There Comes A Second Touch: The First Touch Is Not the Last Touch (Get Ready For the Second Touch)

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel narrative of the life and ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ as it was written and recorded by John Mark. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the eighth chapter of this New Testament book. “IN those days the multitude being very great, and having nothing to eat, Jesus called His disciples unto him, and saith unto them, I have compassion on the multitude, because they have now been with me three days, and have nothing to eat: and if I send them away fasting to their own houses, they will faint by the way: for divers of them came from far. And his disciples answered him, From whence can a man satisfy these men with bread here in the wilderness? And he asked them, How many loaves have ye? And they said, Seven. And he commanded the people to sit down on the ground: and he took the seven loaves, and gave thanks, and brake, and gave to his disciples to set before them; and they did set them before the people. And they had a few small fishes: and he blessed, and commanded to set them also before them. So they did eat, and were filled: and they took up of the broken meat that was left seven baskets. And they that had eaten were about four thousand: and he sent them away” (Marks 8:1-9).

            “And straightway he entered into a ship with his disciples, and came into the parts of Calmanutha. And the Pharisees came forth, and began to question with him, seeking of him a sign from heaven, tempting him. And he sighed deeply in his spirit, and saith, Why doth this generation seek after a sign? Verily I say unto you, There shall no sign be given unto this generation. And he left them, and entering into the ship again departed to the other side” (Mark 8:10-13).

            “Now the disciples had forgotten to take bread, neither had they in the ship with them more than one loaf. And he charged them, saying, Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and of the leaven of Herod. And they reasoned among themselves, saying, It is because we have no bread. And when Jesus knew it, he saith unto them, Why reason ye, because ye have no bread? Perceive ye not yet, neither understand? Have ye your heart yet hardened? Having eyes, see ye not? And having ears, hear ye not? And do ye not remember? When I brake the five loaves among five thousand, how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? They say unto him, Twelve. And when the seven among four thousand, how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? And they said, Seven. And he said unto them, How is it that ye do not understand?” (Mark 8:14-21).

            “And he cometh to Bethsaida; and they bring a blind man unto him, and besought him to touch him, and he took the blind man by the hand, and led him out of the town; and when he had spit on his eyes, and put his hands upon him, he asked him if he saw ought. And he looked up, and said, I see men as trees, walking. After that he put his hands again upon his eyes, and made him look up: and he was restored, and saw every man clearly. And he sent him away to his house, saying, Neither go into the town, nor tell it to any in the town” (Mark 8:22-26).

            “And Jesus went out, and his disciples, into the towns of Caesarea Philippi: and by the way he asked his disciples, saying unto them, Whom do men say that I am? And they answered, John the Baptist: but some say Elias; and others, One of the prophets. And he saith unto them, But whom say ye that I am? And Peter answereth and saith unto him, Thou art the Christ. And he charged them that they should tell no man of him” (Mark 8:27-30).

            “And he began to teach them, tha the Son of man, must suffer many things, and be rejected of the elders, and of the chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. And he spake that saying openly. And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him. But when he had turned about and looked on his disciples, he rebuked Peter, saying, Get thee behind me, Satan: for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but the things that be of men. And when he had called the people unto him with his disciples also, he said unto them, Whosoever will came after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel’s, the same shall save it. For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? Whosoever therefore shall be ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation; of him also shall the son of man be ashamed, when he cometh in the glory of His Father with the holy angels” (Mark 8:31-38).

            ANOTHER MULTITUDE! ANOTHER CROWD! MORE COMPASSION! ANOTHER MIRACLE! A GREAT MULTITUDE WITH NOTHING TO EAT! I HAVE COMPASSION ON THE MULTITUDE! THEY HAVE NOW BEEN WITH ME THREE DAYS, AND HAVE NOTHING TO EAT! IF I SEND THEM AWAY FASTING TO THEIR OWN HOUSES, THEY WILL FAINT BY THE WAY! DIVERS OF THEM CAME FROM FAR! FROM WHENCE CAN A MAN SATISFY THESE MEN WITH BREAD HERE IN THE WILDERNESS? HOW MANY LOAVES HAVE YE? (DID THE DISCIPLES ALREADY FORGET THE MIRACLE OF THE FIVE THOUSAND? WE KNOW THEY FORGOT AND DID NOT CONSIDER IT IN THE MIDST OF AND AFTER THE STORM) HOW MANY LOAVES HAVE YE? HE COMMANDED THE PEOPLE TO SIT DOWN ON THE GROUND! HE GAVE THANKS, AND BREAKE, AND GAVE TO HIS DISCIPLES TO SET BEFORE THEM! HE BLESSED, AND COMMANDED TO SET THEM ALSO BEFORE THEM! THEY DID EAT, AND WERE FILLED! THEY TOOK UP OF THE BROKEN MEAT THAT WAS LEFT SEVEN BASKETS! THEY THAT HAD EATEN WERE ABOUT FOUR THOUSAND!

            THE PHARISEES CAME FORTH, AND BEGAN TO QUESTION WITH HIM, SEEKING OF IM A SIGN FROM HEAVEN, TEMPTING HIM! WHY DOTH THIS GENERATION SEEK AFTER A SIGN? THERE SHALL NO SIGN BE GIVEN UNTO HIS GENERATIONS!

            NOW THE DISCIPLES HAD FORGOTTEN TO TAKE BREAD! NEITHER HAD THEY IN THE SHIP WITH THEM MORE THAN ONE LOAF! TAKE HEED, BEWARE OF THE LEAVEN OF THE PHARISEES, AND OF THE LEAVEN OF HEROD! WHY REASON YE, BECAUSE YE HAVE NO BREAD? PERCEIVE YE NOT YET, NEITHER UNDERSTAND? HAVE YE YOUR HEART YET HARDENED? HAVING EYES, SEE YE NOT? AND HAVING EARS, HEAR YE NOT? DO YOU NOT REMEMBER? WHEN I BRAKE THE FIVE LOAVES AMONG FIVE THOUSAND, HOW MANY BASKETS FULL OF FRAGMENTS TOOK YE UP? WHEN THE SEVEN AMONG FOUR THOUSAND, HOW MANY BASKETS FULL OF FRAGMENTS TOOK YE UP?

            HE TOOK THE BLIND MAN BY THE HAND! LED HIM OUT OF THE TOWN! WHEN HE HAD SPIT ON HIS EYES! PUT HIS HANDS UPON HIM! ASKED HIM IF HE SAW OUGHT! HE LOOKED UP, AND SAID, I SEE MEN AS TREES, WALKING! HE PUT HIS HANDS AGAIN UPON HIS EYES! MADE HIM LOOK UP! HE WAS RESTORED! SAW EVERY MANY CLEARLY!

            When you come to this particular portion of Scripture you will find the second occurrence of Jesus feeding a great multitude which would gather itself unto Him. As you read the words which are found in this portion of Scripture you will find that once again the multitude would assemble itself before and around the Lord Jesus Christ—and not only would the multitude assemble itself together unto the Lord Jesus, but the size and number of that multitude would be very great. In the beginning verses of this particular portion of Scripture we find John Mark writing and recording how in those days the multitude was not only very great before and in the presence of Jesus, but also that multitude had nothing to eat. Pause for a moment and think about and consider the tremendous truth surrounding this reality, for not only would there be a great multitude which would be gathered together unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ, but that multitude would have nothing to eat. Undoubtedly that great multitude which had gathered itself unto the person of Jesus the Christ and His disciples would have been hungry having had nothing to eat. Oh how incredibly intriguing it is to think about and consider the fact that not only would there be a great multitude which would gather itself unto Jesus the Christ and His disciples, but that multitude would also have nothing to eat. What’s more, is that when you read the words found within this portion of Scripture you will find Jesus calling His disciples unto Himself and speaking something very deliberate and very powerful unto them. If and as you begin reading the words found within this passage of Scripture you will find that Jesus would call the disciples unto them concerning the multitude which had gathered itself unto Him, and would gather and call them unto Himself with and for a very specific purpose. Consider if you will the following words which are found in the second and third verses of the eighth chapter of this New Testament gospel narrative written by John Mark:

            “I have compassion on the multitude, because they have now been with me three days, and have nothing to eat: and if I send them away fasting to their own houses, they will faint by the way: for divers of them came from far” (Mark 8:2-3).

            Please don’t miss the awesome and tremendous significance of that which is found within this portion of Scripture, for within this passage of Scripture we not only learn and discover that a great multitude had gathered itself unto the Lord Jesus, but we also learn that they had been with Him for three days. For three full days this great multitude would be gathered together before and unto the Lord Jesus Christ and would have heard and listened to Him teach and speak. For three full days this great multitude would be gathered before and unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ and would devote themselves to hearing and listening to the words which He would teach and speak unto them. Three full days this great multitude would be gathered together unto Jesus, and in that place before and in the presence of the Lord Jesus this crowd and multitude would commit and devote themselves to hearing and listening to all the words which Jesus would teach and speak unto them. What’s more is that in the ninth verse which concludes this particular narrative within the eighth chapter you will find John Mark describing how the actual size and number of this crowd was about four thousand men, women and children. Pause for a moment and consider how incredibly powerful and unique this truly is, for this would not be the first time a great multitude would gather itself unto Jesus and His disciples that they might hear and listen to His teach and speak unto them the words of the kingdom of heaven, as well as work miracles and healings among them in their presence. Upon reading the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle Matthew you will find time and time again the Lord Jesus Christ being present among the multitudes as more often than not the fame concerning Jesus would spread throughout the neighboring towns, villages and cities and divers men and women would come from all over that they might gather themselves unto Jesus.

            The more I think about this particular reality and concept of the multitudes which gathered themselves unto the Lord Jesus Christ the more I can’t help but think about the desire, the intention and the motive of those who would actually gather themselves unto Him. There is not a doubt in my mind that present within and among the multitude were those who were entirely and altogether desperate within their hearts, within their souls and within their physical bodies, and sought to come unto the person that they might find healing, wholeness and cleansing within themselves and their persons. Undoubtedly there would be those who would not come unto Jesus alone, but would actually bring someone close to them who themselves had a great need. Oh there is not a doubt in my mind that there would be some who would come unto Jesus in the midst of the multitude who would come unto Him for themselves, and there would be others who would come unto Jesus for others—perhaps a family member, perhaps a loved one, or perhaps even a close friend. With this being said, I am absolutely and completely convinced there would be others who would gather themselves unto Jesus because they desperately desired to hear and listen to the words which He would speak. It would be Simon called Peter who would emphatically declare unto Jesus when He asked if they too would walk away that He alone had the words of eternal life and was the Christ the Son of the living God. Undoubtedly there would be those who would gather themselves together unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ that they might hear and listen to the words which He would speak—particularly and especially when you consider that there were those in the synagogue of Capernaum who marveled and were astonished at the doctrine and teaching of Jesus, for He taught them as one having authority and not as their scribes, nor the Pharisees, nor even the teacher of the Law. Undoubtedly there would be men and women who would not only hear the authority that would be present within the words and teaching of the Lord Jesus Christ, but also those who would realize and understand that Jesus alone would have the words of eternal life and would earnestly and eagerly desire those words.

            With all of this being said, I feel it necessary to state and declare that there would undoubtedly be those who would gather themselves together unto the Lord Jesus Christ who were simply curious as to this person from Nazareth they had perhaps heard so much about. There is not a doubt in my mind that there would be those who would indeed and would in fact gather themselves together unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ because of a tremendous curiosity that would mount within their hearts and their spirits. They would join themselves together with the multitude and would hear and listen to the words which the LORD Jesus would indeed speak unto and among them, however, it would be done more out of curiosity than anything else. Keeping this in mind I would dare contend and argue that there would be those present in the midst of the crowds and multitude who were more of a bystander and spectator than they were an active participant who was engaged with their heart, their mind, their spirit and their entire person in the presence of the Lord Jesus Christ. There is not a doubt in my mind that there would indeed and would in fact be those who would gather themselves together unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ because they had heard of the fame and report concerning Him and what He had wrought among the people—even that which He had taught—and as a direct result they would gather themselves together unto Him that they might hear and see for themselves what all the hype and what all the reports were truly about. When we think about this tremendous concept of the crowds and multitudes which gathered themselves together unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ we must needs realize and understand that the multitudes would themselves be a tremendous mixture of those who actually came unto Jesus desperate within themselves and truly desired to hear and listen to the words Jesus spoke, and truly had a need they believed Jesus could meet, and those who would come unto the person of Jesus Christ simply to see, to watch and to observe that which Jesus would teach and do. Consider if you will the following words which are found concerning the parable of the sower and the different types of hearts and people that would indeed hear the word of the kingdom and would come unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ:

            “And He began again to teach by the sea side: and there was gathered unto him a great multitude, so that he entered into a ship, and sat in the sea; and the whole multitude was by the sea on the land. And he taught them many things by parables, and said unto them in his doctrine, Hearken; Behold, there went out a sower to sow: and it came to pass, as he sowed, some fell by the way side, and the fowls of the air came and devoured it up. And some fell on stony ground; where it had not much earth; and immediately it sprang up, because it had no depth of earth: But when the sun was up, it was scorched; and because it had no root, it withered away. And some fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up, and choked it, and it yielded no fruit. And other fell on good ground, and did yield fruit that sprang up and increased; and brought forth, some thirty, and some sixty, and some an hundred. And he said unto them, HE that hath ears to hear, let him hear” (Mark 4:1-9).

            “And when he was alone, they that were about him with the twelve asked of him the parable. And he said unto them, Unto you it is given to know the mystery of the kingdom of God: but unto them that are without, all these things are done in praables: that seeing they may see, and not perceive; and hearing they may hear, and not understand; lest at any time they should be converted, and their sins should be forgiven them. And he said unto them, Know ye not this parable? And how then will ye know all parables? The sower soweth the word. And these are they by the way side, where the word is sown; but when they have heard, Satan cometh immediately, and taketh away the word that was sown in their hearts. And these are they likewise which are sown on stony ground; who, when they have heard the word, immediately receive it with gladness; and have no root in themselves, and so endure but for a time: afterward, when affliction or persecution ariseth for the word’s sake, immediately they are offended. And these are they which are sown among thorns; such as hear the word, and the cares of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, and the lusts of other things entering in, choke the word, and it becometh unfruitful. And these are they which are sown on good ground; such as hear the word, and receive it, and bring forth fruit, some thirtyfold, some sixty, and some an hundred” (Mark 4:10-20).

            It is truly something worth thinking about and considering when reading the words which are found in this portion of Scripture that there would continually and regularly be great multitudes of people which would gather themselves together unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ. Jesus would indeed and would in fact be no stranger to the multitudes, nor would He be a stranger to the crowds of people which would gather themselves together unto Him. Time and time again there would be great multitudes of men and women who would gather themselves unto Him that they might see and behold for themselves what He was all about, and that they might hear and listen to the words which He would teach and speak unto them. There would be those who would gather themselves unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ because they were entirely and altogether desperate, for they would have a tremendous need within their physical body—perhaps they were blind, or perhaps they were deaf, or perhaps they were lame, or perhaps they were mute, or perhaps they had another infirmity which they had been struggling and dealing with for years. Regardless of the purpose and reason great crowds and multitudes gathered themselves together unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ we know that there would be great crowds and great numbers of men and women who would gather themselves together unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ that they might hear the words which He would speak, and even receive some physical touch and miracle within their person and physical body. Oh we dare not miss and understand this—particularly and especially when we read the words which are found in this portion of Scripture, for within this passage we find the crowd and multitude that had gathered itself unto Jesus having been with Him for three days.

            THREE DAYS WITH JESUS! THREE DAYS HEARING JESUS SPEAK! THREE DAYS HEARING JESUS TEACH! THREE DAYS HEARING JESUS SPEAK OF THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN! THREE DAYS HEARING JESUS SPEAK CONCERNING THE MYSTERIES OF THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN! Oh I sit here today thinking about and considering the awesome and incredible truth surrounding this passage of Scripture and I am not only fascinated by the size of the crowd, and I am not only fascinated with the fact that the multitude had been with Jesus for three days, but I am also fascinated with and by the person of the Lord Jesus Christ and how He was moved with compassion for and towards this great group and great crowd of people. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this awesome truth, for it brings us face to face with the truly remarkable reality that at the very heart of Jesus’ interaction with this multitude for three days, and at the very heart of even that which Jesus did on this particular occasion was compassion within Himself—compassion within His heart and soul for and toward them. If we are truly to understand the words which are found within this passage of Scripture we must needs recognize and understand that it was Jesus Himself who had compassion on the multitude, and it would be this compassion that would drive, propel and compel Him to act within and among the crowd. Oh if there is one thing we must needs recognize and understand concerning the movement and ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ it’s that He was one who was always moved with Compassion and was always one who moved with compassion. Oh it is important that we recognize and understand the difference between these two realities—that of being moved with compassion and that of moving with compassion—for they speak of two entirely and different realities within our hearts and lives. There is a fundamental difference that exists between being moved with compassion which speaks of something which we experience within our hearts, our souls and our spirits, and moving with compassion as it describes the actions we engage ourselves in as a direct result of what we feel within our hearts.

            In all reality, I am absolutely and completely convinced that we must needs realize and understand the vast and tremendous difference that exists between being moved with compassion which speaks of our ability to feel for and toward those who we interact with on a daily bases, and moving which compassion which actually describes how we act and interact with those individuals. Being moved with compassion speaks of our ability to be stirred within the depths of our hearts and our spirits concerning those who are before and all around us having looked upon them, their plight, their needs, and that which they might be struggling with. There is something to be said about our ability to be moved with compassion within the depths of our hearts and our spirits, for it says something about who we are as a people and who we are as individuals when we are able to be moved with compassion for and toward those whom we might interact and engage with. What’s more, is that I would strongly and powerfully suggest that it is virtually impossible to move with compassion if, until and until we are actually those who are moved with compassion. At the very heart of moving with compassion is our ability and our capacity to be stirred with compassion within the depths of our hearts and within the depths of our souls that we might truly be touched with the infirmities of those who are present before and all around us. Oh it is with this in mind I can’t help but think about the words which are found in the final verses of the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative which was written by the apostle Matthew, as well as the words which are found in the final verses of the eleventh chapter of the same New Testament gospel, and even the words which are found in the New Testament epistle which was written by the author of Hebrews. Consider if you will the following words which are found within these passages—this in addition to what we find and read within this same gospel concerning the compassion Jesus would have on the crowd and multitude which would total five thousand souls:

            “And Jesus went about all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing every sickness and every disease among the people. But when He saw the multitudes, HE WAS MOVED WITH COMPASSION on them, because they fainted, and were scattered abroad, as sheep having no shepherd. Then saith he unto His disciples, The harvest truly is plenteous, but the labourers are few; Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth labourers into his harvest” (Matthew 9:35-38).

            “At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast his these things from the wise and the prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes. Even so, Father: for so it seemed good in thy sight. All things are delivered unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal him. Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light” (Matthew 11:25-30).

            “Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that throught death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil; and deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham. Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people. For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succour them that are tempted” (Hebrews 2:14-18).

            “Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our inifirmties; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need” (Hebrews 4:14-16).

            “And they departed into a desert place by ship privately. And the people saw them departing, and many knew him, and ran afoot thither out of all cities, and outwent them, and came together unto him. And Jesus, when he came out, saw much people, and was moved with compassion toward them, because they were as sheep not having a shepherd: and he began to teach them many things” (Mark 6:32-34).

            Oh please don’t miss and lose sight of the words which are found within these passages of Scripture, for the words which we find here bring us face to face with the tremendous compassion Jesus had within Himself. Not only this, but it is when you journey to the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle Matthew you will find and encounter the actual words and language concerning Jesus being moved with compassion. Within these passages of Scripture—not only will you find it written how Jesus was moved with compassion, but within these passages you will also find the Lord Jesus Himself declaring how He had compassion for the crowds and multitudes which were before Him. In the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle Matthew you will find it written how Jesus was moved with compassion for and toward the multitude because He saw them as sheep which had no shepherd, and as sheep which were scattered abroad. It is within the sixth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by John Mark you will find it again written how Jesus was moved with compassion—and not only how Jesus was moved with compassion, but how Jesus would spring into action because of that compassion. What we must needs realize, recognize and understand when reading the words which are found in the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle Matthew and the words which are found in the sixth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by John Mark is that in the gospel of Matthew Jesus was moved with compassion and as a direct result He would speak unto the disciples concerning the harvest being plenteous and great, and asking the disciples to pray therefore unto the Lord of the harvest that He might send forth labourers into the harvest. IN the sixth chapter of the gospel narrative which was written by John Mark we find Jesus again being moved with compassion, and as a direct result of that compassion—not only would He teach them many things, but that compassion would also cause Him to invite the disciples to participate in the miracle of feeding the five thousand which were present before Him who were undoubtedly tired, hungry, and perhaps even weak and weary.

            As I sit here today thinking about and considering the words and language which is found within these portions and passages of Scripture I can’t help but be reminded of the words which the Lord Jesus Christ spoke in the twenty-fifth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative which was written by the apostle Matthew. Not only this, but I am also reminded of the words which we find written and recorded in the tenth chapter of the same New Testament gospel narrative, for it is within the tenth chapter—immediately after we find Jesus declaring unto the disciples that the harvest was plenteous but the laborers were few, and immediately after Jesus instructed and invited them to pray therefore the Lord of the harvest that He might send forth laborers into the harvest—Jesus would call the disciples and apostles unto Himself and would send them out as those very laborers He instructed them to pray unto the Lord of harvest that He would send out. Not only this, but within the New Testament gospel narrative written by the beloved Gentile physician Luke you will find Jesus sending an addition seventy individuals out into the harvest that they too might participate and partner together with Him in the work of the ministry of the kingdom of heaven. Consider if you will the following words which are found within each of these New Testament passages of Scripture:

            “And when he called unto him his twelve disciples, he gave them power against unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to heal all manner of sickness and all manner of disease. Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother; Philip, and Bartholomew; Thomas, and Matthew the publican; James the son of Alphaeus, and LEbbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus; Simon the Canaanites, and Judas Iscariot, who also betrayed him. These twelve Jesus sent forth, and commanded them, saying, GO not into the way of the Gentiles, and into any city of the Samaritans enter ye not: but go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. And as ye go, preach, saying, The kingdom of heaven is at hand. Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, raise the dead, cast out devils: freely ye have received, freely give. Provide neither gold, nor silver, nor brass in your purses, nor scrip for your journey, neither two coats, neither shoes, nor yet staves: for the workman is worthy of his meat. And into whatsoever city or town ye shall enter, inquire who in it is worthy; and there abide till ye go thence. And when ye come into an house, salute it. And if the house be worthy, let your peace come upon it: but if it be not worthy, let your peace return to you. And whosoever shall not receive you, nor hear your words, when ye depart out of that house or city, shake off the dust of your feet. Verily I say unto you, It shall be more tolerable for the land of Sodom and Gomorrha in the day of judgment than for that city” (Matthew 10:1-15).

            “After these things the Lord appointed other seventy also, and sent them two and two before his face into every city and place, whither he himself would come. Therefore said he unto them, The harvest truly is great, but the laborers are few: pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he would send forth labourers into his harvest. Go your ways: behold, I send you forth as lambs among wolves. Carry neither purse, nor scrip, nor shoes: and salute no man by the way. And into whatsoever house ye enter, first say, Peace be to this house. And if the son of peace be there, your peace shall rest upon it: if not, it shall turn to you again. And in the same house remain, eating and drinking such things as they give: for the labourer is worthy of his hire. Go not from house to house. And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you: and heal the sick that are therein, and sayu not them, The kingdom of God is come nigh unto you. But into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you not, go your ways out into the streets of the same, and say, Even the very dust of your city, which cleaveth on us, we do wipe off against you: notwithstanding be ye sure of this, that the kingdom of God is come nigh unto you. But I say unto you, that it shall be more tolerable in that day for Sodom, than for that city” (Luke 10:1-12).

            “Woe unto thee, Chorazin! Woe unto thee, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon, which have been done in you, that had a great while ago repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes. But it shall be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the judgment, than for you. And thou, Capernaum, which art exaluted to heaven, shalt be thrust down to hell. He that heareth you heareth me; and he that despiseth you despiseth me; and he that despiseth me despiseth him that sent me” (Luke 10:13-16).

            “When the son of man shall come in his glory, and all the holy angels with him, then shall he sit upon the throne of his glory: and before him shall be gathered all nations: and he shall separate them one from another, as a shepherd divideth his sheep from the goats: and he shall set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left. Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world: For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in: naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me. Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? Or thisty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? Or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. Then shall he say also unto them on the left hand, Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels; For I was an hungred, and ye gave me no meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me no drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me not it: naked, and ye clothed me not: sick, and in prison, and ye visited me not. Then shall they also answer him, saying, Lord when saw we thee an hungred, or athirst, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister unto thee? Then shall he answer them,s aying, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to me. And these shall go away into everlasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal” (Matthew 25:31-46).

            MOVED WITH COMPASSION, MOVING WITH COMPASSION! Oh I sit here today thinking about the life and ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ and I am absolutely and completely gripped and captivated with the fact that the Lord Jesus was not only One who was moved with compassion being touched with and by the infirmities of those all around Him, but He was also One who would move with compassion. The Lord Jesus Christ was One whose heart, whose soul and whose spirit could truly and indeed be touched, impacted and affected by the needs, the infirmities, the sicknesses, the diseases, and all manner of distress, sorrow, anguish which was all around Him. In all reality I can’t help but wonder what it was like for the person of Jesus Christ to spend three and a half years living among men and actually walking among them in the midst of their distress, walking among them in the midst of their discouragement, walking among them in the midst of their sorrow, walking among them in the midst of their anguish, walking among them in the midst of their needs. There is not a doubt in my mind that the Lord Jesus Christ was One who was acutely aware of all the needs, all the hurting, all the pain, all the brokenness, and all the sorrow and agony which was present before and all around Him. We know from the words which are found in the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle Matthew, as well as the words which are found in the sixth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by John Mark that the Lord Jesus Christ was indeed and was in fact moved with compassion by the needs which were present all around Him. When Jesus stepped out of the boat on the other side of the sea—even though He had invited the twelve disciples to come away and come apart with Him into a desert place that they might experience rest—He would be moved with compassion upon the multitude which had already gathered and assembled together. Pause for a moment and think about this for a moment as Jesus would invite the disciples to come away and come apart with Him to find and experience rest, and yet when they arrived in that place they would be met with a great multitude of people. What’s more, is think about and consider how instead of being moved with frustration, instead of being moved with distress, instead of thinking within Himself that there was another crowd, Jesus was moved with compassion.

            The more I think about and the more I consider this awesome and powerful truth the more I am brought face to face with the awesome and powerful truth that there are times when we within ourselves might simply desire rest—and might desire simply to get away into a quiet place where we can recharge and reset ourselves—and yet instead of finding rest in that place we find ourselves coming face to face with a tremendous need. Within the sixth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by John Mark we find Jesus inviting the disciples to come away and come apart with Him that they might experience rest, and yet it would be in that place where they would actually be met with a great crowd and multitude of people. What’s more, is that not only would they be met with a great crowd and multitude of people, but there in that place they would experience Jesus being moved with compassion toward this great group of people and teaching them many things. Not only this, but we find this great crowd and multitude of people being with Jesus and the disciples well into the afternoon and early evening as they would hear and listen to the words which He would teach. It would be here in this place where Jesus would not only teach them for a good portion of the day, but once the teaching was all done Jesus would also invite the disciples to participate in the miracle of feeding the five thousand. Here in this particular portion of Scripture we find Jesus again encountering a great multitude and group of people, and again we find at the very forefront and center of Jesus action and interaction with the crowd and multitude the compassion within His heart, within His spirit, and within His soul. In the sixth chapter of this gospel narrative we find John Mark writing how Jesus was moved with compassion, while in this particular portion of Scripture we find Jesus actually speaking unto the disciples how He Himself had compassion on the multitude. What’s more, is that not only do we find Jesus speaking and declaring unto the disciples that He had compassion on the multitude, but we also find Him explaining why—namely, “because they have now been with me three days, and have nothing to eat: and if I send them away fasting to their own houses, they will faint by the way: for divers of them came from far” (Mark 8:2-3).

            I have to admit that I absolutely love the words which are found within this passage, for not only do we find and read Jesus Himself describing the compassion He had within His heart and soul, but we also find Jesus explaining the source and foundation for that compassion. We know that Jesus was one hundred percent and fully God in the flesh, and would therefore be all love, would be all compassionate, would be all sympathetic, would be all empathetic toward those whom He would encounter on a daily basis, however, we must needs realize and understand that even while Jesus was in the flesh He would be one who was touched with and by the feelings of the infirmities of those whom He would interact with. It is truly something unique and worth thinking about when reading the words found in this portion of Scripture that Jesus would indeed be moved with compassion for and toward the great multitude and crowd of people that would be gathered together before Him, and the reason for this compassion was because they had been with Him for three days and had nothing to eat. It would be in the first verse we find John Mark describing how the multitude itself had nothing to eat, and it would be Jesus Himself who would describe and declare unto the disciples that not only had the crowd been with Him for three days, but they also had no food. What makes this even more intriguing is when you think about and consider the words which are found in the sixth chapter, for in the sixth chapter of this gospel narrative we find that it was the disciples and Jesus who did not have leisure so much as to eat, while in this passage of Scripture we find the multitude themselves not having anything to eat. It would be in the sixth chapter we find Jesus being moved with compassion and moving with compassion to feed the multitude of people because the day was far spent, and it would be in the eighth chapter we find Jesus being moved with compassion because the great multitude had been with Him for three days and had no food. What’ smore, is that we also find Jesus expressing this compassion in an even greater degree and measure when He declared unto His disciples that if He sent the multitude away fasting to their own houses they would faint along the way. Oh we have a great need to realize and understand the words found here in this passage, for both in the sixth chapter, as well as the eighth chapter we find Jesus unwilling to send the crowds away—even if the crowd had been with Him throughout much of the day, or had been with Him for three days as was found within this portion of Scripture.

            It is something worth thinking about and considering when reading the words found in these passages of Scripture, for within these passages of Scripture we are indeed and are in fact brought face to face with the tremendous reality that even when and if even though the disciples might very well have thought to send the multitudes and crowds away from their presence and from the presence of Jesus—Jesus Himself was unwilling to send them away. Oh how absolutely incredible it is to think about and consider the fact that when we think about and consider the reality surrounding the crowds and multitudes which were present before and unto the Lord Jesus, He was not willing to send them away. Even if they were tired, even if they were hungry, even if they were thirsty, even if they were weary, even if they were weak, Jesus was not willing to send them away without taking the time to minister to their physical needs and their physical bodies. It is truly something to consider when you take the time to think about how the Lord Jesus Christ was not one who was willing to send the crowds away without taking the time to feed them and ensure they had enough strength to depart and return unto their homes. This is actually something quite remarkable and astounding when you think about and consider those who might gather themselves together unto our houses of worship, our church buildings, and our congregations week in and week out. Oh I can’t help but think about how many men and women enter into our houses of worship and enter into our church buildings tired, weak, weary, worn down, worn out, discouraged, distresses, frustrated, in sorrow, in agony, in anguish, and so much more, and yet many of them are not only sent away, but they are sent away no different and no better than when they arrived among us within our houses of worship and our church buildings.

            I sit here today thinking about and considering the words which are found within this passage of Scripture and I can’t help but think about and consider how many times and how often men and women come unto and among us with great distress, with great discouragement, with great weakness, tired, hungry, weary, worn out, worn down, and so much more, and yet we are content to allow them to depart from among us without taking the time to ensure that they have the necessary strength to not only make the journey to their homes, but also to continue on. There is not a doubt in my mind that there are men and women who come unto and among us within our church buildings and our houses of worship, and they come unto and among us being tired, being weak, being weary, being worn out, being worn down, and the like, and yet we are content to take their tithe, we are content to let them depart from among us no better than when they arrived. These individuals might have come unto and among us with great need, with great distress, and with great despair within their hearts and lives, and yet instead of our being moved with compassion, and instead of our moving with compassion we are content with sending them away still in that place of need, still in that place of distress, still in that place of discouragement, still in that place of despair, still in that place of being tired, and weak, and weary and worn down. Perhaps one of the greatest tragedies facing many churches today is that although men, women and families might gather themselves together unto and among us they are being forced to leave no different and no better than they were when they arrived. If there is one thing I absolutely love about the narrative that is found within the gospels it’s that Jesus was never one who was willing to send the crowds away. Nowhere in any of the gospels will you find Jesus sending the crowds away without taking the time to minister to them—regardless of whether it was feeding five thousand with five loaves of bread and two fish, or feeding four thousand with seven loaves of bread and a few small fish, or healing all those who gathered themselves together unto Him. There is not a single place within the Scriptures where you will encounter and come face to face with a Jesus who was willing to allow the crowds and the multitudes to depart from His presence tired, hungry, weary, weak, worn down, thirsty, or even distressed and in need.

            With all of this being said I can’t help but think about the multitudes which would gather themselves together unto Jesus as being very much like David in the Old Testament book of First Samuel when he was forced to flee from the murderous hand and pursuit of Saul. In this Old Testament book you will find David eventually ending up in a cave in Adullam where he would in turn be in a place where he would hide himself from the threats of Saul. During those days after David was anointed as the next king of Israel, and after David had defeated Goliath and delivered Israel out of the hand of the Philistines, and after David had slaughtered one thousand Philistines and led the children of Israel out in battle against their enemies we find him in a place where he would essentially be Israel’s most wanted, and would be a fugitive within the land of his nativity and within the land of inheritance, promise and blessing. Eventually he would find himself in the cave of Adullam where he would be alone with his thoughts, alone with his emotions, and alone with his God. Eventually, however, something dramatic and drastic would take place—something that would dramatically alter, change and transform him as a fugitive, as well as him as the next king of Israel. It would be there in the cave of Adullam where David would find his brethren together with his parents coming unto him, as well as all those who were distressed, all those who were in despair, and all those who were indebted coming unto him. Consider if you will the following words which are found in the Old Testament book of First Samuel concerning David at the cave of Adullam:

            “David therefore departed thence, and escape to the cave of Adullam: and when his brethren and all his father’s house heard it, they went down thither to him. And every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented, gathered themselves unto him; and he became a captain over them: and there were with him about four hundred men. And David went thence to Mizpeh of Moab: and he said unto the king of Moab, Let my father and my mother, I pray thee, come forth, and be with you, till I know what God will do for me. And he brought them before the king of Moab: and they dwelt with him all the while that David was in the hold. And the prophet Gad said unto David, Abide not in the hold; depart, and get thee into the land of Judah. Then David departed, and came into the forest of Hareth” (1 Samuel 22:1-5).

            Within this passage of Scripture we indeed find David himself in a state and period of flight, and while in the middle of that flight we find him in a cave in Adullam. It would be there in the cave of Adullam where David would be met by his brethren, as well as his mother and father before ultimately being joined by four-hundred men who were either in debt, or discontented, or in distress. There in that cave—there in that place of flight David would be joined together by a group of four-hundred men who Scripture would later go on to reveal would become a much larger group that would swell to six hundred men. It would be these six hundred men whom David would be captain over during his time hiding, running and fleeing from Saul before ultimately finding himself in the territory of the Philistines. These six hundred men which surrounded David would be those who would eventually rise up to become part of David’s mighty men which would not only be referred to in the Old Testament book of Second Samuel, but also within the book of First Chronicles. It is absolutely remarkable and astounding to think about and consider this particular truth, for it brings us face to face with the fact that there would be those who would come unto the Son of David who would be distressed, those who would be discouraged, those who would be in despair, those who would find themselves in a tremendous place of need, and those who would even find themselves unsure of where and who to turn to. Such individuals would enter into the presence of the Lord Jesus Christ and would be brought to the place where they would experience compassion—perhaps for the first time, or perhaps even for the umpteenth time, and yet never to the degree and measure they felt it with Jesus. Oh I would dare say that you have not truly felt and experienced compassion until you have felt and experienced it within the presence of the Lord Jesus Christ. Scripture not only reveals how Jesus was moved with compassion, but also how Jesus moved with compassion—the first deals with His ability to feel and identify with those whom He interacted with, while the second deals with His actions among those who would gather themselves unto Him.

            We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of how absolutely remarkable and incredible this truly is, for when you think about and consider the awesome and powerful truth surrounding the compassion of the Lord Jesus Christ you will find that He was one who would and who could be moved with compassion among those who would gather themselves together unto Him. Jesus would indeed and would in fact be moved with compassion as He was able to identify with the needs of all those who would gather themselves together unto Him. Jesus was not one who lived His life detached from those before and all around Him, and even when He would seek to invite the disciples to come away and come apart with Him to find rest He would willingly forfeit and sacrifice that rest for the sake of and on the account of the compassion within His heart, spirit and soul. Permit me to ask you if you are walking in such a place where you would sacrifice your rest, or even allow yourself to be inconvenienced on the account of the compassion that is present within your heart and spirit. Would you be willing to give of your time, give of your talent, and even give of your treasure on account of the compassion that was found within your heart and spirit? Oh I can’t help but be reminded of the parable which Jesus told concerning the friend who would come unto his neighbor’s house at an inopportune time in need, and how that one whose house he came unto and whose door he knocked on would initially be unwilling to provide him with what he asked for. Because, however, of the persistence of the friend who was outside his house and the door to his home he would rise from his place with his family and give what his friend would ask for. Oh we dare not miss and lose sight of this, for it brings us to the place where we must ask ourselves if we are willing to allow ourselves to be inconvenienced on account of the needs of others—and not only on account of the needs of others, but even on account of the compassion which is present within our hearts.

            If there is one thing I absolutely love about the Lord Jesus Christ it’s that He was one who was willing to be inconvenienced, and He was one who was willing to be touched with and by the needs of those who would gather themselves together unto Him that He might minister to and meet their needs. Jesus was not only one who would and who could be moved with compassion, but Jesus was one who could indeed and could in fact move with that compassion and meet the needs of those whom he would interact with on a consistent and daily basis. Jesus was one who would and who could be touched with and by the infirmities of those before and all around Him, and those who would and could be touched by the needs of those who were present before and all around Him. Jesus would indeed be those who would be able to be touched by the needs of those before and all around Him—and not only this, but He would and could be touched with the feeling of the infirmities of great numbers and multitudes of people. If there is one thing we must needs recognize and understand about the narrative of the live and ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ it’s that He was one who was not limited to a certain number of people whom He would minister to, nor was He limited to certain and specific needs. It did not matter what your need was, nor even how many there were who came unto Him, for Jesus was one who would always move with compassion, and whose compassion within His heart and soul would propel and compel Him to act. We must needs recognize and understand this, for one of the greatest things that is necessary within our lives is not only our ability to be moved with compassion, but also our ability to move with compassion. Our ability and our willingness to move with compassion is directly impacted and affected by our ability to be moved with compassion, and we have a great need within our hearts and souls to be those who are able to be touched with and by the feeling of the infirmities of others.

            I have often found it absolutely amazing when reading the narrative found in the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews how the author emphatically declared that we do not have a high priest who cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities, but one who was in all ways tempted as we are and yet was without sin. Not only this, but we have a faithful and merciful high priest who is seated at the right hand of the Father in heaven. It is because of this that we are able to come boldly before and boldly unto the throne of grace to receive help and mercy in a time of need. We have a great and present need within our hearts and lives to realize and understand that at the very heart of our boldness to come before the throne of grace was an understanding that we have a faithful and merciful high priest who can indeed and can in fact be touched with and by the feeling of our infirmities. Although Jesus would and could not actually be touched with and by the infirmities of those whom He would interact with, He could in fact be touched with and by the feeling of those infirmities. Perhaps one of the greatest needs present within our hearts and lives is our ability to feel and our ability to be moved with compassion. We cannot, we dare not and must not be those who are unable to be touched with and by the feeling of the infirmities of those before and around us, and we cannot and must not be those who are unable to feel the distress, the despair, the discouragement, the helplessness, the hopelessness, and the wide range of emotions, thoughts and feelings those before and all around us have felt and are presently feeling within their hearts and lives. There is a great and present need within our hearts and lives to be those who are able to be moved with compassion, and those who are able to move with compassion among the needs which are before and all around us.

            As I prepare to bring this writing to a close it is absolutely necessary that we call and draw our attention to another passage found within this passage of Scripture—namely when Jesus came to Bethsaida and how a blind man was brought unto him that He might touch Him. John Mark writes and recounts how once the blind man was brought to Jesus He not only took the blind man by the hand, but also led him out of town where he would spit on his eyes and put his hands on him and asked if he saw anything. The blind man would speak unto Jesus and declare unto Him that he saw men as trees walking, thus indicating that at that moment his sight had not fully been restored unto him. Upon hearing this the Lord Jesus would once more put his hands upon his eyes and make him look up—this time the blind man would see clearly. If there is one thing I absolutely love about this particular scenario is that not only was Jesus willing to touch the eyes of this blind man, but Jesus was willing to touch the eyes of the blind man twice. What’s more, is that this is perhaps the only instance in the four gospels when we find and read Jesus laying His hands on someone and asking them if they either saw, or if they heard, or if they were able to actually do what they were brought into the presence of Jesus for. It is truly something worth thinking about and considering when reading this particular passage, for it suggests that there are times within our lives when Jesus can indeed and can in fact touch us that He might bring healing, wholeness and restoration within our hearts and lives, and yet that first and initial touch isn’t enough. This particular passage draws us into the tremendous truth that there are times when Jesus can indeed and can in fact lay and place His hands upon us that He might grant unto us that which we have need of, and yet there is a second touch required. Oh it is truly something worth thinking about and considering how for this blind man—not only was Jesus willing to touch his eyes once, but Jesus was also willing to touch him a second time.

            When I speak about Jesus being moved with compassion and Jesus moving with compassion I can’t help but think about this particular blind man who not only received one touch from Jesus that would begin to open his eyes and restore his sight, but he would receive a second touch from Jesus that would actually complete the process of the restoration of his sight. I am absolutely and completely convinced there is a tremendous truth that surrounds this particular narrative—the truth that there are times in our lives when although Jesus might very well touch us and lay His hands upon us the first time, there is a great and present need for a second touch. There are times within our lives when the Lord Jesus Christ can and will touch us, and yet that first touch is not the final touch. WHEN THE FIRST TOUCH IS NOT THE FINAL TOUCH! WHEN THE FIRST TOUCH REQUIRES A SECOND TOUCH! THERE COMES A SECOND TOUCH! OH it is truly something worth thinking about and considering when reading this particular narrative that the first touch this blind man received would begin the process of restoration of his sight, and yet there would need to be a second touch from Jesus that actually completed the process of restoring His sight. Oh we dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this, for there are indeed and there are in fact times within our lives when the first touch is indeed not the only touch we need, nor is it the final touch we will receive. There are times within our hearts and lives when a second touch can and will be needed in order that we might truly receive that which the living and eternal God desires within us. There are times when we might very well receive a touch from the living God, and that initial touch is not the only touch we can receive, nor is it the only touch we will receive.

            I can’t help but think about how absolutely incredible this truly is when you take the time to think about it, for it calls and draws our attention to the tremendous and powerful truth that sometimes the first touch is not the only touch that we can and will receive from the Lord. In fact, I would dare say there are individuals who right now have received an initial touch from the Lord and from His hands as He has placed them upon their heart and life, and yet that touch was not the first, nor was it the only touch. There are individuals who are indeed and who are in fact waiting for a secondary touch from the Lord which will complete that work which was begun in them. In reality, this truth is in direct alignment with the words the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints which were in Philippi when he declared that he was confident that He who began a good work in them will be faithful to complete it until the day of our Lord Jesus Christ. What’s more, is that it’s almost along the same lines as baptism, for there is the initial baptism of John which is a baptism of water and repentance for the remission of sins, while there is a secondary baptism of Jesus which is a baptism of fire and of the Holy Spirit. I am absolutely and completely convinced there are men and women among us right now who have received an initial—perhaps even that first touch from the Lord—and yet that first touch was not the only touch they will receive. That first touch which they received might have started and might have begun the process within their hearts and lives, and yet the truth of the matter is that there is a second touch that is forthcoming that can and will finalize and complete the change and process that was begun. It is truly something worth thinking about and considering when you think about this reality of this second touch from the Lord, for it is this second touch that complete and finalize what was already begun in our lives.

            YOU’RE STILL WALKING IN YOUR FIRST TOUCH! GET READY TO WALK IN THE SECOND TOUCH! I am absolutely and completely convinced there are men and women right now who have been walking in the degree and measure of the first touch within their hearts and lives, and that first touch might have indeed and might have in fact been something to rejoice about, and yet they have been living, walking and moving in that first touch. There is a time coming within the hearts and lives of these individuals when a second touch can and will take place and be present within their lives that will complete the work that first touch began. I firmly believe there are men and women among us in this generation who have been living and walking in that first touch within their lives, and that first touch might have produced deliverance, restoration, healing, cleansing, forgiveness, and the like, and yet that first touch was only the beginning of the process that was meant to take place within their lives. There are men and women among us right now who have been walking in the degree and measure of that first touch, and when that second touch does indeed and does in fact come around they can and will experience the ultimate completing and fulfillment of what was begun within their lives. The reality of He who began a good work in us being faithful to complete it until the day of our Lord Jesus Christ is an incredibly powerful picture, for although we might very well see men walking about as trees right now, there is coming a point in time when we will look up and see things clearly.

            I absolutely love the awesome and powerful truth surrounding this second touch and this second work, for even though the hands of the Lord and the hands of the Master might have indeed and might have in fact been placed upon us and produce an initial work—there is a second work that can and will be produced within our hearts and lives. Although there might very well have been an initial work that has indeed and has in fact taken place within our hearts and lives there is a second work that can and will come thereafter which will further enhance and complete the work which was begun. What’s more is that it’s almost like the words which the apostle Paul wrote unto the saints of Corinth when he described how those who are in Christ are new creations and old things have passed away and all things are becoming new. The actual rendering of this passage is that old things have passed away and are continuing to pass away, and all things have become new and are continuing to become new. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of how absolutely phenomenal this truth truly is, for it calls us into the place where we recognize and understand that the first touch which we might have experienced within our lives is not the final touch, and the first touch we received within our lives might very well have been the catalyst that began the transformation which we have experienced thus far. That first touch might very well have been what set us on the path we are currently on, and yet it is the second touch that can and will set us on the path where we finally step and enter into that which the Spirit of the Lord has designed and intended us to experience. Oh that we would truly recognize and understand this, for it brings us into the place where we realize and understand that the first touch within our lives might very well have been that which began the process and work within our lives, however, it is that second touch that can and will continue and complete that process within our lives. Oh that we would be a people who would truly recognize and understand that the first touch might very well not be the final touch, and that we might have been living, walking and moving in the first touch not even aware that there is a second touch that awaits.

            As I bring this writing to a close I find it absolutely compelling and astonishing to think about and consider the absolutely wonderful and remarkable truth that there are a number of men and women among us right now who have been living and walking in the manifestation of that first touch they received from the Lord, and yet there is a second touch that is just ahead and just before them. There are men and women among us who have been in a place of that first touch which the Lord placed upon their lives, and yet there is a second touch that is forthcoming within and upon their lives. There are men and women who have experienced an initial work within their lives, and yet initial work was not the final work that would be done within them. I firmly believe there are men and women among us who have received that first touch from the living God, and that first touch was such that was the catalyst and foundation for the work that would have been started in them, and yet there was a second work that is still forthcoming within their lives. What we find within this particular narrative is Jesus leading this man by the hand out of the city into a quiet and private place where He could do the work that only He could do, and it would be in that place where not only would Jesus place His hands on his eyes the first time beginning the process of restoration, but Jesus would also place His hands upon him a second time to ensure the work was complete. Jesus was not willing to allow this man to depart from His presence without being fully and completely healed, and that meant Jesus would indeed and would in fact place His hands upon his eyes a second time to ensure the work was indeed and was in fact completed.

Oh how absolutely beautiful it is to consider how Jesus would take the blind man by the hand, would lead him out of the town and would initially place His hands upon his eyes to begin the process of restoration and healing, and there would be another secondary touch upon His eyes that would actually complete the work of healing. Oh how absolutely fascinating and beautiful this truly is when you take the time to think about it, for it calls and draws our attention to the beautiful and powerful truth that Jesus was not only willing to place His hands upon this blind man’s eyes once to begin the work, but He was willing to remain with Him until that work was completed, and was willing to place His hands upon Him that the work itself might indeed and might in fact be completed. Oh how wonderful and beautiful our Savior and Master is who will not only lead us into that place where He can begin a work in us, and who will not only place His hands upon us to begin and start the work, but who will also place His hands on us a second time to complete the work, and remain with us until that work has been completed and finished. THE JESUS WHO LEADS YOU BY THE HAND INTO THAT PERSONAL AND PRIVATE PLACE! THE JESUS WHO WILL PLACE HIS HANDS UPON YOU TO BEGIN THE WORK! THE JESUS WHO WILL PLACE HIS HANDS ON YOU A SECOND TIME TO COMPLETE THE WORK! THE JESUS WHO WILL REMAIN WITH YOU UNTIL THAT WORK IS COMPLETED!

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