed.

When and as we consider the genealogical record that is found within the fifth chapter of the Old Testament book of Genesis it is necessary that we come face to face with the strong reality that the living God would indeed curse the very thing that man himself was made from. If you read the second chapter of the book of Genesis you will find and discover that man would be formed and fashioned from the dust of the ground, and would receive the breath of God which would make him a living soul. After man would sin and transgress against the command of the LORD, the living God would curse the ground—the very thing he had formed man from. It’s necessary that we recognize and understand this, for not only would man from that day forward have to contend with that which he was created and formed from, but there would also be a curse upon that which he would contend. Pause for a moment and think about the tremendous reality of man having to contend with the very substance he was made of, and how that substance had been cursed by the LORD. It would be through much sweat, labor and toil that man would be able to provide for himself in the days after the fall, and it is this reality which is what makes Noah so absolutely significant, for when Noah was conceived and brought into the earth his father was looking for comfort concerning the work and toil of their hands, because of the ground which the LORD had cursed. It is necessary and imperative that we recognize this, for after the fall man would essentially be forced to contend with the very substance he was made from—a powerful prophetic picture that man would have to contend with his very nature from that day on. As I sit here this morning I can’t help but think about and consider the fact that more often than not our greatest enemy and adversary is not even the devil, but rather it is ourselves. We must recognize and remember that the devil has already been defeated and it was for this reason the Son of God was manifested in the earth—namely, that He might destroy the works of the devil. At the cross of Calvary two thousand years ago the ancient serpent who is the Devil and Satan was defeated, which means that since that time he has been defeated. Would it shock and surprise you to think about and consider that for two thousand years ago we have been engaged in a conflict with an ancient foe and enemy which is and has already been defeated by and through the blood of Jesus Christ? What if I told you that there has been an ongoing struggle with an enemy and adversary that was defeated at and has been defeated since the cross of Calvary—together with every principality, every spiritual wickedness in high places, and ever power of darkness? The dragon and his angels have no place against Michael and his angels, and Scripture reveals how the dragon and all those angels with him were cast down to the earth, and will later be cast into the bottomless pit, and would finally be cast into the lake of fire where the beast and false prophet are.

With all of that being said, it is absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand that more often than not are single greatest enemy and adversary might not be the ancient serpent who is the Devil and Satan. Our greatest enemy and adversary most likely isn’t the enemy and adversary, and yes I am fully aware that the apostle Peter instructs to be sober and vigilant because we have an adversary who prowls around like a raging lion who seeks to devour us. What we must also remember and recall is that same enemy and adversary was mentioned and spoken about by James the brother of Jesus, and directly linked and connected to that is the command and instruction to resist the devil and he will flee from us. Not only will the devil flee from us as we humble ourselves and submit to the living God, but the devil must flee from us because he has already been defeated. Despite the fact that we wrestle not against flesh and blood, and despite the fact that the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but are mighty through God to the pulling down of strongholds and the casting down of imaginations, I am convinced that perhaps our single greatest enemy and adversary is ourselves. After the fall the LORD God cursed the ground, and declared that man himself would have to contend with, labor with, and toil with the ground all the days of his life. I am convinced that this does in fact speak in the natural realm of the physical ground from which man would labor and toil, but I would also declare that man would have to labor, would have to toil, and would have to contend with that which the LORD cursed—that which he himself was taken and formed from. Thus, all the days of man’s life he would labor, he would toil, and he would contend with this nature that was inside him. It is for this reason I am absolutely and completely convinced that the single greatest struggle that we have is not necessarily with the ancient serpent, but more often than not the greatest struggle we face is within our own hearts and within our own lives. More often than not the greatest struggle we have is with our own carnal and sinful nature, and it is this reality the apostle Paul wrote and spoke of so heavily in the New Testament epistle written unto the saints which were at Rome. When Noah was conceived and brought forth into the earth his father was looking for comfort from the work and toil of their hands, for they would spend their days contending with that which the LORD had cursed. We must recognize and understand that the living and eternal God has indeed and has in fact cursed our sin nature, and has indeed and has in fact cursed our flesh, and there is a great and powerful need within ourselves to overcome that which we are and that which we have been forced to contend with all our lives. What’s more, is that this struggle will be one that we will face all the days of our lives until the day we die—a reality which the apostle Paul would make mention of in the sixth and seventh chapters of the New Testament epistle which was written unto the saints which were at Rome. Consider if you will the following words which were written by the apostle Paul beginning to read with and from the third verse of the sixth chapter:

“Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection: knowing this, that our world man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. For he that is dead is freed from sin. Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him: knowing that Christ being raised from the dead dieth no more; death hath no more dominion over him. For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God. Likewise reckon ye yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord. Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey it in the lusts thereof. Neither yield ye your members as instruments of unrighteousness unto sin: but yield yourselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and your members as instruments of righteousness unto God. For sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace” (Romans 6:3-14).

“What then? Shall we sin, because we are not under the law, but under grace? God forbid. Know ye not, that to whom ye yield yourselves servants to obey, his servants ye are to whom ye obey; whether or sin unto death, or of obedience unto it righteousness? But God be thanked, that ye were the servants of sin, but ye have obeyed from the heart that form of doctrine which was delivered you. Being then made free from sin, ye became the servants of righteousness. I speak after the manner of men because of the infirmity of your flesh: for as ye have yielded your members servants to uncleanness to iniquity unto iniquity; even so now yield your members servants to righteousness unto holiness. For when ye were the servants of sin, ye were free from righteousness. What fruit had ye then in those things whereof ye are now ashamed? For the end of those things is death. But now being made free from sin, and become servants to God, ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life. For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 6:15-23).

“Know ye not, brethren, (for I speak to them that know the law,) how that the law hath dominion over a man as long as he liveth? For the woman which hath an husband is bound by the law to her husband so long as he liveth; but if the husband be dead, she is loosed from the law of her husband. So then if, while her husband liveth, she be married to another man, she shall be called and adulteress: but if her husband be dead, she is free from that law; so that she is no adulteress, though she be married to another man. Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit unto God. For when we were in the flesh, the motions of sins, which were by the law, did work in our members to bring forth fruit unto death. But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we were held; that we should serve in newness of spirit, and not in the old ness of the letter” (Romans 7:1-6).

“What shall we say then? Is the law sin? God forbid. Nay, I had not known sin, but by the law: for I had not known lust, except the law had said, Thou shalt not covet. But sin, taking occasion by the commandment, wrought in me all manner of concupiscence. For without the law sin was dead. For I was alive without the law once: but when the commandment came, sin revived, and I died. And the commandment, which was ordained to life, I found to be unto death. For sin, taking occasion by the commandment, deceived me, and by it slew me. Wherefore the law is holy, and the commandment holy, and just, and good. Was then that which is good made death unto me? God forbid. But sin, that it might appear sin, working death in me by that which is good; that sin by the commandment might become exceeding sinful. For we know that the law is spiritual: but I am carnal, sold under sin. For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I. If then I do that which I would not, I consent unto the law that it is good. Now then it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me. For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh,) dwelleth no good thing; for to will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not. For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do. Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me. I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me. For I delight in the law of God after the inward man: but I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members. O wretched man that I am! Who shall deliver me from the body of this death? I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord. So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin” (Romans 7:7-25).

Perhaps one of the greatest truths we can learn and discover from what is written and found within Scripture is that the ancient serpent the devil was in fact defeated on, by and through the cross at Calvary, however, there is something that was not defeated—namely, the flesh and our sinful nature. Would it shock you to think about and consider the fact that even though Christ died to deliver us from the curse and bondage of sin, He did not conquer our sinful nature, and He did not conquer our flesh? When Jesus died on the cross for your sins and for mine He didn’t conquer that sinful nature and that carnal self that was found to be within us. Without a doubt He did in fact die for our sins, and He did die to deliver us from the curse and bondage of sin, however, there would continue to be this constant labor, this constant striving, this constant toil and tension between ourselves and this flesh. The apostle Paul emphatically declared and spoke of this struggle in the eighth chapter of the this same New Testament epistle when he spoke of this tension, this strife, this war that exists between the flesh and the spirit. What’s more, is that so long as we dwell in this physical tent, and so long as we dwell in a physical body made of flesh and blood, we can and will continue to struggle with this tension between the flesh and the Spirit. It is for this reason that I fell compelled to declare to you that more often than not the greatest conflict, the greatest struggle and the greatest battle we face is not with an enemy and adversary that was defeated at the cross of Calvary two thousand years ago, but an unseen enemy within ourselves. More often than not the single greatest enemy that we face within our lives is the unseen enemy that exists beneath the surface of this exterior—regardless of how tough this exterior might be. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand this, for it can and will help us to understand what is so desperately needed on a daily and consistent basis. I invite you to walk with me through the words of the apostle Paul which are found in the eighth chapter of this epistle written unto the Roman saints, beginning to read with the first and opening verse:

“There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death. For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh: that the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit. For to be carnally minded is death; but to be spiritually minded is life and peace. Because the carnal mind is enmity against God: for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be. So then they that are in the flesh cannot please God. But ye are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of his. And if Christ be in you, the body is dead because of sin; but the Spirit is life because of righteousness. But if the Spirit of Him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit that dwelleth in you” (Romans 8:1-11).

“Therefore, brethren, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. For if we live after the flesh, ye shall die: but if ye through the Spirit do mortify the deeds of the body, ye shall live. For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, they are the sons of God. For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, ABBA, father. The Spirit itself heareth witness within our spirit, that we are the children of God: and if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with him, that we may be also glorified together. For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us. For the earnest expectation of the creature waiteth for the manifestation of the sons of God. For the creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but by reason of him who hath subjected the same in hope, because the creature itself also shall be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now. And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body. For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, then do we with patience wait for it. Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know now what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings that cannot be uttered. And he that searcheth the hearts knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit, because he maketh intercession for the saints according to the will of God” (Romans 8:12-27).

The genealogies which are presented to us in Scripture bring us face to face with the reality that we are all descendants of Adam, and that we all do in fact struggle and wrestle with a sinful and carnal nature within ourselves. We dare not miss and dare not lose sight of this absolutely tremendous and incredible reality, for to do so would be to miss out on that which is so deeply embedded in the record of the genealogies. Within the record of genealogies is not only this continual struggle with the sin and carnal nature that is present within ourselves, but also that through the seed that would be passed on in the lives of those mentioned in the genealogies there would be one who would emerge in the earth who would reverse and destroy the curse of sin. Even during the days of Noah they were looking for comfort from the labor, the toil and the struggle because the LORD God had cursed the ground, and it would be during those days when the LORD would do something He hadn’t done before—namely, cause it to rain upon the earth. What’s more, is that not only would the LORD send rain upon the earth, but the LORD would cause a great flood and deluge to take place within and upon the earth in order that all flesh might be destroyed and wiped off the face of the earth. The LORD would indeed bring judgment upon the earth during those days, and the LORD would destroy all but the eight souls which were in the ark. In fact, the genealogical record that surrounds Noah and his three sons not only suggests that the living God spared Noah, his wife, their three sons and their wives, but through them the nations of the earth would once more be blessed, would be fruitful and would multiply. The genealogical record that surrounds Noah’s three sons would reveal that despite the judgment of the LORD upon the earth, He would continue to fulfill His plan and promise in the earth. There would be a seed that would be aboard the ark that would continue to be passed on through the generations, and would ultimately not only bring forth the Jewish people, but would also bring forth the Messiah and Savior who would destroy the curse of sin and death. It is absolutely astonishing to read the genealogical record that is found in the eleventh chapter of the book of Genesis, for it is within that chapter that we encounter and come face to face with the astonishing reality that even in the midst of judgment the LORD would still faithfully preserve His plan, His purpose, and that which He had promised and declared He would do. Through Noah’s three sons the nations of the earth would once more be filled, and it would be through his three sons that we would discover the nations that would be within and upon the earth—not only during those days, but in the generations, the centuries, and millennia since then. The genealogical record of Noah’s three sons would reveal that the LORD would continue to enter into covenant with man, and would walk in relationship with those who walked with Him, obeyed His voice and commands, and would enjoy communion and fellowship with Him.

With all of this being said concerning the genealogical records which are found within the Old Testament book of Genesis, it is necessary and imperative that you turn and direct your attention to the two genealogical records which are found within the New Testament gospel narratives written by the apostle Matthew and the beloved physician Luke. It is within these genealogical records that we encounter and come face to face with a lineage that could be traced back to Abraham, as well as David the king of Israel. What’s more, is that while the genealogical record which the apostle Matthew presented unto us brings us face to face with the lineage that would and could be traced back to Abraham, the genealogical narrative and record found in the New Testament gospel of Luke would bring us face with a narrative that would extend as far back as Adam who was not only the first man, but was also the son of God who was taken and formed from the dust of the ground and who became a living soul after the LORD breathed the breath of life into him. Consider if you will these two genealogical records which not only show a seed being passed down from Abraham to the time of Jesus the Christ, but also a seed that began to be passed down through the generations beginning with Adam. Follow with me if you will the tremendous language that is found and contained within each of these records, and as you do—I invite you to allow faith, trust and confidence fill and consume your heart and spirit:

“The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham begat Isaac; and Isaac begat Jacob; and Jacob begat Judas and his brethren; and Judas begat Phares and Zara of Thamar; and Phares begat Esrom; and Esrom began Aram; and Aram began Aminadab; and Aminadab begat Naasson; and Naasson begat Salmon; and Salmon begat Booz of Rachab; and Booz begat Obed of Ruth; and Obed begat Jess; and Jesse begat David the king; and David the king begat Solomon of her that had been the wife of Urias; and Solomon began Roboam; and Roboam begat Abia; and Abia begat Asa; and Asa begat Josaphat; and Josaphat begat Joram; and Joram begat Ozias; and Ozias begat Jotham; and Jotham begat Achaz; and Achaz begat Ezekias; and Ezekias begat Manasses; and Manasses began Amon; and Amon begat Josias; and Josias begat Jechonias and his brethren, about the time they were carried away to Babylon: and after they were brought to Babylon, Jechonias begat Salathiel; and Salathiel begat Zorobbabel; and Zorobobel begat Abiud; and Abiud begat Eliakim; and Eliakim begat Azor; and Azoar begat Sacco; and Sacco begat Achan; and Achan begat Eliud; and Eliud begat Eleazar; and Eleazar begat Matthau; and Matthau begat Jacob; and Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ. So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; and from David until the carrying away into Babylon are fourteen generations; and from the carrying away into Babylon unto Christ are fourteen generations” (Matthew 1:1-17).

“And Jesus Himself began to be about thirty years of age, being (as was supposed) the son of Joseph, which was the son of Heli, which was the son of Matthat, which was the son fo Levi, which was the son of Melchi, which was the song of Janna, which was the son of Joseph, which was the son of Mattathias, which was the son of Amos, which was the son of Naum, which was the son of Eli, which was the son of Nagge, which was the son of Maath, which was the son of Mattathias, which was the son fo Semei, which was the son of Joseph, which was the son of Juda, which was the son of Joanna, which was the son of Rhesa, which was the son of Zorobabel, which was the son of Salathiel, which was the son of Neri, which was the son of Melchi, which was the son of Addi, which was the son of Cosam, which was the son of Elmodam, which was the son of Er, which was the son of Jose, which was the son of Eliezer, which was the son of JOrim, which was the son of Matthat, which was the son of Levi, which was the son of Simeon, which was the son of Juda, which was the son of Joseph, which was the son of Jonan, which was the son of Eliakim, which was the son of Melea, which was the son of Nathan, which was the son of David, which was the son of Jesse, which was the son of Obed, which was the son of Booz, which was the son of Salmon, which was the son of Naasson, which was the son of Esrom, which was the son of Phares, which was the son of Juda, which was the son of Jacob, which was the son of Isaac, which was the son of Abraham, which was the son of Thara, which was the son of Nachor, which was the the son of Saruch, which was the son of Ragau, which was the son of Phalec, which was the son of Hebrews, which was the son of Salma, which was the son of Cainan, which was the son of Arphaxad, which was the son of Sem, which was the son of Noe, which was the son of Lamech, which was the son of Jared, which was the son of Maleleel, which was the son of Cainan, which was the son of Eno’s, which was the son of Seth, which was the son of Adam, which was the son of God” (Luke 3:23-38).

What is so absolutely astonishing about the genealogical records that are found within the New Testament gospel narratives written by Matthew and Luke is that not only do they directly link and connect Jesus to both Abraham and David, but Luke actually takes it a step further and traces this eternal Son of God with Adam who was the son of God formed from the dust of the ground and who became a living soul after the LORD breathed the breath of life into him. What’s more, is that when you read the words which are written and found within these passages you will find and encounter that the seed which was spoken of in the garden before and unto Adam and Eve would be preserved through the great flood and deluge that would come upon the face of the whole earth during the days of Noah, it would be preserved through the four-hundred and thirty years of slavery in the land of Egypt, it would be preserved during the forty years of wandering in the wilderness, it would be preserved during the days of the judges who ruled and governed the land of Israel, it would be preserved through the days of the kings of Judah, and would even be passed down through the kings of Judah, and it would survive during the seventy years of captivity in Babylon. Moreover, the seed that was spoken of in the garden would be preserved and protected during the four-hundred silent years when there was no prophetic voice, nor any prophetic revelation that would be spoken in the midst of the earth. How absolutely astonishing and remarkable it is to think about and consider the reality that when you read the genealogical records that are found concerning Jesus the Christ, you will find that this seed would be preserved through judgment, through slavery, through captivity and through silence. What’s more, is that neither judgment, nor slavery and bondage, nor captivity, nor silence could thwart, nor could it stop and prevent the plans and purposes of God from being fulfilled and accomplished in the earth. When we come to the first two chapters of the Old Testament book of First Chronicles—while it might seem insignificant that there are a bunch of names that are found therein, we must understand that the stage is being set, and the scenes are being made for David the son of Jesse who would be directly linked and connected to Jesus the Christ. It is absolutely phenomenal when you think about and consider the genealogical records that are directly linked and connected to Jesus the Christ, for when the apostle Matthew and the physician Luke were looking to describe this Jesus, they sought to trace His lineage all the way back to Abraham. What’s more, is that Luke would take this a step further and would trace it all the way back to Adam who was the son of God created from the dust of the earth. How incredibly interesting is it to consider the fact that within the third chapter of the gospel narrative written by Luke we have both the eternal Son of God who was begotten of the Father, and we have the physical and natural son of God who was formed from the dust of the ground. When discussing the lineage of Jesus the Christ it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we understand the direct link between the eternal Son of God who was begotten of the Father, as well as the physical son(s) of God who were formed from the dust of the earth. Consider if you will the words which are written and recorded within the first chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative which was written by the apostle John:

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. IN him was life; and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not. There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through Him might believe. He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light. That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made by him, and the world knew him not. He came unto his own, and his own received him not. But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name: which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. John bare witness of him, and cried, saying, This was he of whom I spake, He that cometh after me is preferred before me: for he was before me. And of his fullness have all we received, and grace for grace. For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, He hath declared him” (John 1:1-18).

If there is one thing I absolutely love about this particular passage in the first chapter of the New Testament gospel of John it’s that we not only see a powerful picture of the eternal begotten Son of the Father, but we also see those sons which were created and have the same makeup and nature of Adam, yet were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. IT is absolutely remarkable and astounding to think about and consider the fact that within the narrative of Luke’s gospel account of Jesus—not only do we encounter and come face to face with Jesus being direct linked to the royal line of Judah, and not only do we see Jesus being directly linked to the Hebraic line of Abraham and the patriarchs, but we also see Jesus as being directly linked throughout history and all the way back to Adam who was the son of God formed from and born of the dust of the ground. It is absolutely amazing to think about and consider that the lineage of Jesus the Christ not only runs through years of silence, not only runs through years of captivity, and not only runs through years of slavery, but it also runs directly through the lineage of kings. The royal seed that would present itself in the lineage of Jesus the Christ would be the foundation for Jesus the Christ to sit upon the throne of David and to one day rule and reign as King of kings and Lord of lords from and upon that throne. This is truly astonishing when you think about it, for when we look at the genealogical records we see how the living God worked throughout history to preserve, protect and bring about the seed that would eventually crush the serpent’s head. Not only that, but it’s absolutely astonishing to think about the fact that this seed would incorporate various different kings who would sit upon the throne of David in order that the throne of David might be preserved and established in the earth. If there is one thing we must recognize and learn concerning the house and throne which the living God established for David, it’s that the throne in which He would establish for him would ultimately lead to the one who would rule and reign from and upon that throne in the city of Jerusalem for a one thousand year period of time known as the Millennial Reign of Christ. When we think about and discuss genealogies it is absolutely imperative that we recognize and understand that genealogies not only point to the humanity of Jesus the Christ, but they also point to the government that would be upon His shoulders, and how He would rule and reign from the throne of David. The genealogical record of the LORD Jesus the Christ would indeed bring us face to face with His humanity, which is what is evidenced in the gospel narrative the apostle Matthew. It is through the gospel narrative we find written by the beloved physician Luke that we see both the humanity and divinity of Jesus the Christ, for Luke traces the genealogy all the way back to Adam and describes Adam as the son of God which was formed from the dust of the ground and became a living soul after the breath of God was breathed into him.

As we prepare to bring this writing to a close it is absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand that while the genealogies which are found and recorded in both the Old Testament of Scripture point to a Hebraic and Jewish lineage—one that begins with Adam and continues throughout the generations, as well as one that begins with Abraham, continues through David, and ultimately finds its place in Jesus Christ—there is another genealogy that is found within Scripture which is not partial to the tribe of Levi, nor the tribe of Judah, nor any other specific tribe of Israel. There is another genealogy that is found in the Scripture that is one—not of physical national or origin, but rather is one of faith, one of trust, and one of confidence in the living God. This genealogy is found in the eleventh chapter of the Old Testament book of Hebrews and is one that draws and calls our attention to these men and women of faith who form a spiritual lineage—a spiritual genealogy if you will—which we are all apart of. It is in the eleventh chapter where we encounter a great cloud of witnesses—those who are mentioned by name, and those who aren’t mentioned, but who are implied through the words which the author writes, and it is these names which draw and call our attention to our own place and our own part in the lineage and genealogy of faith. With this writing drawing to a close I leave you with the words which are written and recorded within the eleventh chapter of the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews, and spills over and continues into the twelfth chapter. Consider if you will the words which the author of the epistle of the Hebrews beginning to read with and from the eleventh chapter of the book:

“Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. For by it the elders obtained a good report. Through faith we understand that the world were framed by the word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear. By faith Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain, by which he obtained witness that he was righteous, God testifying of his gifts: and by it he being dead yet speaketh. By faith Enoch was translated that he should not see death; and was not found, because God had translated him: for before his translation he had this testimony, that he pleased God. But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarded of them that diligently seek him. By faith Noah, being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear, prepared an ark to the saving of his house; by the which he condemned the world, became heir of the righteousness which is by faith. By faith Abraham, when he was called to go out into a place which he should after receive for an inheritance, obeyed; and he went out, not knowing whither he went. By faith he sojourned in the land of promise, as in a strange country, dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob, the heirs with him of the same promise: for he looked for a city which hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God. Through faith also Sara herself received strength to conceive seed, and was delivered of a child when she was past age, because she judged him faithful who had promised. Therefore sprang there even of one, and him as good as dead, so many as the stars of the sky in multitude, and as the sand which is by the sea shore innumerable. These all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen them afar off, and were persuaded of them, and embraced them, and confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on the earth. For they that say such things declare plainly that they seek a country. And truly, if they had been mindful of that country from whence they came out, they might have had opportunity to have returned. But now they desire a better country, that is, an heavenly: wherefore God is not shamed to be called their God: for he hath prepared for them a city. By faith Abraham, when he was tried, offered up Isaac: and he that had received the promises offered up his only begotten son, of whom it was said, That in Isaac shall thy seed be called: accounting that God was able to raise him up, even from the dead; from whence also he received him in a figure. By faith Isaac blessed Jacob and Esau concerning things to come. By faith Jacob, when he was a dying, blessed both the sons of Joseph; and worshipped, leaning upon the top of his staff. By faith, Joseph, when he died, made mention of the departing of the children of Israel; and gave commandment concerning his bones. By faith Moses, when he was born, was hid three months of his parents, because they saw he was a proper child; and they were not afraid of the king’s commandment. By faith Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter; choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures in Egypt: for he had respect unto the recompense of the reward. By faith he forsook Egypt, not fearing the wrath of the king: for he endured, as seeing him who is invisible. Through faith he kept the Passover, and the sprinkling of blood, lest he that destroyed the firstborn should touch them. By faith they passed through the Red Sea as by dry land: which the Egyptians assaying to do were drowned. By faith the walls of Jericho fell down, after they were compasses about seven days. By faith the harlot Rahab perished not with them that believed not, when she had received the spies with peace. And what more shall I say? For the time would fail me to tell of Gedeon, and of Barack, and of Samson, and of Jephthae; of David also, and Samuel, and of the prophets: who through faith subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness, obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions, quenched the violence of fire, escape the edge of the sword, out of weakness were made strong, waxed valiant in fight, turned to flight the armies of aliens. Women received their dead raised to life again: and others were tortured, not accepting deliverance; that they might obtain a better resurrection: and others had trial of cruel mocking and scour tings, yea, moreover of bonds and imprisonment: they were stoned, they were sawn asunder, were tempted, were slain with the sword: they wandered about in sheepskins and goatksins; being destitute, afflicted, tormented; (of whom the world was not worthy) they wandered in deserts, and in mountains, and in dens and caves of the earth. And these all, having obtained a good report through faith, received not the promise: God having provided some better thing for us, that they without us should not be made perfect” (Hebrews 11:1-40).

“Wherefore seeing we also are compasses about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God. For consider him that endured such contradiction of sinners against himself, lest ye be wearied and faint in your minds” (Hebrews 12:1-3).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s