The Invitation to Discover Christ In the Psalms

Today’s selected reading continues in the Old Testament poetic book of the Psalms which is a collection and compilation of prayers, petition, praise, instruction, invitation and warning found within psalms, hymns and spiritual songs. More specifically, today’s passage is found in chapters one-hundred and ten through one-hundred and eighteen of this Old Testament book. DISCOVERING CHRIST THROUGH WORSHIP! ENCOUNTERING CHRIST THROUGH WORSHIP! FIDING THE SON IN THE MIDST OF WORSHIP! THE VISION TO SEE THE SON WITHIN WORSHIP! THE ETERNAL CHRIST AND THE HEART OF WORSHIP! DID YOU KNOW YOU CAN FIND THE SON THROUGH WORSHIP IN THE SANCTUARY? SONGS ABOUT THE ETERNAL SON! SONGS UNTO THE ETERNAL SON! MESSIANIC PSALMS OF CHRIST! PSALMS THAT POINT TO CHRIST! SONGS THAT POINT TO CHRIST! PSALMS THAT POINT TO CHRIST! THROUGH THE PSALMS WE WORSHIP GOD, BUT THROUGH THE PSALMS WE ENCOUNTER CHRIST! DID YOU KNOW YOU CAN FIND CHRIST IN THE PSALMS! CHRIST IN THE PSALMS! CHRIST OF THE PSALMS! THE DIRECT CONNECTION BETWEEN THE MESSIANIC PSALMS AND THE EPISTLE WRITTEN UNTO THE HEBREWS! SEEING CHRIST IN THE OLD TESTAMENT! FINDING CHRIST IN THE OLD TESTAMENT! DOES YOUR WORSHIP BRING YOU TO CHRIST? DOES YOUR WORSHIP ALLOW YOU TO SEE THE ETERNAL CHRIST? IS CHRIST FOUND WITHIN YOUR WORSHIP? CAN CHRIST BE SEEN IN YOUR WORSHIP IN HIS HOLY SANCTUARY? PSALM 2:1-2! PSALM 2:7! PSALM 2:9! PSALM 8:2! PSALM 8:4-6! PSALM 16:8-11! PSALM 22:1! PSALM 22:7-8! PSALM 22:18! PSALM 22:22! PSALM 40:6-8! PSALM 41:9! PSALM 45:6-7! PSALM 68:18! PSALM 69:9! PSALM 69:21! PSALM 78:2! PSALM 91:11-12! PSALM 102:25-27! PSALM 110:1! PSALM 110:4! PSALM 118:6! PSALM 118:22-23! PSALM 118:26!

When you come to this particular set of psalms you will find the first psalm in this series being a psalm of David—and not only a psalm of David, but also a very specific psalm. If you read the words which are found within the opening verse of the one-hundred and tenth chapter of the book of Psalms you will find words which might look and appear familiar to you if you have read the New Testament—specifically, the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews. The New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews might very well be best understood as a means to present unto the Hebrew people Christ the Messiah—and not only Christ the Messiah, but also to present Christ the Messiah from the Old Testament. Undoubtedly any Hebrew and Jew would have been familiar with the Torah, and would have been familiar with the poetic literature found within the psalms, as well as the writings of the prophets. As you read the words found within the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews you will quickly discover the author’s intent was to build a powerful and wonderful image of Jesus the Christ as the eternal One whom the Law and the prophets spoke of and prophesied about. Moreover, the underlying intention and motive of the author who wrote this particular epistle was to present unto the Jewish people a Christ whom they had rejected when He was manifested among them. If you read the four gospel narratives concerning the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ you will find that while He did in fact come to His own, His own received Him not, and instead despised and rejected Him. The New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews describes how Jesus did not take on the form of angels when He came to the earth, but rather He took on the seed and nature of Abraham. What’s more, is that if you read the New Testament gospel written by the apostle John you will find tremendous language concerning Jesus the Christ, and how He was [and is still] the eternal Word who was in the beginning with God, who is God, and who simply is the divine and eternal Word. Within the opening chapter of the New Testament gospel written by the apostle John you will find the awesome reality that when Jesus Christ came into the earth and was manifested among men, He came as the living Word who took on the form of human flesh. When Jesus came to the earth and was manifested among men, He neither took on the nature of angels, nor retained His own divine nature which would have been known and manifested in heaven. In fact, the apostle Paul when writing the epistle unto the Philippian congregation further emphasized this awesome and undeniable reality of Jesus the Christ laying aside His divine nature in order to take on the form of human flesh. Concerning Jesus coming unto His own and being despised and rejected, the Hebrew prophet Isaiah prophesied and foretold of this rejection when writing the words which we see in the fifty-third chapter of this Old Testament prophetic book.

As I sit here today, I can’t help but be absolutely gripped and captivated the by the fact that when and as we enter into the courts of the LORD, and when we enter into the sanctuary of the Lord our God, the worship we bring and present unto Him must bring us face to face with the eternal Christ. If there is one thing the words which are found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms reveals unto us, it’s the awesome and incredible reality that even through the psalms we can find Christ, and even through the psalms we can encounter the person of Jesus Christ. There is no indication whether or not David or the other psalmists had any clue they were speaking of and prophesying concerning the coming Messiah and Christ who would be manifested in the midst of the earth, but suffice it to say that the psalmists certainly wrote about the eternal Christ who would be manifested in the midst of the Jewish nation, and would be the divine and personal representation of the eternal God in the midst of the earth. With this being said, we must recognize and understand that when reading the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews the author’s sole intent and purpose was to present Jesus Christ as the eternal Son of God—and not only as the eternal Son of God, but also as the Jewish Messiah and the fulfillment of the Old Testament sacrificial system. This is incredibly important to think about and consider, for we must understand the epistle as being one which was written unto those who might very well have rejected and despised the living and eternal Christ when He appeared among them and made Himself known unto them. We must make absolutely no mistake about the fact that when Jesus the Christ came into the earth He took on the form of Abraham’s seed, as well as taking on the flesh. We must make absolutely no mistake about the fact that Jesus the Christ laid aside His divine nature and glory which He had with the Father from eternity past in order that He might exist and move within the realm of time and space. We see this reality as being expressed in the great high priestly prayer which Jesus prayed in the hearing and company of the disciples on the night in which He was betrayed by one of His own. What’s more, is that it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand that Jesus the Christ was despised and rejected by His own, and that His own received Him not but in all reality viewed Him as an imposter. With this being said, I invite you to first and foremost consider the words which are written and recorded in the first two chapters of the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews, for it is here within these two chapters we are presented with a powerful picture of Jesus Christ as the eternal and only begotten Son of God who came in the form and likeness of Abraham’s seed:

“God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets, hath in these last days spoken unto us by His Son, whom He hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also He made the worlds; who being the brightness of His glory, and the express image of His person, and upholding all things by the word of His power, when He had by Himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high; being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they. For unto which of the angels said He at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to Him a Father, and He shall e to me a Son? And again, when He bringeth in the first begotten into the world, He saith, And let all the angels of God worship Him. And of the angels He saith, Who maketh his angels spirits, and his ministers a flame of fire. But unto the Son He saith, Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of thy k indomitable. Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows. And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands: they shall perish; but thou remainest; and they shall and they all shall wax old as doth a garment; and as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall e changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail. But to which of the angels said He at any time, Sit on my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool? Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation” (Hebrews 1:1-14).

“For unto the angels hath He not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man, that thou art mindful of him? OR the son of man, that thou visitest him Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst Him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that He put all in subjection under Him, He left nothing that is not put under Him. But now we see not yet all things put under Him. But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that He by the grace of God should taste death for every man. For it became Him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause He is not ashamed to call them brethren, saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee. And agin, I will put my trust in Him. And again, Behold I and the children which God hath given me. Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, He also Himself likewise took part of the same; that through death He might destroy Him that had the power of death, that is, the devil; and deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. For verily He took not on Him the nature of angels; but He took on Him the seed of Abraham. Wherefore in all things it behoved Him to be made like unto His brethren, that He might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people. For in that He Himself hath suffered being tempted, He is able to succour them that are tempted” (Hebrews 2:5-18).

It is quite clear from the very outset of the New Testament epistle of Hebrews that the author sought to reveal how in times past God spoke very clearly through the prophets, but in these Last Days hath chosen s to speak in an entirely new and different way—namely, speaking through His eternal Son. In the opening two chapters of this New Testament epistle we encounter Christ—and not only do we encounter Christ, but we encounter Christ as the eternal Son of God who was from the beginning, and who was the one who was prophesied about and foretold of by the prophets, within the Law, and in the psalms themselves. In fact, you will find within the opening two chapters of the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews multiple references to the psalms, and those words which are found within the book of Psalms, and which point directly at and speak to the coming Messiah and Christ. Undoubtedly the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews was well-versed and knowledgeable in the Torah and in the Hebrew Scriptures, and used them as a foundation to demonstrate Jesus as Christ the Messiah, as well as the eternal and only begotten Son of God. Moreover, the author used the words of the Torah and the writings of the prophets and psalmists to demonstrate that Jesus was the perfect and ultimate fulfillment of the Old Testament sacrificial system that was implemented under Moses the servant of God. We cannot separate the New Testament epistle of Hebrews from the words found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms, for within the Old Testament book of the Psalms we find countless references to and concerning Jesus the Christ. I find it absolutely remarkable and astonishing when reading the Old Testament book of the Psalms that the psalmists—even if they weren’t readily aware of it and understood it—spoke of and prophesied concerning Jesus the coming Messiah and Son of the living God. What I so love about the Old Testament book of the Psalms is that not only are they an invitation to worship and experience the LORD our God, but within and through many of the Psalms there is also an invitation to experience and encounter Christ the Messiah and Son of the living God. I realize this might not seem likely, however, there are a number of psalms that point directly to Jesus the Christ, and which help paint a powerful picture of this One who would take on the form of human flesh and would be the physical embodiment of the living and eternal God in the flesh. With this in mind, I invite you to now consider the words found in the opening chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John beginning to read with the first verse of the opening chapter:

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by Him; and without Him was not any thing made that was made. In Him was life; and a the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness; and the Rines’s comprehended it not. There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through Him might believe. He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light. That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made by Him, and the world knew Him not. He came unto His own, and His own received Him not. But as many as received Him, to them that believe on his name: which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the f Leah, nor of the will of man, but of God. And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the holy begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. John bare witness of Him, and cried, saying, This was He of whom I spake, He that cometh after me is preferred before me: for He was before me. And of His fullness have all we received, and grace for grace. For the Law as given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, He hath declared Him” (John 1:1-18).

The words which the apostle John wrote and recorded within this particular section of Scripture must be carefully understood when seeking to understand Jesus who is the Messiah and Christ—the Son of the eternal and living God. Within this passage of Scripture we find the apostle John speaking of the eternal and divine nature of Jesus—not only as the divine and living Word, but also that as the Word He was with God in the beginning, He was in the beginning, and He was God. At the very outset of the gospel narrative concerning the life and ministry of Jesus the apostle John writes and brings his audience face to face with the eternal and divine nature of Jesus as the divine and eternal “logos,”—the eternal Word which came down from heaven and dwelt among men. The apostle John expresses this divine nature by further declaring that the Word was in the beginning with God, and that all things were made by Him, and without Him was not any thing made that was made. John goes on to further declare that in the Word was life, and this life was the light of men and shines in the darkness. What we must recognize and understand when reading the words of the apostle John in the opening chapter of this New Testament gospel is that He not only attempted to speak to and reveal the divine and eternal nature of Jesus as the Word which was in the beginning with God, and which was in the beginning God, but also how Jesus took on the form of human flesh and dwelt among us. In all reality one would say there are three distinct characteristics of Jesus which are aptly expressed within this passage of Scripture—namely, that Jesus is the Word which was in the beginning with God, and which was in the beginning God; namely, that this Word became and was made flesh and dwelt among us; and namely, that He came unto His own and His own received Him not. From the very outset of this particular gospel narrative the apostle John seeks to highlight and underscore the divine nature of Jesus the Christ, how Jesus took on the form of frail human flesh, and how Jesus dwelt among us in that form of human flesh. What’s more, is that within these verses we not only discover that the darkness did not comprehend the life which was the Light of men bound up and contained within Jesus, but also that He came unto His own, and His own received Him not. This is important for us to recognize and consider, for as you read the gospel narrative written by the apostle John you will find time after time and example after example of how His own received Him not, as well as how His own rejected and despised Him. The New Testament gospel narrative is replete with account after account of His own receiving Him not, and His own rejecting and despising Him—a reality which is expressed and proclaimed in the Old Testament prophetic book of Isaiah. Consider if you will the words which are found within this Old Testament prophetic book beginning to read with and from the first and opening verse of the fifty-third chapter:

“Who hath believed our report? And to whom is the arm of the LORD revealed? For He shall grow up before Him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: He hath not form nor comeliness; and when we shall see Him, there is no beauty that we should desire Him. He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from Him; He was despised, and we esteemed Him not. Surely He hath born our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem Him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. But He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon Him; and with His stripes we are healed. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to His own way; and the LORD hath laid on Hi the iniquity of us all. He was oppressed, and He was afflicted, yet He opened not His mouth: He is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so He openeth not His mouth. He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare His generation? For He was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was He stricken. And He made His grave with the wicked, and with the rich in His death; because he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in His mouth. Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise Him; He hath put Him to grief: when thou shalt make His soul an offering for sin, He shall see His seed, He shall prolong His days, and the pleasure of the LORD shall prosper in His hand. He shall see of the travail of His soul, and shall e satisfied: by His knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for He shall bear their iniquities. Therefore will I divide Him a portion with the great, and He shall divide the spoil with the strong; because He hath poured out His soul unto death: and He was numbered with the transgressors; and He bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors” (Isaiah 53:1-12).

Within this prophetic revelation and declaration of the Hebrew prophet Isaiah we encounter the suffering of the Messiah which would be foretold and spoken of by inspiration of the Holy Spirit, but we also encounter the tremendous reality of the Messiah being despised and rejected by His own. We know from the New Testament gospel narrative of the apostle John that the Messiah came unto His own and that His own received Him not, and the prophetic words of Isaiah further confirm this reality when they speak of the Messiah being afflicted, being smitten, being oppressed, despised and esteemed not. We cannot overlook the language that is written and recorded within this passage of Scripture, for the language that is found therein points directly to the reality that the Messiah not only took on the form of human flesh that He might suffer and make atonement for sin and transgression, but also during the three and a half years of public ministry He engaged Himself in He was greatly despised, greatly rejected, greatly abhorred by many during that generation. We know for a fact that virtually the entire religious system and establishment of that generation hated, abhorred and despised Jesus the Christ, as well as the claims He made and the works which He wrought among them. In all reality, it is worth noting that the religious leaders took great offense to Jesus’ claim that He was truly and indeed the Son of God, and His seemingly and blatant disregard for their rules, their traditions, and even for the Law which the LORD gave unto Moses His servant. The religious system of Jesus’ generation could not handle Him because He did not operate within their boundaries and their parameters. Jesus could not be boxed in, nor could He be manipulated, controlled and intimidated by the religious system of His generation, and we would do well to recognize and understand this. In the wilderness we find Jesus being tempted of the devil, and yet we find that despite His being tempted of the devil He sinned not with His words or His actions. How absolutely incredible it is to think about the fact that Jesus could not be tempted to sin in the wilderness, and He could not be manipulated, coerced, controlled and intimidated by religion and by the religious leaders. Though the Pharisees continually and repeatedly attempted to test and tempt Him, He would never sin with His lips, nor would He ever commit an offense against His Father in heaven. How absolutely remarkable and astounding it is to think about the fact Jesus was despised, abhorred and rejected by a good number of those during His days—those who were so bound by and steeped in tradition and religion, and those who could not see past His claims, nor His works and deeds.

THE CLAIMS OF JESUS! THE WORKS OF JESUS! THE DEEDS OF JESUS! If and as you study the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ you will encounter the awesome and incredible reality that those who despised and rejected Him did so because of the words which He spoke, and the works which He wrought among them in their midst. Those who despised and rejected Jesus the Christ did so because He would not and could not fit into any box or mold they attempted to put Him in, and He operated solely and completely according to the divine will of the Father. When Jesus came to the earth He came not to do His own will, but to do the will of the One who had sent Him. Even Jesus Himself would declare that His meat was to do the will of the Father, thus emphatically declaring that His sole mission and purpose was to fulfill that which the eternal God had sent Him to do. Jesus took on the form of human flesh and dwelt among us in order that He might completely and utterly fulfill the divine and perfect will of the Father within and upon the earth. Jesus did not come of His own accord, and Jesus did not come speaking of Himself, but He came speaking of the Father. Eventually—when He knew He was departing from this world and returning to the Father—He would speak of the Spirit, and how His presence in the earth would be replaced by the Holy Spirit who would be the divine Counseller and would guide them into all truth. Throughout most of the ministry of Jesus He spoke about the Father, and He spoke of delighting to do the will of His Father who was in heaven, and there would come a time when Jesus would begin speaking of the Spirit—the same Spirit which descended upon Him in the bodily form of a dove when He emerged out of the waters of baptism at the Jordan River. Oh that we would behold with great wonder and great awe the divine nature and character of the eternal and living Christ, and that He was the physical embodiment of the divine and eternal Father within and upon the earth. Jesus came into the earth and came unto His own that He might demonstrate and show unto man the eternal Father, and to make Him known unto them. Jesus the Christ took on the form of human flesh, and took on Him the form of the seed of Abraham that He might be a merciful and faithful high priest who is able to minister unto those who are tempted, those who are afflicted, those who are overwhelmed, and those who have great need of the divine nature and character of the living God. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this absolutely precious reality of Jesus the Christ taking on the form of flesh, and dwelling among us, for He was willing to lay aside His divine nature, and the glory which He had with the Father from eternity past that He might fulfill the divine will and plan of the living God from before the foundation of the world. Consider if you will the words which are found in the seventeenth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John, as well as the words which are found in the second chapter of the New Testament epistle written by the apostle Paul unto the Philippian saints:

“These words spake Jesus, and lifted up His eyes to heaven, and said, Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee: as thou hast given Him power over all flesh, that He should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given Him. And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent. I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do. And now, O Father, glorify thou me with thine own self with the glory which I had with thee before the world was” (John 17:1-5).

“If there be therefore any consolation in Christ, if any comfort of love, if any fellowship of the Spirit, if any bowels and mercies, fulfil ye my joy, that ye be likeminded, having the same love, being of one accord, of one mind. Let nothing be done through strife or vain glory; but in loneliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves. Look not every man on His own things, but every man also on the things of others. Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: but made Himself of no reputation, and took upon Him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: and being found in fashion as a man, He humbled Himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. Wherefore God also hath highly exalted Him, and given Him a name which is above every name: that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Philippians 2:1-11).

This divine and eternal nature is further expressed in the New Testament epistle which the apostle Paul wrote unto the Colossians, as well as the words which the apostle John wrote in the thirteenth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative of the life of Jesus written by the apostle John. Consider if you will the following two passages which further speak to this divine and eternal nature of Jesus the Christ and Son of the living God, and His direct relationship with the eternal Father:

“…giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of saints in light: who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of His dear Son: In whom we have redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness of sins: who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature: For by Him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by Him, and for Him: and He is before all things, and by Him all things consist. And He is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things He might have the preeminence. For it pleased the Father that in Him should all fullness dwell; and, having made peace through the blood of His cross, by Him to reconcile all things unto Himself; by him, I say, whether they be things in earth, or things in heaven” (Colossians 1:12-20).

“Now before the feast of the Passover, when Jesus knew that His hour was come that He should depart out of this world unto the Father, having loved His own which were in the world, He loved them unto the end. And supper being ended, the devil having now put into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray Him; Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into His hands, and that He was come from God, and went to God; He riseth from supper, and laid aside His garments; and took a towel, and girded Himself. After that He poureth water into a bason, and began to wash the disciples’ feet, and to wipe them with the towel wherewith He was girded” (John 13:1-5).

We must recognize and understand these passages of Scripture which directly point to the eternal and divine nature of Jesus the Christ, for we must recognize that when Jesus came to the earth—not only did He come as the eternal and only begotten Son of the living God, but He also came as the promised Messiah and Christ. When we read the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews we come face to face with the wonderful and beautiful truth of Jesus the Christ—not only fulfilling Scripture, but also being spoken of within the psalms. If and as you read the words which are found within the first two chapters of the epistle written unto the Hebrews you will find the author taking those references and those declarations made by the psalmists concerning Jesus the Christ and the Messiah, and using them to paint a truly wonderful and powerful picture of Jesus who is the Son of God. I have to admit that I absolutely love the words which are found within the opening chapters of the epistle written unto the Hebrews, for within those words we see a very clear and present picture of Jesus the Christ, and how Jesus was spoken of and foretold—even by the psalmists. We know and understand that Jesus was prophesied and spoken of by the ancient Hebrew prophets, and we know that Jesus was indeed spoken of within the Law, however, we must also recognize that Jesus was spoken of in the Messiah. As you read the Old Testament poetic book of the Psalms you will find that there were certain statements and declarations that were made by the psalmists which directly correlated to and spoke of the coming Messiah. There are certain psalms which are commonly referred to as “Messianic Psalms,” while there other psalms which contain specific references to the Messiah, and specific words and phrases which were used by the Messiah. Perhaps the most noted Messianic psalm that contains words which were actually used by the Messiah is the twenty-second chapter of this poetic book where we find words which were echoed by Jesus the Christ as He hung naked and bleeding suspended between earth and sky.

The more I read and the more I consider the Old Testament book of the Psalms the more I can’t help but encounter the tremendous invitation to not only worship before the Great King, but also to encounter and come before the eternal and only begotten Son of the living God. The New Testament author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews used a number of Messianic references found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms in order to paint and portray a very clear and candid picture of the Messiah. The New Testament author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews took references from the Old Testament book of the Psalms—references which they undoubtedly knew through inspiration of the Holy Spirit—directly applied to Jesus the Christ and the Messiah. The author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews understood these passages and references from within the Psalms had a direct link to Jesus the Christ, and used them to reveal unto their audience that this Jesus who walked among them was indeed the Son of God, and was indeed the Messiah and Christ. Before I even delve into the specific references that were taken from the book of the Psalms and used to paint this beautiful portrait of Christ, I feel it absolutely necessary to draw and call your attention to the words which the apostle Peter spoke on the Day of Pentecost when he addressed more than three thousand men and women in the city of Jerusalem. If you turn and direct your attention to the second chapter of the New Testament book of Acts you will find the narrative and account of the Day of Pentecost and the events that surrounded the arrival and outpouring of the Spirit. In response to those in Jerusalem thinking that those who spoke in other tongues and other languages were drunk, the apostle Peter would not only quote the Old Testament prophet Joel, but the apostle Peter would also call and direct their attention to the reality of this Jesus whom they crucified and put to death outside the city of Jerusalem, and yet whom God the Father raised up from death to life on the third day, and received Him unto Himself and to His right hand as He ascended into heaven. Consider if you will the following words which are found within the second chapter of the book of Acts, and those words which were spoken by the apostle Peter concerning this Jesus whom they crucified, and yet who not only rose from the dead on the third day, and not only ascended unto the right hand of the Father, but also who sent the eternal and Holy Spirit who had filled the upper room where the one-hundred and twenty were gathered together praying and in one accord:

“And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be saved. Ye men of Israel, hear these words; Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by Him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know: Him, being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain: whom God hath raised up, having loosed the pains of death: because it was not possible that He should be Holden of it. For David speaketh concerning Him, I foresaw the Lord always before my face, for he is on my right hand, that I should not be moved: Therefore did my heart rejoice, and my tongue was glad; moreover also my flesh shall rest in hope: because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. Thou hast mad eknown to me the ways of life; thou shalt make me full of joy with thy countenance. Men and brethren, let me freely speak unto you of the patriarch David, that he is both dead and buried, and his sepulchre is with us unto this day. Therefore being a prophet, and knowing that God had sworn with an oath to him, that of the fruit of his loins, according to the flesh, he would raise up Christ to sit on his throne; he seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his flesh did see corruption. This Jesus hath God raised up, whereof we all are witnesses. Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear. For David is not ascended into the heavens: but he saith himself, The LORD said unto my Lord, sit thou on my right hand, until I make thy foes thy footstool. Therefore let all the house of Israel know assuredly, that God hath made that same Jesus, whom ye have crucified, both Lord and Christ. Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart, and said unto Peter and to the rest of the apostles. Men and brethren, what shall we do? Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost. For the promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call. And with many other words did He testily and exhort, saying, Save yourselves from this untoward generation” (Acts 2:21-40).

With this in mind, it is also necessary to read and consider the words which the apostle Peter would speak and are recorded for us in the very next chapter of the book of Acts. After healing the man who was lame and sat outside the Temple at the gate called Beautiful, the apostle Peter would once more speak before those within the Temple—not necessarily about the man before them who was healed, but rather about Jesus in whose name this man was healed, and this Jesus whom they crucified according to the flesh. Consider if you will the words which are found within the third chapter of the New Testament book of Acts beginning to read from the eleventh verse after this lame man leaping up stood, and walked, and entered with Peter and John into the Temple, whaling, and leaping and praising God. Consider the response which the apostle Peter gave when all the people saw this lame man walking and praising God and knew that it was this same man which sat for alms at the Beautiful gate of the Temple:

“And as the lame man which was healed held Peter and John, all the people ran together unto them in the porch that is called Solomon’s greatly wondering. And when Peter saw it, he answered unto the people, Ye men of Israel, why marvel ye at this? Or why look ye so earnestly on us, as though by our own power or holiness we had made this man to walk? The God of Abraham, and of Isaac, and of Jacob, the God of our fathers, hath glorified His Son Jesus; whom ye delivered up, and denied Him in the presence of Pilate, when He was determined to let Him go. But ye denied the Holy One and the Just, and desired a murder to be granted unto you; and killed the Prince of life, whom God hath raised from the dead; whereof we are witnesses. And his name through faith in His name hath made this man strong, whom ye see and know: yea, the faith which is boy Him hath given Him this perfect soundness in the presence of you all. And now, brethren, I wot that through ignorance ye did it, as did also your rulers. But those things which God before had shewed by the mouth of all His prophets, that Christ should suffer, He hath so fulfilled. Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord;and he shall send Jesus Christ, which before was preached unto you: whom the heaven must receive until the times of restitution of all things, which God hath spoken by the mouth of all his holy prophets since the world began. For Moses truly said unto the fathers, A prophet shall the LORD your God raise up unto you of your brethren, like unto me; Him shall ye hear in all things whatsoever He shall say unto you. And it shall come to pass, that every soul, which will not hear that prophet, shall e destroyed from among the people. Yea, and all the prophets from Samuel and those that follower after, as many as have spoken, have likewise foretold of these days. Ye are the children of the prophets, and of the covenant which God made with our fathers, saying unto Abraham, And in thy seed shall all the kindreds of the earth be blessed. Unto you first God, having raise up His Son Jesus, sent Him to bless you, in turning away every one of you from his iniquities” (Acts 3:11-26).

The apostle Peter under further inspiration of the Holy Spirit and with a holy boldness, authority and confidence given in the name of Jesus Christ, as well as in the baptism of the Holy Spirit that was received on the day of Pentecost would further proclaim the following words when the Sadducees came upon them, laid hands on them, and put them on hold until the following day. When you begin reading with and from the opening verse of the fourth chapter you will find that as Peter and John spoke unto the people, the priests, and the captain of the Temple, and the Sadducees came upon them, being grieved that they taught the people, and preached through Jesus the resurrection of the dead. It is absolutely wonderful and remarkable to read the following words which were spoken with great authority and boldness by the apostle Peter after they had been removed and released from the hold. Consider if you will the following words which were written and recorded by the beloved physician Luke concerning this powerful declaration of the apostle Peter:

“And as they spake unto the people, the priests, and the captain of the Temple, and the Sadducees, came upon them, being grieved that they taught the people, and preached through Jesus the resurrection from the dead. And they laid hands on them, and put them in hold unto the next day: for it was now eventide. Howbeit many of them which heard the word believed; and the number of the men was about five thousand. And it came to pass on the morrow, that their rulers, and e leers, and scribes, and Annas the high priest, and Caiaphas, and John, and Alexander, and as many as were of the kindred of the high priest, were gathered together at Jerusalem. And when they had set them in the midst, they asked, By what power, or by what name, have ye done this? Then Peter, filled with the Holy Ghost, said unto them, Ye rulers of the people, and elders of Israel, If we this day be examined of the good deed done to the impotent man, by what means He is made whole; be it known unto you all, and to all the people of Israel, that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom ye crucified, whom God raised from the dead, even by Him doth this man stand here before you whole. This is the stone which was set at nought of you builders, which is become the head of the corner. Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under haven given among men, whereby we must be saved” (Acts 4:1-12).

Taking this even further, and as you continue reading in the fourth chapter of the book of Acts you will find the following words which were prayed by the saints and disciples of Jesus the Christ after the apostles were released by the religious council and returned to their own company. Consider the following words which are found in the fourth chapter beginning to read with and from the twenty-third verse:

“And being let go, they went to their own company, and reported all that the chief priests and elders had said unto them. And when they heard that, they lifted up their voice to God with one accord, and said, Lord, thou art God, which hast made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and all that in them is: who by the mouth of thy servant David hast said, Why did the heathen rage, and the people imagine vain things? The kings of the earth stood up, and the rulers were gathered together against the Lord, and against His Christ. For of a truth against thy holy child Jesus, whom thou hast anointed, both Herod, and Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles, and the people of Israel, were gathered together, for to do whatsoever thy hand and thy counsel determined before to be done. And now, Lord, behold their threatenings: and grant unto thy servants, that with all boldness they may speak thy word, by stretching forth thine hand to heal; and that signs and wonders may be done by the name of thy hold child Jesus. And when they had prayed, the place was shaken where they were assembled together; and they were all filled with the Holy Ghost, and they spake the word of God with boldness” (Acts 4:23-31).

When you take the time to read and consider each of these passages found within the New Testament book of Acts you will find the apostle Peter speaking unto the people, unto the priests, unto the captain of the Temple, unto the Sadducees, and unto all those who were before him and within the sound of his voice concerning Jesus the Christ. These passages not only bring us face to face with the awesome truth concerning Jesus the Christ, but they also show and demonstrate how the apostle Peter—under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit with all boldness authority and confidence—emphatically proclaimed and declared the truth concerning this Jesus Christ whom the people of Israel with the help of the Romans crucified and put to death. It is absolutely necessary and important that we recognize and understand this reality, for when you come to the opening chapters of the epistle written unto the Hebrews you will find the author doing a similar thing by taking references found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms and using them to paint a beautiful and powerful portrait concerning Jesus. What we must realize and recognize concerning this portrait is that it was not only intended on revealing the truth about Jesus as the Son of God, but also to express His divine essence and nature. We must pay close attention to and consider the words which are found within the New Testament epistle which was written unto the Hebrews, for the words found within this passage of Scripture were taken directly from multiple psalms found within this Old Testament. In all reality, we might as well say that we cannot truly understand Jesus as the Christ, as the Messiah and as the eternal Son of God without understanding the psalms where His presence is felt and found. There are countless psalms found within this Old Testament poetic book where we see glimpses and portraits of the Messiah, and while there are specific psalms that are entirely and altogether portraits of the Messiah, there are other psalms which contain their own unique references to Jesus the Christ. If and as you read the words found within the first two chapters of the epistle which was written unto the Hebrews you will encounter psalm after psalm that helps paint a beautiful picture of Jesus Christ, and one can’t help but see the poetic nature in the opening chapters of this epistle. Undoubtedly the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews was seeking to use the language of the psalms—language which their reader and audience would have been very familiar with—in order to paint a beautiful and wonderful portrait of Christ. What’s more, is that the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews sought to take these references from the Old Testament book of the Psalms and highlight and underscore the glory, the majesty, the splendor, the wonder, the awe, and the beauty of Jesus the Christ. Consider if you will the following words which are found within the opening chapters of the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews, which were taken directly from the book of the Psalms:

“Thou are my Son, this day have I begotten thee” (Psalm 2:7)

“I will be to Him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son” (Psalm 89:26-27).

“Who maketh his angels spirits, and his ministers a flame of rice” (Psalm 104:4)

“Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of thy kingdom. Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows” (Psalm 45:6-7).

“Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands. They shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment; and as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall e changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail” (Psalm 102:25-27).

“Sit on my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool” (Psalm 110:1).

If there is one thing I absolutely love about the epistle which was written unto the Hebrews, as well as the words which are found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms, it’s how within the Psalms we are invited to encounter Jesus who is both the Christ, and the Son of the living God. We cannot read the Old Testament book of the Psalms without encountering a wonderful and powerful invitation to behold and to worship Jesus the Christ—the eternal and divine Son of the living God. Even as you begin reading the words which are found within the one-hundred and tenth chapter of the book of the Psalms you will encounter Christ in the opening verses. What I find truly astonishing about the language concerning Jesus the Christ in the Old Testament book of the Psalms is that within this Old Testament poetic book we encounter a wonderful invitation to experience the eternal Son. The question I can’t help but wonder is whether or not when David wrote the words at the opening of the one-hundred and tenth psalm that he was writing and speaking to a Son of David who would appear and manifest within the earth as the physical embodiment of the eternal and living God. I can’t hep but wonder if when David wrote these words concerning “The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool” he knew that he would speaking prophetically concerning the coming Messiah and Christ who after making an atonement and forgiveness for the sins of humanity would rise from the grave on the third day, ascend into heaven, and sit down at the right hand of all authority, all power and all glory. When David wrote these words, did he know and understand that he would be writing and speaking prophetically concerning the right hand of the living and eternal God in heaven, and would be writing of a powerful moment when Jesus the Christ would ascend into heaven and be seated at the right hand of the Father? I can’t help but think about and consider the truly wonderful and amazing reality that when the author of the epistle which was written unto the Hebrews wrote that letter, they used this reference—as well as other references found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms—to underscore and highlight the supremacy of Jesus the Christ. The author of the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews used these words to speak directly of the supremacy of Christ, and even the apostle Peter on the Day of Pentecost used these words to speak to the supremacy of Jesus the Christ before all those who would hear the sound of His voice. If you turn and direct your attention to the second chapter of the New Testament book of Acts you will find that on the Day of Pentecost the apostle Peter spoke of “this Jesus” whom God hath raised up, of whom they were all witnesses. Moreover, the apostle Peter would go on to declare that this same Jesus was exalted to the right hand of God having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, which He shed forth upon all those who were present in the upper room.

I sit here this morning and I can’t help but be absolutely and completely gripped with the fact that when the apostle Peter used these words to speak about the ascension and exaltation of Jesus unto the right hand of the Father, he would also declare how God has made this same Jesus whom they crucified both Lord and Christ. The words which David wrote which are found within this passage of Scripture in the book of the Psalms—words which were not only used and quoted by the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews, but also used of the apostle Peter on the day of Pentecost—were absolutely and incredibly prophetic, for these words would speak directly to Jesus being made both Christ and Lord. This is something which even the apostle Paul realized and recognized when writing unto the Philippian saints and Christians, for in the second chapter of that epistle you will find him speaking of how God highly exalted Jesus, and gave Him a name which is above every name. It would be this name which every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in the earth, and things under the earth; and that every tongue should confess Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. It is truly remarkable to consider the words which are found within this particular passage, for David would speak concerning one who would come directly through His lineage, one who would be known as the Son of David, and one who would not only be seated at the right hand of God the Father, but who would also take His seat upon the throne of David in the midst of the city of the Great King. We dare not and must not miss this absolutely incredible reality, for the words which David the psalmist wrote in this passage were entirely and altogether prophetic concerning one who would emerge in the fullness of time and who after making an atonement for the sin, transgression and iniquity of mankind would ascend unto the right hand of the Father in heaven. It’s worth noting that when the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews used these words they used them to highlight and underscore the supremacy of Jesus over the angels which were in heaven, and to demonstrate the truly wonderful and powerful authority that was bestowed upon Jesus who would be made both Christ and Lord. It would be when Jesus ascended to the right hand of the Father that He would truly be established as Christ and Lord, and it was in that moment when Jesus sat down at the right hand of the Father that the eternal God gave Him a name that was above every other name in heaven, every other name in the earth, and every other name under the earth.

As I bring this writing to a close I feel absolutely compelled to present you with the reality that the words and language we find within the book of the Psalms is not only an invitation to come before the LORD and worship and exalt Him, but within the Psalms we also have a truly wonderful and powerful invitation to encounter, experience and worship Jesus. With this being said, it’s worth noting that this experience and this encounter with Jesus is not only an experience with the exalted Jesus who was made both Christ and Lord having been seated at the right hand of the Father, but also as being the suffering Servant which the prophet Isaiah spoke about. There are numerous references found within the Old Testament book of the Psalms which speak directly to the suffering of Jesus here on the earth, as well as to Jesus’ time spent hanging suspended between earth and sky on the cross of Calvary. Within the book of the Psalms we are given a truly and wonderful invitation to worship before this Jesus whom men crucified, yet whom the living and eternal God who is the Father of our Lord Jesus raised up on the third day, received into heaven upon His ascension, seated Him at His right hand in all glory, and gave Him a name which is above every name in heaven, in the earth and under the earth. The more we read the Old Testament book of the Psalms the more we encounter the person of Jesus the Christ, which further points to and reveals the fact that in the Old Testament we see Jesus Christ concealed, while in the New Testament we see Jesus Christ revealed. Please note that this isn’t to say that we cannot find and experience Jesus in the Old Testament, but that we have to allow the Holy Spirit to guide us through the words which are presented within the Old Testament—words which point to the person, the arrival and the manifestation of Jesus who would come as the Lamb of God which would take away the sin of the world, but after fulfilling and accomplishing His divine role and mission as the Lamb of God would be exalted as both Christ and Lord who would sit at the right hand of the Father in heaven and would rule and reign from that place of authority and power until the LORD would make all His enemies His footstool. Oh how absolutely incredible these words and this reality truly are when you think about and consider it, for within the Old Testament book of the Psalms—not only do we encounter and experience Jesus as the suffering servant, but we also experience Jesus as the sovereign and supreme One who would be made both Christ and Lord.

It is with this reality in mind that I feel absolutely compelled to declare unto you that we desperately need a fresh vision and revelation of Jesus—not only as the Lamb of God which took away the sins of the world, but as both Christ and Lord. Simon called Peter declared and proclaimed Jesus as being the Christ, the Son of the living God, and in the epistle which was written unto the Romans the apostle Paul spoke of a powerful confession that would indeed proceed forth from our lips and from our mouth. Upon bring this writing to a close, I invite you to read and consider the words which the apostle Paul wrote in the epistle written unto the saints which were at Rome. It is with these words where we not only come face to face with the encounter of Jesus as Christ and Lord, but also the confession of Jesus as Christ and Lord. Oh that we would join the tremendous chorus of men and women who not only confess and profess Jesus as the Lamb of God as did John the Baptist, but those who like the apostle Peter will confess and proclaim with their mouths that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God. I leave you now with the words which are found in the tenth chapter of the New Testament epistle written unto the Roman saints beginning to read with and from the sixth verse:

“But the righteousness which is of faith speaketh on this wise, Say not in thine heart, Who shall ascend into heaven? (That is, to bring Christ down from above) Or, Who shall descend into the deep? (That is, to bring up Christ again from the dead.) But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach; that if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. For the Scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. How then shall they call on Him in whom they have not believed? And how shall they believe in Him of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear without a preacher? And how shall they preach, except they be sent? As it is written, How beautiful at the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings of good things!” (Romans 10:6-15).

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