When Divinity Steps Down & Takes Upon Itself Humility & Humanity

Today’s selected reading is found in the New Testament epistle which was written unto the Hebrews. More specifically today’s passage is found in the first two chapters of this New Testament epistle. “God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets, hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds; who being the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high; being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they” (Hebrews 1:1-4).

 

            “For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to him a father, and he shall be to me a Son? And again, when he bringeth in the first begotten into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him. And of the angels he saith, Who maketh his angels spirits, and his ministers a flame of fire. But unto the Son he saith, Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of thy kingdom. Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows. And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands: They shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment; and as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail. But to which of the angels said he at any time, Sit on my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool? Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation” (Hebrews 1:5-14).

 

            “Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest ay any time we should let them slip. For if the word spoken by angels was stedfast, and every transgression and disobedience received a just recompence of reward; how shall we escape, if we neglect so great salvation; which at the first began to be spoken by the Lord, and was confirmed unto us by them that heard him; God also bearing them witness, both with signs and wonders, and with divers miracles, and gifts of the Holy Ghost, according to his own will” (Hebrews 2:1-4).

 

            “For unto the angels hath he not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man, that thou art mindful of him? Or the son of man, that thou visitest him? Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing that is not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man. For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren, saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee. And again, I will put my trust in him. And again, Behold I and the children which God hath given me. Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil; and deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham. Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people. For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succour them that are tempted” (Hebrews 2:5-18).

 

            When you come to the epistle written unto the Hebrews the first thing you will notice is that it is entirely different from the epistles written by the apostle Paul. In each of the previous thirteen epistles they all began with the customary greeting of the apostle Paul with his name and a reference to his being a servant of the Lord Jesus or an apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ. In each of the epistles written unto the churches as well as unto the three individuals he wrote letters unto you know from the very start who wrote the epistle. As you come to the epistle written unto the Hebrews, however, you are not given any name or any indication who wrote the words which are contained therein. The epistle written unto the Hebrews simply begins with one word—and not merely a word alone but a name. If you begin reading with and from the first verse of the opening chapter of this epistle you will find it beginning with perhaps one of the most powerful statements in all of Scripture. In the Old Testament book of Genesis you will it begins with the words “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” If you break the first verse of the opening chapter of the book of Genesis you would break it down as follows: In the beginning; In the beginning God; In the beginning God created; In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Thus the Old Testament book of Genesis not only places God at the beginning of all things in creation but also at the beginning of all things we know and understand in the realm of time and space.

 

            We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this incredible truth when reading the Old Testament book of Genesis for as we will see it directly ties into and applies to what we have in the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews. In the opening verses of the first chapter of the book of Genesis we not only find God in the beginning which directly correlates to His being in the beginning and knowing the beginning but also as being the One who is both the beginning and the end. Pause for a moment and consider how the Old Testament book of Genesis begins with just the following words—“In the beginning God.” Stop there and don’t move any further. Before you delve into any of the supernatural wonders of the creation of the heavens and the earth and everything that is present within them you begin your journey in Scripture with the reality of the presence and existence of God. In all reality the first and opening verse of the book of Genesis is at the very heart and center of your relationship with God for you must settle it within your heart that you either believe that He exists or for whatever reason doubt and deny His existence. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this and how important it is for when you come to the eleventh chapter of this epistle written unto the Hebrews you will find the author declaring that without faith it is impossible to please God for those who believe must believe that God is and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him.

 

            At the very heart and center of faith is a firm and resolute belief in the existence of God and that He has existed from the beginning. The Old Testament book of Genesis is perhaps one of the most vital and critical books in all of Scripture for if you begin reading the sacred Scripture from the beginning you must either accept that God is and does in fact exist or deny that He exists. If and when we have a conversation regarding faith we must needs recognize that at the very heart and center of faith is the belief in the existence of the living God and that He is in fact who He says He is. The Old Testament book of Genesis does in fact begin with the emphatic declaration that God was in the beginning—and not only that God was in the beginning but also that in the beginning God created. This is something which we must needs recognize and understand for when we come to the New Testament gospel of John we find a similar reality spoken concerning the Lord Jesus Christ of Nazareth. Although the gospel of John is the fourth gospel presented among the gospels in the New Testament it nonetheless begins and opens up with our belief concerning the person of the Lord Jesus Christ. It is in the first and opening verse of the first chapter of this gospel we find the apostle John emphatically declaring how in the beginning was the Word, and the Word was in the beginning with God, and how the Word was God. This is something we have a great need of paying close attention to for it forces us to acknowledge our belief in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ. It is with this being said I invite you to consider the following words which are found in both the first chapter of the Old Testament book of Genesis as well as the first chapter of the New Testament gospel written by the apostle John:

 

            “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters” (Genesis 1:1-2).

 

            “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life; and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not” (John 1:1-5).

 

            Pay close attention to the words which are found in these passages of Scripture for within them we not only acknowledge the existence of both the living and eternal God but also of the eternal and only begotten Son of God who is the Christ. Within these passages of Scripture we are brought face to face with whether or not we believe that God does in fact exist and that Jesus of Nazareth whom Scripture refers to as both Christ and Lord exists. If you want to have an open and honest discussion concerning faith within your heart and soul you must needs settle within yourself whether or not you believe that God does in fact exist and that Jesus who is the Christ exists. What’s more is that in addition to this you must also believe that both God the Father and Jesus the Son existed in the beginning and were not only from the beginning but even before the beginning. We cannot afford to miss on this particular truth for it forces us into the place where we acknowledge whether or not we believe in the existence of both the eternal God and the Lord Jesus Christ.

 

            With all of this being said you will find in each of these passages of Scripture both the existence of God and His existence in the beginning as well as His involvement in creation. In the Old Testament book of Genesis we find God existing in the beginning and God creating the heavens and the earth. In the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John we find the Word whom Scripture refers to as the person of Jesus Christ existing in the beginning and being involved with creation. The Old Testament book of Genesis speaks to and refers to the living and eternal God as being in the beginning and creating the heavens and the earth while in the New Testament gospel written by John we find the only begotten Son as being present in the beginning. What’s more is that we find that all things were made by Him and that without Him was not any thing made that was made. Thus within both of these passages of Scripture we see the perfect unity and harmony between the eternal God and the only begotten Son. What’s more is that in the Old Testament book of Genesis we find the presence of the Spirit of God for Moses wrote according to the inspiration of the Holy Spirit that the Spirt hovered over the face of the deep. This is something we must needs recognize and understand when seeking to understand Scripture—and not only understand Scripture but also understand our faith. We as the saints of God and disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ must needs settle within our hearts our belief in the existence of both God the Father as well as His only begotten Son. Not only this but we must also settle within our hearts that we believe both existed in and from the beginning and were involved in the creation of all things that are made.

 

            I sit here today thinking about and considering the words which are found in the eleventh chapter of the epistle written unto the Hebrews and how the words presented unto us there are directly and intrinsically linked to how the epistle opens. What’s more is these words are not only intrinsically linked to how the epistle written unto the Hebrews opens but also to the words which are found in the first chapters of the Old Testament book of Genesis as well as the New Testament gospel written by the apostle John. It is in the eleventh chapter of the New Testament epistle written by the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews speaks of faith but we also find a powerful definition concerning faith. There is not a doubt in my mind that before we even delve into the words which are found in the opening chapter of the epistle written unto the Hebrews we must first begin with and from the words which are presented in the eleventh chapter. It is in the eleventh chapter we learn and discover—not only what faith is but also what faith accomplishes. It is in the eleventh chapter where we encounter both the substance of faith as well as the evidence of faith. Not only this but it is in the eleventh chapter of this epistle we are brought face to face with the wonderful truth surrounding the demonstration and manifestation of faith in the earth within the lives of all those whom the author presented within the epistle. Not only this but there were those whom the author could not and did not present in this particular chapter of faith who also lived according to faith and died in faith not having received the promises they looked forward to. It is with this in mind I invite you to consider the following words which are found in the eleventh chapter of the epistle written unto the Hebrews beginning with and from the first verse:

 

            “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. For by it the elders obtained a good report. Through faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear” (Hebrews 11:1-3).

 

            “But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him” (Hebrews 11:6).

 

            “These all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen them afar off, and were persuaded of them, and embraced them, and confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on the earth. For they that say such things declare plainly that they seek a country. And truly, if they had been mindful of that country from whence they came out, they might have had opportunity to have returned. But now they desire a better country, that is, an heavenly: wherefore God is not ashamed to be called their God: for he hath prepared for them a city” (Hebrews 11:13-16).

 

            “And what shall I more say? For the time would fail me to tell of Gedeon, and of Barak, and of Samson, and of Jephthae; of David also, and Samuel, and of the prophets: Who through faith subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness, obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions, quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of the sword, out of weakness were made strong, waxed valiant in fight, turned to flight the armies of the aliens. Women received their dead raised to life again: and others were tortured, not accepting deliverance; that they might obtain a better resurrection: and others had trial of cruel mockings and scourgings, yea, moreover of bonds and imprisonment: they were stoned, they were sawn asunder, were tempted, were slain with the sword: they wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins; being destitute, afflicted, tormented; (OF whom the world was not worthy) they wandered in deserts, and in mountains, and in dens and caves of the earth. And these all, having obtained a good report through faith, received not the promise: God having provided some better thing for us, that they without us should not be made perfect” (Hebrews 11:32-40>

 

            It is absolutely necessary we recognize and understand the words which are found in this passage of Scripture for what we find here is the author describing and declaring that faith is the substance of things hoped for and the evidence of things unseen. The author of this epistle declared that it was by faith the elders obtained a good report and it is through faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that the things which are seen were not made of things which do appear. Within the eleventh chapter of this epistle we are brought face to face with the awesome truth surrounding faith and how faith not only believes that the worlds were framed by the word of God but also that God is. Essentially faith not only believes in the existence of God but it also believes in the creation of God. This is something we must needs recognize and consider for you cannot read the opening chapters of the book of Genesis and the gospel of John without and apart from faith. There are those who would dare read these chapters without and apart from faith, however, the opening verses of these chapters demands faith within our hearts and spirits. With this being said we must needs recognize and understand that we either possess faith and believe that God is and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him or we do not. The opening chapters of the books of Genesis and John demand that we believe in the preexistence of the living God and of His Christ and that everything that was made was made ex-nihilo or “out of nothing.”

 

            If you begin reading the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews you will find it begins and opens with an emphatic statement and declaration—and not only a statement but also the declaration of a name. Stop for a moment and consider just how this epistle opens and how it does so with one single word—a word that has struck fear in the hearts and minds of sceptics, atheists, agnostics, principalities, powers of darkness, rulers of the air, and the gates of hell. Upon beginning to read with and from the opening verse of the epistle written unto the Hebrews you will find that it begins with the wonderful and powerful declaration of God. In all reality we don’t need to go any further than this for at the very heart and center of everything we do and everything we are must be the name of God—and not only the name of God but also the existence of God. To begin this epistle with the emphatic statement and declaration of God is a powerful invitation for us to step into the reality of choosing whether or not we believe that He does in fact exist. Just as one who reads the book of Genesis must determine from the very beginning and outset whether they believe that God exists and just as one who begins reading the gospel of John must believe that Jesus exists so also must one who reads the epistle written unto the Hebrews believe in the existence of God. The author would clearly declare that without faith it is impossible to please God and that those who wish to please God through faith must believe that He is.

 

            Pause for a moment for in the Old Testament book of Genesis we uncover the reality of God being in the beginning and God in the beginning creating the heavens and the earth. In the New Testament epistle written unto the Hebrews we find God speaking—and not only speaking but speaking in times past. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this particular truth for they go hand in hand. If you read the first chapter of the Old Testament book of Genesis you will find God being present in the beginning—and not only God being present in the beginning but also God speaking. Consider how many times you will find written in the first and opening chapter of the Old Testament book of Genesis God speaking that creation might spring forth from that which is nothing. The entire first chapter of the book of Genesis not only speaks to the existence of God but also to the voice of God and His speaking the words that would result in the creation of all things. What’s more is that when you read the Old Testament book of Genesis you will find that after God spoke the words of creation and after God spoke the words concerning the formation of man in His image and after His likeness He would begin speaking unto men. From speaking unto Adam in the garden concerning the tree of life, the tree of the knowledge of good and evil and the other trees in the garden to His speaking unto men such as Noah and Abraham we find the living and eternal God speaking. It is in the first chapter of the book of Genesis we find the living and eternal God speaking the words that would bring about the creation of everything that was made while in the rest of the book we find the voice of God speaking unto men whom He would call to walk with Him.

            In all reality what we find in the opening chapter of the epistle written unto the Hebrews is the powerful statement concerning the existence of God as well as the truth surrounding the voice of God speaking. What’s more is that within this passage of Scripture we discover God speaking at sundry times and in divers manners in time past unto the fathers by the prophets. The words and language presented unto us in this passage of Scripture brings us face to face with the awesome truth surrounding God speaking unto the fathers by and through the prophets. This is something we must needs recognize and understand for the entire Old Testament is centered upon the Law and the prophets. It is in the Law and prophets we encounter the greatest commandment which not only believes that the LORD our God is one but also that we are to love the LORD our God with all our heart, with all our soul and with all our strength. Moreover it is in the Law and the prophets where we discover the second commandment which is likened unto the first—namely, that we love our neighbor as ourselves. The words which the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews writes in the first chapter emphatically declares the existence of God as well as the voice of God who spoke through the prophets unto our fathers. The author states in no uncertain terms that the voice of the living God was indeed present within the generations of the fathers as he spoke through the prophets. It is with this in mind I invite you to consider the following words which are found in the Old Testament book of Psalms concerning the voice of the living God as it speaks from eternity into the realm of time and space:

 

            “Give unto the Lord, O ye mighty, Give unto the Lord glory and strength. Give unto the Lord the glory due unto his name; Worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: The God of glory thundereth: The LORD is upon many waters. The voice of the Lord is powerful; the voice of the Lord is full of majesty. The voice of the Lord breaketh the cedars; Yea, the Lord breaketh the cedars of Lebanon. He maketh them also to skip like a calf; Lebanon and Sirion like a young unicorn. The voice of the Lord divideth the flames of fire. The voice of the Lord shaketh the wilderness; The Lord shaketh the wilderness of Kadesh. The voice of the Lord maketh the hinds to calve, and discovereth the forests: and in his temple doth every one speak of his glory. The Lord sitteth upon the flood; Yea, the Lord sitteth king for ever. The Lord will give strength unto his people; the Lord will bless his people with peace” (Psalm 29:1-11).

 

            The words which we find in the opening chapter of the epistle written unto the Hebrews brings us face to face with the existence of God and in His existence as manifested through speaking. The author of this epistle seeks to confront us with our belief in the existence of God—and not only in the existence of the living God but also in the belief that He did in fact in times past and in divers manners speak unto the fathers through the prophets. With this being said, however—despite the fact that God spoke at sundry times and in divers manners unto the fathers by his servants the prophets He would in these Last Days speak unto men in an entirely different way. Although the author of the epistle written unto the Hebrews does in fact begin with the declaration that God spoke in times past unto the fathers by the prophets they go on to declare that in these Last Days He has spoken unto us in an entirely new and different way. The author is very clear and adamant on the truth and reality that in these Last Days God has spoken unto us by His Son—and not only by His Son but His Son who He appointed heir of all things and by whom he made the worlds. God has in these Last Days spoken unto us—us and not the fathers—by and through the person of His eternal and only begotten Son. Although God the Father spoke in times past unto the fathers through the prophets He has in these Last Days spoken unto us by and through His Son. Oh with this in mind I invite you to consider the following words which are found in the first chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John as well as the seventeenth chapter of the New Testament gospel written by the apostle Matthew:

 

            “There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through him might believe. He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light. That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made by him, and the world knew him not. He came unto his own, and his own received him not. But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name: which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. John bare witness of him, and cried, saying, This was he of whom I spake, He that cometh after me is preferred before me: for he was before me. And of his fulness have all we received, and grace for grace. For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Chriast. No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, He hath declared him” (John 1:6-18).

 

            “And after six days Jesus taketh Peter, James and John his brother, and bringeth them up into an high mountain apart, and was transfigured before them: and his face did shine as the sun, and his raiment was white as the light. And, behold, there appeared unto them Moses and Elias talking with him. Then answered Peter, and said unto Jesus, Lord it is good for us to be here: if thou wilt, let us make here three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. While he yet spake, behold, a bright cloud overshadowed them: and behold a voice out of the cloud, which said, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; heare ye him. And when the disciples heard it, they fell on their face, and were sore afraid. And Jesus came and touched them, and said, Arise, and be not afraid. And when they had lifted up their eyes, they saw no man, save Jesus only. And as they came down from the mountain, Jesus charged them, saying, Tell the vision to no man, until the Son of man be risen again from the dead” (Matthew 17:1-9).

 

            Consider also if you will the following words which are found in the New Testament gospel narrative of Luke concerning the same event which took place in the life of Jesus and those three disciples which made up His inner circle. Found within the ninth chapter of this gospel is the same narrative and account of the transfiguration of the Lord Jesus upon the mountain as was originally recorded by the apostle Matthew and later referenced by the apostle Peter in one of his epistles unto the saints which were scattered and suffering. With this in mind I invite you to consider the following words which are found in both the ninth chapter of the New Testament gospel written by the beloved physician Luke as well as the words which are found in the epistle written by the apostle Peter:

            “And it came to pass about an eight days after these sayings, he took Peter and John and James, and went up into a mountain to pray. And as he prayed, the fashion of his countenance was altered, and his raiment was white and glistering. And, behold, there talked with him two men, which were Moses and Elias: Who appeared in glory, and speak of his decease which he should accomplish at Jerusalem. But Peter and they that were with him were heavy with sleep: and when they were awake, they saw his glory, and the two men that stood with him. And it came to pass, as they departed from him, Peter said unto Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias: not knowing what he said. While he thus spake, there came a voice out of the cloud, saying, This is my beloved Son: hear him. And when the voice was past, Jesus was found alone. And they kept it close, and told no man in those days any of those things which they had seen” (Luke 9:28-36).

 

            “Wherefore I will not be negligent to put you always in remembrance of these things, though ye know them, and be established in the present truth. Yea, I think it meet, as long as I am in this tabernacle, to stir you up, by putting you in remembrance; knowing that shortly I must put off this my tabernacle, even as our Lord Jesus Christ hath shewed me. Moreover I will endeavour that ye may be able after my decease to have these things always in remembrance. For we have not followed cunningly devised fables, when we made known unto you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but were eyewitnesses of his majesty. For he received from God the Father honour and glory, when there came such a voice to him from the excellent glory, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. And this voice which came from heaven we heard, when we were with him in the holy mount. We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts: Knowing this first, that no prophesy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost” (2 Peter 1:12-21).

 

            It is absolutely necessary we recognize and understand the narrative of Jesus’ transfiguration which occurred atop the mountain in the company and presence of the apostles James, John and Peter. When you read the words which are found in the New Testament gospels you will find that not only was Jesus’ physical appearance altered as He was clothed with the glory—at least in part—which He had with the Father from the beginning but He also appeared talking unto Moses and Elijah. The fact that He spoke with Moses and Elijah is actually quite interesting when you think about it for Moses represented the Law and Elijah represented the prophets. The simple fact that the Lord Jesus appeared speaking unto both of these men—and not only speaking unto them but speaking unto them concerning His decease—is quite astounding when you think about it for essentially Jesus was speaking unto the Law and the prophets in plain terms that which they had spoken of in veiled and obscure terms. It is no coincidence the voice of the Father broke through the silence of that moment and not only declared that this was His beloved Son in whom He was well pleased but also instructed those present to hear Him. In all reality I have more often than not wondered who the voice of the Father actually spoke to—whether His command to “Hear Him” was spoken unto Peter, James and John or unto Moses and Elijah. The apostles Peter, James and John had already spent a considerable amount of time walking with and following the Lord Jesus and heard the words which He taught and spoke unto them in private as well as unto the masses and crowds in public. The apostles Peter, James and John were those who had walked with and followed the Lord Jesus during those days and had indeed heard and listened to the words which He spoke as they engaged themselves in full discipleship in the company and presence of the Lord Jesus.

 

            It is actually quite unique and astonishing when you read the words found in this passage of Scripture for the command to “Hear Him” suggests the tremendous and powerful need to hear and to in fact listen to the Lord Jesus. Scripture is unclear whether or not this command to hear Him was spoken unto the three apostles who were present on the mount with the Lord Jesus or whether they were spoken unto Moses and Elijah. What we do know is that on this particular day on the mountain of transfiguration in the presence of the Lord Jesus Christ Moses and Elijah were the ones who appeared with Jesus speaking and talking unto Him. We know that the apostles Peter, James and John fell to the ground on their faces as dead men because they were heavy with sleep. For God the Father to emphatically declare and proclaim from the midst of the cloud that overshadowed them to “Hear Him” suggests that He was indeed speaking unto both the Law and the prophets. Imagine being present on the mountain on this particular day and hearing God the Father speaking unto both the Law and the prophets and instructing them to hear Him. That one whom they had spoken about during their own generations was now standing in their midst—or them standing in His presence. Moreover the voice of God the Father broke through the silence and instructed them to hear Him. Essentially this command which was spoken by God the Father made the emphatic declaration and statement that the words which were spoken by the Lord Jesus were far greater than the Law and the prophets—this despite the fact that Jesus did not come to abolish the Law but to fulfill it.

 

            When we come to the first chapter of the epistle written unto the Hebrews we find the author not only declaring the existence of God and how in times past God spoke unto the fathers through the prophets—the prophets represented by Elijah atop the mountain of transfiguration—but also how in these Last Days God has spoken unto us by His Son. Moreover the author of this epistle would go on to declare concerning the Son how He was appointed heir of all things by whom also the worlds were made. This eternal and only begotten Son was the brightness of the glory of the living God and the express image of His person who upheld all things by the word of His power. As if this weren’t enough the author goes on to write concerning the Son that He Himself purged our sins and then sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high being made so much better than the angels as He had by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they. Oh we dare not and must not miss and lose sight of the words which are found in these passages of Scripture for concerning Christ we must needs recognize that not only was He the brightness of the glory of the living and eternal God but He was also the express image of His person. This is something the apostle Paul wrote in the epistle written unto the Colossian saints as well as the epistle which was written by the apostle unto the Philippian saints concerning the Lord Jesus Christ. It would be in each of these epistles the apostle Paul would in fact write and speak of how the Lord Jesus Christ was indeed the fulness of the image of the living God—and not only the fulness of His image but also the expression of His glory, His majesty and His presence upon the earth. Consider if you will the following words which are found in these epistles beginning with the epistle written by the apostle Paul unto the Philippian saints:

 

            “…Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: and being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Philippians 2:5-11).

 

            “…giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light: who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son: In whom we have redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness of sins: Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature: For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: and he is before all things, and by him all things consist. And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence. For it pleased the Father that in him should all fulness dwell; And, having made peace through the blood of his cross, by him to reconcile all things unto himself; but him, I say, whether they be things in earth, or things in heaven” (Colossians 1:12-20).

 

            “Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ. For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily. And ye are complete in him, which is the head of all principality and power: in whom also ye are circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, in putting off the body of the sins of the flesh by the circumcision of Christ: buried with him in baptism, wherein also ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead. And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses; blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross; and having spoiled principalities and power, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it” (Colossians 2:8-15).

 

            In all reality when we read the epistle written unto the Hebrews we must needs recognize and understand that it was written with the express image and sole purpose of demonstrating and showing the preeminence of the Lord Jesus Christ. Within the first two chapters of this epistle the author seeks to show us that the Lord Jesus Christ was indeed greater than the angels in heaven having been granted a name greater than they and having obtained an inheritance greater than their own. The author seeks to convey unto their audience how God the Father has spoken us into these last days—not through the prophets as He had done in days of old—but has spoken unto us by His own begotten Son. It is this Son who is the express brightness of the glory of the Father and the express image of his person. Just as Adam was formed of the dust of the earth in the image and after the likeness of the living God so also was the Lord Jesus the express image of the invisible God as the apostle Paul had mentioned. This was what was written and recorded in the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John concerning the Lord Jesus and no man seeing the Father at any time save the Lord Jesus Christ who was in the bosom of the Father. Through Jesus we not only see the image and likeness of the living God but we also see Him who was with the eternal Father from before time began. It is the Lord Jesus Christ who was indeed the express image of the invisible God and who was clothed with all power from on High.

 

            If we want to truly understand the words which are found within the opening chapters of the epistle written unto the Hebrews we must needs recognize the preeminence of the Lord Jesus Christ over and above the angels and how even though He was greater than the angels he would be made lower than the angels. If in the first chapter of this epistle we encounter and come face to face with the reality of the Lord Jesus Christ being greater than the angels then in the second chapter we encounter and come face to face with the awesome reality of the Lord Jesus Christ being made a little lower than the angels when He came in the form of human flesh. It’s actually quite unique and powerful how the author sets all this up for within the first chapter the author demonstrates how Jesus is greater than the angels which were in heaven while in the second chapter the author goes on to not only describe how man himself was created a little lower than the angels but also the Lord Jesus Christ—in coming in the form of human flesh—was Himself made lower than the angels. Pause for a moment and consider how He who was greater than the angels actually took upon Himself the form of human flesh and allowed Himself to be made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death. This is something we must needs recognize and understand for it draws and calls our attention to the absolutely astounding truth that is contained within these two chapters at the outset and beginning of the epistle written unto the Hebrews. It is within this epistle we are brought face to face with the wonderful truth that the Lord Jesus Christ was indeed greater than the angels in heaven having set down at the right hand of the Majesty on high and obtaining an inheritance and name greater than they.

 

            What makes all of this all the more interesting when you think about and consider it is how the voice of the Father spoke from the midst of the cloud which overshadowed Peter, James and John atop the mountain and not only declared concerning Jesus that He was His Son but also commanded and instructed those present to hear Him. In the epistle written unto the Hebrews we find the author emphatically declaring how in these Last Days God the Father has spoken us by and through His Son whom He appointed as heir of all things and by whom he made the worlds. What’s more is that this Jesus was indeed the brightness of the glory of the Father and the express image of his person and upheld all things by the word of his power when He Himself had purged our sins and sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high. It’s absolutely remarkable to read the words found in this passage of Scripture and to consider the fact that the author goes on to declare how Jesus had been made much better than the angels and has by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they. Oh please don’t miss and lose sight of this for when we read the words which are found in these two chapters we are first brought face to face with the tremendous truth that the Lord Jesus was made so much better than the angels. It is in the first and opening chapter of this epistle the author seeks to demonstrate the awesome truth that the Lord Jesus was indeed made better than the angels while in the second chapter the author shows how although Jesus was made greater than the angels He needed to be made a little lower than the angels for the purposes of the Father.

 

            The more I read the words which are found in these two chapters the more I am brought face to face with the awesome truth surrounding the eternal and only begotten Son and how He was indeed made greater than the angels who were in heaven. Beginning with the fifth verse of the first chapter and continuing through to the final verse of the same chapter the author seeks to show how the eternal and only begotten Son of God was indeed and was in fact greater than the angels. The author uses the words which were spoken within the Law and the prophets—even the Psalms themselves—to demonstrate how the eternal and only begotten Son of the living God was indeed far greater than the angels which were in heaven. It was unto the Son whom the living and eternal God declared that He was His Son and on this day He had begotten Him. It was unto the eternal and only begotten Son the Father declared that He would be to Him a Father and He would be unto Him a Son. Not only this but the eternal Father declared concerning the Son that all the angels of God would worship Him—those whom He made spirits and those who were flames of fire. It would be unto the Son whom the Father would declare that His throne is for ever and ever and how a sceptre of righteousness was the sceptre of His kingdom. Concerning the Son the Father also declared how he loved righteousness and hated iniquity and as a result God—even His God—has anointed him with the oil of gladness above his fellows. As if all this weren’t enough it would be unto the Son and only the Son whom the Father would invite to sit on His right hand until He made His enemies His footstool.

 

            It’s absolutely necessary we pay attention to the words which are found in the first and opening chapter of the epistle written unto the Hebrews for the words we find here brings us face to face with the awesome truth that Jesus was far greater and far more majestic than the angels which were in heaven. Jesus was indeed the eternal and only begotten Son of the Father and was the express image of His glory, His majesty, His power, His presence and the like. It is necessary for us to recognize and understand that which is found in the first chapter of this epistle for in order to understand just how great Jesus’ coming in the form of human flesh was you need to know that He was greater than those whom He was made lower than. The first chapter of this epistle clearly demonstrates the Lord Jesus Christ was made greater than the angels which were in heaven, however, it is in the second chapter of this epistle we are brought face to face with the fact that when man was formed from the dust of the ground and created in the image and after the likeness of the living God he was made a little lower than the angels. It was this reality which was expressed in the eighth chapter of the Old Testament book of Psalms when David asked the living God who was man that He was mindful of him. Not only this but the David would also go on to declare how God had made man a little lower than the angels and yet crowned him with glory and gave him authority and dominion upon the earth. It is this being crowned with glory and given authority and dominion upon the earth that we must needs recognize and understand for when the Lord Jesus Christ came in the form of flesh—not only was He made a little lower than the angels in taking on the form of human flesh but He was also crowned with glory and given authority and dominion upon the earth.

 

            As I prepare to bring this writing to a close it is absolutely necessary we recognize and understand that Jesus is indeed supreme and preeminent over and above the angels which were in heaven. The Lord Jesus Christ has indeed obtained an inheritance and name far greater than any of the angels in heaven and even sat down at the right hand of the Father. This Jesus was and still is the fulness of the glory and majesty of the living God and is the express image of His person and His presence. When the Lord Jesus came unto the earth—not only did He take upon Himself the form of human flesh but He also allowed Himself to be made a little lower than the angels themselves. The Lord Jesus was indeed supreme over the angels which were in heaven and yet He allowed Himself to be made lower than the angels for the suffering of death. This one who was crowned with glory and honor took upon Himself the nature of flesh and blood and was made a little lower than the angels that He should taste death for every man. In the first chapter of this epistle we find the author speaking concerning the Lord Jesus that He was the voice and image of the living God in these Last Days and was how the living God chose to speak unto us in these generations. The first chapter of this epistle was indeed all about the Lord Jesus being the express image of the invisible God and how God has indeed spoken unto us by and through Him while the second chapter was about the Lord Jesus tasting death and experiencing suffering in the form of human flesh for us.

 

            It is absolutely necessary we recognize and understand that which is found in these two chapters for in the first chapter we find the Lord Jesus as being the image of the invisible God by whom and through whom He has spoken unto us. This Jesus was made far greater than the angels which are in heaven and is greater than any of them having obtained a greater name and inheritance than them. It is this truth that the Lord Jesus was made greater than the angels in heaven in the first chapter this is so incredibly powerful for in the first chapter we encounter the Lord Jesus being made greater than the angels in supremacy being in the image and likeness of the living God while in the second chapter we find the Lord Jesus Christ being made lower than angels. This one who was made greater than the angels was indeed made lower than the angels for a very specific purpose—the purpose of suffering and death. Moreover the Lord Jesus was made lower than the angels that He might partake of flesh and blood that though death he might destroy him that had the power of death which is the devil. Moreover the Lord Jesus was and is able to deliver those who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. The Lord Jesus took not on him the nature of angels but he took on him the seed of Abraham. In addition to this we find and read that in all things it behooved the Lord Jesus to be made like unto his brethren that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God that He might make reconciliation for the sins of the people. Oh we must needs recognize and understand this truth for when we think about and consider the Lord Jesus Christ taking upon Himself the form of flesh and blood and being made lower than the angels we must not only recognize that he did so for the purpose of suffering and death but he also did so that He might destroy him who had the power of death which was the devil.

 

The words which we find in this passage of Scripture bring us face to face with the awesome and powerful truth concerning the Lord Jesus Christ who took upon Himself the seed of Abraham and flesh and blood that He might accomplish and fulfill the purposes of the eternal and living God. The Lord Jesus would take upon Himself the form of flesh and blood and would indeed be made a little lower than the angels for the purpose of suffering and death. Not only would the Lord Jesus take upon Himself flesh and blood for the purpose of suffering and death but that through His death He might destroy him who had the power of death which was the devil. Not only this but Jesus would deliver those who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage that they might be free and delivered. Moreover the Lord Jesus Christ took not upon Himself the nature of angels but took upon Himself the seed of Abraham that He might be made like unto his brethren that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God. This is something we must needs recognize and understand for when we consider the Lord Jesus being made a little lower than the angels that he might experience suffering and death He would do so that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest—one who is able to uphold and succour us in all our temptations, trials, tribulations, and troubles. Oh that we would recognize and understand that this Jesus who was greater than the angels was made lower than the angels for the purposes of suffering and death—not only that he might make reconciliation for us with the Father but also that we might have a faithful and merciful high priest who is able to uphold us in all our trials, temptations, troubles and tribulations.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s