I That Speak Unto Thee Am He: When the Word Made Flesh Offers Living Water At A Well In Samaria

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel narrative of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as it was written and recorded by the apostle John. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the fourth and fifth chapters of this New Testament book. When you come to the fourth and fifth chapters of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John you will find two distinct events which would take place in the public life and ministry of Jesus the Christ. In the fourth chapter of this gospel narrative you will find the account of Jesus journeying from Judaea unto Galilee, and as Jesus made the journey from Judaea to Galilee He must needs go through Samaria. This is actually quite interesting when you consider three distinct facts surrounding Jesus’ journey from Judaea unto Galilee. In the opening verse of the fourth chapter we discover that when the Lord knew how the Pharisees had heard that Jesus made and baptized more disciples than John, He left Judaea, and departed into Galilee. The entire reason and purpose for Jesus making the journey from Judaea unto Galilee was directly linked and connected to the report being circulated how He baptized more disciples than John—this despite the fact that Jesus Himself was not the one who baptized, but His disciples. It’s actually something worth noting and pointing out when reading these words—particularly and especially when you consider the report that was heard among and by the Pharisees. Scripture is very clear that Jesus left Judaea because He heard and was made aware of the Pharisees hearing how He had baptized more disciples than John. I find it absolutely remarkable how within the text the apostle John was sure to write and include how it wasn’t actually Jesus who baptized the disciples, but rather it was His disciples who actually baptized them. This reality and concept concerning Jesus’ disciples baptizing, as well as the report of Jesus baptizing more disciples than John is quite telling on two distinct fronts—namely, when you think about and consider the words found in the final verses of the third chapter concerning the dispute that rose up between the Jews and the disciples of John concerning purifying, as well as Jesus baptizing more disciples than John. The second front is when you consider the words which John the Baptist spoke concerning Jesus, and how he indeed came baptizing in water, but there would come one among them who would baptize with the Holy Ghost and with fire.

            As I sit here this morning I can’t help but think about and consider the awesome and powerful truth and reality that within the final verses of the third chapter you will find the disciples of John coming unto him and declaring unto him how He who was with him beyond Jordan—the one to whom he bore witness—was also baptizing, and how all men came to Him. In the final verses of the third chapter we find the disciples of John the Baptist coming unto him and speaking concerning Jesus, and how Jesus baptized during those days—and not only that Jesus baptized during those days, but also that all men came unto Him. These words and this exchange between John the Baptist and his disciples is actually quite telling—particularly when you consider the response of John the Baptist’s response to their words. Not only this, but the response which John the Baptist spoke unto His disciples concerning Jesus baptizing and all men coming unto Him actually directly ties into the words which John the Baptist would teach and preach concerning His purpose, concerning His mission, and His identity. It would be when John the Baptist spoke concerning His identity and purpose that he would actually make quite a powerful declaration concerning Jesus concerning baptism. It was true that Jesus would indeed baptize, however, the baptism which Jesus would bring was not a baptism of water unto repentance, but rather an entirely and altogether different baptism. The baptism which Jesus would bring was not the same baptism which John the Baptist would bring during those days—and not only this, but the baptism which Jesus would release would not even be manifested during those three and a half years He was publicly manifested in the midst of the earth. The baptism Jesus would baptize with would not be manifested unto fifty days after His death and after He had returned unto His Father who was in heaven and had ascended unto the right hand of the Father. With this in mind I invite you to consider the following words which are found in John the Baptist’s declaration to his disciples, as well as his declaration to all those who came unto him, as well as the Pharisees who also came to him:

            “John answered and said, A man can receive nothing, except it be given him from heaven. Ye yourselves bear me witness, that I said, I am not the Christ, but that I am sent before Him. HE that hath the bride is the bridegroom: but the friend of the bridegroom, which standeth and heareth him, rejocieth greatly because o the bridegroom’s voice: this my joy therefore is fulfilled. He must increase, but I must decrease. He that cometh from above is above all: he that is of the earth is earthly, and speaketh of the earth: he that cometh from heaven is above all. And what he hath seen and heard, that he testifeth; and no man receiveth his testimony. He that hath receive his testimony hath set to his seal that God is true. For he whom God hath sent speaketh the words of God: for God giveth not the Spirit by measure unto Him. The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into His hand. HE that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him” (John 3:27-36).

            “And this is the record of John, when the Jews sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, Who art thou? And he confessed, and denied not; but confessed, I am not the Christ. And they asked him, What then? Art thou Elias? And he saith, I am not. Art thou that prophet? And he answered, no. Then said they unto him, Who art thou? That we may give an answer to them that sent us. What sayest thou of thyself. He said, I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness, Make straight the way of the Lord, as said the prophet Esaias. And they which were sent were of the Pharisees. And they asked him, and said unto him, Why baptizes thou then, if thou be not that Christ, nor Elias, neither that prophet? John answered them, saying, I baptize with water: but there standeth one among you, whom ye know not; He it is, who coming after me is preferred before me, whose shoe’s latchet I am not worthy to unloose. These things were done in Bethabara beyond Jordan where John was baptizing” (John 2:19-28).

            “The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world. This is he of whom I said, After me cometh a man which is preferred before m: for he was before me. And I knew him not: but that he should be made manifest to Israel, therefore am I come baptizing with water. And John bare record, saying, I saw the Spirit descending from heaven like a dove, and it abode upon him. And I Knew him not: but he that sent me to baptize with water, the same said unto me, Upon whom thou shalt see the Spirit descending, and remaining on Him, the same is He which baptizeth with the Holy Ghost. And I saw, and bare record that this is the Son of God” (John 2:29-34).

            “In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, and saying, Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. For this is he that was spoken of by the prophet Esaias, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. And the same John had his raiment of camel’s hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and his meat was locusts and wild honey. Then went out to him Jerusalem, and all Judaea, and all the region round about Jordan, and were baptized of him in Jordan, confessing their sins. But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come? Bring forth therefore fruits meet for repentance: and think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say unto you, that God is able of these stones to raise up children unto Abraham. And now also the axe is laid unto the root of the trees: therefore every tree which bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire. I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance: but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire: whose fan is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his floor, and gather his wheat into the garner; but he will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire” (Matthew 3:1-12).

            “The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; As it is written in the prophets, Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, which shall prepare thy way before thee. The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. John did baptize in the wilderness, and preach the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins. And there went out unto him all the land of Judaea, and they of Jerusalem, and were all baptized of him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins. And John was clothed with camel’s hair, and with a girdle of a skin about his loins; and he did eat locusts and wild honey; and preached, saying, There cometh one mightier than I after me, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and unloose. I indeed have baptized you with water: but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost” (Mark 1:1-8).

            “…the word of God came unto John the son of Zacharias in the wilderness. And he came into all the country about Jordan, preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins; as it is written in the book of the words of Esaias the prophet, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. Every valley shall b efilled, and every mountain and hill shall be brought low; and the crooked ways shall be made smooth; and all flesh shall see the salvation of God. Then said he to the multitude that came forth to be baptized of him, O generation of vipers who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come? Bring forth therefore fruits worthy of repentance, and begin not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say unto you, That God is able of these stones to raise up children unto Abraham. And now also the axe is laid unto the root of the trees: every tree therefore which bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire. And the people asked him, saying, What shall we do then? He answereth and said unto them, HE that hath two coats, let him impart to him that hath none; and he that hath meat, let him do likewise. Then came also publicans to be baptized, and said unto him, Master, what shall we do? And he said unto them, Exact no more than that which is appointed you. And the soldiers likewise demanded of him,s aying, And what shall we do? And he said unto them, Do violence to no man, neither accuse any falsely; and be content with your wages. And as the people were in expectation, and all men mused in their hearts of John, whether he were the Christ, or not; John answered, saying unto them all, I indeed baptize you with water; but one mightier than I cometh, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to unloose: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and with fire: whose fan is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his flood, and will gather the wheat into his garner; but the chaff he will burn with fire unquenchable” (Luke 3:1-17).

            The words which we find in these passages of Scripture are actually quite intriguing when you read and consider them in light of how the fourth chapter begins and opens—and not only how the fourth chapter begins, but also how the final verses of the third chapter played out. In the final verses of the third chapter we find the disciples of John coming unto him concerning that One who was with him at the Jordan, and the One of whom he bore witness, for the same was baptizing, and all men were going unto him. Not only this, but in the opening verses of the fourth chapter we find that Jesus departed from Judaea and Galilee when He knew how the Pharisees had heard that He baptized more disciples than John. What makes this interesting and intriguing is when you think about the fact that the apostle John emphatically declared and made sure to include in the text that it wasn’t actually Jesus who baptized with water, but rather it was His disciples. This is quite telling when you consider the fact that Jesus allowed His disciples to baptize with water, and yet He Himself would not baptize with water. Jesus would invite and instruct His disciples to baptize with water, but He Himself would refrain from engaging in the baptism of water. There is something quite powerful within the text, for although Jesus baptized more disciples than did John the Baptist—it wasn’t actually Jesus who would do the baptizing, but rather His disciples who would do the baptizing. Not only this, but what we must needs recognize and understand is that while Jesus would not be the one who would baptize with water, He would be the One who would baptize with the Holy Ghost and with fire. In fact, it was John the Baptist who would emphatically declare and proclaim concerning Jesus the Christ that He would indeed baptize with the Holy Ghost and with fire. What makes this even more captivating is when you think about the words which John the Baptist spoke unto those who came unto his baptism—not only those who came to be baptized, but also those Pharisees and scribes who also came. If you read the words carefully you will find John the Baptist speaking of two distinct forms of fire—both of which were directly linked and connected to Jesus the Christ—as John would speak of the baptism of fire which would be directly linked and connected to the baptism of the Holy Spirit, as well as the fire in which those trees which bore not fruit would be cut down and cast into. John the Baptist would indeed speak of the baptism of the Holy Ghost and fire, but it is also true that he would speak concerning a fire into which all those which did not bear and bring forth fruit would be cast into after they had been hewn and cut down with the axe which was laid to the root of the tree.

            It is truly something worth noting and pointing out how Jesus baptized more disciples than John—this despite the fact that it wasn’t actually Jesus who baptized but rather His disciples who did the baptizing—for it actually helps set the stage for a future baptism which would be manifested in the earth three and a half years after He was publicly manifested in the midst of Judaea and the surrounding regions. If you read and study the book of Acts you will find and discover how fifty days after Jesus had been raised from death to life He would indeed fulfill that which the prophet Joel prophesied and spoke of—and not only that which the prophet Joel spoke of, but also that which John the Baptist spoke of, and which He Himself had spoken of concerning the promise of the Father. It was true that while Jesus was present upon the earth His disciples would baptize other disciples, but it would be Jesus Himself who would indeed baptize with the Holy Spirit and with fire. It would be on the day of Pentecost Jesus would Himself send the promise of the Father, and would indeed baptize men and women with the Holy Spirit just as He had spoken of, and just as John the Baptist had spoken at his baptism. Oh it is actually quite unique to think about and consider the fact that although there were those who spoke unto John the Baptist concerning Jesus baptizing more disciples than he, and although the Pharisees had heard how Jesus had baptized more than John the Baptist—not only was it not Jesus who actually did the baptizing but His disciples, but when Jesus would indeed baptize He would baptize with the Holy Ghost. It would be Jesus the Christ—after He had ascended unto the right hand of His Father who was in heaven—who would baptize with the Holy Ghost and with fire as there would come a sound from heaven as of a mighty rushing wind, and as the person and presence of the Holy Spirit would be poured out and released upon all those in the upper room, and as cloven tongues of fire would rest upon them. It would be on the day of Pentecost we would clearly see and encounter the absolutely fantastic and wonderful reality of that baptism which Jesus the Christ would actually engage in, for while His disciples would indeed baptize with water—not only during the three and a half years He was publicly manifested in the midst of the earth, but also after His ascension unto the right hand of the Father—it would be Jesus Himself who would baptize with the Holy Ghost and with fire. It would be John the Baptist who would indeed recognize and understand that Jesus the Christ would indeed baptize with the Holy Ghost and with fire—despite the fact that he would baptize with water unto the repentance of sins.

            Transitioning back to the text which is found in the opening verses of the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative of John it is quite interesting how Jesus would indeed journey from Judaea unto Galilee—not only because the Pharisees had heard how He baptized more disciples than John the Baptist—for if and as you read the final verses of the fourth chapter you will find that after Jesus had spent two days dwelling among the Samaritans in the town of Sychar He would depart and go unto Galilee. It would be in these verses the apostle John would write how Jesus Himself testified that a prophet had no honour in His own country. The apostle John goes on to write how when and after Jesus had come unto Galilee, the Galilaeans received Him, having seen all the things that He did at Jerusalem at the feast: for they also went unto the feast. It would be in the final verses of the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John we find Jesus journeying unto Galilee, and how those in Galilee gladly and willingly received Him as many of them were at Jerusalem at the feast and saw all those things which He did. There is not a doubt in my mind that Jesus not only journeyed from Judaea unto Galilee because of the report which was heard of and by the Pharisees, but also because there was indeed a ministry which needed to take place in the midst thereof. We know in the second chapter that Jesus and His disciples would be invited to a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and how it would be there in Cana of Galilee that Jesus would perform His first miracle, which would be the miracle of turning water into wine. In the second chapter we find and read of the first miracle Jesus performed, while in the fourth chapter we find and read of the second miracle Jesus would perform in Galilee—and not only in Galilee, but also in Cana of Galilee which was the very same place where He had turned water into wine. The apostle John writes of this second miracle how Jesus came again unto Cana of Galilee where He had made water into wine, and how there was a certain nobleman whose son was sick at Capernaum. When this nobleman heard that Jesus was come out of Judaea into Galilee, he went unto Him, and besought Him that He would come down, and heal his son, for he was at the point of death. It would be there in Cana of Galilee—there in the same place Jesus would turn water into wine—Jesus would declare unto the nobleman to go his way, for his son lived. The apostle John writes and records—not only how this nobleman believed the word which Jesus spoke, but also how this nobleman went his way unto his home. It would be while this nobleman journeyed unto his home his servants would meet him and declare unto him how his son lived. When the nobleman inquired of the hour when his son began to amend, they would say and speak unto him how it was the prior day at the seventh hour when the fever left him. The father immediately knew that it was at the same hour in which Jesus spoke unto him and declared unto him that his son lived, and not only he, but his entire house believed.

            What makes this interesting is when you think about the fact that the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative of the life and ministry of Jesus written by the apostle John is how the final verse reads how this word which was proclaimed and declared concerning the nobleman’s son was the second miracle which Jesus did after He had come out of Judaea into Galilee. It would be in Cana of Galilee Jesus would perform His first miracle which was water turned into wine at a wedding in which He, His disciples and His mother was invited to. It would be in that same place—in that same place He had turned water into wine, and that same place where He would abide and dwell in fellowship with others at a wedding—that Jesus would perform His second miracle during those days. It would be there in Cana of Galilee Jesus would heal a nobleman’s son—not by journeying with him unto his home and placing his hands upon him, but simply by speaking the word. This is actually quite captivating when you take the time to think about it, for in the second chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John you will find the first miracle which Jesus did being directly linked with a command He spoke—and not only a command He spoke, but also with an obedience and response to that command He spoke. It would be at Cana of Galilee, and at the wedding which took place there Jesus would simply issue the command to fill the six waterpots with water, and then once the waterpots were filled with water to draw water out of and from those waterpots and bring it unto the governor of the feast. Please do not miss and lose sight of this, for the first miracle Jesus would perform would be directly linked and connected to a specific command He had given unto the servants at the wedding—namely, that they might not only fill up the water jars with water, but also that they might draw forth water out of those vessels and bring it unto the governor of the feast. It would be there in Cana of Galilee Jesus would perform His first miracle—one that would be directly linked and associated with a command given, and obedience to the command. Not only this, but when you read of the second miracle which Jesus would perform—also which would coincidentally take place at Cana of Galilee—you will find that it would also be linked with a command. The second miracle which Jesus would perform at Cana of Galilee would be centered upon a command that would be spoken unto the nobleman concerning his son—the command simply to go his way. This second miracle Jesus would perform would be directly linked to both a command and a declaration—and not only a declaration, but also a promise which was spoken unto this father. Jesus would instruct this nobleman to go his way, and the purpose for his departure and the purpose for his going his way would be directly linked to the declaration and promise that his son lived. Jesus would indeed send this nobleman away from and out from His presence with a command, as well as a promise and declaration. The command given unto this nobleman was not because Jesus did not want to bring healing unto this nobleman’s son, but rather because Jesus sent him away with a challenge of faith, with a challenge of trust, and with a challenge of confidence. Oh how absolutely wonderful and powerful it is to think and consider how the nobleman believed the word which the Lord had spoken, and would return unto his home according to the word of the Lord.

            I wrote and spoke of the opening verses of the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John being absolutely astounding on three distinct and three different fronts, and I have already written and mentioned two of those fronts. The first front is concerning the report that was heard concerning Jesus baptizing more disciples than John, and how when Jesus knew that the Pharisees had heard this He departed from Judaea and went unto Galilee. The second front is when you think about and consider that it would be in Galilee Jesus would be received by those living and dwelling in that region because there were many of them which were at the feast in Jerusalem, and which saw the things He did at the feast. The third front is one that is actually quite powerful and truly captivating when you think about it—particularly and especially when you think about and consider both the need Jesus had to pass through Samaria, as well as the declaration the apostle John made concerning Jesus, and how Jesus was indeed the Word which was made flesh and dwelt among us. The third front surrounding the words we find in the fourth chapter is not only centered upon Jesus’ need to pass through Samaria—Jesus’ need to pass through a region which many in Jewry would not even think or consider passing through. What’s more, is that it would be there in Samaria where we would witness and behold a powerful demonstration and manifestation of the Word being made flesh and dwelling among us. It would be there in Samaria we would truly see a powerful demonstration of the Word being made flesh and dwelling among us—and not only the Word being made flesh and dwelling among us, but also the Word being made flesh and dwelling among us in a place that would otherwise be avoided by those in Jewry. There were very few who would actually journey from Judaea unto Galilee and pass through Samaria to do so, and there were very few who would journey from Galilee unto Judaea and would pass through Samaria. When you read concerning Jesus the Christ, however, you will find that when He departed out of Judaea and would journey unto Galilee, He must needs pass through Samaria.

            It is truly something worth noting and pointing out concerning Jesus departing from Judaea and journeying unto Galilee—and not only His departure from Judaea, but also the need to pass through Samaria. Normally those in Jewry would go around Samaria when journeying from Judaea unto Galilee, or from Galilee unto Judaea. Normally those who would make this journey would choose to completely avoid Samaria, and would choose to keep their distance from the Samaritans which were present in the midst of that region. When we read and consider the narrative of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ, however, we do not find Him avoiding or going around Samaria, but actually passing through the midst of it. Not only do we find Jesus passing through Samaria to journey from Judaea unto Galilee, but we find Him actually needing to pass through the midst thereof. Scripture makes it abundantly and perfectly clear why Jesus needed to pass through Samaria, for the apostle John not only writes concerning Jesus’ interaction with the Samaritan woman at the will in Sychar, but the apostle John also writes and records of Jesus tarrying, abiding and dwelling in Samaria for a full two days. Pause for a moment and think about the awesome significance of Jesus’ actions, for not only did Jesus deliberately and intentionally choose to pass through Samaria, but Jesus also chose to sit down in a Samaritan town. Not only did Jesus sit down at a well in a Samaritan town, but Jesus would engage in conversation, fellowship and relationship a Samaritan woman who would come with her water jar that she might draw water out of Jacob’s well which was present there in that place. What’s more, is that not only did Jesus engage in fellowship, engage in conversation, and engage in friendship with a woman, but Scripture also makes it perfectly and abundantly clear that Jesus would also abide in the midst of Samaria, and in the Samaritan town of Sychar for a full two days. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this absolutely incredible reality, for not only did Jesus need to pass through Samaria rather than avoiding it, and not only did Jesus choose to sit down in the midst of Samaria, but Jesus also chose to deliberately and intentionally engage a Samaritan woman at the well, as well as choosing to abide there in the town of Sychar for two days. PASSING THROUGH, SITTING DOWN, STARTING A CONVERSATION, ABIDING AND DWELLING!

            As I sit here today I can’t help but think about the words which are found in this text and within this chapter of the gospel narrative written by the apostle John, and I find within it a powerful picture of what ministry should indeed look like within our generation. We dare not and must not think and consider that what is found here in this passage of Scripture was solely for Jesus’ day and that it does not have any application to our generation in which we are living in. I would dare say that when we think of ministry we tend to think of it in terms of the church building and within the four walls of the church, however, there is within the fourth chapter of the gospel narrative of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written by the apostle John a powerful manifesto if you will concerning and regarding ministry. It is here in the fourth chapter where we find one of the most powerful manifestations of the word becoming flesh and dwelling among us—and not only dwelling among us, but dwelling among us in fellowship, in relationship, and in communion. It is within the fourth chapter of the gospel narrative written by the apostle John we find one of the most powerful statements, one of the most powerful demonstrations, and one of the most powerful manifestations of the Word becoming flesh and dwelling among us, for we find the Word becoming flesh and dwelling among us in a place that would otherwise have been avoided. It is within the fourth chapter of the gospel narrative written by the apostle John we do in fact find the Word becoming flesh and dwelling among us, and the Word made flesh dwelling among us in the form of fellowship and relationship in a place filled with outcasts and those who were marginalized. In all reality, this is what the four gospel narratives were all about, for the Word becoming flesh and dwelling among us was about the Word made flesh dwelling among us in those places where others would be marginalized, ostracized, vilified, despised, rejected, ignored, and the like. The Word made flesh and dwelling among us wasn’t merely about dwelling among us in the synagogue, nor was it about dwelling among us in the Temple, but it was about the Word made flesh dwelling among us in fellowship and relationship in those places where you wouldn’t think the Word would go.

            THE WORD MADE FLESH AND DWELLING AMONG US IS NOT LIMITED TO THE FOUR WALLS OF THE SYNAGOGUES! THE WORD MADE FLESH DWELLING AMONG US IS NOT LIMITED TO THE FOUR WALLS OF THE TEMPLE! THE WORD MADE FLESH IS NOT LIMITED TO THE BORDERS OF JUDAEA! THE WORD MADE FLESH IS NOT LIMITED TO THE BORDERS OF GALILEE! THE WORD MADE FLESH AND DWELLING AMONG US IS NOT LIMITED TO THE CITY OF JERUSALEM! THE WORD MADE FLESH AND DWELT AMONG US CAME FORTH OUT OF NAZARETH AND WOULD MOVE WITHIN AND THROUGHOUT JUDAEA, GALILEE, AND SAMARIA!

            As I sit here this morning I can’t help but think about and consider the reality and truth surrounding the Word made flesh and dwelling among us, and how one of the most powerful truths surrounding the Word being made flesh and dwelling among us is that the Word would not only dwell among us, but the Word would also go to those places where others would otherwise not go. It is easy to think of the Word made flesh and dwelling among us and how that Word was made flesh in Galilee, that Word was made flesh in Judaea, and that Word was made flesh in Jerusalem, however, what we must recognize and understand is that the Word made flesh and dwelling among us is also a powerful statement and declaration that it can go into and unto those places which would have otherwise been avoided. If you take the time to read the words which are found in the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John you will find the Word being made flesh, and the Word not only dwelling among us, but also the Word going into those places which would otherwise be avoided. The Word being made flesh and dwelling among us is more than simply the Word made flesh and dwelling among us in those places which were convenient, and those places which were considered normal and acceptable. The Word made flesh and dwelling among us would enter into the homes of publicans and sinners alike—homes which the scribes, the Pharisees, the chief priests, the elders of Israel, and others alike would otherwise avoid and choose not to enter. The Word made flesh and dwelling among us would enter into the homes of Pharisees, and would not only enter into the home of one Pharisee, but Scripture actually speaks of and reveals the Word entering into the homes of three different and three distinct Pharisees—including Simon the Pharisee. The Word made flesh and dwelling among us would enter into the homes of various individuals who were present during those days within Capernaum, within Galilee, within Judaea, and I would dare say even within the city of Jerusalem. What I find to be truly remarkable and captivating about this is that the Word made flesh and dwelling among us would also deliberately and intentionally pass through Samaria—would pass through that place which many within Jewry would never think or consider entering. The Word made flesh and dwelling among us would not only deliberately and intentionally pass through Samaria, but would also deliberately and intentionally sit down in the midst of this otherwise marginalized region within the land during those days.

            The more I think about and the more I consider the truth surrounding the Word being made flesh and dwelling among us the more I can’t help but think about the fact that the Word made flesh and dwelling among us would indeed go into those places which were perhaps considered hard to reach and/or even those places which would have been avoided. In all reality, I absolutely love the narrative surrounding the Word made flesh and dwelling among us, for the Word made flesh and dwelling among us would indeed go into those places and those locations where men wouldn’t otherwise go. In other words—despite the fact that men themselves would perhaps not go into and unto these places the Word which had been made flesh and which would dwell among us would indeed go into those places. Not only this, but the Word made flesh and dwelling among us would indeed go into those places willingly, gladly, happily, deliberately and intentionally. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this, for the Word made flesh which dwelt among us needed to journey through Samaria on the way and journey to Galilee. The word which was made flesh and which dwelt among us would need to pass through Samaria on the way to Galilee—and not only pass through Samaria, but actually sit down in the midst of it. Oh I would love to know how far within the region of Samaria this town of Sychar actually was, for it is one thing to pass through Samaria on the way to some other destination, but it is something else entirely to pass through Samaria and to sit down by a well. The apostle John makes it perfectly clear that Jesus was wearied from the journey from Judaea, and that He had stopped to sit by a well there in Sychar. I have long believed that one of the main reasons Jesus was wearied from the journey was because not only did He need to pass through Samaria, but Jesus also needed to get to Samaria, and to this particular town, and to this particular well at a specific time. I have long believed that this Samaritan woman would come to the well at the same time each day, and when Jesus needed to pass through Samaria He made haste that He might arrive at the well just in time for this woman to arrive with her water jar. What is so absolutely captivating about this narrative is that it almost appears as though Jesus didn’t merely sit by this well because He was wearied from the journey, but Jesus sat by this well because He was waiting for this woman. I firmly believe that while Jesus was in Judaea He saw this woman—perhaps much like He saw Nathaniel under the fig tree in the opening chapter of this gospel narrative—and knew He needed to get to Samaria to encounter this woman.

            I sit here thinking about and considering the absolutely wonderful and incredible truth of Jesus needing to pass through Samaria, for while the apostle John writes how Jesus needed to pass through Samaria—that which we actually see in the text is more than simply Jesus passing through this place. If and as you read the words which are found within this text you will find and discover Jesus needing to pass through Samaria, but Jesus doing more than simply passing through Samaria, but Jesus sitting down in Samaria, Jesus interacting and conversating with a woman from Samaria, and ultimately Jesus dwelling and abiding two days in Samaria. The text seems to speak to and suggest that Jesus needed to pass through Samaria, however, if you actually take the time to read the text in its entirety you will find that Jesus didn’t merely pass through Samaria while on His way to Galilee, but Jesus actually chose to stop in the midst of Samaria, and chose to sit down at a well there in the town called Sychar. Within the text—not only do you read how Jesus must needs pass through Samaria, and not only do you read about Jesus being wearied from His journey, but you will also find Jesus sitting down on a well, and the time of the day which was the sixth hour. Within the text we find Jesus needing to pass through Samaria, we find Jesus being wearied from the journey, we find Jesus sitting down on the well in Sychar, and we find the time of the day being the sixth hour. Oh we must needs pay close and careful attention to this powerful truth, for it brings us face to face with the fact that while the text clearly states Jesus needed to pass through Samaria we know and understand that He didn’t pass through to reach His destination, but He passed through to abide and dwell. Jesus did in fact need to pass through Samaria, however, I would dare say that His need to pass through Samaria was directly linked and connected to His need to sit down on that well at that particular hour during the day and in that particular town. Jesus could have passed through Samaria and chosen to stop in any of the towns and villages therein, however, He deliberately and intentionally chose to come to this city and to this well.

            It is truly something worth paying close and careful attention to when reading the words which are found in this narrative, for what we find within this passage of Scripture is the statement and declaration that Jesus needed to pass through Samaria that He might arrive in this city, at this time of the day, and come to this particular well. When the text speaks of Jesus needing to pass through Samaria we must needs understand that He didn’t need to pass through Samaria that He might come to and arrive in Galilee, for there was a work which needed to be done there in Samaria. Jesus needed to pass through Samaria because He needed to come to this particular city at this particular time during the day that He might sit down at this particular well so He could talk to and encounter this particular woman. There are absolutely no coincidences found within the four gospel narratives, and we must needs recognize and understand that everything Jesus did was deliberately and intentionally, and according to the divine will of the Father. It would be in the next chapter we find Jesus declaring unto the Jews that He could in and of Himself do nothing, but only what He hears the Father speak, and what He sees the Father do. The text indicates that Jesus needed to pass through Samaria, however, what we actually find as we continue to read the text is that Jesus needed to do more than simply pass through Samaria, but that Jesus needed to pass through Samaria and to arrive in this particular city that He might encounter this particular woman. Oh there is not a doubt in my mind that when Jesus departed from Judaea to journey unto Galilee He undoubtedly made haste—not necessarily to arrive in Galilee, but to arrive in Samaria, and in the city of Sychar, and at this particular well. I do not believe it is any coincidence that the apostle John writes concerning the time of the day, nor even that Jesus was wearied from His journey, for there is every indication that Jesus sought to make haste to arrive in this time of Samaria that He might arrive at this time in order to be there and wait for the woman. If there is one thing this text reveals it’s that Jesus didn’t merely sit down on this well, but Jesus arrived at this well and sat down upon it as He waited for this woman to arrive with her water jar. There is not a doubt in my mind that Jesus arrived in Sychar at this particular time of the day because He knew that it was at this time of the day this woman would be present at this well. Jesus made haste to arrive in Samaria, and at this particular well at this particular day in order that He might be there waiting for this woman to arrive.

            The question I find myself asking is whether or not this woman came to the well daily at this time to draw forth water from the midst of it, or whether or not this woman would come to this well on a slightly less frequent schedule. I am inclined to believe that this woman came to this well day after day at this same time, and Jesus knew and was aware of this time of the day, and sought to be at this well at the precise time this woman would arrive. What I so love about this encounter between Jesus and the woman at the well is that Jesus didn’t come unto and come upon this woman after she had already come to the well, and even as she was drawing water forth from the well. The text reveals and suggests that Jesus came to the city of Sychar and sat down on this well at the sixth hour that He might be there when the woman arrived. Oh there is something incredibly intriguing and fascinating about this particular truth and reality, for it would have been one thing for Jesus to come unto this well as the woman was drawing water from the midst of it, and/or even as the woman had finished drawing water from the well. I would dare say that it was absolutely necessary for Jesus to come to this well at this particular point in the day, and to wait for this woman, for the encounter might very well have been entirely and altogether different had Jesus showed up while the woman was drawing water out of the well, and began speaking unto her. I have to admit that when I read the words found in this passage I find it absolutely remarkable and astounding that Jesus would show up at the well before the woman would herself show up—not only as a sign that He was waiting for her, but I would also dare say that by showing up before this woman arrived Jesus would seek to grab and lay hold of the attention of this woman before she would actually begin drawing water from the well. The text wonderfully and powerfully speaks to the awesome truth that this woman came to the well and might very well have been surprised to find a man sitting there at the well. What’s more, is that not only might she have been surprised to find a man sitting there at the well, but she might also have been surprised to find a Jewish man sitting there at the well. Pause for a moment and think about the fact that the Jewish Messiah would journey from and out of Judaea unto Galilee and would not only pass through Samaria, but would also sit down on a well in Samaria, and would deliberately and intentionally wait for this Samaritan woman to show up.

            THE GOD WHO WAITS FOR YOU TO SHOW UP! WHEN THE WORD SHOWS UP AND WAITS FOR YOU! WHEN THE WORD WAITS FOR THE WOMAN TO SHOW UP! THE WORD, THE WELL, THE WOMAN AND THE WATER! Perhaps one of the most powerful and astounding truths surrounding this passage of Scripture is that the Word which became flesh and dwelt among us would not only pass through Samaria, and would not only sit down on this well, but would sit down upon this well at a specific time that He might wait for this woman to show up. I find it worth noting and pointing out that the Word which was made flesh would arrive at and within a specific place that it might be there when the woman arrived. The Word which became flesh would arrive at the well at a very specific time that the Word might deliberately and intentionally wait for this woman to show up that He might speak to her—and not only speak to her concerning water, but might speak to her about spiritual thirst. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand the words and language that is found within this passage of Scripture, for the words which are found here wonderfully and powerfully suggest that the Word which was made flesh and would dwell among us would show up at this well and wait for this woman to arrive that He might draw forth out of her—despite the fact that she would come unto the well to draw water from the midst of it. If and as you read the text you will find that while it was true this woman came to this well to draw water out of the well—what she would actually experience was herself being a well and Jesus drawing forth out of her that which was needed to bring about transformation within her life. It is absolutely necessary that we understand how Jesus would show up at this well—in this place of drawing forth and drawing out of—that instead of this woman drawing physical and natural water out of the well Jesus might draw out of and draw forth out of the depths of her heart and soul, and might offer her living water. This woman would come unto the well with her water jar that she might draw forth water out of the well, and yet what she would find on this particular day was the Jewish Messiah sitting there at the well waiting for her—and not only waiting for her that He might draw out of the depths of her heart and soul, but also that He might offer her living water. Jesus would arrive and sit down at this well at this particular time that He might wait for this woman to arrive, and once the woman arrived Jesus would speak unto her and ask her to give Him to drink.

            SEARCHING FOR FRUIT ON TREES AND SEEKING WATER IN THE MIDST OF WELLS! JUST AS JESUS DESIRED FRUIT FROM THE TREES OF MEN’S LIVES, SO ALSO WOULD JESUS DESIRE WATER TO DRINK OUT OF THE DEPTHS OF MEN’S HEARTS AND SOULS! WHEN JESUS ASKED THIS WOMAN TO GIVE HIM TO DRINK HE WAS ASKING FOR MORE THAN SIMPLY THAT WHICH WAS IN THE PHYSICAL AND NATURAL REALM, BUT THAT WHICH WAS IN THE SPIRITUAL REALM! WILL YOU GIVE JESUS TO DRINK FROM THE DEPTHS OF YOUR HEART? WOULD YOU GIVE JESUS TO DRINK FROM THE DEPTHS OF YOUR SOUL?

            I sit here thinking about and considering this awesome and powerful truth of Jesus coming unto the city of Sychar in the region of Samaria, and I think about Jesus being there waiting for the woman to arrive, and how Jesus would ask the woman for a drink. It’s important for us to understand that even though Jesus might have been wearied from the journey, I do not believe for one moment that His asking this woman to give Him to drink had anything to do with the natural realm. What shines even more light on to this reality is when you continue reading in this passage of Scripture and read how Jesus declared in the hearing of the disciples that He had meat which they knew nothing of, and when the disciples were confused and puzzled by this statement Jesus would declare that His meat was to do the will of the Father. If Jesus’ meat was to do the will of the Father, then I would dare say that Jesus’ asking this woman to give Him to drink was not as much about a physical drink of water as much as it was for this woman to give her to drink of that which was found within the depths of her heart and soul. Despite the fact this woman might not have been aware of that which Jesus was ultimately seeking to accomplish there at the well we can deduce and conclude that when Jesus asked this woman to give Him to drink He was ultimately looking for something that would be produced from the depths of her soul. What lends even more weight and credence to this thought is when you think about the fact that this woman undoubtedly never even drew water from the well, for the apostle John writes and records how she left the presence of Jesus and left her water jar behind. If Jesus really was after being given a drink from the water that was in the well I would dare say that this woman would possibly have not left her water jar there at the well. Although Scripture is not entirely clear whether or not this woman was actually able to draw water from the well, I would dare say that Jesus’ request for this woman to give Him to drink was the catalyst that would set in motion the events that would take place there at the well. What’s more, is that we know within the gospels how Jesus would make His way to Jerusalem and would see a fig tree in the distance. Not only would Jesus see the fig tree from a distance, but Scripture points to and reveals that Jesus desired fruit from the fig tree, and that He was hungry.

            A JESUS WHO IS HUNGRY FOR FRUIT! A JESUS WHO IS THIRSTY FOR WATER! We know that the fig tree which Jesus saw in the distance—and not only the fig tree, but also the parable of the fig tree—was a powerful picture of Jesus’ hunger for fruit within and from our hearts and lives. There is not a doubt in my mind that just as Jesus is hungry for fruit within and from out lives just as He was hungry for fruit from the fig tree as He journeyed to Jerusalem, so also is Jesus thirsty for water from our hearts and our souls. There is not a doubt in my mind that Jesus is indeed thirsty for water from the depths of our soul, and when Jesus asked this woman to give Him to drink He was ultimately speaking unto her concerning that which was found within the depths of her heart and within the depths of her soul. What I so absolutely love about the words found in this passage of Scripture is that Jesus would show up in Sychar without any advanced notice or announcement, and would sit down upon a well that would be present there in the midst of the city. Not only this, but Jesus would sit down at the well there in Sychar and would make sure He was there at the sixth hour. Oh I firmly believe with all my heart that Jesus came unto Sychar and came unto this well—not only so He could be there waiting for this woman when she showed up, but also so Jesus could draw water from the depths of her soul and from the depths of her heart. It’s worth noting that when you read the narrative of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well that while the conversation might very well have begun with Jesus speaking about physical water—it would transition to a conversation about spiritual water, and it would transition into a place where instead of this woman drawing water from the well, Jesus would draw water from the depths of her heart and soul. While it was true that this woman would come to the well much like she had countless other times—it would be true that on this particular day she would not be drawing water from the well.

            I find it absolutely remarkable and astounding to think about and consider the awesome and powerful truth and reality surrounding this encounter with the woman at the well, for not only was Jesus waiting for this woman there at the well, but once this woman showed up at the well Jesus would immediately ask her to give Him to drink. This woman could not understand why Jesus being a Jew would ask of her to give Him to drink, for the Jews had no dealings with the Samaritans. It’s quite intriguing to think about the fact that Jesus showed up in the town of Sychar as the Word became flesh which dwelt among us, and would show up in a place where Jews had no dealings, and where Jews would not make a regular habit and occurrence of traveling to and visiting. Jesus was indeed the Word became flesh and the Word which dwelt among us, and when the Word showed up at a well in Sychar—not only would He be found waiting for this woman, but Jesus would also ask of this woman to give Him to drink. This woman was clearly taken back and surprised with and by Jesus’ request to give Him to drink, for He was a Jew, and Jews had no dealings with Samaritans. What makes this truly beautiful is when you think about and consider that not only did Jesus enter into Samaria and sit down at the well and wait for this woman, but Jesus also desired that this woman give Him to drink. How absolutely wonderful it is to think about the fact that Jesus would ask of a drink from those whom Jews had no dealings, and those with whom the Jews did not associate with. We must needs pay close and careful attention to this, for Jesus would show up in Samaria—in a place where Jews would have no dealings—and would show up there waiting for this woman to arrive at the well, and wanting this woman to give Him to drink. I happen to find this to be truly captivating, for here we find Jesus showing up in a place where Jews had no dealings, and not only choosing to sit down at a well in the midst of a Samaritan city, but Jesus would show up in Samaria and ask for a drink from a Samaritan woman. What we must realize and recognize and understand is that not only did Jesus desire fruit from those in Judaea, those in Galilee, and those in Jerusalem, but Jesus also desired from those in Samaria. What’s more, is that not only did Jesus desire for those in Judaea, those in Galilee, and those in Jerusalem to give Him to drink, but so also did Jesus desire those in Samaria to give Him to drink.

            As I prepare to bring this writing to a close I find it absolutely worth noting and mentioning that Jesus’ showing up at the well and waiting for this woman is not only a powerful picture of the Word being made flesh and dwelling among us in those places where men and women are ostracized, despised and rejected, but Jesus also shows up in those places and desires to be given to drink. Jesus would show up at a well in a Samaritan city and would ask this Samaritan woman to give Him to drink—something which would never take place in the regions of Judaea and Galilee. Search the four gospel narratives if you will and you not find any occurrence of Jesus sitting down by a well in the regions of Judaea and Galilee and asking a Jew to give Him something to drink. The only time in the four gospels we find Jesus asking another to give Him to drink is in the Samaritan town of Sychar, and at a well there in Sychar where a local Samaritan woman would meet Him. Jesus would show up at this well as she had perhaps done time and time again, day after day, week after week, and on this particular day she would show up to someone sitting at the well—someone who clearly looked out of place, and someone whom she might very well have thought and felt did not belong there. What makes this truly worth thinking about and considering is that Jesus actually showed up at this well and waited for this woman to arrive that He might deliberately and intentionally ask her for something to drink. Jesus must needs pass through Samaria—and not only pass through Samaria, but also sit down by a well in Samaria that He might ask this woman to give Him to drink.

            If there is one thing I find absolutely incredible about this narrative is that after this woman would go and speak unto the men of the city concerning this man who told her everything she ever did, the Samaritans would entreat Jesus to abide and dwell with them. We know from Scripture that Jesus would dwell and abide with them for two days, and I can’t help but wonder what Jesus would teach and preach among them. Stop and think about what it would have been like for Jesus and His disciples—both of which were Jews—to not only pass through Samaria, but also to dwell and abide there for two full days. Not only this, but think about the fact that what would originally begin with Jesus asking this woman to give Him to drink might very well have escalated and been transformed into something so much greater, as not only would Jesus draw from the depths of this woman’s heart and soul, but Jesus would most likely draw from the depths of the hearts and souls of those who were present in Samaria. I absolutely love how Jesus didn’t merely show up at this well in this Samaritan town simply and solely for this woman, but Jesus would show up in the Samaritan town of Sychar knowing and anticipating abiding and dwelling with them for two full days. It would be there at the well Jesus would essentially knock, and His knock would come in the form of a request to be given to drink, and this Samaritan woman’s testimony spoken in the hearing of all those who were found in the city of Sychar. What would initially and originally begin with an encounter with a Samaritan woman there at the well in Sychar would ultimately be transformed into two full days of Jesus abiding and dwelling with Samaritans. Oh I can’t help but wonder what those in Jewry would have thought and would have said if they knew that Jesus not only passed through Samaria, but also abode and dwelt among and with them for two full days. I can’t help but wonder what would and could very well have happened had the scribes, the chief priests, the elders of Israel, and even the Jews learning that Jesus passed through Samaria, and that Jesus would deliberately and intentionally abide there with them for two full days. There in Samaria Jesus would dwell and abide with Samaritans—those whom Jews had no dealings with, and those whom Jews did not interact with. OH that we would pay close and careful attention to this, for it brings us face to face with the absolutely remarkable and powerful truth concerning the Word being made flesh and dwelling among us in those places we might otherwise be hesitant to go to.

            Jesus would enter into the region of Samaria, Jesus would sit down by a well there in Sychar, and Jesus would ask this Samaritan woman to give Him to drink, and it would be there at the well in Samaria Jesus would ask of her to give Him to drink—and not merely give Him to drink of physical and natural water, but of something much greater and something much deeper than that. Jesus would show up here at this well asking this woman to give Him to drink, and there is not a doubt in my mind that what Jesus was truly and ultimately asking for was for this woman to give Him to drink from the depths of her heart and soul. Not only this, but this would ultimately transition to Jesus dwelling and abiding with the Samaritans for two full days as He would not only give them to drink from Himself, but He would also be given to drink from them as He would without a doubt draw from the depths of their hearts and souls. I find it absolutely astonishing and captivating that Jesus would choose to spend a full two days in Samaria, and that for two full days the Word which became flesh and dwelt among us would reside within this place where Jews normally would not have any dealings or association with. How absolutely powerful it is to think and consider that Jesus as the Word made flesh which would dwell among us would actually choose to be manifested in the midst of the region of Samaria—and not only would choose to be manifested in the midst of Samaria, but would choose to abide there for a full two days. For two days the Word which became flesh and which would dwell among us would actually come forth out of Galilee, and would actually come forth from Judaea in order that He might be manifested in the midst of a region and place of those which were marginalized, despised, rejected, avoided, and the like. How absolutely powerful it is to think about and consider the fact that Jesus the Christ would choose to willingly and voluntarily dwell and abide two full days in a place where Jews would have no dealings and where Jews would choose not to associate. Much like the priest and the Levite who would pass by on the other side of the road when seeing that one who was left bruised, bloodied and half-dead, so the Jews would choose to go around and pass by on the other side of Samaria rather than going through Samaria.

What I find to be truly captivating is when you consider the fact that when delivering the Great Commission Jesus would emphatically declare unto His disciples that they would be His witnesses in Jerusalem, in Judaea and in Samaria. Not only this, but Philip—one of the deacons of the early Church—would actually journey into the region of Samaria and preach the gospel concerning Jesus Christ unto them. What would begin with Jesus the Christ as the Word made flesh and dwelling among us would continue with the early Church, as the Spirit would lead Philip into Samaria to preach the gospel concerning Jesus the Christ. In other words—no longer could those Jews who were Christians avoid Samaria. Despite the fact that their Jewish counterparts and Jewish contemporaries would choose to avoid Samaria and continue to pass by and go around rather than journeying through, the Jewish believers and followers of Yeshua of Nazareth would and could no longer bypass, go around, and avoid Samaria. With the release of the Spirit and the Great Commission Jesus would not send His disciples and His followers directly into Samaria. Oh we must needs recognize and understand this, for when we make the decision to follow Jesus the Christ, and when the person, the presence and power of the Holy Spirit is manifested within our lives we no longer have any control and we no longer have any authority over where we choose to minister and who and what we choose to avoid. It was the person and presence of the Holy Spirit that would send Philip into Samaria, and it would be the person and presence of the Spirit that would send the apostle Peter unto Cornelius’ house to preach the gospel concerning Jesus the Christ unto Gentiles. Not only this, but it would be there in the house of Cornelius the Holy Ghost would be poured out and released, and all those who were present in the midst of that house would receive the baptism and infilling of the Holy Spirit. Oh that we would recognize and understand that while it was indeed true that the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, so we—each and every one of us—are words become flesh which are called to dwell in the midst of and among people, and we no longer have any control or authority over where we go for ministry, who we interact with in relation to the gospel, and the like. No longer can we be picky when it comes to ministry, and no longer can we be selective when it comes to actively preaching the gospel concerning Jesus the Christ. No longer can we have, and no longer are we entitled to an “avoidance” mentality where we avoid certain places and certain people groups. Oh that we would recognize and understand that we are indeed “words become flesh” and “words which dwell in the midst of and among men.”

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