Sons of Korah: We Choose Not to Walk In the Sins of our Father

Today’s selected reading continues in the Old Testament book of the Psalms which is a collection of prayers, petition and praise contained in psalms, hymns and spiritual songs. More specifically, today’s passage is found in chapters forty-three through forty-eight of this Old Testament book. As you begin reading the words which are found within this passage of Scripture you will once more encounter the psalmist crying out before and unto the LORD to judge them—and not only to judge them, but also to plead their cause against an ungodly nation. The author of the forty-third chapter of the book of the Psalms would go on to cry out unto the LORD and ask Him to deliver them from the deceitful and unjust man. What’s quite interesting when you think about and consider the words which are found in this particular psalm is when you consider the fact that the psalmist would go on to declare that the LORD was the God of their strength, and yet they felt as though the LORD had cast them off. Furthermore, the psalmist felt that they went about mourning because of the oppression of the enemy. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand the words which are written and recorded within this passage of Scripture, for what we find within this passage of Scripture is not only one who felt that the living God had cast them off, but they also went about mourning because of the oppression of the enemy. The psalmist opened this psalm by asking the LORD to judge them, and to plead their cause against an ungodly nation—a nation that was filled with deceitful and unjust men. What I find truly remarkable and astounding when you think about the words which are written and contained within this particular psalm is that the psalmist would go on to ask the LORD to send out His light and His truth, and to let them lead him, and to bring them unto the holy hill, and to the tabernacles of the LORD. The psalmist would go on to declare that they would go unto the altar of God, and unto God their exceeding joy whom they would praise upon the harp. It is actually quite unique to read the words of this passage, for at the beginning of this chapter we find the psalmist discouraged because of the oppression of the enemy, and because of the deceitful and unjust man, and yet as this short psalm would progress we find the psalmist ultimately transitioning to the holy hill of the LORD, and to the tabernacles of the LORD. What’s more, is that this psalmist would ultimately go from feeling as though God had cast them off to desiring the house of the LORD—and not only the house of the LORD, but also the altar of the LORD. It is this particular concept of the altar of the LORD and the house of the LORD that is written and contained within the book of the Psalms, and is found within at least five distinct passages in the book of the Psalms. Consider if you will the words which are found in these specific passages within the Old Testament book of the Psalms:

“Lord, Who shall abide in thy tabernacle? Who shall dwell in thy holy hill? He that walketh uprightly, and worketh righteousness, and speaketh the truth in his heart. He that backbiteth not with his tongue, nor doeth evil to his neighbour, nor taketh up a reproach against his neighbour. In whose eyes a vile person is contemned; but he honoureth them that fear the LORD. He that sweareth to his own hurt, and changeth not. He that putteth not out his money to usury, nor taketh reward against the innocent. He that doeth these things shall never be moved” (Psalm 15:1-5).

“The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth. Me beside the still waters. He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of m one enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will well in the house of the LORD forever” (Psalm 23:1-6).

“The earth is the LORD’s and the fulness thereof; The world, and they that dwell therein. For he hath founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the floods. Who shall ascend into the hill of the LORD? Or who shall stand in His holy place? He that hath clean hands, and a pure heart; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceitfully. He shall receive the blessing from the LORD, and righteousness from the God of his salvation. This is the generation of them that seek him, that seek thy face, O Jacob. Selah. Lift up your heads, O ye gates; and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The LORD strong and mighty, the LORD mighty in battle. Lift up your heads, O ye gates; even lift them up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The LORD of hosts, He is the King of glory. Selah” (Psalm 24:1-10).

“The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The LORD is the st Renata of my life; of whom shall I be afraid? When the wicked, even mine enemies and my foes, came upon me to eat up my flesh, they stumbled and fell. Though an host should encamped against me, my heart shall not fear: though war should rise against me, in this will I be confident. One thing have I desired of the LORD, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the LORD, and to inquire in his temple. For in the time of trouble He shall hide me in His pavilion: in the secret of His tabernacle shall He hide me; He shall set me upon a rock. And now shall mine head be lifted up above mine enemies round about me: therefore will I offer in His tabernacle sacrifices of joy; I will sing, yea I will sing praises unto the LORD. Hear, O LORD, when I cry with my voice: have mercy also upon me, and answer me. When thou saidst, Seek ye my face; my heart said unto thee, Thy face, LORD, will I seek. Hide not thy face far from me; put not thy servant away in anger: thou hast been my help; leave me not, neither forsake me, O God of my salvation. When my father and my mother forsake me, then the LORD will take me up. Teach me thy way, O LORD, and lead me in a plan path, because of mine enemies. Deliver me not over unto the will of mine enemies: for false witnesses are risen up against me, and such as breathe out cruelty. I had fainted, unless I had believed to see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living. Wait on the LORD: be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart: Wait, I say, on the LORD” (Psalm 27:1-14).

“truly God is good to Israel, even to such as are of a clean heart. But as for me, my feet were almost gone; my steps had well nigh slipped. For I was envious at the foolish, when I saw the prosperity of the wicked. For there ware no bands in their death: but their strength is firm. They are not in trouble as other men; neither are they plagued like other men. Therefore pride compasseth them about as a chain; violence covereth them as a garment. Their eyes stand out with fatness: they have more than heart could wish. They are corrupt, and speak wickedly concerning oppression: they speak loftily. They set their mouth against the heavens, and their tongue walketh through the earth. Therefore his people return hither: and waters of a full cup are wrung out to them. And they say, how doth God know? And is there knowledge in the most High? Behold, these are the ungodly, who prosper in the world; they increase in riches. Verily I have cleansed my heart in vain, and washed my hands in innocency. For all the day long have I been plagued, and chastened every morning. If I say, I will speak thus; Behold, I should offend against the generation of thy children. When I thought to know this, it was too painful for me; until I went into the sanctuary of God; then understood I their end. Surely thou didst set them in slippery places: thou castedst them down into destruction. How are they brought into desolation, as in a moment! They are utterly consumed with terrors. As a dream when one awaketh; so, O LORD, when thou awakest, thou shalt despise their image” (Psalm 73:1-20).

“How amiable are thy tabernacles, O LORD of hosts! My soul longeth, yea, even fainteth for the courts of the LORD: my heart and my flesh crieth out for the living God. Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O LORD of hosts, my King and my God. Blessed are they that dwell in thy house: they will still be praising thee. Selah. Blessed is the man whose strength is in thee; in whose heart are the ways of them. Who passing through the valley of Baca make it a well; the rain also filleth the pools. They go from strength to strength, every one of them in Zion appeareth before God. O LORD God of hosts, hear my prayer: Give ear, O God of Jacob. Selah. Behold, O God our shield, and look upon the face of thine anointed. For a day in thy courts is better than a thousand. I had rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God, than to dwell in the tents of wickedness. For the LORD God is a sun and shield: the LORD will give grace and glory: no good thing will he withhold from them that walk uprightly. O LORD of hosts, Blessed is the man that trusteth in thee” (Psalm 84:1-12).

“He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the LORD, He is my refuge and my fortress: my God; in Him will I trust. Surely he shall deliver thee from the snare of the Fowler, and from the noisome pestilence. He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust: his truth shall e thy shield and buckler. Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; nor for the arrow that flieth by day; nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday. A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee. Only with thine eyes shalt thou behold and see the reward of the wicked. Because thou hast made the LORD, which is my refuge, even the most High, thy habitation; there shall no evil befall thee, neither shall any plague come nigh thy dwelling. For He shall give His angels charge over thee, to keep thee in all thy ways. They shall ear thee up in their hands, lest thou dash thy foot against a stone. Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder: the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under feet. Because he hath set his love upon me, therefore will I deliver him: I will set him on high, because he hath known my name. He shall call upon me, and I will answer him: I will e with him in trouble; I will deliver him, and honour him. With long life will I satisfy him, and shew him my salvation” (Psalm 91:16).

In a book that is so heavily focused on prayer, so heavily focused on praise and petition, it is no wonder that there is such a great emphasis placed upon the house of the LORD—and not merely the house of the LORD, but the hill of the LORD, the courts of the LORD, the altar of the LORD, and the like. If and as you read the words which are written and recorded within the entire book of the Psalms you will notice that the house of the LORD was of utmost importance to the psalmist who wrote the words. In all reality, it is no wonder the house of the LORD has such a prominent place within the book of the Psalms when you look at and consider who wrote most of the words which were written and contained therein. Upon reading the words which are found within the book of the Psalms you will encounter and come face to face with David king of Israel who penned most of the psalms which we find written and recorded within this book. What we must recognize, however, is that it wasn’t merely David who wrote the book of the Psalms, for within the book of the Psalms we also find those which were written by the sons of Korah, as well as those which were written by Asaph. Of course we know and understand that there is also a psalm which was written by Solomon, as well as a psalm which was written by Moses, however, a vast majority of the psalms which are found within this Old Testament were written by David and those who were closest to David. The sons of Korah you will recall ministered before the house of the LORD and within the courts of the LORD, while Asaph was heavily involved in the worship of the LORD in the sanctuary and in the courts of the LORD. Many of the psalms which are found within this Old Testament book weren’t merely written by David who was a man after God’s own heart, but many were written by those who ministered in the house of the LORD, and in the courts of the LORD before the Ark of the Covenant which David had brought into the city of Jerusalem. In order for you to truly understand that which is found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms it is necessary to understand the tremendous presence of the house of the LORD together with its courts and with its altar. The altar of the living God, and the house of the LORD were of utmost importance to David, to Asaph and to the son of Korah, for they were all worshippers at heart, and worshippers by nature.

It’s actually quite interesting and unique to think about what coming into the house of the LORD, and what coming into the presence of the LORD trust does look like when you read the words which are found—not only in the forty-second chapter of the book of the Psalms, but also the words which are found within the forty-sixth chapter of the book. As you read the words which are found within these two passages you will find two incredible and distinct realities which were written by worshipers and the tremendous desire before and in the presence of the LORD, as well as in the courts of the living God. Consider if you will the words which are found in the forty-second chapter of this Old Testament book, as well as the words which are found within the forty-sixth chapter:

“As the hart panteth after the water books, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God? My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where is thy God? When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holyday. Why art thou cast down, O m y soul? And why art thou disquieted in me? Hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him for the help of his countenance. O my God, my soul is cast down within me: therefore will I remember thee from the land of Jordan, and of the Hermonites, from the hill Mizar. Deep calleth unto deep at the noise of thy waterspouts: all thy waves and thy billows are gone over me. Yet the LORD will command his loving kindness in the daytime, and in the night his song shall be with me, and my prayer unto the God of my life. I will ay unto God my rock, Why hast thou forgotten me? Why go I mourning because of the oppression of the enemy? As with a sword in my bones, mine enemies reproach me; while they say d Ailey unto me, Where is thy God? Why art thou cast down, O my soul? And why art thou disquieted within me? Hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God” (Psalm 42:1-11).

“God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore will we not fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea; thou the waters thereof roar and be troubled, though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof. Selah. There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of God, the holy place of the tabernacles of the most High. God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help her, and that right early. The heathen raged, the kingdoms were moved: he uttered his voice, the earth melted. The LORD of hosts is with us; The God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah. Come, behold the works of the LORD, what desolations he hath made in the earth. He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire. Be still, and know that I am God: I will be exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth. The LORD of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah” (Psalm 46:1-11).

It’s truly astonishing to come to the words which are found within this particular set of psalms within this book, for these psalms were written for the sons of Korah. It is unclear whether or not these psalms were written by the sons of Korah, or whether these psalms were merely written for the sons of Korah that they might worship and praise the LORD in His sanctuary in His holy courts. What makes this particular set of psalms so absolutely incredible is when you think about and consider the fact that their father who was alive and present during the days and generation of Moses in the wilderness actually lead a rebellion and insurrection against Moses and against Aaron. If and as you turn your attention back to the Old Testament book of Numbers you will find the narrative of Korah, of Dathan and Abiram, and two-hundred and fifty men whom they gathered unto themselves in a direct rebellion and insurrection against Moses, against the authority which the LORD had bestowed upon Moses, and against the LORD Himself. It is actually worth noting and pointing out this insurrection and rebellion, for it would be a tremendous blemish on the history of the children of Israel during their time in the wilderness, as there would once more be a rebellion against the authority of Moses. What makes this truly astonishing is when you think about the narrative surrounding Korah and those whom he gathered around him, and ultimately the judgment of the living God against and upon him. In order to truly understand the narrative of Korah and why this particular set of psalms are so incredibly astounding, we must turn and direct our attention back to the Old Testament book of Numbers—and not only to the Old Testament book of Numbers, but specifically to the sixteenth and twenty-sixth chapter of this Old Testament book. It is what we find and read within these chapters that not only bring us face to face with Koran’s rebellion in the midst of the congregation and assembly of the living God, but also the tremendous preservation which the LORD wrought in the midst of, and in spite of that rebellion. Consider if you will the following words which are recorded within these two chapters in this Old Testament book:

“Now Korah, the son of Izhar, the son of Kohath, the son of Levi, and Dathan and Abiram, the sons of Eliab, and On, the son of Peleth, sons of Reuben, took men: and they rose up before Moses, with certain of the children of Israel, two hundred and fifty princes of the assembly, famous in the congregation, men of renown: and they gathered themselves together against Moses and against Aaron, and said unto them, Ye take too much upon you, seeing all the congregation are holy, every one of them, and the LORD is among them: wherefore then lift ye up yourselves above the congregation of the LORD? And when Moses heard it, he fell upon his face: and he spake unto Korah and unto all his company, saying, Even to morrow the LORD will shew who are his, and who is holy; and will cause him to come near unto him: even him whom he hath chosen will he clause to come near unto him. This do; Take you censers, Korah, and all his company; and put fire therein, and put incense in them before the LORD to morrow: and it shall be that the man whom the LORD doth choose, He shall be holy: ye take too much upon you, ye sons of Levi. And Moses Sadia unto Korah, Hear, I pray you, ye sons of Levi: seemeth it but a small thing unto you, that the God of Israel hath separated you from the congregation of Israel, to bring you near to himself to do the service of the tabernacle of the LORD, and to stand before the congregation to minister unto them? And he hath brought thee near to him, and all thy brethren the sons of Levi with thee: and seek ye the priesthood also? For which cause both thou and all thy company are gathered together against the LORD: and what is Aaron, that ye murmured against him? And Moses sent to call Dathan and Abiram, the sons of Eliab: which said, We will not come up: Is it a small thing that thou hast brought us up out of a land that floweth with milk and honey, to kill us in the wilderness, except thou make thyself altogether a. Prince over us? Moreover thou hast not brought us into a land that floweth with milk and honey, or given us inheritance of fields and vineyards: wilt thou put out the eyes of these men? We will not come up. And Moses was very wroth, and said unto the LORD, Respect not thou their offering: I have not taken one ass from them, neither have I hurt one of them. And Moses said unto. Korah, Be thou and all thy company before the LORD, thou, and they, and Aaron, to morrow: and take every man his censer, and put incense in them, and bring ye before the LORD every man his censer, two hundred and fifty censers; thou also, and Aaron, each of you his censer. And they took every man his censer, and put fire in them, and laid incense therein, and stood in the door of the tabernacle of the congregation with Moses and Aaron. And. KOrah gathered all the congregation against them unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation: and the glory of the LORD appeared unto all the congregation. And the LORD spake unto Moses and unto Aaron, saying, Separate yourselves from among this congregation, that I may consume them in a moment. And they fell upon their faces, and said, o God, the God of the spirits of all flesh, shall one man sin, and wilt thou be wroth with all the congregation? And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the congregation, saying, Get you up from about the tabernacle of Korah, Dathan and Abiram. And Moses rose up and went unto Dathan and Abiram; and the elders of Israel followed him. And he spake unto the congregation, saying, Depart, I pray you, from the tents of these wicked men, and touch nothing of theirs, lest ye be consumed in all their sins. So they gat up from the tabernacle of Korah, Dathan, and Abiram, on every side: and Dathan and Abiram came out, and stood in the door of their tents, and their wives, and their sons, and their little children. And Moses said, Herby ye shall know that the LORD hath sent me to do all these works; for I have not done them of mine own mind. If these men die the common death of all men, or if they be visited after the visitation of all men; then the LORD hath not sent me. But if the LORD make a new thing, and the earth open her mouth, and swallow them up, with all that appertain unto them, and they go down quick into the pit; then ye shall understand that these men have provoked the LORD. And it came to pass, as he had made an end of speaking all these words, that the ground clave asunder that was under them: and the earth opened her mouth, and swallowed them up, and their houses, and all the men that appertained unto Korah, and all their goods. They, and all that appertained to them, went down alive into the pit, and the earth closed upon them: and they perished from among the congregation. And all Israel that were round about them fled as the cry of them: for they said, Lest the earth swallow us up also. And there came out a fire from the LORD, and consumed the two hundred and fifty men that offered incense. And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto Eleazar the son of Aaron the priest, that he takes up the censers out of the burning, and scatter thou the fire yonder; for they are hallowed. The censers of these sinners against their own souls, let them make them broad plates for a covering of the altar: for they offered them before the LORD, therefore they are hallowed: and they shall be a sign unto the children of Israel. And Eleazar the priest took the brasen censers, wherewith they that were burnt had offered; and they were made broad plates for a covering of the altar: to be a memorial unto the children of Israel, that no stranger, which is not of the seed of Aaron, come near to offer incense before the LORD; that he be not as Korah, and as his company: as the LORd said to him by the hand of Moses. But on the morrow all the congregation of the children of Israel murmured against Moses and against Aaron, saying, Ye have killed the people of the LORD. And it came to pass, when the congregation was gathered against Moses and against Aaron, that they looked toward the tabernacle of the congregation: and, behold, the cloud covered it, and the glory of the LORD appeared. And Moses and Aaron came before the tabernacle of the congregation. And the LORD spakea unto Moses, saying, Get you up from among this congregation, that I may consume them as in a moment. And they fell upon their faces. And Moses said unto Aaron, Take a censer, and put fire therein from off the altar, and put on incense, and go quickly unto the congregation, and make atonement for them: for there is warmth gone out from the LORD; the plague is begun. And Aaron took as Moses commanded, and ran into the midst of the congregation; and, behold, the plague was begun among the people: and he put on incense, and made an atonement for the people. And he stood between the dead and the living; and the plague was stayed. Now they that died in the plague were fourteen thousand and seven hundred, beside them that died about the matter of Korah. And Aaron returned unto Moses unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation: and the plague was stayed” (Numbers 16:1-50).

“Reuben, the eldest son of Israel: the children of Reuben; Hanoch, of whom cometh the family of the Hanochites: of Paula, the family of the Palluites: of Hezron, the family of the Hezronites: of Carmi, the family of the Carmines. These are the families of the Reubenites: and they that were numbered of them were forty and three thousand and seven hundred and thirty. And the sons of Palau; Eliab. And the sons of Eliab; Nemuel, and Dathan, and Abiram. This was that Dathan and Abiram, which were famous in the congregation, who strove against Moses and against Aaron in the company of Korah, when they strive against the LORD: and the earth opened her mouth, and swallowed them up together with Korah, when that company died, what time the fire devoured two hundred and fifty men: and they became a sign. Notwithstanding the children of Korah died not” (Numbers 26:5-11).

Upon reading the words which are found within these passages you will encounter and come face to face with a rebellion and insurrections hat was led by Korah—a rebellion that also included two sons of Reuben which were Dathan and Abiram, as well as two hundred and fifty other men. Within the sixteenth chapter of the Old Testament book of Numbers you will find and discover that in the process of time and in the midst of this rebellion Moses instructed the entire congregation to get themselves away from Dathan and Abiram, together with their households, lest they be consumed and caught up together in the wrath appointed against them. Moreover, Moses instructed and commanded the entire congregation to get themselves away from Korah and his tent, lest they be consumed in the wrath that was appointed against him. As you read the words which are written and recorded within the sixteenth chapter of this Old Testament book you will find that this rebellions wasn’t led by one of the twelve tribes of Israel, but rather, it was led by one from among the sons of Levi. In fact, when you read the words which Moses spoke unto Korah—namely, “Hear, I pray you, ye sons of Levi: seemeth it but a small thing unto you, that the God of Israel hath separated you from the congregation of Israel, to bring you near to Himself to do the service of the tabernacle of the LORD, and to stand before the congregation to minister unto them? And he hath brought thee near to him, and all thy brethren the sons of Levi with thee: and seek ye the priesthood also? For which cause both thou and all thy company are gathered together against the LORD; and what is Aaron, that ye murmur against him?” With these words we clearly see and encounter the reality that Korah wasn’t merely anyone in the congregation of Israel, for Korah was one of the sons of Levi, and even one of the sons of Kohath. In order to truly understand how significant this was, and ultimately what would set the stage for the sons of Korah, it is necessary to recognize and understand that Kohath was a direct descendant of Levi. Consider if you will the words which are found within the same Old Testament book of Numbers, and in the third chapter of this Old Testament book beginning to read with and from the first verse of the chapter:

“These also are the generations of Aaron and Moses in the day that the LORD spake with Moses in mount Sinai. And these are the names of the sons of Aaron; Nadab the firstborn, and Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar. These are the names of the sons of Aron, the priests which were anointed, whom he consecrated to minister in the priest’s office. And Nadab and Abihu died before the LORD, when they offered strange fire before the LORD, in the wilderness of Sinai, and they had no children: and Eleazar and Ithamar ministered in the priest’s office in sight of Aaron their father. And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, Bring the tribe of Levi near, and present them before Aaron the priest, that they may minister unto him. And they shall keep his charge, and the charge of the whole congregation before the tabernacle of the congregation, to do the service of the tabernacle. And they shall keep all the instruments of the tabernacle of the congregation, and the charge of the children of Israel, to do the service of the tabernacle. And thou shalt give the Levites unto Aaron and to his sons: they are wholly given unto him out of the children of Israel. And thou shalt appoint Aaron and his sons, and they shall wait on their priest’s office: and the stranger that cometh nigh shall e put to death. And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, And I, behold, I have taken the Levites from among the children of Israel instead of all the firstborn that openeth the matrix among the children of Israel: therefore all the Levites shall be mine; because all the firstborn are mine; for on the day that I smote all the firstborn in the land of Egypt I hallowed unto me all the firstborn in Israel, both man and beast: mine shall they be: I am the LORD. And the LORD spake unto Moses in the wilderness of Sinai, saying, Number the children of Levi after the house of their fathers, by their families: every male from a month old and upward shalt thou number them. And Moses numbered them according to the word of the LORD, as he was commanded. And these were the sons of Levi by their names; Gershon, and Kohath, and Merari…” (Numbers 3:1-17).

“And of Kohath was the family of the Amramites, and the family of the Izeharites, and the family of the Hebronites, and the family of the Uzzielites: these are the families of the Kohathites. IN the number of all the males, from a month old and upward, were eight thousand and six hundred, keeping the charge of the sanctuary. The families of the sons of Kohath shall pitch on the side of the tabernacle southward. And the chief of the house of the father of the families of the Kohathites shall be Elizaphan the son of Uzziel. And their charge shall be the ark, and the table, and the candlestick, and the altars, and the vessels of the sanctuary wherewith they minister, and the hanging, and all the service thereof. And Eleazar the son of Aaron the priest shall be chief over the chief of the Levites, and have the oversight of them that keep the charge of the sanctuary” (Numbers 3:27-32).

It is absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand these verses found in the third chapter of the Old Testament book of Judges, for not only do they help us understand the history and background of Korah, but also the son of Korah who would continue on long after his supernatural death before the congregation of the children of Israel. What made Korah’s rebellion so dangerous and so deadly was the fact that he was of the sons of Kohath which were given charge of the sanctuary. What’s more, is that these sons of Levi were given more than simply charge the sanctuary, but they were also given charge over the ark, over the table, over the candlestick, and the altars, and the vessels of the sanctuary wherewith they ministered. Please don’t miss and lose sight of this fact, for Korah would have undoubtedly been very familiar and very acquainted with the service and ministry of the Tabernacle of Congregation, and would have ministered with the holy and sacred things of the living God. Korah was among those sons that were given charge over the sanctuary itself, which would include the Ark of the covenant. In all reality, Korah was among those sons of Levi who would be given charge over the vessels of the sanctuary from the inside out—beginning in the Holy of Holies and continuing into the Most Holy Place. Korah would have undoubtedly have committed himself—at least at first, and at least in part—to the service of the sanctuary and the vessels thereof, and yet there would come a point in time when he would want and desire more. It wasn’t enough for Korah to be among those who had charge over the sanctuary, for he dared lift and raise himself up against Moses and against Aaron who themselves were sons of Levi. Korah—this son of Levi and member of the Kohathites—not only lifted and raised himself up against Moses who was the servant of the LORD, but also against Aaron who was the high priest of the LORD. We dare not, we cannot and must not miss and lose sight of this absolutely remarkable and astounding reality, for to do so would be to miss what was so deadly and dangerous regarding the rebellion of Korah against Moses and Aaron in the wilderness. This Korah was among those who were separated from the congregation of the children of Israel to come near unto the LORD to do the service of the tabernacle of the LORD, and to stand before the congregation to minister unto them. This Korah would have been brought near to the LORD along with all his brethren the son of Levi, and yet even this appeared to not be enough for Korah, for Moses would ask him if he would seek the priesthood as well.

We must recognize and understand this truly wonderful reality when considering the rebellion of Korah, for this rebellion wasn’t led by a member of one of the twelve tribes of Israel, but it was led by one who had access to the sanctuary. Moreover, this rebellion was led by one who would have access to the sacred and holy things within the sanctuary. It is a dangerous thing to be given access to the sanctuary of the living God, and to minister among the sacred and holy things before the LORD in His sanctuary, and yet still desire more. It is a dangerous thing to not be content in the service which you were given in the sanctuary and Tabernacle of the LORD, and to desire more for yourself. Even more, there is an inherent danger in taking that discontentment, that desire, that restlessness, and perhaps even that covetousness, and use it to rebel against the authority which the living and eternal God has established. What makes Koran’s rebellion so sinister is that he didn’t merely rise up against Moses and against Aaron himself, for he gathered together unto himself Dathan and Abiram who were famous in the congregation, as well as two-hundred and fifty other men of renown who were famous in the congregation. Korah didn’t rebel or lead a rebellion alone, nor did his rebellion take place in a vacuum, nor in a bubble, for his rebellion would be joined together with at least two-hundred and fifty others. It’s something fierce to think about and consider the fact that this rebellion of Korah was such that would be something beyond himself, for he would not rebel alone and by himself. In order to give this rebellion more weight—perhaps even to try and force the hand of Moses and Aaron—Korah would gather unto himself those who would join together in a powerful rebellion and insurrection against Moses and Aaron. What’s more, is that his rebellion wouldn’t merely be against Moses and Aaron, for both were mere men who were ordained and appointed by the living God. The rebellion of Korah would be against the authority of heaven and the authority of the throne of God which was bestowed upon Moses and Aaron. It is unclear exactly what Korah desired through and with this rebellion, however, Moses’ words seem to indicate a desire for something beyond the care and charge they were given over the sanctuary of the LORD, and the articles of the sanctuary. It wasn’t enough to have charge over the Ark of the Covenant, and the Table of Shewbread, and the Altar of Burnt Incense, and even the Golden Candlestick, for Korah desired something more—something beyond what had been ordained and appointed unto him.

Upon reading the narrative of Koran’s rebellion you will find that the LORD supernaturally opened the earth and caused Korah, Dathan and Abiram, together with the houses and families of Dathan and Abiram to be swallowed alive and brought down into the pit. Scripture is extremely clear concerning and regarding this judgment of the LORD, for the LORD would completely and utterly remove Korah, Dathan, Abiram, and the households of Dathan and Abiram from the midst of the camp and congregation of the LORD. What makes this narrative so incredibly interesting is when you think about the fact that in the twenty-sixth chapter of the Old Testament book of Numbers you will find that when Korah was brought alive down into the pit the LORD did not and would not cause the children of Korah to go down into the pit. The LORD would not hold the children of Korah responsible for the sin and rebellion of their father, and would allow the children to remain within and upon the earth. From the time of Korah’s rebellion, to the time of Korah’s descent into the pit, to the time of David the king of Israel we would find a lineage that would continue within the earth—a lineage of the sons of Korah who would not only continue in the charge of the sanctuary, but who would be instrumental in the worship that was ordained by David for the Temple and house of the LORD that would be built in the midst of the city of Jerusalem. What is so incredibly interesting about this title “the sons of Korah,” is that there would always be a reminder of what their father had done all those years earlier in the wilderness. To be known as “a son of Korah” would undoubtedly mean that there would perhaps be a stigma that would be attached to who you were and to your name, for you were essentially a son of rebellion. Stop for a moment and think about the fact that “the sons of Korah” were essentially sons of rebellion—despite the fact that they themselves neither participated in that rebellion, nor continued in their own rebellion. It is actually quite astounding and remarkable to think about and consider the fact that the sons of Korah—although there was the stigma that was attached to them being descendants of their father who rebelled against the LORD, and against His servant Moses, and His high priest Aaron—would continue on faithfully ministering their charge over and within the sanctuary. The sons of Korah—although they were essentially sons of a rebellion, and sons of one who rebelled against the authority of the LORD—would be those who would choose to live their lives beyond that of their past, and beyond the sin of their father. How absolutely remarkable and astounding it is to think about and consider the fact that one of the most profound realities surrounding the sons of Korah was that they were such as would not only choose to live beyond the sin of their father, but would choose to continue in the God-ordained and God-appointed charge that was given unto their fathers in the wilderness. What we must fully recognize concerning the sons of Korah is that although their father did in fact lead a rebellion against Moses and against Aaron, they themselves would faithfully carry out their charge and their duty before the LORD. Even more than this, is they would be ordained and appointed by David in the service and worship of the sanctuary:

“And of the Levites; Shemiah the son of Hasshub, the son of African, the son of Hashabiah, of the sons of Menard; and Bakbakkar, Heresh, and Galal, and Mattathias the son of Micah, the son of Zichri, the son of Asaph; and Obadiah the son of Shemaiah, the son of Galal, the son of Jeduthun, and Berechiah the son of Asa, the son of Elkanah, that dwelt in the villages of the Netophathites. And the porters were, Shallum, and Akkub, and Talmon, and Ahriman, and their brethren: Shallum was the chief; who hitherto waited in the king’s gate eastward: they were porters in the companies of the children of Levi. And Shallum the son of Kore, the son of Ebiasaph, the son of Korah, and his brethren, of the house of his father, the Korahites, were over the work of the service, keepers of the gates of the tabernacle: and their fathers, being over the host of the LORD, were keepers of the entry. And Phineas the son of Eleazar was the ruler over them in time past, and the LORD was with him. And Zechariah the son of Meshelemiah was porter of the door of the tabernacle of the congregation. All these which were chosen to be porters in the gates were two hundred and twelve. These were reckoned by their genealogy in their villages, whom David and Samuel the seer did ordain in their set office. So they and their children had the oversight of the gates of the house of the LORD, namely, the house of the tabernacle, by wards. In four quarters were the porters, toward the east, west, north, and south. And their brethren, which were in their villages, were to come after seven days from time to time with them. For these Levites, the four chief porters were in their set office, and were over the chambers and treasuries of the house of God. And they lodged round about the house of God, because the charge was upon them, and the opening thereof every morning pertained to them. And certain of them had the charge of the ministering vessels, that they should bring them in and out by tale. Some of them also were appointed to oversee the vessels, and all the instruments of the sanctuary, and the fine flour, and the wine, and the oil, and the frankincense, and the spices. And some of the sons of the priests made the ointment of the spices. And Mattathias, one of the Levites, who was the firstborn of Shallum the Korahite, had the set office over the things that were made in the pans. And other of their brethren, of the sons of the Kohathites, were over the shewbread, to prepare it every Sabbath. And these are the singers, chief of the fathers of the Levites, who remaining in the chambers were free: for they were employed in that work day and night. These chief fathers of the Levites were chief throughout their generations; these dwelt at Jerusalem” (1 Chronicles 9:14-34).

OVER THE WORK OF THE SERVICE! KEEPERS OF THE GATES OF THE TABERNACLE! KEEPERS OF THE ENTRY! PORTER OF THE DOOR OF THE TABERNACLE OF THE CONGREGATION! PORTERS IN THE GATES! DAVID AND SAMUEL THE SEER DID ORDAIN IN THEIR SET OFFICE! THEY AND THEIR CHILDREN HAD THE OVERSIGHT OF THE GATES OF THE HOUSE OF THE LORD! OVER THE CHAMBERS AND TREASURIES OF THE HOUSE OF GOD! LODGED ROUND ABOUT THE HOUSE OF GOD! BECAUSE THE CHARGE WAS PON THEM! THE OPENING THEREOF EVERY MORNING PERTAINED TO THEM! CERTAIN OF THEM HAD THE CHARGE OF THE MINISTERING VESSELS! APPOINTED TO OVERSEE THE VESSELS, AND ALL THE INSTRUMENTS OF THE SANCTUARY! THESE ARE THE SINGERS! THEY WERE EMPLOYED IN THAT WORK DAY AND NIGHT!

“OF the sons of the Kohathites: Heman a singer, the son of Joel, the son of Shemuel, the son of Elkanah, the son of Jeroham, Theron of ELiel, the son of Torah, the son of Zuph, the son of Elkanah, the son of Joel, the son of Azariah, the son of Zephaniah, the son of Tahath, the son of Asia, the son of Ebiasaph, the son of Korah, the son of Izhar, the son of Kohath, the son of Levi, the son of Israel. And his brother Asaph, who stood on his right hand, even Asaph the son of Berachiah, the son of Shimei, the son of Michael, the son of Baaseiah, the son of Malchiah, the son of Ethni, the son of Zerah, the son of Ahaziah, the son of Ethan, the son of Zimmah, the son of Shimei, the son of Jahath, the son of Gershom, the son of Levi. And their brethren the sons of Menard stood on the left hand: Ethan the son of Kishi, the son of Abdi, the son of Malluch, the son of Hashabiah, the son of Ahaziah, the son of Hilkiah, the son of Amzi, the son of Bani, the son of Shamer, the son of Mali, the son of Mushi, the son of Merari, the son of Levi. Their brethren also the Levites were appointed unto all manner of service of the tabernacle of the house of God. But Aaron and his sons offered upon the altar of the burnt offering, and on the altar of incense, and were appointed for all the work of the place most holy, and to make an atonement for Israel, according to all that Moses the servant of God had commanded” (1 Chronicles 6:33-49).

“And David made him houses in the city of David, and prepared a place for the ark of God, and pitched for it a tent. Then David said, None ought to carry the ark of God but the Levites: for them hath the LORD chosen to carry the ark of God, and to minister unto him for ever. And David gathered all Israel together to Jerusalem, to bring up the ark of the LORD unto his place, which he had prepared for it. And David assembled the children of Aaron, and the Levites: of the sons of Kohath; Uriel the chief, and his brethren and hundred and twenty: of the sons of Merari; Asaiah the chief, and his brethren two hundred and twenty: of the sons of Gershom; Joel the chief, and his brethren an hundred and thirty: of the sons of Elizaphan; Shemaiah the chief, and his brethren two hundred: of the sons of Hebron; Eliel the chief, and his brethren four score: of the sons of Uzziel; Ammindab the chief, and his brethren an hundred and twelve” (1 Chronicles 15:1-10).

“So when David was old and full of days, he made Solomon his son king over Israel. And he gathered together all the princes of Israel, with the priests and the Levites. Now the Levites were numbered from the age of thirty years and upward: and their number by their polls, man by man, was thirty and eight thousand. Of which, twenty and four thousand were set FORWARD the work of the house of the LORD; and six thousand were officers and judges: moreover four thousand were porters; and four thousand praised the LORD with the instruments which I made, said David, to praise therewith. And David divided them into courses among the sons of Levi, namely, Gershon, Kohath, and Merari…The sons of Kohath; Abram, Izhar, Hebron, and Uzziel, four. The sons of Amram; Aaron and Moses: and Aaron was separated that he should sanctifieth the most holy things, he and his sons for ever, to burn incense before the LORD, to minister unto him, and to bless in his name for ever. Now concerning Moses the man of God, his sons were named of the tribe of Levi. The sons of Moses were Gershom, and Eliezer” (1 Chronicles 23:1-6, 12-15).

It is quite clear from these passages found in the Old Testament book of First Chronicles that David and Samuel ordained and appointed the sons of Levi—the sons of Kohath, the sons of Merari, and the sons of Gershon—as ministers in the midst of the sanctuary and Temple of the living God. What’s more, is that it is important for us to understand that these sons of Kohath which were mentioned and spoken of in this particular book were descendants of Korah, and might possibly have been the sons of Korah which were mentioned and spoken of in the book of the Psalms. It’s truly remarkable to think about and consider the fact that when you come to the Old Testament book of the Psalms you will find eleven different and eleven specific psalms which were written by the sons of Korah—sons who were not only given charge over the sanctuary and house of the LORD, but who were responsible for the care of the house and sanctuary. I can’t help but be absolutely gripped and captivated with the fact that perhaps one of the greatest charges of these sons of Korah—these sons of Kohath—was that they were gatekeepers of the house of the LORD, and that they encamped round about the house of the LORD. During the days of David these sons of Korah—these sons of Kohath—would not only oversee the gates and entrances of the house of the LORD, but they would even lodge around the house of the LORD. These sons of Korah would be those who were responsible for opening the gates of the house of the living God every morning because the charge was upon them. Is it any wonder why you would come to the eighty-fourth chapter of the book of the Psalms and find the sons of Korah speaking of the sanctuary, speaking of the courts of the LORD, speaking of the house of the LORD, and speaking of the tabernacles of the LORD—the very dwelling place of the most High God? Consider once more the words which are found written and recorded within the eighty-fourth chapter of this Old Testament book of the Psalms beginning with the first and opening verse:

“How amiable are thy tabernacles, O LORD of hosts! My soul longeth, yea, even fainteth for the courts of the LORD: my heart and my flesh crieth out for the living God. Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O LORD of hosts, my King and my God. Blessed are they that dwell in thy house: they will be still praising thee. Selah. Blessed is the man whose strength is in thee; in whose heart are the ways of them. Who passing through the valley of Baca make it a well; the rain also filleth the pools. They go from strength to strength, every one of them in Zion appeareth before God. O LORD God of hosts, hear my prayer: give ear, O God of Jacob. Selah. Behold, O God our shield, and look upon the face of thine anointed. For a day in thy courts is better than a thousand. I had rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God, than to dwell in the tents of wickedness. For the LORD God is a sun and shield: the LORD will give grace and glory: No good thing will he withhold from them that walk uprightly. O LORD of hosts, Blessed is the man that trusteth in thee” (Psalm 84:1-12).

There is without a doubt in my mind the sons of Korah—those who were given charge and command over the sanctuary of the LORD with its courts therein—earnestly and desperately longed for the house of the LORD. One cannot read the words which are found within the book of the Psalms which were written for the sons of Korah, and not encounter and come face to face with the tremendous reality that at the very center of their affection and at the very center of their desire was the house of the LORD together with its courts, and together with the altar. When we read the narrative surrounding the sons of Korah it is absolutely astounding to think about and consider that their father Korah was one who was ordained and appointed by Moses the servant of the LORD to be among the sons of Levi who would have charge over the sanctuary and tabernacle of the LORD in the wilderness. It is truly wonderful to think about the fact that even though Korah forfeited his place—not only in the Tabernacle of the congregation, but also in the midst of the assembly itself—that his sons would remain in the wake of his death. What’s more, is that not only would his sons remain in the wake a of his death, but they would also continue to carry out the charge and the command that was given them of the LORD through His servant Moses. The simply fact that we continue to read of the sons of Korah during the days of David, and have eleven different psalms within the Old Testament book of the Psalms is something that is absolutely beautiful, for it not only represents the fact that the sons of Korah would not allow themselves to be swept away in his rebellion, nor would incite their own rebellion in the generations which followed. Although Koran’s rebellion would be severe, and although his rebellion would be judged in a supernatural way in the midst of the congregation and assembly of the people of God, it would not be continued, nor would it be carried out by his sons. Although the sons of Korah would have the stigma and stain of their father’s rebellion attached to their name and lineage, they would neither abandon, nor would they forfeit their place in the sanctuary of the living God, nor in the midst of the assembly of His people. FORFEITING YOUR PLACE IN THE SANCTUARY OF GOD, FORFEITING YOUR PLACE IN THE ASSEMBLY OF GOD’S PEOPLE! For the sons of Korah, they would be inextricably and intrinsically linked to the sanctuary and house of the LORD, for it would be unto them charge of the sanctuary was given. It was the sons of Korah who were responsible for opening the sanctuary each and every day, and it was the sons of Korah who lodged round about the sanctuary and house of the living God that they might fulfill their God ordained appointment and charge.

I have to admit that I have never seen the psalms which were found in the Old Testament book of Psalms in this particular light before, however, I am absolutely astounded by how the words found and contained within them take on a whole new meaning when you consider them in light of the history behind their father, and how they were not swept away, nor were they consumed in their father’s iniquity, transgression and rebellion. What’s more, is that if you read the Old Testament book of the Psalms you will encounter and come face to face with the fact that there are a total of eleven psalms which were written for the sons of Korah—psalms which were written for those who were given charge over the sanctuary and house of the living God. If and as you begin reading with and from the forty-second chapter of the book of Psalms you will find that Psalm 42, Psalm 44, Psalm 45, Psalm 46, Psalm 47, Psalm 48, and Psalm 49. Between Psalm 40 and Psalm 50 there are at least seven psalms which were written for the sons of Korah, and it might be argued that Psalm 43 might be a continuation of Psalm 42. It’s truly interesting to think about and consider the language that is found within these psalms which were written for the sons of Korah, for there would be four more psalms later on in this Old Testament book—Psalm 84, Psalm 85, Psalm 87 and Psalm 88—that were also written for the sons of Korah. It’s truly something worth noting and pointing out when you consider the language these sons of Korah—those who had charge and appointment within and over the sanctuary and courts of the LORD—you will find that this language would without a doubt be centered around the sanctuary of the LORD, the courts of the LORD, and would invite individuals to not only come into the courts of the LORD, but to come unto the sanctuary of the living God. I can’t help but read the language that is found within these songs and psalms which were written for the sons of Korah as more than simply songs which might have been sung by them in the congregation and assembly, but through those songs there would be a powerful invitation to those listening to the words to draw nearer, to draw closer, and to come near to the LORD of hosts Himself. I can’t help but read the words which are written and contained within these songs and psalms and view them as a powerful challenge and powerful invitation to those who would sing along, or perhaps even those who would simply hear and listen to them to examine their relationship with the LORD. I am becoming increasingly convinced that these songs were not only invitations to enter into a deeper place with the LORD, but also challenge those who listened to and/or sung the words of them within the current place they themselves were in. The words which were found and recorded within these psalms were an invitation to come unto the sanctuary of the LORD—and not only come unto the sanctuary of the LORD, but also to draw nearer to the LORD their God than they ever have before. Consider if you will the tremendous and intense invitation and challenge that is found within these psalms, and the tremendous challenge it would have presented to those who sang the words contained within the songs, and those who would have heard them:

“As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: When shall I come and appear before God? My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where is thy God? When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holy day. Why art thou cast down, O my soul? And why art thou disquieted in me? Hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him for the help of His countenance. O my God, my soul is cast down within me: therefore will I remember thee from the land of Jordan, and of the Hermonites, from the hill Mizar. Deep calleth unto deep at the noise of thy waterspouts: all thy waves and thy billows are gone over me. Yet the LORD will command His lovingkindness in the daytime, and in the night his song shall be with me, and my prayer unto the God of my life. I will say unto God my rock, Why hast thou forgotten me? Why go I mourning because of the oppression of the enemy? As with a sword in my bones, mine enemies reproach me; while they say daily unto me, Where is thy God?” (Psalm 42:1-10).

“For thou art the God of my strength: why dost thou cast me off? Why go I mourning because of the oppression of the enemy? O send out thy light and thy truth: let them lead me; let them bring me unto thy holy hill, and do thy tabernacles. Then will I go unto the altar of God, unto God my exceeding joy: yea, upon the harp will I praise thee, O God my God. Why art thou cast down, O my soul? And why art thou disquieted within me? Hope in God: for I shall yet praise Him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God” (Psalm 43:2-5).

“We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work thou didst in their days, in the times of old. How thou didst drive out the heathen with thy hand, and plantedst them; how thou didst afflict the people, and cast them out. For they got not the land in possession by their own sword, neither did their own arm save them: but by thy right hand, and thine arm, and the light of thy countenance, because thou hadst favor unto them. Thou art my King, O God: Command deliverances for Jacob. Through thee will we push down our enemies: through thy name will we tread them under that rise up against us. For I will not trust in my bow, neither shall my sword save me. But thou hast saved us from our enemies, and hast put them to shame that hated us. In God we boast all the day long, and praise thy name for ever. Selah” (Psalm 44:1-8).

“God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore will we not fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea; though the waters thereof roar and be troubled, though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof. Selah. There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of God the holy place of the tabernacles of the most High. God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help her, and that right early. The heathen raged, the kingdoms were moved: He uttered His voice, the earth melted. The LORD of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah. Come, behold the works of the LORD, What desolations he hath made in the earth. He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire. Be still, and know that I am God: I will e exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth. The LORD of hosts is with us; The God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah” (Psalm 46:1-11).

“O clap your hands, all ye people; shout unto God with the voice of triumph. For the LORD most high is terrible; He is a great King over all the earth. He shall subdue the people under us, and the nations under our feet. He shall choose our inheritance for us, the excellency of Jacob whom he loved. Selah. God is gone up with a shout, the LORD with the sound of a trumpet. Sing praises to God, sing praises: sing praised unto our King, sing praises. For God is the King of all the earth: Sony ye praises with understanding. God reigneth over the heathen: God sitteth upon the throne of his holiness. The princes of the people are gathered together, even the people of the God of Abraham: for the shields of the earth belong unto God: He is greatly exalted” (Psalm 47:1-9).

“Great is the LORD, and greatly to be praised in the city of our God, in the mountain of His holiness. Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth, is mount Zion, on the sides of the north, the city of the great King. God is known in her palaces for a refuge” (Psalm 48:1-3).

“As we have heard, so have we seen in the city of the LORD of hosts, in the city of our God: God will establish it for ever. Selah. We have thought of thy lovingkindness, O God, in the midst of thy temple. According to thy name, O God, so is thy praise unto the ends of the earth: thy right hand is full of righteousness. Let mount Zion rejoice, let the daughters of Judah be glad, because of thy judgments. Walk about Zion, and go round about her: tell the towers thereof. Mark ye well her bulwarks, consider her palaces; that ye may tell it to the generation following. For this God is our God for ever and ever: He will be our guide even unto death” (Psalm 48:8-14).

As I bring this writing to a close, I fell compelled to end and conclude with the forty-fifth chapter of the Old Testament book of the Psalms, for it is what we read and what we find in this chapter that I am convinced summarizes and is essentially the quintessential psalm among the psalms which are before us. The forty-fifth chapter was to the chief musician upon Shoshannim, for the sons of Korah, and was not only for instruction, but was also considered “A song of loves.” The reason I conclude with this chapter, is because the forty-fifth chapter of the book of Psalms is not only a song of loves, but it is a song about the king who sits upon and reigns from the throne in the midst of the city of Jerusalem. What’s more, is that this particular psalm is not only a reference to the earthly king which would sit upon the throne of David in the midst of the city of Jerusalem, but it is also a Messianic psalm and one that points to the eternal and sovereign King who would not only sit upon the throne of David, but who would be the King of kings and Lord of lords. The words which are written and contained within this psalm are incredibly powerful, for they express a deep affection for the king—and while the words which are found in the psalm itself might have been sung about an earthly king, they are words which we can and should sing before and unto the Lord who is our King, and the Lord who is sovereign, who is eternal, who is triumphant, and who is victorious. THE SONG OF THE KING! THE SONG UNTO THE KING! I leave you with the words which are written and recorded within the forty-fifth chapter of the book of the Psalms, as the words which we find written and recorded within this passage should resonate and stir within our soul and spirit that we might burst forth in song before, unto and about our King who reigns eternal and who is victorious, who is omnipotent, who is omnipresent, and who is omniscient. Consider if you will the following words which are found within this psalm beginning to read with and from the first verse of the chapter:

“My heart is inditing a good matter: I speak of the things which I have made touching the king: My tongue is the pen of a ready writer. Thou art fairer than the children of men: Grace is poured into thy lips: Therefore God hath blessed thee for ever. Gird thy sword upon thy thigh, O most mighty, with thy glory and thy majesty. And in thy majesty ride prosperously because of truth and meekness and righteousness; and thy right hand shall teach thee terrible things. Thine arrows are sharp in the heart of the king’s enemies; whereby the people fall under thee. Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: the sceptre of thy kingdom is a right sceptre. Thou lovest righteousness, and hatest wickedness: therefore God, thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows. All thy garments smell of myrrh, and aloes, and cassia, out of the ivory palaces, whereby they have made thee glad. King’s daughters were among thy honorable women…Hearken, O daughter, and consider, and incline thine ear; forget also thine own people, and thy father’s house; so shall the king greatly desire thy beauty: for he is thy Lord; and worship thou him. And the daughter of Tyre shall be there with a gift; even the rich among the people shall intreat thy FAVOUR. The king’s daughter is all glorious within: her clothing is of wrought gold. She shall be brought unto the king in raiment of needlework: the virgins her companions that follow her shall be brought unto thee. With gladness and rejoicing shall they b e brought: they shall enter into the king’s palace. Instead of thy fathers shall be thy children, whom thou mayest make princes in all the earth. I will make thy name to be remembered in all generation: therefore shall all the people praise thee for ever and ever” (Psalm 45:1-17).

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