The Invitation to Find Your Words & Voice: God Doesn’t Want Polished Words From Your Mind, But Honest Words From Your Heart

Today’s selected reading is found in the Old Testament poetic book of the Psalms which contains a myriad of prayers, petitions, requests, songs, hymns, complaints, cries, and the like from those who wrote them. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the first seven chapters of this Old Testament book. BLESSED! BLESSED IS THE MAN! WALK! STAND! SIT! UNGODLY! SINNERS! SCORNFUL! DELIGHTING IN THE LAW OF THE LORD! MEDITATING IN THE LAW DAY AND NIGHT! PLANTED! DRIVEN AWAY! SHALL NOT STAND! SHALL PERISH! WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE, AND THE PEOPLE IMAGINE A VAIN THING? THE KINGS OF THE EARTH SET THEMSELVES, AND THE RULERS TAKE COUNSEL TOGETHER, AGAINST THE LORD, AND AGAINST HIS ANOINTED! LET US BREAK THEIR BANDS ASUNDER, AND CAST AWAY THEIR CORDS FROM US! YET HAVE I SET MY KING UPON MY HOLD HILL OF ZION! SERVE THE LORD WITH FEAR, AND REJOICE WITH TREMBLING! KISS THE SON, LEST HE BE ANGRY, AND HYE PERISH FROM THE WAY! BLESSED ARE ALL THEY THAT PUT THEIR TRUST IN HIM! TROUBLED AND RISEN UP AGAINST! MANY! THERE IS NO HELP FOR HIM IN GOD! THOU, O LORD, AR A SHIELD FOR ME! MY GLORY, AND THE LIFTER UP OF MINE HEAD! I CRIED UNTO THE LORD WITH. MY VOICE! HE HEARD ME OUT OF HIS HOLY HILL! I LAID ME DOWN AND SLEPT( I AWAKED, FOR THE LORD SUSTAINED ME! I WILL NOT BE AFRAID OF TEN THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE, THAT HAVE SET THEMSELVES AGAINST ME ROUND ABOUT! SURROUNDED YET NOT AFRAID! ARISE, O LORD! SAVE ME, O MY GOD! SALVATION BELONGETH UNTO THE LORD! HEAR ME! HEAR ME WHEN I CALL! GOD OF MY RIGHTEOUSNESS! HAVE MERCY UPON ME! HEAR MY PRAYER! KNOW THAT THE LORD HATH SET APART HIM THAT IS GODLY FOR HIMSELF! THE LORD WILL HEAR WHEN I CALL UNTO HIM! STAND IN AWE, AND SIN NOT! COMMUNE WITH YOUR OWN HEART UPON YOUR BED, AND BE STILL! OFFER THE SACRIFICES OF RIGHTEOUSNESS, AND PUT YOUR TRUST IN THE LORD! THOU HAST PUT GLADNESS IN MY HEART! I WILL BOTH LAY ME DOWN IN PEACE, AND SLEEP! THOU, LORD, ONLY MAKEST ME DWELL IN SAFETY! GIVE EAR TO MY WORDS! CONSIDER MY MEDITATION! HEARKEN UNTO THE VOICE OF MY CRY, MY KING AND MY GOD! UNTO THEE WILL I PRAY! MY VOICE SHALL THOU HEAR IN THE MORNING, O LORD! IN THE MORNING WILL I DIRECT MY PRAYTR UNTO THEE, AND WILL LOOK UP! I WILL COME INTO THY HOUSE IN THE MULTITUDE OF THY MERCY! IN THY FEAR WILL I WORSHIP TOWARD THY HOLY TEMPLE! LEAD ME, O LORD, IN THY RIGHTEOUSNESS BECAUSE OF MINE ENEMIES! MAKE THEY WAY STRAIGHT BEFORE MY FACE! LET ALL THOSE THAT PUT THEIR TRUST IN THEE REJOICE! LET THEM EVER SHOUT FOR JOY, BECAUSE THOU DEFENDEST THEM! LET THEM ALSO THAT LOVE THY NAME BE JOYFUL IN THEE! WITH FAVOUR WILT THOU COMPASS HIM AS WITH A SHIELD!

When you come to this particular portion of Scripture you will find the Old Testament book of the Psalms beginning. If you have been a believer for any amount of time, or if you have been reading and studying Scripture for any period of time you will notice and discover that the book of the Psalms has long been a source of encouragement, a source of hope, a source of comfort, a source of refuge for all those who would read the words contained within its pages. Countless Christians and great men and women of faith have turned to the words written and contained within this book of psalms, of hymns, of songs, of spiritual songs in order to find a voice for their suffering, a voice for their pain, a voice for their hurting, a voice for their discouragement, a voice for their brokenness, a voice for their despair, and so much more. Perhaps one of the greatest realities surrounding the Old Testament book of the Psalms is that it without a doubt gives a voice to all those who are hurting and all those who are broken. If you think about and consider the book of the Psalms you will undoubtedly encounter the tremendous reality that it has given a voice to your own sorrow, to your own anguish, and to your own suffering. How many times have you turned to the Old Testament book of the Psalms in order that you might find a place to turn to, a place to run to when you have found yourself completely and utterly hopeless in the midst of your circumstance? If you are truly honest with yourself, as well as with the LORD—how many times have you turned to the words which are written and contained within this Old Testament book in order to find the words with which you sought and desired to pray before and unto the living God? What’s more, is how many times have you found yourself in the midst of something that was much too difficult, and something that was much greater than you could handle, and you simply did not know how to express yourself—whether expressing yourself to others, or even expressing yourself to others that they might have some glimpse of what you have been facing and what you have been going through?

If there is one underlying truth that is found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms, it’s that the words which are written and contained here don’t present us with finding our voice among men, but rather, they present us with the reality of finding our voice with God. Oh, we are fully aware of the words which the New Testament author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews writes concerning coming boldly before the throne of grace, however, how many times have we been at a complete and utter loss for words in the midst of our praying that we haven’t known or understood the words with which we ought to pray? How many times have we sought and struggled with finding our voice in the midst of our suffering and in the midst of our pain, and yet when we begin opening our mouths to pray, or when we begin to speak from our heart we simply don’t have or know the words to speak. I can’t help but be reminded of the words which the New Testament author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews wrote in this particular epistle concerning the confidence and boldness we are to have toward and before the living God, as well as the words which the apostle Paul wrote in the eighth chapter of the New Testament epistle which was written unto the Roman saints. Consider if you will the words which are first found in the New Testament epistle which was written unto the Hebrews, and then consider the words which are found in the New Testament epistle which was written unto the saints which were at Rome:

“Let us therefore fear, lest a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it. For unto us was the gospel preached, as well as unto them: but the word preached did not profit them, not being mixed with faith in them that heard it. For we which have believed do enter into rest, as he said, As I have sworn in my wrath, if they shall enter into my rest: although the words were finished from the foundation of the world. For He spake in a certain place of the seventh day on this wise, And God did rest the seventh day from all his works. And in this place again, If they shall enter into my rest. Seeing therefore it remaineth that some must enter therein, and they to whom it was first preached entered not in because of unbelief: Aagain, he limiteth a certain day, saying in David, To day, after so long a time; as it is said, To day if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts. For if Jesus had given them rest, then would he not afterward have spoken of another day. There remain ent therefore a rest to the people of God. For he that is entered into his rest, he also hath ceased from his own works, as God did from his. Let us labour therefore to entereth into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief” (Hebrews 4:1-11).

“For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do. Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need” (Hebrews 4:12-16).

“Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh; and having an high priest over the house of God; let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience, and our bodies washed with pure water. Let us hold fast the profession of our faith without wavering; (for he is faithful that promised;) and let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works: not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting one another: and so much the more, as ye see the day approaching” (Hebrews 10:19-25).

“Wherefore seeing we also are compasses about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God. For consider him that endured such contradiction of sinners against himself, lest ye be wearied and faint in your minds” (Hebrews 12:1-3).

“See that ye refuse not him that speaketh. For if they escaped not who refused him that spake on earth, much more shall not we escape, if we turn away from him that speaketh from heaven: whose voice then shook the earth: but now he hath promised, saying, Yet once more I shake not the earth only, but also heaven. And this word, Yet once more, signifieth the removing of those things that are shaken, as of things that are made, that those things which cannot be shaken may remain. Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear: For our God is a consuming fire” (Hebrews 12:25-28).

“Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach. For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come. By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. But to do good and to community forget not: for with such sacrifices God is well pleased”(Hebrews 13:13-15).

“Therefore, brethren, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. For if ye live after the flesh, ye shall die: but if ye through the Spirit do mortify the deeds of the body, ye shall live. For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, they are the sons of God. For ye have not received the spirit of bondage against o fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, ABBA, Father. The Spirit itself heareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God: and if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with him, that we may be also glorified together. For I reek on that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us. For the earnest expectation of the creature waiteth for the manifestation of the sons of God. For the creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, by by reason of him who hath subjected the same in hope, because the creature itself also shall be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now. And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body. For we are saved by hope; but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for? But if we hope for that we seen not, then do we with patience wait for it. Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know now what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself make the intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. And he that searcheth the hearts knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit, because he maketh intercession for the saints according to the will of God. And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according His purpose. For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of His Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brethren. Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called: and whom he called, them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified. What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us? He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall we not with him also freely give us all things? Who shall lay any thing to the charge of God’s elect? IT is God that justifieth. Who is he that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written, For thy sake we are killed all the day long; we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter. Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us. For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our LORD” Romans 8:12-39).

Concerning the words which the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews wrote in the fourth chapter, we know and are fully aware of the fact that since we have a great high priest which is passed into the heavens—namely, Jesus Christ, the Son of God—we are to hold fast our profession. The author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews writes that we do not have a high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. The author then goes on to make an incredibly powerful declaration—and not merely a declaration, but also a wonderful and powerful invitation to those who would read the words of this epistle. In the sixteenth and final verse of this chapter the author calls on their audience to come boldly unto the throne of grace, that they might obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need. We are fully aware of this absolutely wonderful invitation to come boldly before the throne of grace, and we are fully aware that there is mercy and grace to help in time of need when we come unto the throne of grace, however, how many times have you attempted to come before the throne of grace, and you have been able to come anything but boldly? Oh, I do not speak of you struggling with sin in your life, nor do I speak of your struggle with guilt and condemnation within your heart, which as a result has caused you to be unable to come boldly before the throne of grace. What I am speaking of is something that is much greater than simply guilt and condemnation. The apostle Paul in the opening verse of the eighth chapter of the epistle which was written unto the Roman saints emphatically declared that there is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus. Later on in the very same chapter the apostle Paul goes on to speak about the Spirit of the triune Godhead making intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered when we know not what we ought to pray. The apostle Paul recognized and understood that there were times, and there were going to be times within our lives when although we could indeed and could in fact come boldly unto the throne of grace to receive mercy, and to find grace to help in time of need, we would find it difficult to truly express ourselves before that throne, and in the presence of the living God. The apostle Paul recognized that there were going to be times when we would seek to pray, and yet the more we sought and desired to pray, the more we were confronted with the reality that we simply knew not what we needed to pray. Oh, we know that we can come boldly before the throne of grace, and yet we find it difficult to do so because we don’t have the words, nor the voice to do so.

As I sit here this morning, I can’t help but be directly confronted with the tremendous reality of the struggle we sometimes—perhaps the struggle we oftentimes face when attempt to come boldly before the throne of grace. There is not a doubt in many mind that there have been times within your life when you have sought to come boldly before the throne of grace, and yet you did not have the words with which to make your petition known unto God. I can’t help but be reminded of the words which the apostle Paul wrote in the fourth and final chapter of the New Testament epistle which was written unto the Philippian saints and congregation. Consider if you will the words which are written and recorded in this chapter beginning to read with and from the fourth verse: “Rejoice in the LORD always: and again I say, Rejoice. Let your moderation be known unto all men. The LORD is at hand. Be careful for nothing: but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God. And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus. Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things. Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and see in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you” (Philippians 4:4-9). With these words the apostle Paul instructs us to be careful for nothing, and to be in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving letting our requests be made known unto God. I can’t help but be also be reminded of the words which the apostle Peter wrote in the first epistle which was written and sent unto the saints and followers of the Way which were scattered throughout Asia Minor. In order to understand the words which are written in the fifth chapter of this New Testament epistle it is first necessary to consider the words which are written and recorded in the fourth chapter of the same epistle. Consider if you will the words which are found in the final portion of the fourth chapter, and then those which are recorded in the fifth chapter:

“Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you: but rejoice, inasmuch as ye are partakers of Christ’s sufferings; that, when his glory shall be revealed, ye may be glad also with exceeding joy. If ye be reproached for the name of Christ, happy are ye; for the spirit of glory and of God resteth upon you: on their part he is evil spoken of, but on your part he is glorified. But let none of you suffer as a murder, or as a thief, or as an evildoer, or as a busybody in other men’s matters. Yet if any man suffer as a Christian, let him not be shamed; but let him glorify God on this behalf. For the time is come that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if it first begin at us, what shall the end be of them that obey not the gospel of God? And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and the sinner appear? Wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God commit the keeping of their souls to him in well doing, as unto a faithful Creator” (1 Peter 4:12-19).

“The elders which are among you I exhort, who am also an elder, and a witness of the sufferings of Christ, and also a partakers of the glory that shall be revealed: Feed the flock of God which is among you, taking the oversight thereof, not by constraint, but willingly; not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mind; neither as being lords over God’s heritage, but being ensamples to the flock. And when the chief Shepherd shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fade the not away. Likewise, ye younger, submit yourselves unto the elder. Yea, all of you be subject one to another, and be clothed with humility: for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble. Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you in due time: casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you. Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour: whom resist steadfast in the faith, knowing that the same afflictions are accomplished in your brethren that are in the world. But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye have suffered a while, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you. To him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen” (1 Peter 5:1-11).

We are fully aware of the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the Philippian saints in which he encouraged them to be careful or anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication. We are aware of the words which the apostle Peter wrote when he instructed and encouraged his audience to cast all their care upon the living God, for he cares for them. There is not a doubt in our hearts, nor within our mind that we can indeed cast all our cares upon the LORD, and yet there are times within our lives when we struggle—when we struggle to not only find the words with which to pray, but also to find our voice before the throne of God. FINDING YOUR VOICE BEFORE THE THRONE OF GRACE! We know from the Old Testament book of Job that Satan has absolutely no trouble finding his voice before the throne of God in the court of heaven, for he goes before the throne of God to accuse the saints of God both night and dayr. The apostle John in the New Testament prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ writes of the accuser of the brethren who was and who would be cast down to the earth, which accused the saints of God both night and day before the throne of God. We know from the prophetic book of Zechariah that Satan the adversary stood beside Joshua the high priest before the angel of the LORD to resist and to accuse him. We do not have to be curious, nor do we have to wonder whether or not the adversary, which is Satan and the Devil has and has found his found voice before the throne of God. We know for a fact that the adversary is also the accuser of the brethren, and he stands to accuse the saints of God both night and day before the throne of God. With that being said, however, there is a great and tremendous need for us as the people of God to find our voice before the throne of God. There is a great and powerful need for us as the saints of God to note only find our voice before the throne of God, but also to find the words with which we entreat the LORD our God. There is not a doubt in my mind that we all struggle, that we all face conflicts, that we all face trials and troubles, that we all face hardship. I do not believe for one minute that we all face hurt and pain, and that we all face sorrow, suffering, anguish, and agony within our hearts and our souls. I firmly believe that there have been specific times within our lives when we have found ourselves facing something that was much greater, and something that was much bigger than ourselves. There have been times within our lives when we have found ourselves being confronted with a conflict that was too great and too much for us to handle and bear, and which has warranted and required us to come before and come unto the throne of grace that we might obtain grace, and find mercy to help in time of need.

As I sit here this morning and think about and consider the Old Testament book of the Psalms, I can’t help but be absolutely gripped and captivated with the fact that when you come to the Old Testament book of the Psalms—not only do you find the voices of the psalmists, but also within the voices of the psalmists you find your own voice. I firmly believe that the Old Testament book of the Psalms was placed in Scripture for more than simply giving us the voices of those who would write the words which were contained in the midst of them. I do not believe for one moment that the Old Testament book of the Psalms was inserted into Scriptures simply so we could hear the voices of the psalmists and somehow marvel at the voices which they themselves found before the throne of grace—even before the throne of grace would even be penned by the apostle Paul. It’s worth interesting that the psalmists whose words are found within this Old Testament book not only found their voices, but also found their voices in the midst of writing. Perhaps the greatest psalmist who wrote more psalms than any other individual was David the shepherd boy turned giant killer turned vagabond and fugitive turned commander of mighty men turned king of the nation and kingdom of Israel. One of the most astonishing and intriguing realities surrounding the Old Testament book of the Psalms is the fact that not only did the psalmists find their voices, but they found their voices as they took up the pen and began penning and writing that which was within and upon their soul. I sit here this morning thinking about the words which are found within this Old Testament book, and I can’t help but be absolutely gripped and captivated by the fact that the psalmists which wrote the words contained in this Old Testament book found their voice when they took up the pen, and when they sat before and within the presence of the LORD their God. It’s absolutely astonishing and remarkable to think about and consider the fact that the words which are found within the book of the Psalms were written and penned—not merely for our pleasure and enjoyment, but as a clarion call and a clarion invitation to find our voice before the living God.

THE INVITATION TO FIND YOUR VOICE! I cannot help but read the words which are written and recorded in the Old Testament book of the Psalms and come face to face with the fact that the words which are contained here are more than simply for our pleasure, for our enjoyment, and for our delight. Oh, it is true that throughout the centuries, and throughout the ages men and women have read the words which are found within this Old Testament poetic book, and yet the truth of the matter is that I am convinced that this book is not as much a book about pleasure and enjoyment as it is a book about finding and discovering our voice before the throne of God, and finding our voice in the presence of God. It is absolutely unmistakeable when reading the words found in this Old Testament book that the psalmists did indeed find their voice before the throne of God, and did in fact find their voice in the presence of God—perhaps first through words written on parchment or a scroll, and then in a song that would be sung before and in the presence of God. It’s interesting and worth noting and pointing out that what we find in the Old Testament book of Psalms is more than simply poetic language and literature, but is in fact psalms, hymns, songs, prayers, petitions, requests, and cries of the heart and soul before the living God. With this in mind, I can’t help but be reminded of the words which the apostle Paul wrote—not only in the New Testament epistle which was written in the fifth chapter of the epistle which was written unto the Ephesian saints, but also the words which were written in the third chapter of the epistle which was written unto the Colossian saints. Consider if you will the words which are found in each of these epistles which were written and penned by the apostle Paul:

“See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, redeeming the time, because the days are evil. Wherefore be ye not unwise, but understanding what the will of the LORD is. And be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess; but be filled with the Spirit; speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the LORD; giving thanks always for all things unto God and the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ; submitting yourselves one to another in the fear of God” (Ephesians 5:14-21).

“Put on therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of mercies, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, long suffering; forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also d ye. And above all these things put on charity, which is the bond of perfectness. And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to the which also ye are called in one body; and be ye thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in your richly in all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord. And whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God and the Father by Him” (Colossians 3:12-17).

Within these two passages we find the apostle Paul writing and speaking of psalms, of hymns, and of spiritual songs, and in the epistle written unto the Ephesian saints he encourages them to speak to themselves in psalms, in hymns, and in spiritual songs, while unto the Colossian saints he encourages them to teach and admonish one another in psalms, in hymns, and in spiritual songs. It is absolutely necessary that we recognize and pay close attention to these words, for with them the apostle Paul not only suggests that we can and must speak to each other in psalms, in hymns, and in spiritual songs, but he also speaks of and encourages us to teach and admonish one another in the same manner. It is necessary that we recognize and understand this particular reality, for it brings us face to face with the tremendous and underlying purpose that is found within and surrounding the book of the Psalms. If the apostle Paul instructed and encouraged the Ephesian congregation to speak to themselves in psalms, in hymns, and in spiritual songs, and if the apostle Paul instructed and encouraged the Colossian saints to teach and admonish one another in the same manner, then I am absolutely and completely convinced that we can and must take the words which are found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms and not only use them as means to speak within and unto ourselves, but also as a means with which to teach and admonish—not only ourselves, but others. With that being said, it is absolutely imperative that we recognize and understand that the words which we find within the Old Testament book of the Psalms is more than simply poetic language and literature, and is more than simply psalms, hymns, songs, and the like. The Old Testament book of the Psalms is a book that is chalk full of prayers and petitions that not only bring us face to face with the prayer lives of others, but it also brings us face to face with the worship of others. We read in the eleventh chapter of the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews a great role call of the heroes of faith which would make up the great cloud of witnesses which we read about in the very next chapter. Within the eleventh chapter of the New Testament epistle which was written unto the Hebrews we find the narrative(s) and account(s) of great men and women of faith in the days of the Old Covenant who walked with and followed the living God as strangers and pilgrims upon and within this earth. Keeping that in mind, I can’t help but read the Old Testament book of the Psalms and be directly confronted with what the prayer lives of such men and women would have looked like. We know from reading the Old Testament book of the Psalms that David, that Solomon, that Moses, that Asaph, and that the sons of Korah all contributed to this collection of psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs which were prayers, petitions and praise before the throne of God. It must be carefully understood that within the Old Testament book of the Psalms we do in fact find prayer and petitions, but we also find praise. In fact, I would dare say that the Old Testament book of the Psalms is a tremendous balance between prayer, petition and praise.

As I sit here this morning, I can’t help but come face to face with the tremendous reality that it’s one thing to come face to face with the voices of others—voices which others found before the throne of God in prayer, in petition, and in praise, however, it is something else entirely and altogether to find our own voice before the throne of God. The book of the Psalms does indeed and does in fact bring us face to face with the voices of men such as David, his son Solomon, Moses the servant of the LORD, and even Asaph and the sons of Korah, however, there must be a powerful transition that takes places when and as we read the Old Testament book of the Psalms as we not only read the voices of others, but also as we find and discover our own voice. Permit me to ask you a tremendous and powerful question as you read these words—namely, whether or not you have found your voice before the throne of God. Have you found your voice in prayer before the throne of God? Have you found your voice of prayer before the throne of God? Have you found your voice in petition before the throne of God? Have you found your voice of praise before the throne of God? The more I read and the more I think about the words which are written and recorded within the Old Testament book of the Psalms, the more I can’t help but encounter and come face to face with the fact that there are a great number and a great many men and women who have not yet found their voice before the throne of God, or who might at one point in time have had a voice before the throne of God, and yet have lost it over a period of time. There is not a doubt in my mind that through the Old Testament book of Psalms—not only can men and women find and discover their voice before the throne of God for the first time, but I am also convinced that men and women rediscover and reclaim the voice they once had before the throne of God. There is something truly wonderful and powerful about the Old Testament book of the Psalms, for within its pages, and within the words contained therein we encounter the voices of the psalmists themselves, but we are also invited into a place where we find our voice. It makes absolutely no difference whether we are finding our voice for the first time, or our rediscovering our voice again, for the underlying and important reality is that we not only recognize that we have a voice before the throne of God, but also that we discover the sound of that voice. Have you heard the sound your voice can make before the throne of God? Have you heard the sound your voice can make before the throne of God in prayer and petition? Have you heard the sound your voice can make before the throne of grace in praise as you worship the true and living God?

THE INVITATION TO FIND YOUR WORDS! THE INVITATION TO FIND THE WORDS TO SPEAK! It is through the words we find written in this Old Testament book that we encounter a wider range and wide variety of words. If you study the Old Testament book of the Psalms you will not only find and discover that it is the largest book of the Bible, but within is also the longest chapter. The Old Testament book of the Psalms has one-hundred and fifty chapters contained within it, and the one-hundred and nineteenth chapter of this book is the single longest chapter in the entire canon of Scripture. I am absolutely convinced that with a book as large and voluminous as this book is there is a wide plethora of words which were written, prayed, and sang by the psalmists who wrote them. I did a search this morning with my smartphone and asked Siri how many words are found and contained within this Old Testament book of the Psalms, and the answer I received back was forty-two thousand six hundred and eight-seven words. Stop for a moment and think about that reality, for within this Old Testament book of the Psalms there are more than forty-thousand words which have been written and dedicated before the LORD in prayer, in petition and in praise before the living God. Stop for a moment and think about the reality that more than forty-thousand words are contained within this Old Testament book that is filled with psalms, hymns, spiritual songs, prayers, petitions, requests, complains, declarations, and the like. I happen to find it absolutely remarkable and incredible to think about and consider the fact that with a book as large as the book of Psalms is (standing at one-hundred and fifty chapters), and with a book that has as many words as the book of Psalms is (with 42, 687 words), there are more than enough words for us to come face to face with words we are perhaps searching for, and words which we perhaps have been searching for in prayer and in praise before the LORD. How many times have you attempted to come before the throne of grace in prayer and petition before the LORD, and you have struggled to find the words to pray? How many times have you attempted to enter into the presence of the living God, and you simply couldn’t find the words which you wanted to speak and declare unto the throne of the living God? With that being said, it’s important that we recognize and understand that despite the fact that the Old Testament book of the Psalms is found in what is known as “the poetic books” of the Bible, our prayers, and the words which we pray before and unto the living God do not need to be poetic in nature. We do not need to come before the LORD with eloquent and persuasive words, nor do we need to come before the LORD with poetic and elegant words. The LORD has never invited us into His presence and required of us beautiful and masterful words, and there is perhaps no greater demonstration of this than is found in the Old Testament sacrificial system that was in place. D

If you journey back to the Old Testament book of Leviticus and read concerning the gifts, the offerings and the sacrifices which were offered before and unto the living God upon the altar, you will find that the altar itself wasn’t a pretty place. The altar of burnt offering was a place that was saturated and consumed with blood, and it was a place that undoubtedly had blood which stained the sand all around it. I remember writing at one point concerning the trail of blood which was undoubtedly left within and throughout the wilderness, as with each location the children of Israel came to when the pillar of cloud or pillar of fire stopped, they would set up camp in that location. There is not a doubt in my mind that the sands of the wilderness of Sinai were stained with the blood of lambs and goats as the children of Israel brought their sacrifices and offerings before and unto the altar of burnt sacrifice. The court of the Tabernacle was a place of death, for it would be there at the entrance, and there in the court of the LORD that the sacrifice and offering would be killed by the one who brought it, and then the priests themselves would engage in the ministry of pouring out the blood round about the altar. The offering itself would be placed and arranged upon the altar in the midst of the fire, and it would be an offering of sweet smelling fragrance before the LORD made by fire, however, the blood of the sacrifice would be spilled before and round about the altar. The altar of burnt offering wasn’t a beautiful, nor glamorous, nor attractive place, for it was a place of death, it was a place of death, and it was a place where the smell of burning flesh could undoubtedly be smelt within the camp. The altar of burnt sacrifice, and the altar of burnt offering was indeed a gruesome and grotesque place for the children of Israel, and yet it was in that place the children of Israel would come and appear before the LORD with their gifts, with their sacrifices, and with their offerings. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this absolutely wonderful and tremendous reality, for it brings us face to face with a reality which must be understood when we think about how we appear before and how we approach the throne of the living God.

While it is true that the book of the Psalms itself is a book found within the Poetic Books of the Bible, and while it is true that the Old Testament book of the Psalms is a book that is made up of poetic words and literature as the psalmists prayed before and praised the living God, however, this by no means and in no way indicates the reality that the words which we bring before the throne of God need to be eloquent, need to be lofty, need to be beautiful need to be poetic, need to be glamorous, and the like. I am convinced that the words which we bring before the LORD can and may very well at times seem and appear to be just as gruesome and just as ugly as the altar of burnt offering and the court of the LORD in the midst of the Tabernacle. In fact, I would dare say that when we think about how we come before and how we appear before the living God, we must not allow ourselves to get caught up with the beauty of the words we speak, for it has never been, nor will it ever be about the eloquence of the words we bring before the LORD. In fact, I can’t help but be reminded of the words which Solomon the son of David wrote in the fifth chapter of the Old Testament book of Ecclesiastes, as well as the words which the apostle Paul wrote in the first and second chapters of the first epistle which was written unto the Corinthian saints. Consider if you will the following words, and while some of them deal specifically with and speak directly to the preaching of the gospel concerning Jesus the Christ, it is necessary that we recognize and understand them in direct relation to the words which we are to bring before the throne of the living God when we appear before Him:

“Keep thy foot when thou goest to the house of God, and be more ready to hear, than to give the sacrifice of fools: for they consider not that they do evil. Be not rash with thy mouth, and let not thine heart be hast to utterly any thing before God: for God is in heaven, and thou upon the earth: therefore let thy words be few. For a dream cometh through the multitude of business; and a fool’s voice is known by multitude of words. When thou vowest a vow unto God, defer not to pay it; for he hath no pleasure in fools: pay that which thou hast vowed. Better is it that thou shouldest not vow, than thou shouldest vow and not pay. Suffers not thy mouth to cause thy flesh to sin; neither say thou before the angel, that it was an error: wherefore should God be angry at thy voice, and destroy the work of thine hands? For in the multitude of dreams and many words there are also divers vanities: but fear thou God” (Ecclesiastes 5:1-7).

“For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: not with wisdom of words, lest the cross of Christ should be made of none effect. For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God. For it is written, I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and will bring to nothing the understanding of the prudent. Where is the wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the disputer of this world? Hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe. For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek after wisdom: but we preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews a stumbling block, and unto the Greeks foolishness; but unto them which are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God. Because the foolishness of God is wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men. For ye see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called: but God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty; and the base things of the world to confound the things which are mighty; and base things of the world, and things which are despised, hath God chosen, yea, and things which are not, got bring to nought things that are: that no flesh should glory in his presence. But of him are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption: that, according as it is written, He that glorieth, let him glory in the LORD” (1 Corinthians 1:16-31).

“And I, brethren, when I came to you, came not with excellency of speech or of wisdom, declaring unto you the testimony of God. For I determined not to know any thing among you, save Jesus Christ, and Him crucified. And I was with you in weakness, and in fear, and in much trembling. And my speech and my preaching was not with enticing words of man’s wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power: that your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God” (1 Corinthians 2:1-5).

The more I read and the more I think about the words which are written and recorded within the Old Testament book of the Psalms, I am not only gripped and captivated with the fact that there are more than forty-thousand words contained therein, but much—if not all of the words which are found within are poetic in nature. If there is one thing I would like to make absolutely clear, and one thing I would like to ensure you are very much aware of, it’s that despite the sheer volume of words contained within this book, and despite the nature of thee: Not language surrounding these words, that is in no way indicative of the fact that when you enter into the presence of the living God you need to come with eloquent, with persuasive, with poetic, and with beautiful words—either in the natural sense, or the spiritual sense. What’s more, is that I am in no way convinced, nor do I believe that when you come before the throne of God you need to come with many words and with much speaking. I fully realize and recognize that the Old Testament book of Psalms is the longest book in the Bible with one-hundred and fifty chapters, and more than forty-two thousand words, however, this in no way suggests or implies that when you appear before the throne of God you need to come with many words. What’s more, is that I do not for one minute believe that when you come before the throne of God you need to come with polished and rehearsed words and speech which you have somehow conjured up with your own imagination. In fact, I would dare say that it is highly possible that you can conjure up and produced much words which are polished and poetic in nature, and yet those words are nothing more than words produced from your own imagination and your own mind. When you journey to the New Testament gospel narrative of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ written by the apostle Matthew you will find Jesus speaking about the words which proceed from our mouth, and the incredible and tremendous source of those words. Consider if you will the following words which were spoken and emphatically declared by Jesus the Christ—not only concerning the words which proceed forth from our mouth, but also the source of those words. I would also invite you to immediately after the words of Jesus consider the words which James wrote in the third chapter of the epistle he wrote which is contained in the New Testament, as I am convinced that the words of Jesus were the foundation and catalyst for the words which he wrote unto his audience:

“Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto me: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come. Either make the tree good, and his fruit good; or else make the tree corrupt, and his fruit corrupt: for the three is known by his fruit. O generation of vipers, how can ye, being evil, speak good things? For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh. A good man out of the good treasure of the heart bringeth forth good things: and an evil man out of the veil treasure bringeth forth evil things. But I say unto you, That every idle word that men shall speak, they shall give account thereof in the day of judgment. For by thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned” (Matthew 12:31-37).

“And He called the multitude, and said unto them, Hear, and understand: no that which goeth into the mouth defileth a man; but that which cometh out of the mouth, this defileth a man. Then came His disciples, and said unto him, Knowest thou that the Pharisees were offended, after they heard this saying? But He answered and said, Every plant, which my heavenly Father hath not planted, shall be rooted up. Let them alone: they be blind leaders of the blind. And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch. Then answered Peter and said unto him, Declare unto us this parable. And Jesus said, Are ye also yet without understanding? Do not ye yet understand, that whatsoever entereth in at the mouth goeth into the belly, and is cast out into the draught? But those things which proceed out of the mouth come forth from the heart; and they defile the man. For out of the heart proceed evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornications, thefts, false witness, blasphemies: these are the things which defile a man: but to eat with unwashed hands defileth not a man” (Matthew 15:11-20).

“My brethren, be not many masters, knowing that we shall receive the greater condemnation. For in many things we offend all. If any man offend not in word, the same is a perfect man, and able also to bridle the whole body. Behold, we put bits in the horses’ mouths, that they may obey us; and we turn about their whole body. Behold also the ships, which though they be so great, and are driven of fierce winds, yet are they turned about with a very small helm, whithersoever the governor listeth. Even so the tongue is a little member, and boasteth great things. Behold, how great a matter a little fire kindleth! And the tongue is a fire, a world of iniquity: so is the tongue among our members, that it defileth the whole body, and setteth on fire the course of nature; and it is set on fire of hell. For every kind of beasts, and of birds, and of serpents, and of things in the sea, is tamed, and hath been tamed of Nam kind: but the tongue can no man tame; it is an unruly evil, full of deadly poison. There with bless we God, even the Father; and therewith curse we men, which are made after the similitude of God. Out of the same mouth proceedeth blessing and cursing. My brethren, these things ought not so to be. Doth a fountain send forth at the same place sweet water and bitter? Can the fig tree, my brethren, bear olive berries? Either a vine, figs? So can no fountain both yield salt water and fresh” (James 3:1-12).

The words which we find within these three passages of Scriptures must be carefully understood, for when we come to these passages we find the tremendous reality that it is out of the abundance of the heart (our heart) the mouth speaks. I have long and often said that the truest condition of a man’s heart is measured by the words which proceed forth out of his mouth. If you want to truly understand the nature and condition of a man’s heart—you need look no further (or rather hear no further) than the words which proceed forth from his mouth. With that being said, it is absolutely necessary that we understand when we pray—although our mind is indeed involved in the process of praying—we must allow ourselves to pray from the depths of our heart, and from the depths of our soul. It is very easy to pray—or to at least think we are praying—when we use words of our own imagination and from our own thoughts, and yet the truth of the matter is that this simply is not the case. Truth be told we pray our best when we pray—not with our minds, but with our hearts. If it is out of the abundance of our hearts our mouths speak, then I would dare say that when we pray we must speak from the heart above and beyond simply speaking from our minds. Anyone can pray from the thoughts and imaginations which are present within their minds, yet how very few there are who can pray from the depths of their heart, and from the depths of their soul. Even more than this, I would dare say that more often than not what we pray from our mind is what we think God wants to hear, when in all reality the words which we pray with and from our heart are the words which God needs to hear. So many times we pray based on what we think and believe the LORD wants to hear, and we do so from our imagination and our thoughts as we craft eloquent words and phrases in the midst of prayer. The truth of the matter is that more often than not it is the words which proceed forth from our minds which are the more polished words with a powerful measure of veneer, when the words which proceed forth from our mouth are not only less polished, but are perhaps gruesome, perhaps ugly, and perhaps even words which the LORD is truly interested. If I am being honest with you who are reading these words, I would dare say that the LORD isn’t as much interested with polished and cleverly crafted words and phrases produced within our minds as much as He is with our spontaneous, gruesome, bitter, sometimes ugly, and sometimes even grotesque words which proceed forth from our heart. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize the absolutely wonderful reality that when we pray, and when we come and appear before the throne of God—not only are we to find our voice in the midst of His presence, but so also must we find the words to speak in His hearing and in His presence.

The more I read the book of the Psalms the more I am absolutely convinced that when we read the words contained therein—not only are we given a voice to some of the struggles we face within our daily lives, but we also find some of the words we have been searching for concerning the struggles we face. There is not a doubt in my mind that some of the questions we have asked—even if we have only asked them within our hearts and minds—are found within the pages of this sacred Old Testament book of psalms and prayers. I am absolutely convinced that one of the main and underlying reasons why the book of Psalms is so beloved by countless saints throughout the generations is because of the rawness and reality that is set forth in the words which were prayed and cried out by those who wrote them. You cannot read the Old Testament book of the Psalms and not be directly and completely confronted with the reality of the struggle you have within your own heart and soul. The words which we find written and recorded in the Old Testament book of the Psalms are a powerful picture of the struggle which the psalmists had—particularly David who was a shepherd boy, turned hero, turned fugitive, turned king. One cannot read the Old Testament book of the Psalms with at least to some degree or measure coming face to face with the condition of their heart and the condition of their soul, and the hurt, the pain, the sorrow, the anguish, and the agony that men and women face all the time. Especially during a time right now where men and women who have perhaps suffered and struggled alone without having and/or finding their voice are finding their voice in the company and presence of others who are crying out the very same things which are present in their heart. One of the most profound realities surrounding the Old Testament book of the Psalms is the underlying reality that it is incredibly powerful to find your voice in the company and presence of other voices. Through and with the book of the Psalms we find and discover the company of the suffering and the cries of the afflicted. THE COMPANY OF THE SUFFERING, THE CRIES OF THE AFFLICTED! Within the book of the Psalms—not only do we find our voice and the words to speak, but we also find a tremendous company of others who have asked the same questions, prayed the same things, and cried the same things we have cried. If there is one underlying and predominant truth within the Old Testament book of the Psalms it is that we are not alone in our struggles. It is true that we have a great High Priest who can be touched with the feeling of our infirmities, but it is also true that there is a “fellowship of sufferings,” and a fellowship of the cries of broken hearts and downcast souls. THE FELLOWSHIP OF BROKEN HEARTS AND DISCOURAGED SOULS!

With all of this being said, I invite you to consider some of the cries which proceeded forth from the desperate heart of David who wrote the psalms which are found within the first seven chapters of the book of Psalms. In the opening verse of the third chapter we find David emphatically declaring, “Lord, How are they increased that trouble me! Many are they that rise up against me. Many there be which say of my soul, There is no help for him in God. Selah” (Psalm 3:1-2). In the seventh verse of the same chapter you will find David crying out the following words: “Arise, O LORD, save me, O my God: For thou hast smitten all mine enemies upon the cheek bone; thou hast broken the teeth of the ungodly” (Psalm 3:7). The entire sixth chapter of the book of the Psalms is a desperate cry and plea before and in the sight of the living God. Consider if you will the words which are written and recorded within this passage, and listen to the desperation that is found within the heart and soul of David—despite the fact that we don’t know the circumstances surrounding the psalm itself: “O LORD, rebuke me not in thine anger, neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure. Have mercy upon me, O LORD; for I am weak: O LORD, heal me; for my bones are vexed. My soul is sore vexed: but thou, O LORD, how long? Return, O LORD, deliver my soul: oh save me for thy mercies’ sake. For in death there is no remembrance of thee: in the grave who shall give thee thanks? I am weary with my groaning; all the night make I my bed to swim; I water my couch with my tears. Mine eye is consumed because of grief; it waxeth old because of all mine enemies. Depart from me, all ye workers of iniquity” (Psalm 6:1-8). IN the seventh chapter we find David crying out to the LORD and asking for rescue concerning the words which Cush the Benjamite spoke concerning him. Consider if you will the following words which are written and recorded in the seventh chapter of this Old Testament book of the Psalms: “Save me from all them that persecute me, and deliver me: lest he tear my soul like a lion, rending it in pieces, while there is none to deliver. O LORD my God, if I have done this; if there be iniquity in my hands; if I have rewarded evil unto him that was at peace with me; (Yea, I have delivered him that without cause is mine enemy) let the enemy persecute my soul, and take it; yea, let him tread down my life upon the earth, and lay mine honour in the dust. Selah. Arise, O LORD, in thine anger, lift up thyself because of the rage of mine enemies: and awake for me to the judgment that thou hast commanded” (Psalm 7:1-6).

Within the first seven chapters of the Old Testament book of the Psalms we find two distinct situations and circumstances within the life of David—the first when he found himself fleeing and running from his son Absalom who tried to usurp the throne and steal the kingdom, and secondly concerning the words of Cush the Benjamite when he spoke against him. Consider the fact that one of these psalms has to do with running and fleeing, while the other has to do with the words which another was speaking against David. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand this reality, for this reality helps us understand the tremendous anguish and suffering David experienced within his life, which caused him to cry out to the LORD in the midst of his distress, in the midst of his discouragement, and in the midst of his despair. Perhaps the single greatest question we must ask ourselves is what we do and how we respond when we find ourselves in the midst of despair, and when we find ourselves in the midst of discouragement and distress. What do we do and how to we response when we find ourselves in the midst of a conflict and struggle that we neither asked for not expected? The answer to these questions is found in the Old Testament book of the Psalms, and not only concerns our crying out to the LORD from the depths of our soul in prayer and supplication as we make our petitions known to God, but also declare unto the LORD our trust and confidence in Him. I fully realize that more often than not it is easier to simply cry out in our despair and distress and not also declare our trust and confidence in the LORD, and yet what you will find in this Old Testament book is a powerful demonstration of the cries of David in the midst of his trouble, and in the midst of his struggle, and his declarations which he made to the LORD. As I bring this writing to a close I invite you to consider the following words which are found within these chapters concerning David’s declaration in the midst of his distress. DECLARATIONS IN THE MIDST OF DISTRESS! CRIES IN THE MIDST OF CALAMITY. As you read the following words, it is my prayer that you would allow these declarations to not only echo within your heart and soul, but also resonate within your spirit as you are able to emphatically declare and proclaim them without hesitation, and without reservation:

“But thou, O LORD, art a shield for me; my glory, and the lifter up of mine head” (Psalm 3:3).

“I cried unto the LORD with my voice, and He heard me out of his holy hill. Selah” (Psalm 3:4).

“I laid me down and slept; I awaked; for the LORD sustained me” (Psalm 3:5

“I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people, that have set themselves against me round about” (Psalm 3:6).

“Salvation belongeth unto the LORD: Thy blessing is upon thy people. Selah” (Psalm 3:8).

“Thou has put gladness in my heart, more than in the time that their corn and their wine increased” (Psalm 4:7).

“I will both lay me down in peace, and sleep: for thou, LORD, only makest me dwell in safety” Psalm 4:8).

“My voice shalt thou hear in the morning, O LORD; in the morning will I direct my prayer unto thee, and will look up” (Psalm 5:3).

“But as for me, I will come into thy house in the multitude of thy mercy: and in thy fear will I worship toward thy holy temple” (Psalm 5:7).

“For thou, LORD, wilt bless the righteous; with favour wilt thou compass him as with a shield” (Psalm 5:12).

“The LORD hath heard my supplication; the LORD will receive my prayer” (Psalm 6:9).

“O LORD my God, in thee do I put my trust” (Psalm 7:1).

“My defence is of God, which saveth the upright in heart” (Psalm 7:10).

“I will praise the LORD according to His righteousness: and will sing praise to the name of the LORD most High” (Psalm 7:17).

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