The Power of the Knock & the Sound of the Voice

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel narrative of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as it was written and recorded by the beloved physician Luke. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the eleventh and twelfth chapters of this New Testament book. “Now it came to pass, as they went, that He entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha receive him into her house. And she had a sister called Mary, which also sat at Jesus’ feet, and heard his word. But Martha was cumbered about much serving, and came to him, and said, Lord, dost thou not care that my sister hath left me to serve alone? Bid here therefore that she help me. And Jesus answered and said unto her, Martha, Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things: but one thing is needful: and Mary hath chosen that good part, which shall not be taken away from her” (Luke 10:38-42) “And it came to pass, that, as He was praying in a certain place, when he ceased, one of his disciples said unto him, Lord, teach us to pray, as John also taught his disciples. And he said unto them, When ye pray, say, Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth. Give us day by day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil” (Luke 11:1-4).

            When you come to this particular portion of Scripture you will find it beginning with what is perhaps one of the most powerful and necessary disciplines and practices within our lives as disciples and followers of Jesus the Christ. As you begin reading with and from the opening verse of the eleventh chapter you will find it coming on the heels of an encounter which Jesus had within the house of Mary and her sister Martha. In all reality, I find it absolutely and incredibly intriguing and captivating to read the words found in the opening verses of the eleventh chapter and how they deal specifically and exclusively with prayer, for in the final verses of the tenth chapter we find Jesus entering into the house of Mary and Martha and experiencing two different ways of interacting with Him within their home. The words which I find in the tenth chapter of gospel narrative written by the beloved physician Luke are incredibly powerful when you take the time to think about them, for what we find is Jesus entering a certain village—a village which the four gospels will reveal as being the village of Bethany which was outside of Jerusalem. It would be there in the village a woman named Martha would invite Jesus into her home where she would be with her sister Mary. Later in the gospel narrative written by the apostle John we find that this same Mary and Martha were sisters to Lazarus whom Jesus would raise from the dead. On this particular occasion we find Jesus entering into the village of Bethany and accepting the invitation given unto Him by Martha to come into her home. In all reality, I find it utterly and completely fascinating to read of the different times when Jesus would either be willing to come under the roof of the homes of men and women during those days, or would actually come under the roofs of the homes men and women lived in. Pause for a moment and think about this and the tremendous impact it can and does in fact have on us as the saints and disciples of the living God and followers of Jesus Christ, for while the gospels spoke of Jesus entering into the homes and houses of those who were present during those days it is a powerful demonstration and manifestation unto us that He is truly and indeed willing to come to where we are, and is indeed willing to come in and make His abode with us. To help shine a little more light on to this reality, consider the following words concerning the abode Jesus desires to make with us right where we are within our houses, within our homes, and within our hearts:

            “Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to Him, and will sup with him, and he with me” (Revelation 3:20).

            “Jesus answered and said unto him, If a man love me, He will keep my words: and my Father will love him, and we will come unto him, and make our abode with him. He that loveth me not keepeth not my sayings: and the word which ye hear is not mine, but the Father’s which sent me” (John 14:23-24).

            “For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you, That the Lord Jesus the same night in which He was betrayed took bread: and when He had given thanks, He brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me. After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me. For as often as ye eat of this bread, and drink this cup, ye so shew the Lord’s death till he come. Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup. For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord’s body” (1 Corinthians 11:23-29).

            What I so love and appreciate about the words which are found in these passages of Scripture—particularly the words found in the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John, as well as the prophetic revelation of Jesus the Christ written by the apostle John—is that not only in the gospels do we find Jesus speaking of both He and the Father coming in and making their abode with us, but also in the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus the Christ we continue to find this willingness of the Lord to come in and make His abode with us. How absolutely remarkable and astonishing it is to think and consider the fact that both within the gospels, as well as the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus the Christ—both coincidentally which were written by the apostle John—we find Jesus speaking of the desire of the Father and the Son to come in and make their abode with us. In the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus the Christ we find the Lord declaring how He stands at the door and knocks, and that if any man hears His voice and opens the door, He will come in unto Him, will sup with Him, and they with Him. In the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John we find Jesus declaring that if any man love Him they will keep His words, and not only will His Father love Him, but so also will the Father and the Son come unto them, but they will also make their abode with them. What makes these words so absolutely remarkable and astonishing is when you take the time to consider the direct connection and link between Jesus’ standing at the door, His knocking on the door, and our opening the door with our loving Jesus the Christ. Oh, I would dare say how that which could and would cause us to open up the door when we hear the voice and the sound of our beloved outside the door is truly and indeed love within our hearts and our souls toward Him. It is love which propels and compels us to open the door to our beloved and to the Lord when we hear Him on the other side of the door knocking that he might gain access and entrance into our hearts, into our homes, and into our houses. In order to get a true and powerful picture of what this looks like I would like to invite you to consider the following words which are found within the fifth chapter of the Old Testament poetic book Song of Solomon which has within it a powerful narrative of the beloved standing on the other side of the door and knocking that he might be let in:

            “I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: Eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved. I sleep, but my heart waketh: It is the voice of my beloved that knocketh, saying, Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled: for my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night. I have put off my coat; how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet; how shall I defiled them? My beloved put in his hand by the hole of the door, and my bowels were moved for him. I rose to open to my beloved; and my hands dropped with myrrh, and my fingers with sweet smelling myrrh, upon the handles of the lock. I opened to my beloved; but my beloved had withdrawn himself, and was gone: my soul failed, when he spake: I sought him, but I could not find him; I called him, but he gave me no answer” (Song of Solomon 5:1-6).

            The words we find in this passage of Scripture present us with perhaps one of the most powerful examples and illustrations of Jesus the Christ standing outside of our houses and hearts and knocking with the desire, with the longing, and with the intensity to enter and come in unto those He desires fellowship, communion, and intimacy with. Perhaps one of the greatest pictures of the type of fellowship we find within our houses and homes, as well as within our hearts is seen in the Passover supper which Jesus celebrated and observed with His disciples, and how He and His disciples sat down together for supper and partook both of the cup of wine, as well as the bread. It is within this powerful narrative we encounter and come face to face with the awesome and incredible reality of the Lord entering and coming in unto us that He might have fellowship, communion and relationship with us. The narrative we find in the Old Testament poetic book Song of Solomon is a truly remarkable and wonderful picture of Jesus the Christ standing outside the door and knocking with the tremendous longing and intensity to be let in that He might share and partake in communion and fellowship with us as the disciples and followers of His life. This is something that is truly worth thinking about and considering, for it brings us face to face with the awesome and powerful truth that the living and eternal God, and His Christ desire to enter and come in unto us that they might have fellowship with us, and that they might dine and sup with us. What’s more, is that it is quite clear and quite obvious that the Father and the Son don’t merely desire to come in to visit, but they desire to come in and actually make their abode with those who are willing to let them in to that place within their houses, their homes and their hearts. Within the gospel narrative written by the apostle John, as well as the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus the Christ we encounter and come face to face with the truth that the Father does indeed desire to come in unto and among us, and to dwell with, to inhabit and to abide with us. The Father and the Son desire to come in and make their abode with us, and the underlying truth and thought we must ask ourselves is whether or not we hear our Beloved knocking on the door to be invited and let in and whether we are choosing to ignore the sound of the knocking and leave Him outside the house on the other side of the door.

            What is so alluring and captivating when you read the words found in the Song of Solomon is when you find the bride initially shut up within her house and not willing to rise up to defile her feet nor to put her coat on. Initially the bride heard the sound of her beloved’s knocking, and heard the sound of her beloved’s voice, and yet she wasn’t willing to rise from her place to come to the door to allow her beloved in. When she finally did arise from her place with anticipation and excitement within her heart and soul it was too late as her beloved had already departed. The fifth chapter of the Song of Solomon reveals how the anticipation and excitement of the bride was so thick and powerful that she would even depart from her house that she might find her beloved whom she longed for, but how she would not find him. Oh it is absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand this, for there is a powerful connection between the sound of the beloved knocking, the willingness and desire of the bride to come to the door, to open it and let the beloved in, and Jesus’ words concerning His desire to come in and make His abode with us. What’s more, is that there is also a powerful link and connection between these words and the ones we find in the eleventh chapter of the New Testament gospel of Luke, for in the eleventh chapter of Luke we not only find Jesus speaking concerning prayer, but we also find Jesus using an illustration of someone else coming knocking on the door of someone’s house with a need. We must needs recognize and understand this awesome and powerful truth and reality, for there is a strong and powerful link and connection between hearing the sound of Jesus’ knocking on the doors of our hearts and homes with our willingness to open up and let Him in, as well as with the secret closet of prayer, with the parable He spoke concerning that one who came knocking on the door of another in the middle of the night with a need. Even more, there is a strong and powerful link with the words Jesus spoke when delivering the Sermon on the Mount and what He spoke concerning prayer. It is absolutely necessary that we recognize and understand all of these links, for it helps us to further understand Jesus’ willingness to enter into the homes of those whom He interacted with during those days and times. It is with this in mind I invite you to consider the following words which are found in the eleventh chapter of the gospel narrative written by the physician Luke, as well as the words which are found in the sixth chapter of the New Testament gospel written by the apostle Matthew:

            “And He said unto them, Which of you shall have a friend, and shall go unto him at midnight, and say unto him, Friend, lend me three loaves; for a friend of mine in his journey is come to me, and I have nothing to set before him? And he from within shall answer and say, Trouble me not: the door is now shut, and my children are with me in bed; I cannot rise and give thee. I say unto you, Though he will not rise and give him, because he is his friend, yet because of his importunity he will rise and give him as many as he needeth. And I say unto you, Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you. For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened. If a son shall ask bread of any of you that is a father, will he give him a stone? Or if he ask a fish, will he for a fish give him a serpent? Or if he shall ask an egg, will he offer him a scorpion? If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask Him” (Luke 11:5-13).

            “And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward. But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth ins ecret shall reward thee openly. But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions as the heathen do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking. Be not ye therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of, before ye ask him. After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: for thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen” (Matthew 6:5-13).

            Please pay close and careful attention to the words which are found within these chapters and passages of Scripture, for the words contained therein bring us face to face with the powerful link and connection between the sound of the knock at the door and our willingness to rise from our place inside to allow the Lord to enter in and abide us with us, as well as with the secret closet of prayer. I am absolutely and completely convinced that this language and narrative we find written within these passages of Scripture is a powerful picture of the awesome truth and reality that this sound of the knocking might not only be reflective of our houses and our hearts, but it might also be reflective of the door of the closet we enter into when we pray. You will find and recall how Jesus instructed us when we pray to enter into our closet, to shut the door behind us, and after we have shut the door to pray to our Father which sees in secret, and how our Father which sees in secret shall reward us openly. I am absolutely and completely convinced that we must needs pay close and careful attention to this, for when speaking of prayer Jesus would not only speak of entering into our closet, but Jesus would also speak of closing and shutting the door behind us. It is there in that place within the closet and behind the closed door the Father who sees in secret sees and hears us—and not only sees and hears us, but also responds to us. With this being said there is not a doubt in my heart and mind that even though we shut the door of our closet behind us when we go in to pray the eternal Son comes and knocks on the door that we might hear the sound of His knocking and might open up unto Him. There is not a doubt in my mind when reading these words that although we enter into our closets and shut the door behind us that we might pray before and unto our Father who is in heaven, the eternal Son of God comes and knocks on the door of that closet that He might enter in and make His abode with us. What’s more, is that it is not only the Son who comes and knocks on the door that He might make His abode with us, but we must also recognize and understand that it is more than just the Son who desires to enter in and make His abode with us, but it is also the Father who desires to come in and make His abode with us. It is absolutely necessary and imperative we understand and recognize this tremendous and wonderful truth, for even though we enter into our closets, and even though we shut the door behind us, the eternal Son comes directly to that door and knocks on the door that we might open unto Him, and that He might have fellowship and communion with us.

            Would it shock and surprise you to think and consider that it’s possible for us to enter into our closets of prayer, and enter into our closets to seek and pray unto the Father who is in heaven, and how the eternal Son comes knocking on the door of that closet seeking access and entrance in the midst of it. WHEN THE SON KNOCKS ON THE DOOR OF OUR CLOSETS! WHEN THE SON KNOCKS ON THE DOOR OF OUR PRAYER CLOSETS! WHEN THE SON “INTERUPTS” OUR PRAYER TIME!” WHEN WE ENTER INTO THE PRAYER CLOSET AND SHUT THE DOOR BEHIND US AND THE ETERNAL SON COMES KNOCKING ON THE DOOR. I sit here today thinking about and considering these words, and I can’t help but be brought face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that even though we enter into our secret closets of prayer the Son comes unto the door of that closet with the desire, with the longing, and with the expectation of being let in that both He and the Father might be allowed access and entrance into that place of intimacy and that place of prayer. I firmly believe and am absolutely convinced that the eternal Son does indeed and does in fact come unto the door of our closet in prayer with the desire to enter into that place of communion and fellowship that He and the Father might have access and entrance before and with us. Oh that we would recognize and understand this, for when we think about this awesome and powerful reality of entering into our close of prayer, and when we think about it being a secret place of prayer and intimacy with the Father, there is this powerful truth that centers around our entering into the closet, shutting the door behind us, but also being in that posture of being open to the sound of the knock on the door, and being open to allow the eternal Son access and entrance into the secret close of prayer that we might have fellowship and communion with Him. We must needs recognize and understand that when we enter into the secret closet of prayer we must needs maintain a posture of openness and willingness to allow and invite both the Son and the Father to enter into that place that we might have fellowship, intimacy and communion with them. We dare not, we cannot and must not be so rigid and so narrow-minded and close-minded within our hearts and our spirits that we have absolutely no willingness to allow the eternal Son and Father our closet of prayer that we might experience the joys of relationship and intimacy with them.

            It is with all this in mind I feel it absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and consider all of this in direct connection and relation to those times within the public life and ministry of Jesus the Christ when He would not only enter into homes of those who invited Him in, but also His willingness to travel with the Roman centurion unto his home where He offered to bring healing into the life and physical body of his servant. What’s more, is that in the second chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John we find Jesus, His mother, and His disciples being invited to a wedding in Cana—a wedding invitation which He would accept. What’s more is that it would be in that place of invitation we find Jesus the Christ turning water into wine after the wine had run out. [WHEN WINE RUNS OUT IN THE PLACE OF INTIMACY]. We must needs consider the various narratives of Jesus entering into the homes of those whom He encountered during the days of His public life and ministry. Consider if you will the following words which are found within the four gospels concerning Jesus entering into the homes of certain of those whom He interacted with during that generation:

            “And when Jesus was come into Peter’s house, He saw his wife’s mother laid, and sick of a fever. And he touched her hand, and the fever left her: and she arose, and ministered unto them. When the even was come, they brought unto him many that were possessed with devils: and he cast out the spirits with his word, and healed all that were sick: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses” (Matthew 8:14-17).

            “And as Jesus passed forth from thence, He saw a man, named Matthew, sitting at the receipt of custom: and He saith unto him, Follow me. And he arose, and followed him. And it came to pass, as Jesus sat at meat in the house, behold, many publicans and sinners came and sat down with him and his disciples. And when the Pharisees saw it, they said unto his disciples, Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners? But when Jesus heard that, He said unto them, They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick. But go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice: for I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance” (Matthew 9:9-13).

            “…And when Jesus came into the ruler’s house, and saw the minstrels and the people making a noise, He said unto them, Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleepeth. And they laughed Him to scorn. But when people were put forth, He went in, and took her by the hand, and the maid arose. And the fame thereof went abroad into all that land” (Matthew 9:23-26).

            “Now when Jesus was in Bethany, in the house of Simon the leper, there came unto him a woman having an alabaster box of very precious ointment, and poured it on his head, as he sat at meat. But when his disciples saw it, they had indignation, saying, To what purpose is this waste? For this ointment might have been sold for much, and given to the poor” (Matthew 26:6-9).

            “And again he entered into Capernaum, after some days; and it was noised that he was in the house. And straightway many were gathered together, insomuch that there was no room to receive them, no, not so much as about the door: and he preached the word unto them. And they come unto him, bringing one sick of the palsy, which was borne of four. And when they could not come night unto him for the press, they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay. When Jesus saw their faith, he said unto the sick of the palsy, Son, thy sins be forgiven thee” (Mark 2:1-5).

            “And he came to Capernaum: and being in the house He asked them, What was it that ye disputed among yourselves by the way? But they held their peace: for by the way they had disputed among themselves, who should be the greatest. And He sat down and called the twelve, and saith unto them, If any man desire to be first, the same shall be last of all, and servant of all. And he took a child, and set him in the midst of them: and when he had taken him in his arms, he said unto them, Whosoever shall receive one of such children in my name, receiveth me: and whosoever shall receive me, receiveth not me, but him that sent me” (Mark 9:33-37).

            “Now when He had ended all his sayings in the audience of the people, he entered into Capernaum. And a certain centurion’s servant, who was dear unto him, was sick, and ready to die. And when he heard of Jesus, he sent unto him the elders of the Jews, beseeching him that he would come and heal his servant. And when they came to Jesus, they besought him instantly, saying, That he was worthy for whom he should do this: for he loveth our nation, and he hath built us a synagogue. Then Jesus went with them. And when he was now not far from the house, the centurion sent friends to him, saying unto him, Lord, trouble not thyself: for I am not worthy that thou shouldest enter under my roof: wherevore neither thought I myself worthy to come unto thee: but say in a word, and my servant shall be healed” (Luke 7:1-7).

            ”And one of the Pharisees desired him that he would eat with him. And he went into the Pharisee’s house, and sat down to meat. And, behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee’s house, brought an alabaster box of ointment, and stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the haris of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment. Now when the Pharisee which had bidden him saw it, he spake within himself, saying, This man, if he were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of woman this is that toucheth him: for she is a sinner…And he turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for my feet: but she hath washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the haris of her head. Thou gavest me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet. My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment. Wherefore I say unto thee, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven: for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little” (Luke 7:36-47).

            “Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha receive him into her house. And she had a sister called Mary, which also sat at Jesus’ feet, and heard his word. But Martha was cumbered about much serving, and came to him, and said, Lord, dost thou not care that my sister hath left me to serve alone? Bid her therefore that she help me. And Jesus answered and said unto her, Martha, Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things: but one thing is needful: and Mary hath chosen that good part, which shall not be taken away from her” (Luke 10:38-41).

            “And Jesus entered and passed through Jericho. And, behold, there was a man named Zaccheaus, which was the chief among the publicans, and he was rich. And he sought to see Jesus who he was; and could not for the press, because was little of stature. And he ran before, and climbed up into a sycamore tree to see him: for he was to pass that way. And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up, and saw him, and said unto him, Zacchaeus, make haste, and come down; for to day I must abide at thy house. And he made house, and came down, and received him joyfully. And when they saw it, they all murmured, saying, That he was gone to be guest with a man that is a sinner. And Zaccheaus stood, and said unto the Lord; Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken any thing from any man by false accusation, I restore him fourfold. And Jesus said unto him, This day is salvation come to this house, forsomuch as he also is a son of Abraham. For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost” (Luke 19:1-10).

            “Then Jesus six days before the Passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was which had been dead, whom he raised from the dead. There they made him a supper; and Martha served: but Lazarus was one of them that sat at the table with him. Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment. Then saith one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, which should betray him, Why was not this ointment sold for three hundred pence, and given to the poor? This he said, not that he cared for the poor; but because he was a thief, and had the bag, and bare what was put therein. Then said Jesus let her alone: against the day of my burying hath she kept this. For the poor always ye have with you; but me ye have not always” (John 12:1-8).

            HOW DO YOU TREAT JESUS WHEN HE ENTERS INTO YOUR HOUSE? HOW DO YOU REACT TO JESUS WHEN HE’S IN YOUR HOUSE? ARE YOU WILLING TO SIT AT THE FEET OF JESUS WHEN HE ENTERS INTO THE HOUSE? ARE YOU WILLING TO SIT AT THE FEET OF JESUS WITHIN THE HOUSE? ARE YOU WILLING TO ANOINT THE FEET OF JESUS WHEN HE ENTERS INTO THE HOUSE?

            As you take the time to read the words which are found in each of these passages of Scripture you will immediately be confronted with the awesome and incredible reality that Jesus was willing to come to where people are, and that Jesus didn’t always expect men and women to come unto Him. The more you read the words found within these passages the more you will encounter and come face to face with the powerful truth that Jesus was willing to enter into the house of a synagogue ruler, Jesus was willing to enter into the house of a Roman centurion, but Jesus was also willing to enter into the house of Simon the Pharisee, as well as the house of two publicans—namely, Matthew who would become one of the disciples, as well as the house of Zaccheaus who was the chief of all the publicans. This is also in addition to the fact that Jesus was willing to enter into the homes of Simon called Peter, as well as the house of Martha who welcomed and received Him into her home. It is absolutely fascinating to read and consider these passages for there were countless examples found within Scriptures of men and women inviting Jesus into their homes—and not only inviting Jesus into their homes, but also making room for Him within their homes. What I absolutely love about these passages and narratives is the fact that not only was Jesus willing to accept the invitation of men and women to enter into their homes, but so also was Jesus willing to come to where people were, and was willing to bring healing and salvation into those homes. Think about how Jesus entered into the house of Jairus and brought life to his daughter who had died and was raised up again. Think about how Jesus not only brought healing to Simon’s mother-in-law, but also brought healing to all those who had come unto Him. Think of how Jesus brought salvation into the home of Zaccheaus when he welcomed Him into His home. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of these absolutely remarkable and astonishing truths, for these truths bring us face to face with a Jesus who was not afraid, nor was He ashamed to enter into the homes of those who invited Him in. What makes this even more captivating is when you think about the fact that Jesus would enter into the house of a publican and a Pharisee alike, Please don’t this lose its appeal, its awe and its wonder, for when it came to entering into homes, Jesus was no respecter of persons. Jesus would enter into the home of the Pharisee just as well as He would enter the house of a publican just as well as He would enter into the house of a ruler of one of the synagogues. What’s more, is that Jesus was willing to enter into the house of a Roman centurion, and undoubtedly entered into the home or homes of Samaritans when He spent two full days among them in Samaria.

            INVITING THE LORD TO YOUR HOUSE AND OPENING THE DOOR WHEN HE KNOCKS! THE INVITATION AND THE KNOCKING! THE KNOCKING AND THE OPENING! THE OPENING AND THE SITTING DOWN! THE SITTING DOWN AND THE FELLOWSHIP! I have to admit that the more I read and consider this reality and concept of those homes which Jesus would enter what it would be like—not only for the invitation, but also for the arrival of Jesus. PREPARING FOR THE ARRIVAL! PREPARING FOR THE KNOCK! I read the words which are found within these passages of Scripture and I can’t help but be gripped and captivated with the awesome reality that there were those who would invite Jesus into their homes, and might have even scheduled a specific time and day for when Jesus would actually come unto and enter their home. I find myself thinking about how there might have been those who invited Jesus into their home to dine and sup with them, and how there were those who would extend an invite unto Jesus—and perhaps not only to Jesus, but also to His disciples—to enter into their home that they might entertain, fellowship, dine, commune and sup with Him. What makes this truly unique and captivating is when you think about and consider the awesome and powerful truth that there might have been times when there was the initial invitation given unto Jesus to enter into the home, and yet there would be an appointed time that would be set for when Jesus would actually come to and enter the home. There is a part of me that can’t help but wonder what it would be like on those specific occasions when an invitation would have been given to Jesus to not only come unto, but also enter into the home, and what it would have been like for the knock to come at the door. Within our present generation we don’t entirely understand the language of the knock, for with all the modern technology we have it is very easy for men and women to simply send a text message, or call upon arrival alerting the other person that they have arrived. This would in all reality make it easy for the hosting and entertaining party to unlock the door that the guest and/or visitor might simply enter in. There are certain instances when sending a text and phone call to the host will alert them to our arrival, and instead of merely unlocking the door and allowing us to simply open the door and walk in they actually come to the door, open the door, and stand at the door to usher us into the home, the apartment and/or the condo.

            I sit here this morning thinking about and considering this awesome and powerful truth and I can’t help but find myself encountering and coming face to face with the fact that there is something truly astounding about the knock. There is something about the expectation and anticipation of a particular guest arriving at your residence and to your home, and upon their arrival there is no advanced  notice that they have arrived. There are no text messages sent, there are no phone calls made, there is no shouting outside a window, there is nothing else but a simple knock at the door. It is absolutely captivating to think about and consider this reality of the power of the knock, for even Jesus Himself would instruct His disciples concerning prayer to knock and the door would be opened unto them. What’s more, is that not only did Jesus instruct His disciples to knock and it shall be opened unto them, but in the final book of the Bible—the prophetic book of the Revelation—we find Jesus Himself standing outside the door and outside the home. Not only this, but we also find Jesus standing at the door and knocking, and emphatically declaring that those who heard His voice and the sound of His knocking and opened up unto Him would experience His divine presence, His divine fellowship, and His divine communion. Please do not miss the awesome and incredible around this concept, for there is something absolutely intriguing about the power of the knock—and not only the power of the knock, but also the sound of the knock. There is something about hearing the sound of the knock at the door and upon hearing the sound of the knock knowing that the party on the other side of the door is perhaps one whom you had invited to come unto your home. What makes this even more captivating is when you think about the fact that while the knock may come as a result of your inviting someone to come unto your home, the knock means absolutely nothing until and unless you are willing to let that person into your home. The sound of the knock at the door means absolutely nothing until and unless you are willing to rise from your place within the home, come to the door, open the door, and not only allow, but also welcome the person into your home.

            THE POWER OF THE KNOCK AT AN INOPPORTUNE TIME! THE POWER OF THE KNOCK AT AN UNEXPECTED TIME! THE POWER OF A KNOCK AT AN INCONVENIENT TIME! What makes this reality all the more interesting and fascinating is when you think about the fact that the sound of the knock at the door doesn’t always come at a time when we are expecting it. As was the case in the parable which Jesus spoke concerning prayer—not only did He speak about the knock at the door, but so also did He speak about the sound of the knock at the door at midnight. A KNOCK IN THE MIDNIGHT HOUR! A KNOCK AT A TIME WHEN YOU’RE SLEEPING! A KNOCK AT THE TIME WHEN YOU’VE RETIRED FOR THE NIGHT! There is not a doubt in my mind that the awesome and powerful truth surrounding these words is not only the sound of the knock at the door, but also the sound of the knock at a time that was perhaps inconvenient and inopportune for the one within the home. As you read the words found in this passage of Scripture you will notice Jesus not only speaking of the sound of the knock coming at the midnight hour, but also the knock coming with a need. WHEN THE KNOCK IS ACCOMPANIED BY A NEED! WHEN THE KNOCK IS ACCOMPANIED BY A REQUEST! The words we find in this passage of Scripture are absolutely and quite remarkable when you take the time to truly think about and consider them, for not only did the sound of the knock come at the midnight hour, but the sound of the knock came with a need and a request. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this reality, nor should we allow it to be lost in what is found within the words of Jesus, for not only will there be the sound of the knock at the door, but that knock would also be accompanied with and by a voice that would present both a need and a request. Pause for a moment and picture how you would respond if a knock came at your door during the midnight hour when you and your family were asleep, and when you and your family had retired for the night, had washed your feet, had gotten yourselves in bed, and prepared to retire for the rest of the night. All of a sudden—without warning, without advanced notice, and without advanced words—a knock comes at the door. Not only this, but the knock comes at a time when you are not expecting and even anticipating it. The sound of the knock in this parable would not only come at the midnight hour, but the sound of the knock would come with a request that would be voiced on the other side of the door.

            I have to admit that as I sit here today thinking about and considering these words I am brought face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that there is something incredibly powerful about the sound of the knock at the door. There is something worth speaking about concerning the sound of the knock on the other side of the door, for within Scripture—not only do we find Jesus instructing us to knock as it pertains to prayer, but within Scripture we also find Jesus speaking unto the Church and emphatically declaring unto them how He stands at the door and knocks. When speaking unto His disciples concerning their knocking, Jesus would declare that if they knocked—and if they continued knocking—it would be opened unto them. In the letter which was written unto the Laodicean congregation Jesus declared that He was the One who stood at the door and knocked, and would then go on to declare that if any man hears His voice and opens up the door to let Him in He would come and sup with and make His abode with them. If there is one thing we must recognize and understand concerning the power of the knock and the sound of the knock it’s that not only have we been instructed to knock in order for it to be opened unto us, but so also how Jesus Himself stands at the door and knocks. Pause for a moment and think about the fact that Jesus would stand outside the door and would knock, and that there is a decision we must needs make when we hear the sound of the knock and the sound of the voice at the door. Stop and think about the fact that within this parable on prayer there would undoubtedly not only be a knock at the door, but there would also be a voice that would accompany the knock. Not only this, but there would also be a need and a request that would accompany the knock, as the one who came unto the home would ask for three loaves of bread in order that he might entertain another who had come from a long journey unto their home. We dare not and must not miss the awesome power and truth surrounding this reality, for there is something incredibly powerful about the sound of the knock, and the power of the sound of the voice that accompanies the knock. There seems to be within Scripture this tremendous concept that the sound of the knock doesn’t merely come alone and by itself, but it is more often than not accompanied by a voice on the other side of the door—a voice that beckons and calls you to let the one standing outside inside.

            THE KNOCK ALERTS YOU TO THE PRESENCE! THE VOICE ALERTS YOU TO THE REQUEST! We must needs recognize and understand that the knock alerts you to the presence of the individual at your home, while the sound of the voice actually alerts you to who it is that is standing on the other side of the door. It’s quite intriguing to think about the fact that when the knock was heard by those inside the house there was really no indication as to who it was who stood on the other side of the door. When the sound of the knock came there was absolutely no way to know who was on the other side of the door. We must realize and recognize that during these days there were no peep holes, and there were no Ring cameras that would allow you to see who it was who came knocking at the door. During the days when this parable was spoken the sound of the knock would alert you to the presence of someone outside the home, and someone on the other side of the door, but you would not know who it was. What makes this even more intriguing is when you think about and consider the fact that there would essentially be two ways to know who it was who was at and on the other side of the door was either by opening the door up without knowing who was on the other side, or by hearing the sound of the voice of that person. Please allow the truth and reality of this to sink in, for there is something incredibly powerful about the sound of the knock at the door, for the sound of the knock alerts us to the powerful truth and reality that there is someone who has come unto our home and who is standing on the other side of the door. During those days, however, it would be absolutely impossible to know who it was who was on the other side of the door simply by the sound of the knock. During those days when the sound of the knock would come at the door there was absolutely no way of knowing who it was who had come unto the home, nor even where they had come from, nor even how long they had traveled for, nor what they had come for—namely, the purpose of their visit. During the days when Jesus walked upon the earth there would be no knowledge of how far the individual would have come from simply by hearing the sound and the noise of the knock at the door. When the sound of the knock came at the door there would be absolutely no knowledge of the visitor, nor any knowledge concerning the purpose of the visit. It would only be when the person inside either heard the sound of the voice that they would be alerted to who was standing at and on the other side of the door, or would simply open the door not knowing who it was who was standing on the other side. Oh how absolutely and incredibly intriguing this truly is when you take the time to think about it, for it is worth noting and pointing out the incredibly significance of the knock which comes at the door.

            THE POWER OF THE KNOCK, THE SOUND OF THE VOICE! I have to admit that I cannot escape this reality of the power of the knock at the door, for although the sound of the knock would come at any given time during the day—during the days when Jesus would have spoken this parable the knock alone wouldn’t alert you as to who it was on the other side of the door. This would especially be true when you think about and consider the fact that if a knock came at the door of your home and you weren’t expecting or anticipating it you would potentially have no clue, nor any idea who it was who had come unto your home. The sound of the knock at the door would in fact alert you to the truth that there was one who had come unto your home, however, the knock alone would not provide you with any insight or knowledge concerning who it was that actually came to your home. What makes the words which Jesus spoke in His letter to the church of Laodicea so absolutely captivating is that within it you will not only find the knock at the door, but you will also find the sound of the voice. If you take the time to read the words which are presented before and unto us in the final verses of the third chapter you will find Jesus emphatically declaring unto this church that He stood at the door and knocked, however, immediately after that you find Jesus declaring that if any man heard His voice and opened the door, He would come in to him, and would sup with him, and they with him. Oh it is absolutely necessary that we pay close and careful attention to this, for within these words Jesus speaks of His standing at the door and His knocking on the door, however, Jesus would also speak about something that would accompany the knock. Jesus would indeed declare that He stood at the door and knocked, however, Jesus’ words here didn’t merely seem to suggest His knocking at the door, but it also seemed to suggest His speaking outside and on the other side of the door. If you truly take the time to read these words you will find Jesus declaring unto the Laodicean church that He did indeed stand at the door, and He did indeed knock, however, He seemed to suggest that it was as a result of hearing His voice that one would actually let Him in. Oh please don’t miss and lose sight of this awesome and powerful concept, for the knock alerts you to the reality that there is someone who is standing at the door, and someone who is standing on the other side of the door, however, the door would not be opened until the sound of the voice would be heard.

            ASK! SEEK! KNOCK! In all reality, I am absolutely and completely convinced that this concept of knocking and the sound of the voice was found in Jesus’ parable in this passage of Scripture, as well as Jesus’ words which He spoke in the Sermon on the Mount. It is within this parable Jesus speaks of the sound of the one outside and on the other side of the door asking for something very specific—namely, three loaves of bread. When you read the words Jesus spoke in the Sermon on the Mount you will find the concept of the voice and the knock, for not only would Jesus speak of asking, but Jesus would also speak of knocking. Please don’t miss this incredible truth, for there seems to be this intrinsic link and connection between the sound of the knock at the door and the sound of the voice outside and on the other side of the door. Jesus Himself declared that He stood at the door and knocked, however, He would also go on to declare that those who heard His voice—those who heard the sound of His voice—and let Him in, He would come in unto them and would sup with them, and they with Him. Oh please don’t miss this powerful truth, for it brings us face to face with the fact that it wasn’t necessarily the sound of the knock at the door that would cause someone to open the door to Jesus and allow Him in. Please make note of the fact that Jesus didn’t say “If any man hears the sound of the knock,” nor did Jesus say, “If any many hears the knock at the door” and lets me in He would come in and sup with them, and they with Him. The words which Jesus would speak and declare unto the church of Laodicea declared how He stood at the door and knocked, but would also declare that if any man heard the sound of the voice—the sound of His voice—on the other side of the door and let Him in, He would come in unto them, would sup and dine with them, and they with Him.

            Oh dear brother, oh dear sister—I have to admit that there is something absolutely captivating and powerful when you take the time to read and consider these words, for while it was true that Jesus did in fact state that He stood at the door and knocked, it was also true that Jesus declared that if any man hears His voice and let Him in. IF ANY MAN HEARS MY VOICE AND LETS ME IN! IF ANY MAN HEARS MY VOICE AND OPENS UP! IF ANY MAN HEARS MY VOICE, AND RECOGNIZES ME!. It’s worth noting that when Jesus spoke concerning His being the good Shepherd as was recorded in the tenth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John He would declare concerning His sheep that they not only heard His voice, but also that they recognized His voice. Jesus spoke concerning His sheep how they heard His voice, and how they recognized His voice, and it was precisely because they heard and recognized the sound of His voice they would not follow another. I am absolutely and completely convinced that there is a great need to pay close and careful attention to these words, for within these words we recognize and understand that when the knock comes it alerts us to the reality that there is someone who is attempting to get in, and someone who desires access and entrance. With this being said, however, it is not the sound of the knock alone that causes the door to be opened, and it is not the knock alone that causes one to invite Jesus in, but rather it is the sound of the voice of Jesus on the other side of the door. The question I find myself asking is while there might not be any identifying reality surrounding the knock, nor even the sound of the knock, there is something absolutely unmistakable about the sound of the voice that accompanies the knock, and the sound of the voice which is on the other side of the door. In the parable Jesus spoke concerning the friend who came at midnight He used the language of intimacy, for He used the word “friend” within this parable. Oh please don’t miss the significance and importance of this, for within the parable it wouldn’t simply be anyone who would come knocking on the door at midnight, but it would be a friend who come knocking at the door at midnight. It wouldn’t be a stranger, nor would it be a foreigner who would come knocking on the door at midnight, but it would actually be a friend—perhaps even a close companion of the one who was inside the house with his wife and his children.

            WHEN A FRIEND COMES KNOCKING AT THE DOOR! WHEN A FRIEND SPEAKS OUTSIDE THE DOOR! WHEN YOU HEAR A KNOCK AT THE DOOR AND THE VOICE OF A FRIEND! THE POWER OF THE KNOCK: THE SOUND OF THE KNOCK AND THE VOICE OF A FRIEND! Oh we must needs recognize and understand this truth, for it brings us face to face with and confronts us with the truly astonishing reality that while there is something about the knocking that alerts that one on the inside that we are not only standing on the outside, but are also standing at the door, there is something about the accompanying voice that enhances the sound of the knock. When speaking unto the Laodicean church Jesus declared how He stood at the door and knocked, but Jesus didn’t merely stop there. Jesus could have stopped with those words and merely said that He stood at the door, and then went on to declare that if any man heard the knock and opened the door to Him and let Him in He would sup with them, and they with Him. What Jesus spoke within this passage of Scripture was that He stood at the door and knocked, and those who heard His voice and opened up the door and let Him in, He would come in unto them, would sup with them, and they with Him. When we think about this reality of Jesus standing at the door and knocking we must not miss and lose sight of the absolutely remarkable and powerful truth and reality that while it is true there does indeed come the sound of a knock at the door—it is the sound of the voice that actually causes someone to open up the door to allow that one who was without inside. Jesus did in fact declare that He stood at the door and knocked, however, He would go on to speak of and declare that it would be as a direct result of the sound of His voice that the door would be opened unto Him.

            As I prepare to bring this writing to a close we must needs recognize and understand that when Jesus spoke about prayer—not only did He speak about knocking, but He also spoke about asking. We must pay close and careful attention to this truly astonishing reality, for within these words Jesus seems to directly link the sound of the knock with the sound of the voice. Within these words Jesus seems to indicate that the act of knocking must also be accompanied by the voice of speaking, as it is the voice of speaking that identifies who is knocking at the door. What’s more, is that it is the voice of the one speaking that actually alerts the one who opened the door to the purpose, the nature, and the reason for the visit. Please don’t miss and lose sight of this truth, for when it comes to prayer and our seeking the face of the living God we must needs recognize that when we enter into our secret closets of prayer, and when we shut the door behind us we must prepare and make ourselves ready for that moment—a moment which we know not when it would come—when a knock comes at the door alerting us to the reality of someone having arrived. What’s more, is that we must needs prepare and make ourselves ready for the sound of the voice on the other side of the door that when we hear and recognize the voice we allow that One on the other side of the door to enter in. I find it absolutely wonderful and incredible to think about and consider the fact that there is something absolutely and incredibly powerful about a knock on the door, but there is something just as powerful about the sound of the voice at the other side of the door. Within our modern context and generation—when we hear a knock at the door we tend to ask from within the house who it is that has come unto our home and is standing outside the door. This is even more true when we are not expecting the knock, and aren’t expecting a visitor or guest to and within our home. More often than not if you hear a knock at your door you will either ask from within home who it is, or you will look through the peep hole to see who it is, or you will activate your security cameras to see who it is. This would not have been the case during Jesus’ day, and you would have either had to open the door up without knowing who it was on the other side of the door, or you would have had to hear the voice of the one who came to the door and opened as a direct result of hearing the voice.

The question I find myself asking when bringing this writing to a close is not only do you recognize the voice of the Master and the Lord when it is heard on the other side of the door, but do you anticipate and expect the Lord to come knocking on the door of your closet, and His standing at the door and knocking. Do you truly know the voice of the Master and Lord, and would you recognize it if it stood on the other side of the door of your closet of prayer? Do you anticipate and do you expect the Lord and the Master to stand at the door and to knock that He might be granted access and entrance into your secret closet of prayer? We know that Jesus stands at the door and knocks, yet the truth of the matter we must needs ask ourselves and be absolutely certain of is whether or not we will open the door unto Him—not necessarily when we hear the sound of the knock, but when we hear the sound of His voice on the other side of the door. I absolutely love that when we find and read the words of Jesus in the final New Testament book—the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus the Christ—we find Jesus still knocking and continuing to knock. What’s more is that not only do we find Jesus knocking, but we still find Him speaking, for He would declare unto the Laodicean church that if any man hears His voice and opens the door unto Him He would come in, He would sup with them, and they with Him. What would begin in the gospels with Jesus speaking of He and His Father seeking to enter into the houses, the homes and the hearts of men and women would continue within and unto the final book of the New Testament—the prophetic book of the Revelation of Jesus the Christ—for we still find Jesus knocking, and we still find Jesus speaking. The underlying question we must needs ask ourselves is not solely whether or not we can recognize the voice of our Lord and Master and will open the door to Him, but also whether or not we ourselves will knock and keep on knocking, as well as ask and keep on asking. As surely and as certainly as we must recognize the knock and voice of the Master and Lord, so also must we ourselves be a people who are willing to ask until it’s given, to seek until we find, and to knock until it is opened unto us.

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