Even When the Accusations Were True & the Condemnation Was Warranted: Neither Do I Condemn You

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel narrative of the life and ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ as it was written and recorded by the apostle John. More specifically today’s passage is found in the first thirty verses of the eighth chapter. “Jesus went unto the mount of Olives. And early in the mornign he came again into the temple, and all the people came unto him; and he sat down, and taught them. And the scribes and the Pharisees brought unto him a woman taken in adultery; and when they had set her in the midst, they say unto him, Master, this woman was taken in adultery, in the very act. Now Moses in the law commanded us, that such should be stoned: but what sayest thou? This they said, tempting him, that they might have to accuse him. But Jesus stooped down, and with his finger wrote on the ground, as though he heard them not. So when they continued asking him, he lifted up himself, and said unto them, He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her. And again he stooped down, and wrote on the ground. And they which heard it, being convicted by their own conscience, went out one by one, beginning at the eldest, even unto the last: and Jesus was left alone, and the woman standing in the midst. When Jesus had lifted up himself, and saw none but the woman, he said unto her, Woman, where are those thine accusers? Hath no man condemned thee? She said, No man, Lord. And Jesus said unto her, Neither do I condemn thee: go, and sin no more” (John 8:1-11). “Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life. The Pharisees therefore said unto him, Thou hearest record of thyself; thy record is not true. Jesus answered and said unto them, Though I bear record of myself, yet my record is true: for I know whence I came, and whither I go; but ye cannot tell whence I come, and whither I go. Ye judge after the flesh; I judge no man. And yet if I judge, my judgment is true: for I am not alone, but I and the Father that sent me. It is also written in your law, that the testimony of two men is true. I am one that bear witness of me. Then said they unto him, Where is thy Father? Jesus answered, Ye neither know me, nor my Father: if ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also. These words spake Jesus in the treasury, as he taught in the temple: and no man laid hands on him; for his hour was not yet come” (John 8:12-20). “Then said Jesus again unto them, I go my way, and ye shall seek me, and shall die in your sins: whither I go, ye cannot come. Then said the Jews, Will he kill himself? Because he saith, Whither I go, ye cannot come. And he said unto them, Ye are from beneath; I am from above: ye are of this world; I am not of this world. I said therefore unto you, that ye shall die in your sins: for if ye believe not that I am he, ye shall die in your sins. Then said they unto him, Who art thou? And Jesus saith unto them, Even the same that I said unto you from the beginning. I have many things to say and to judge of you: but he that sent me is true; and I speak to the world those things which I have heard of him. They understood not that he spake to them of the Father. Then said Jesus unto them, When ye have lifted up the Son of man, then shall ye know that I am he, and that I do nothing of myself; but as my Father hath taught me, I speak these things. And he that sent me is with me: the Father hath not left me alone; for I do always those things that please him. As he spake these words, many believed on him” (John 8:21-30). When you come to the eighth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John you will come to a passage of Scripture that is perhaps one of the most provocative out of all the gospel accounts. It is when you come to the eighth chapter of this New Testament gospel narrative you will encounter the only time in any of the four gospels where there is the mention of a woman who was caught in the act of adultery being brought to Jesus. The more you read the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John the more you can and will find that there are certain accounts and events within the life and ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ which only he records and writes about. It is only the apostle John who writes and records of the miracle of turning water into wine at the wedding in Cana of Galilee. It is the apostle John who along writes of Jesus speaking with a man by the name of Nicodemus who was a Pharisee and a ruler of the Jews by night. The apostle John was the only one to write about Jesus entering into Samaria and not only speaking with a woman at the well outside the city of Sychar but also writing of Jesus spending two full days there with the people of the city. The gospel narrative written by John is the only gospel which includes the miracle of the healing of the impotent man at the pool of Bethesda in the city of Jerusalem by the sheep gate. It is only the gospel narrative written by John where we find the account of the man who was born blind being healed by the person of the Lord Jesus. Also it is only in the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John where we find the account of Jesus raising Lazarus from the grave. Furthermore it is this gospel alone where we find the account of the woman who was caught in the act of adultery and brought unto Jesus. CAUGHT AND BROUGHT! If you take the time to read the words which are found in this passage of Scripture you can and will encounter one of the most provocative passages within any of the four gospel narratives written by the person of the Lord Jesus. Here in the eighth chapter you will find a passage of Scripture that in some versions and translations has an asterisk next to it or might even be in parentheses because they would seek to convey that this particular account and passage is no necessarily one that was present in the midst of the original manuscripts. In all reality the words which we find in this particular passage of Scripture are entirely and altogether unique when you take the time to think about and consider them for it would not only put Jesus against the Pharisees and scribes but it would also be in this passage where those same religious leaders sought to present unto Jesus one whom the Law demanded be condemned to death because of their actions. Oh it is impossible to read the words found in this passage of Scripture and not be absolutely and entirely captivated with the words and language that is found within it for within it we are brought face to face with the scribes and the Pharisees using another to tempt the Lord Jesus. We know when reading each of the four gospels the scribes, the Pharisees, the Sadducees, the lawyers and the teachers of the Law came unto Jesus at different times to tempt Him with their questions that they might have reason to accuse Him. That which we find here in this passage of Scripture is absolutely no different from any of the other accounts of the religious leaders and system seeking to tempt the Lord Jesus. What we find here int his passage of Scripture, however, are the religious leaders actually using another as bait that they might entrap and ensnare the person of the Lord Jesus in the midst of the Temple. Upon reading the words which are found in this passage of Scripture you will find it beginning with Jesus going unto the mount of Olives. Early in the morning Jesus would come again into the Temple and all the people would come unto Him. It’s important to note that this is at least the fourth time we find Jesus being present in the midst of the Temple which was present in the midst of the city of Jerusalem. It would be in the second chapter of this New Testament gospel we find Jesus in the Temple for it was here we read of Jesus fashioning a scourge of cords which He would use to overturn the tables of money, drive out the money changers, cast out those who bought and sold, and all that was bought and sold from the Temple. It would be in the fifth chapter of this same gospel we find Jesus once more in the Temple—this time finding the man whom He had just healed at the pool of Bethesda of the infinity which he had for thirty and eight years. In the seventh chapter we again find Jesus in the Temple for it would be there in the midst of the Temple Jesus would cry out with a loud voice to all those who were thirsty to come unto Him that he might give them rivers of living water which would flow forth from their innermost beings. Now here we are in the eighth chapter and we again find Jesus in the Temple which stood in the midst of the city of Jerusalem. Oh we dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this for if you wish to read this gospel you must needs understand it through the lens of the Jewish feasts which were celebrated by the Jews throughout each year as well as Jesus’ movement and activity within the Temple. The more you read the fourth gospel which was written by the apostle John the more you can and will be brought face to face with the tremendous truth that the Lord Jesus Christ would indeed engage in a tremendous amount of ministry within the Temple. What would indeed begin with Jesus fashioning a scourge of cords which He would use to cleanse the Temple would indeed eventually culminate and reach the point where Jesus would once more be found in the Temple and the scribes and Pharisees would bring unto Him a woman who was caught in the act of adultery. As you read the words which are found in this passage of Scripture you will find that early in the morning Jesus once more came into the Temple and all the people came unto Him. It would be there in the midst of the Temple Jesus would teach all the people who had gathered themselves unto Him for to hear and listen to Him teach and spoke. What makes this particular account so incredibly unique when you take the time to think about it is when you consider that it was in the midst of the Temple—and not only in the midst of the Temple but also in the midst of Jesus’ teaching the people as well as in the midst of the people themselves—the scribes and the Pharisees would bring into the presence of the Lord Jesus a woman who was caught in the act of adultery. TAUGHT, CAUGHT, AND BROUGHT! Oh we dare not and miss and lose sight of the words which are found in this passage of Scripture for within it we encounter the tremendous truth surrounding this woman who was caught in the act of adultery and brought by the scribes and Pharisees unto the Temple. What’s more is not only was this woman caught in the act of adultery and brought into the Temple but this woman was also brought into the presence of the Lord Jesus as well as into the presence of all those who were present in the Temple on this particular occasion. Stop and consider that when this woman was brought by the scribes and Pharisees—not only was she brought unto the very Temple of the living God but she was also brought into the presence of the Lord Jesus as well as brought into the presence of all those who were present there. As you read the words presented in this passage of Scripture you can and will encounter the incredible truth that this woman was caught in the act of adultery and immediately seized and brought forth from the place where she had committed the act. Oh if there is one thing I can’t help but wonder when reading the words found in this passage it’s who this woman was caught in the act of adultery. Not only do I wonder how this woman was caught in the act of adultery but I also wonder who it was that caught this woman in the act of adultery. Were there spies who were sent to follow this woman to the place where she had committed adultery and upon her exiting of that house they would seize her and bring her to the scribes and Pharisees? Oh imagine what it would and could have been like for this woman to not only engage in the act of adultery but to also be seized by those who would bring her unto the scribes and Pharisees. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of the words which are found in this passage of Scripture for I do not believe for one moment the scribes and Pharisees themselves who caught this woman in the act of adultery. I imagine this passage of Scripture being centered around this woman engaging in the act of adultery and there being certain men who lie in wait for her when she came out of the house that they might lay hold of her and bring her unto the scribes and Pharisees. Oh with this being said I can’t help but wonder if there weren’t others who were caught in the act of adultery during those three and a half years Jesus was engaged in public and full-time ministry. Were there others who were caught in the act of adultery and if so how was their adultery handled and treated? Is it possible that there were others who were engaging in the act of adultery during those days and yet we don’t read of their being caught and brought into the presence of the Lord Jesus? Here in this particular passage of Scripture we find this woman who was caught in the act of adultery being brought into the presence of the Lord Jesus in the midst of the Temple. I sit here today and read the words which are found in this passage of Scripture and I can’t help but come face to face with the incredible truth surrounding this woman who was caught in the act of adultery and perhaps almost immediately brought into the court of the Temple. What’s more is that not only was this woman perhaps caught in the act of adultery and brought unto the Temple but. She was also brought into the presence of Jesus. It’s important to note that the sole reason this woman was brought unto the Temple and into the presence of the Lord Jesus was because they sought to tempt Jesus using this woman as bait in His presence. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of the words which are found in this passage of Scripture for it would be while and as Jesus taught in the midst of the Temple of the living God that a woman who was caught in the act of adultery would be brought into the presence of the Lord Jesus. What’s more is that this woman wasn’t merely brought into the presence of the Lord Jesus being accused of adultery but she was also brought into the presence of the Lord Jesus being condemned according to the Law. Oh we dare not and must not miss and lose sight of the words which are found in this passage of Scripture for it is within this passage of Scripture where we find this woman not only being caught in the act of adultery but also brought into the Temple of the living God where she would be accused of the scribes and Pharisees—and not only accused of the scribes and Pharisees but also condemned according to the Law. Undoubtedly the scribes and the Pharisees thought and perhaps even believed that Jesus would indeed condemn this woman according to the Law. What’s more is that there were perhaps those who thought that this woman would indeed be indicted and condemned by the Lord Jesus and either that Jesus would consent to her being stoned by those who were present in the midst of the Temple or that Jesus Himself might have even picked up a stone to cast at the woman. I am writing about the words which are presented in this passage and I can’t help but think about and consider that this would indeed be the second time Jesus would find Himself in the midst of stones. If you read the New Testament gospel narratives written by the apostle Matthew as well as the gospel narrative written by the beloved physician Luke you will find that Jesus found Himself in the midst of stones in the wilderness. After having been baptized in the Jordan River by John the Baptist, after the heavens were opened unto and before Him, after the Holy Spirit descended and lighted upon Him in the form of a dove and after the voice of the Father would speak from heaven and confess and proclaim that Jesus was His beloved Son we find the Spirit driving Jesus into the wilderness. It would be there in the midst of the wilderness where the tempter would come unto the Lord Jesus with three very unique and different temptations. It would be there in the midst of the wilderness where the tempter would come unto the person of the Lord Jesus and tempt Him using stones which were present there in the midst of the desert. The tempter would indeed come unto the person of the Lord Jesus and tempt Him using those stones that he might turn those stones into bread. It would be there in the midst of the wilderness where the temper would indeed come unto the the Lord Jesus and would in fact tempt him to turn those stones into bread that He might not only demonstrate His power and authority as the Son of the living God but also to satisfy His own hunger and need there in the midst of the wilderness. Of course we know and understand that Jesus would resist the devil using that which was written in the Law by emphatically declaring that man ought not to live by bread alone but by every word which proceeded forth from the mouth of God. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this for it calls and draws our attention to the incredible truth that the Lord Jesus would once more find Himself in the midst of stones here in the Temple of the living God. Here in the Temple as Jesus taught and as the people came unto Him for to hear and listen to the words which He would speak we find Jesus being tempted of the scribes and Pharisees. What’s more is that not only would Jesus be tempted by the scribes and Pharisees but Jesus would also be tempted using a woman who was caught in the act of adultery. Moreover it would be the Lord Jesus who would indeed experience the scribes and Pharisees using the very Law of Moses itself to tempt Him. The scribes and Pharisees brought this woman who had been caught in the act of adultery into the court of the Temple and into the presence of the Lord Jesus. The sole purpose for the scribes and the Pharisees bringing this woman who was caught in the act of adultery into the Temple was that she might be used as bait in the presence of the Lord Jesus to see what He would say and how he would respond. Oh we dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this and how absolutely incredibly it truly is for it calls and draws our attention to the incredible reality that this woman would indeed be used by the scribes and Pharisees to tempt the person of the Lord Jesus. Here in the midst of the Temple this woman who was caught in the act of adultery would indeed be brought into the presence of the Lord Jesus. There in the midst of the Temple this woman’s sin and iniquity would be paraded before all those who were present in the midst of it. There in the midst of the Temple as Jesus taught this woman would indeed have her adultery and her transgression paraded before all those who were gathered into that place—perhaps to worship the living God with their sacrifices and offerings as well as those who were gathered there into the midst of the Temple for to hear and listen to the words which the Lord Jesus spoke. Oh if there is one thing I can’t help but think about when reading the words which are found in this passage of Scripture it’s how this woman was caught in the act of adultery and brought unto the Temple of the living God. Undoubtedly the scribes and the Pharisees knew and understood that Jesus was present in the midst of the Temple—and not only was Jesus present in the midst of the Temple but there would be people who were gathered together unto Him for to hear Him teach and speak. It is absolutely necessary and imperative we recognize and understand this for within this passage of Scripture we find the scribes and the Pharisees turning teaching into accusation and turning teaching into condemnation. Stop for a moment and consider that which truly took place during this particular time Jesus was present in the midst of the Temple for the scribes and the Pharisees would take and use one woman’s adultery to transform Jesus’ teaching into accusation and condemnation. It would be there in the midst of the Temple where Jesus taught the people that one woman’s sin and iniquity would be used to not only tempt Jesus but also to condemn this woman to death. It’s important to note that when you read the words found in this passage of Scripture the scribes and Pharisees didn’t merely seek to accuse this woman according to the Law of Moses but they also sought to use the Law to condemn this woman. What’s more is the scribes and the Pharisees sought to use this woman as bait to tempt Jesus to see if He would indeed agree with the Law of Moses which demanded and commanded that such a woman be stoned to death. Undoubtedly the scribes and the Pharisees themselves thought and desired that this woman would indeed be condemned and accused by the person of the Lord Jesus that they might have grounds to accuse Him. Oh if there is one thing I can’t help but wonder when reading the words found in this passage of Scripture it’s what would and could have happened had Jesus agreed with the accusation being brought against this woman—and not only the accusation brought against this woman but also the condemnation found in the Law. I sit here today thinking about and considering the words which are found in this passage of Scripture and I can’t help but think about the presence of two distinct realities present within the temple on this particular day. On the one hand there was the accusation of the scribes and the Pharisees who brought this woman who was caught in the act of adultery and accused her both in the Temple as well as in the presence of the Lord Jesus. It would be there in the midst of the Temple of the living God this woman was accused of the scribes and Pharisees in the presence of the Lord Jesus as well as in the presence of all those who had gathered themselves together unto Him for to hear and listen to Him teach and speak. Oh there is something incredibly unique when reading the words which are found in this passage of Scripture for within it we are brought face to face with the awesome and incredible truth that this woman was not only accused of the scribes and Pharisees but she was also condemned according to the Law. ACCUSED BY RELIGION, CONDEMNED BY THE LAW! Oh stop and think about how incredibly provocative this passage of Scripture truly is within this gospel that was so Jewish-centric as this woman who was caught in the act of adultery was indeed brought into the Temple where Jesus of Nazareth was teaching the people. This woman was caught in the act of adultery and brought unto the Temple where she would be accused of religion and its leaders. There in the midst of the Temple this woman who was caught in the act of adultery would indeed be accused by religion and its leaders of the iniquity and transgression which she had committed. Oh we dare not and must not miss and lose sight of this for there is something truly captivating about this woman having been caught in the act of adultery—and not only being caught in the act of adultery but also being accused by religion and its leaders of that very iniquity and transgression. The law clearly forbid and spoke against adultery for within the Ten Commandments we find the living God commanding the people of Israel not to commit adultery. Oh the more I read the words which are found in this passage of Scripture the more I am brought face to face with the incredibly awesome and powerful truth surrounding this woman was not only caught in the act of adultery but also seized and brought unto the Temple of the living God. As if it weren’t bad enough this woman undoubtedly faced the guilt and shame that was directly associated with her actions she was not dragged unto the Temple by the scribes and Pharisees. What’s more is that in addition to her dealing with the guilt and the shame of her actions she was also brought unto the Temple and into the presence of the Lord Jesus where she was accused by religion and the religious leaders. There in the midst of the Temple this woman would be confronted on one side with the guilt and shame from her actions as well as with the accusation of the scribes and the Pharisees on the other side. As if this weren’t enough we also read the words found in this passage of Scripture and must needs consider that within it we are brought face to face with the condemnation which was required within the Law given unto Moses atop the mountain of God in the midst of the wilderness. Oh there is something truly unique and powerful when reading the words presented in this passage of Scripture for within it we find this woman being assaulted and assailed by guilt and condemnation on one side, we find this woman being assaulted and assailed by the accusation of religion on another side, we find this woman being assaulted and assailed by the condemnation of the Law on the other side and we perhaps even find this woman being assaulted and assailed by the jeers and sneers of those who were present in the midst of the Temple. Oh imagine how there might very well have been those who gathered into the he Temple for to hear and listen to the Lord Jesus teach and speak and yet as soon as this woman who was brought in the act of adultery accused of the scribes and Pharisees and condemned according to the Law they would abandon their place in the presence of Jesus. What’s more is that not only is it possible that they abandoned their place in the presence of Jesus but they might also have taken up their scorn, their ridicule and their mockery of this woman who was caught in the act of adultery. As if this weren’t enough it’s possible there were those present on this particular occasion who would agree with the condemnation which was found in the Law and seek to execute judgment against and upon this woman.

If you are reading the words of this writing right now I would like to ask you to stop for a moment and imagine yourself in the shoes and place of this woman. Imagine that you were caught in the very act of sin, iniquity and transgression and you were brought into the presence of Jesus. What’s more is I would like to call you to imagine that you were not only caught in the very act of iniquity and transgression but you were also caught in the act and brought into the Temple of the living God. Having been caught in the act you were not only accused by religion and its leaders but you were also condemned according to the Law. There is something incredibly unique and powerful about the words which are found in this passage of Scripture for this woman wasn’t merely accused of the scribes and Pharisees but this woman was also condemned according to the Law. Undoubtedly this woman thought that she was facing imminent death as she would face the punishment and judgment for her iniquity and transgression. Oh there is a part of me that can’t help but wonder what this woman thought and what went through her mind as she was being dragged by the scribes and Pharisees unto the Temple of the living God. What went through this woman’s mind as the scribes and the Pharisees had her dragged from the place she had committed adultery and brought unto the Temple. What’s more is I can’t help but wonder what would have gone through the mind of this woman as she was being brought into the midst of the Temple where Jesus taught the people. As this woman was brought—and perhaps even cast into the presence of Jesus—I can’t help but wonder what would and could have gone through her mind as she stood accused of religion and its leaders and even condemned by the Law for her actions and her transgression. There in the midst of the Temple this woman was not only accused of religion but she was also condemned according to the Law of Moses which demanded and commanded her being stoned.

Oh as I read the words which are found in this passage of Scripture I can’t help but think about the fact this woman was not only caught in the very act of adultery but she was also cast into the presence of Jesus in the midst of the Temple. This woman was caught in the act of adultery and was dragged by the scribes and Pharisees from that place of adultery and brought into the Temple of the living God. I have to admit that I wonder how far the house and bed where this woman was caught in the act of adultery was in relation to the Temple. The reason I find this to be so intriguing and captivating when thinking about it is that not only was this woman caught in the act of adultery but it’s very possible that she was dragged through the streets of the city of Jerusalem. Imagine this woman having not only been caught in the act of adultery but also dragged through the streets of the city of Jerusalem. Oh I can’t help but think about the words which are found in this passage of Scripture and consider how even before this woman was brought into the presence of Jesus her sin, her iniquity, her adultery and her transgression was paraded through the streets of the city. This woman was indeed caught in the act of adultery and was brought by the scribes and the Pharisees into the court of the Temple where the Lord Jesus. Oh imagine what it was like for this woman as she was dragged from the place where she had been caught in the act of adultery and had been brought into the Temple of the living God. Imagine the stares and the gossip that would have been lobbied against this woman as she was perhaps dragged through the streets of the city of Jerusalem before she was ultimately brought into the Temple of the living God. Imagine what it would have been like as the scribes and Pharisees entered into the temple—and not only as they entered into the Temple but also as they came dragging a woman who was caught in the act of adultery whom they cast in the presence of the Lord Jesus.

I am absolutely convinced that if we want to truly understand the significance of the words which are found in this passage of Scripture we must not only consider the account of the Samaritan woman which is recorded for us in the fourth chapter of this gospel but we must also consider the account of the woman of the city who was a sinner and yet who entered into the house of religion without invitation and yet bringing her worship. WITHOUT INVITATION YET WITH AN OFFERING! WITHOUT INVITATION YET WITH A GIFT! It is in the seventh chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the beloved physician Luke we find the account of this woman who was a sinner and who perhaps even had a reputation as such entering into the house of religion where Jesus was that she might not only anoint His feet with the fragrant perfume and ointment which was present within the alabaster box but also wash His feet with her tears and dry them with the hairs of her head. What’s more is I am absolutely convinced that we must also consider the narrative and account of such an action as it was written and recorded in the other four gospels for each of the four gospels would include an account of a woman who dared enter into the presence of the Lord Jesus with an alabaster box of fragrant perfume and ointment that she might anoint the feet of Jesus. Oh if we are to truly understand the narrative of this woman who was caught in the act of adultery we must needs recognize that which is found in these different passages for they call and draw our attention to the incredible truth of women who undoubtedly had a reputation and yet who found compassion, who found grace, who found mercy and who found the very love of God in the presence of the Lord Jesus. Oh consider if you will the following words which are found within the four gospels beginning with that which is presented in the fourth chapter of this New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John:

“When therefore the Lord knew how the Pharisees had heard that Jesus made and baptized more disciples than John, (Though Jesus himself baptized not, but his disciples,) He left Judaea, and departed again into Galilee. And he must needs go through Samaria. Then cometh he to a city of Samaria, which is called Sychar, near to the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son Joseph. Now Jacob’s well was there. Jesus therefore, being wearied with his journey, sat thus on the well: and it was about the sixth hour. There cometh a woman of Samaria to draw water: Jesus saith unto her, Give me to drink. (For his disciples were gone away unto the city to but meat.) Then saith the woman of Samaria unto him, How is it that thou, being a jew, askest drink of me, which am a woman of Samaria? For the Jews have no dealings with the Samaritans. Jesus answered and said unto her, If thou knewest the gifts of God, and who it was that saith to thee, Give me to drink; thou wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee living water. The woman saith unto him, Sir, thou hast nothing to draw with, and the well is deep: from whence then hast thou that living water? Art thou greater than our father Jacob, which gave us the well, and drank thereof himself, and his children, and his cattle? Jesus answered and said unto her, Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst again: But whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into everlasting life. The woman saith unto him, Sir give me this water, that I thirst not, neither come hither to draw. Jesus saith unto her, Go, call thy husband, and come hither. The woman answered and said, I have no husband. Jesus said unto her, Thou hast well said, I have no husband: For thou hast had five husbands; and he whom thou now hast is not thy husband: in that saidst thou truly. The woman saith unto him, Sir, I perceive that thou art a p roper. Our fathers worshipped in this mountain; and ye say, that in Jerusalem is the place where men ought to worship. Jesus saith unto her, Woman, believe me, the hour cometh, when ye shall neither in this mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, worship the Father. Ye worship ye know not what: we know what we worship: for salvation is of the Jews. But the hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth: for the Father seeketh such to worship him. God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth. The woman saith unto him, I know that Messias cometh, which is called Christ: when he is come, h e will tell us all things. Jesus saith unto her, I that speak unto thee am he. And upon this came his disciples, and marveled that he talked with the woman: yet not man said, What seekest thou? Or, Why tallest thou with her? The woman then left her water pot, and went her way into the city, and saith to the men, Come, see a man, which told me all things that ever I did: is not this the Christ? Then they went out of the city, and came unto him” (John 4:1-30). “And one of the Pharisees desired him that he would eat with him. And he went into the Pharisee’s house, and sat down to meat. And, behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee’s house, brought an alabaster box of ointment, and stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment. Now when the Pharisee which had bidden him saw it, he spake within himself, saying, This man, if he were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of woman this is that toucheth him: for she is a sinner. And Jesus answering said unto him, Simon, I have somewhat to say unto thee. And he saith, master, say on. There was a certain creditor which had two debtors: the one owed five hundred pence, and the other fifty. And when they had nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me therefore, which of them will love him most? Simon answered and said, I suppose that he, to whom he forgave most. And he said unto him, Thou hast rightly judged. And he turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for my feet: but she hath washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. Thou gavest me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet. My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment. Wherefore I say unto her, Her sins which are many, are forgiven: for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little. And he said unto her, Thy sins are forgiven. And they that sat at meat with him began to say within themselves, Who is this that for giveth sins also? And he said unto the woman, Thy faith hath saved thee; go in peace” (Luke 7:36-50). “Now when Jesus was in Bethany, in the house of Simon the leper, there came unto him a woman having an alabaster box of very previous ointment, and poured it on his head, as he sat at meat. But when his disciples saw it, they had indignation, saying, To what purpose is this waste? For this ointment might have been sold for much, and given to the poor. When Jesus understood it, he said unto them, Why trouble ye the woman? For she hath wrought a good work upon me. For ye have the poor always with you; but me ye have not always. For in that she hath poured this ointment on my body, she did it for my burial. Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached in the whole world, there shall also this, that this woman hath done, be told for a memorial of her” (Matthew 26:6-13). “And being in Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he sat at meat, there came a woman having an alabaster box of ointment of spikenard very previous; and she bake the box, and poured it on his head. And there were some that had indignation within themselves, and said, Why was this waste of the ointment made? For it might have been sold for more than three hundred pence, and have been given to the poor. And they murmured against her. And Jesus said, Let her alone; why trouble. Ye her? She hath wrought a good work on me. For ye have the poor with you always, and when soever ye will ye may do them good: but me ye have not always. She hath done what she could: she is come a forehand to anoint my body to the burying. Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her” (Mark 14:3-9). “Then Jesus six days before the Passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was which had been dead, whom he raised from the dead. There they made him a supper; and Martha served: but Lazarus was one of them that sat at the table with him. Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment. Then saith one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, which should betray him, Why was not this ointment sold for three hundred pence, and given to the poor? This he said, not that he cared for the poor; but because he was a thief, and had the bag, and bare what was put therein. Then said Jesus, Let her alone: against the day of my burying hath she kept this. For the poor always ye have with you; but me ye have not always” (John 12:1-8). There is a great need for us to recognize and pay close attention to these passages of Scripture for they call and draw our attention to the incredible truth of certain woman who found grace, who found compassion, who found mercy and who found tenderness and love in the presence of the Lord Jesus. Although Scripture doesn’t refer to the Samaritan woman whom Jesus encountered at the well as being a sinner we must needs recognize and understand that she might very well have been a woman of reputation. When Jesus asked her to go and call her husband she responded by stating she had no husband—a statement to which Jesus would reveal that she had had five husbands and the man whom she was now with was not her husband. Undoubtedly this woman—if she wasn’t perceived and considered by those in the city of Sychar as being a sinner—would have been considered as a woman who might very well have been loose or perhaps even promiscuous. Pause for a moment and consider what it would have been like for this woman to have had five husbands and the man whom she was now with was not her husband. Although it is not explicitly written within this gospel that this woman was a sinner we can nonetheless deduce from the words and language found and contained within it that this woman might very well have had a reputation among the men of the city—perhaps even among the women of the city. There is not a doubt in my mind that this woman might not have been perceived as a sinner by the men in the city but was nonetheless considered one who was loose and perhaps even promiscuous bouncing from relationship to relationship and husband. With this being said we must needs recognize and understand that the woman whom the beloved physician Luke wrote of in the seventh chapter of his gospel narrative was considered a sinner—and not only was she considered a sinner but Luke referred to as a sinner and even Simon the Pharisee referred to as a sinner within his own head and heart. As you read the words which are found in the eighth chapter of the gospel narrative which was written by the apostle John you will find a woman who might not have been considered a sinner alone but might also have been considered an adulteress. The more I read the words which are found in this passage of Scripture the more I am brought face to face with the fact that this woman was indeed one who was caught in the very act of adultery and then dragged by the scribes and Pharisees to the Temple of the living God which stood in the midst of the city of Jerusalem. Oh I have to admit there is a part of me that can’t help but wonder if this particular woman had her adultery, her iniquity, her sin and her transgression paraded through and in the midst of the streets of the city in the sight and presence of those who were present. I can’t help but wonder if this woman not only stood accused of the religious leaders and of religion in the Temple, and not only stood condemned according to the Law of Moses in the Temple but also had to deal with the stares, the sneers and the gossip of those who were perhaps made aware of her adultery. Imagine what it was like for this woman having suffered from the guilt and the shame of her actions and then being paraded through the streets of the city of Jerusalem as she was brought unto the Temple to the place where the Lord Jesus. Oh I can’t help but think about how this woman might very well have been paraded through the streets of the city for her actions and being caught in the act of adultery for within the four gospels we find that not only was Jesus compelled to carry His cross but He was also forced to carry His cross through the streets of the city of Jerusalem. Stop and consider the fact that He who knew no sin was forced to carry His cross—that instrument which would indeed represent more than suffering and death but which would also represent sin as well. Jesus would indeed carry the cross and the instrument which would indeed represent sin and would carry it through the streets within the city of Jerusalem until He reached the place where He would be nailed to that cross and crucified in the sight and presence of those who were present at Golgotha. Oh consider if you will the following accounts of Jesus being forced to carry His cross unto the place of the skull where He would indeed be killed and crucified: “Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus. Into the common hall, and gathered unto him the whole band of soldiers. And they stripped him, and put on him a scarlet robe. And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and thy bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews! And they spit upon him, and took the reed , and smote him on the head. And after that they had mocked him, they took the rob e off from him, and put his own raiment on him, and led him away to crucify him. And as they came out, they found a man of Cyrene, Simon by name: him they compelled to bear his cross. And when they were come unto a place called Golgotha, that is to say, a place of a skull, they gave him vinegar to drink mingled with gall: and when he had tasted thereof, he would not drink. And they crucified him, and parted his garments, casting lots” (Matthew 27:27-35). “And the soldiers led him away into the hall, called Praetorium; and they call together the whole band. And they clothed him with purple, and platted a crown of thorns, and put it about his head, and began to salute him, Hail, King of the Jews! And they smote him on the head with a reed, and did spit upon him, and bowing their knees worshipped him. And when they had mocked him, they took off the purple from him, and put his own clothes on him, and led him out to crucify him. And they compel one Simon a Cyrenian, who passed by, coming out of the country, the father of Alexander and Rufus, to bear his cross. And they bring him unto the place Golgotha, which is, being interpreted, The place of a skull. And they gave him to drink wine mingled with myrrh: but he received it not. And when they had crucified him, they parted his garments, casting lots upon them, what every man should take” (Mark 15:16-24). “And as the led him away, they laid hold upon one Simon, a Cyrenian, coming out of the country, and on him they laid the cross, that he might bear it after Jesus. And there followed him a great company of people, and of women, which also bewailed and lamented him. But Jesus turning unto them said, daughters of Jerusalem, weep not for me, but weep for yourselves, and for your children. For, behold, the days are coming, in the which they shall say, Blessed are the barren, and the wombs that never bare, and the paps which never gave suck. Then shall they begin to say to the mountains, Fall on us; and to the hills, Cover us. For if they do these things in a green tree, what shall be done in the dry? And there were two other, malefactors, led with him to be put to death. And when they were come to the place, which is called Calvary, there they crucified him, and the malefactors, one on the right hand, and the other on the left. Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they did. And they parted his raiment, and cast lots. And th people stood beholding. And the rulers also with them derided him, saying, He saved others; let him save himself, if he be Christ, the chosen of God. And the soldiers also mocked him, coming to him, and offering him vineyard, and saying, If thou be the king of the Jews, save thyself” (Luke 23:26-36). “And they took Jesus, and led him away. And he bearing his cross went forth into a place called the place of a skull, which is called in the Hebrew tongue Golgotha: where they crucified him, and two other with him, on either side one, and Jesus in the midst. And Pilate wrote a title, and put it on the cross. And the writing was, JESUS OF NAZARETH THE KING OF THE JEWS” (John 9:16-19). Oh I am absolutely gripped and captivated with the words and language that is found in this passage of Scripture for it calls and draws our attention to the fact that for this woman to have been brought into the court of the Temple where Jesus was she might have undoubtedly been dragged and brought through the streets of the city. Pause for a moment and consider what it would have been like for this woman as she was not only caught in the act of adultery but perhaps even dragged out of the very house and even the very bed where she had been caught in the act of adultery. What’s more is there is a part of me that can’t help but wonder what this woman was wearing on this particular occasion if she had been caught in the very act of adultery. Scripture doesn’t merely reveal that this woman was caught in adultery but was caught in the very act of adultery. This woman wasn’t merely caught AFTER having committed adultery but was in fact caught in the very act of adultery and I can’t help but wonder if this suggests that she was perhaps dragged from the bed where she committed adultery and even dragged out of the house. DRAGGED FROM THE BED! DRAGGED FROM THE BED!@ DRAGGED THROUGH THE STREETS OF THE CITY! DRAGGED UNTO THE TEMPLE! Oh there is not a single part of this narrative that suggests that this woman might not only have suffered and struggled from the guilt and the shame of what she had done but she also had to contend with the stares, the sidewalk, the sneers, the gossip, the slander and even the words and voices of those who saw her as the scribes and the Pharisees had dragged her through the streets of the city. Undoubtedly this woman was dragged through the streets of the city having been caught in the act of adultery that she might be brought into the Temple where she would be cast down into the presence of the Lord Jesus. Oh with this in mind I invite you to consider the following words which are found in the twelfth chapter of the New Testament epistle written by the apostle Paul unto the saints which were at Rome as well as the words which are found in the fifth chapter of the second epistle written by the apostle Paul unto the Corinthian saints: “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death. For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh: That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit. For to be carnally minded is death; but to be spiritually minded is life and peace. Because the carnal mind is enmity against God: for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be. So then they that are in the flesh cannot please God. But ye are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of his. And if Christ be in you, the body is dead because of sin; but the Spirit is life because of righteousness. But if the Spirit of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit that dwelleth in you. Therefore, brethren, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. For if ye live after the flesh, ye shall die: but if ye through the Spirit do mortify the deeds of the body, ye shall live. For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, they are the sons of God. For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father. The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God: and if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with him, that we may also be glorified together” (Romans 8:1-17). “Wherefore henceforth know we no man after the flesh: yea, though we have known Christ after the flesh, yet now henceforth know we him no more. Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new. And all things are of God, who hath reconciled us to himself by Jesus Christ, and hath give to us the ministry of reconciliation; to wit, that God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them; and hath committed unto us the word of reconciliation. Now then we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God did beseech you by us: we pray you in Christ’s stead, be ye reconciled to God. For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him” (2 Corinthians 5:16-21). It is clear from these distinct passages found within Scripture that not only is there therefore no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus but those who are in Christ are new creations. NO CONDEMNATION, NEW CREATIONS! NO CONDEMNATION FOR NEW CREATIONS! I sit here today thinking about and considering the words which are found in these two passages of Scripture and how they are directly related to what we find in the eighth chapter of the New Testament gospel narrative written by the apostle John. Within these two passages of Scripture we encounter the distinct reality surrounding this woman having been caught in the very act of adultery, having perhaps been dragged through the streets of the city unto the Temple, having been cast down before Jesus in the midst of the people gathered unto Him, having been accused of the scribes and Pharisees of adultery and being condemned according to the Law which demanded death. Stop for a moment and consider the fact that this woman not only stood accused by religion but she also stood accused by the Law—the Law which demanded death. It would have been one thing for this woman to have been falsely accused of something she had not done, however, what we find within this passage of Scripture is the woman being accused of something she had not only committed but also something she had been caught in the midst of. It would have been something if this woman was accused of something she had absolutely nothing to do with, however, it would have been something else entirely for her to be accused of something which she had indeed committed and been guilty of. It’s important for us to recognize that although this woman was indeed accused by religion she was indeed guilty—and not only guilty but guilty according to the Law of Moses. As such the Law not only pronounced guilt upon this woman but it also pronounced judgment against her demanding that she be stoned to death. I sit here today thinking about the words which are found in this passage of Scripture and how this woman was indeed accused of having committed adultery and how that accusation was not one which was unfounded and false. This woman wasn’t merely accused of adultery which would have required two or three witnesses but this woman was caught in the very act of adultery. Oh if this woman had merely been accused of adultery there would have needed to be at least two or three witnesses to properly judge her and possibly even pass judgment and sentence upon her. What we find here, however, is this woman not being accused of adultery based on here say but being accused of adultery having been caught in the very act. Stop and consider how many witnesses it would have taken for this woman to have been caught in the act of adultery—and not only to have been caught in the act of adultery but accused in the Temple in the presence of Jesus. This woman was caught in the very act of adultery by perhaps at least one witness—possibly even more than one witness. With this being said this woman was dragged unto the court of the Temple and then accused of her adultery in the presence of Jesus with perhaps the witnesses which were needed to condemn her being present in the midst. Imagine what these scene would have looked like as this woman stood accused by religion in the Temple and in the presence of Jesus, as this woman was surrounded by the witnesses who might very well have been the ones who caught her in the act of adultery, as this woman was condemned by the Law which demanded that she be stoned to death and even as those who were present on this particular occasion took up stones in their hands to cast at her. Imagine what would and could have gone through this woman’s head and heart during this time and how she might very well have thought that she was facing the last moments of her life. Here this woman had engaged in the act of adultery and now she stood accused by religion and condemned by the Law which demanded her being stoned. I absolutely love the words which are found in this passage of Scripture for they highlight and underscore the words which we find in the third chapter of this same New Testament gospel. If you turn and direct your attention back to the third chapter of this gospel you can and will encounter the incredible truth of Jesus speaking with Nicodemus by night. Nicodemus this Pharisee and ruler of the Jews came to Jesus by night acknowledging that He came from God and that God was with Him for no man could do the miracles He did unless God were with Him. It would be in the context of this nighttime encounter between Jesus and Nicodemus we find Jesus speaking of the Father—and not only speaking of the Father but how the Father so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son that whosoever believed in Him would not perish but have everlasting life. What’s more is that it is in this context where Jesus would also speak and declare of the Father that He did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world but that the world through Him might be saved. This is something which must needs be understood in direct relation to the narrative and account of the woman who was caught in the act of adultery for it would be this woman who would not only stand accused by religion but would also stand condemned by the Law itself. With this being said there is a part of me that can’t help but wonder how many witnesses there might have been which stood in agreement with both the law and the accusation. Oh it might not have been enough for there to be the accusation and the condemnation but there also might have been the need for witnesses who personally witnessed and observed this woman caught in the act of adultery. What an incredibly unique and powerful scene is found in this passage of Scripture as this woman stood accused by religion, stood condemned by the Law, and perhaps even stood accused by however witnesses might have agreed with the accusation and which would have strengthened the condemnation of the Law. I sit here today thinking about and reading the words which are found in this passage of Scripture and I am brought face to face with the tremendous truth that in addition to this woman standing accused by religion and condemned by the Law there might have also been the presence of those who would have served as witnesses to the demand(s) of the Law. It would have been one thing for this woman to have been accused by religion and to even by condemned by the Law but it would have been something else entirely for this woman to be accused and condemned in the presence of witnesses. I find myself being incredibly captivated with the words and language that is found in this passage of Scripture and how this woman was indeed accused by religion and condemned according to the Law but also how in the court of the Temple and in the presence of Jesus she might have been surrounded by potential executioners and even standing before those who would witness against her. ACCUSED, CONDEMNED AND WITNESSED AGAINST! There is something absolutely remarkable about the words presented in this passage of Scripture and how this woman was undoubtedly accused by the scribes and Pharisees on this particular day and even condemned by the Law and yet there would have been the need for witnesses. There in the midst of the Temple the scribes and the Pharisees asked Jesus what He said concerning this woman—and not only concerning this woman but also concerning their accusation and the condemnation of the Law. If there is one thing we must recognize and understand when reading the words found in this passage of Scripture it’s that the scribes and the Pharisees weren’t merely asking Jesus what He had to say about this woman having been caught in the act of adultery but also what He said about the Law and what it demanded concerning her. In reading the words which are found in this passage of Scripture you find that when Jesus heard the scribes and Pharisees ask Him what He said about this woman He would stoop down in the ground and would begin writing as though He did not hear and had not heard them. There in the midst of the court of the Temple Jesus would hear the accusation of religion and would even hear the condemnation and judgment of the Law and yet He would not even speak concerning that for which this woman had been accused. This woman was dragged, brought and cast into the presence of the Lord Jesus and yet Jesus would not accused nor would He judge or condemn her. Instead what we find Jesus doing is stooping down to the ground as though he had not heard them and writing in it. Scripture doesn’t reveal what exactly Jesus wrote—only that as the scribes and Pharisees watched and observed Jesus writing in the ground they would repeat their question and ask Him once more what He said concerning this woman’s accusation and condemnation. It would be at this second and repeated question Jesus would stand up in the midst of the religious leaders, would stand up in the midst of all those who were present within the Temple and would perhaps even stand up in the midst of the witnesses who would testify against her and would speak some incredibly powerful words. It would be Jesus who would speak and declare the words which have been used throughout the years—not only to demonstrate the grace and mercy and forgiveness of the living God but also to demonstrate the hypocrisy of those who would assume the mantle and responsibility of pointing out the speck in someone else’s eye while ignoring the beam and plank that is present in their own eye. It would be here on this particular occasion the Lord Jesus would choose not to condemn, nor indict nor even judge this woman—even according to the Law and even though she was indeed guilty. On this particular occasion the Lord Jesus would stand up in the midst of those present after He had just stooped down in the ground to write in both the dirt and dust and would call on those who were without sin to cast the first stone. I find it absolutely incredible that when you read the words presented in this passage of Scripture you will find that after Jesus had spoken these words “He that is without sin let him cast the first stone” each one who not only stood to accuse and condemn this woman but also sought to judge her according to the Law departed one by one beginning with the oldest and continuing all the way to the youngest. Eventually as a result of all those who had departed from the Temple being pricked and convicted in their own conscience Jesus was left alone with this woman and asked her a very pointed question. What makes this even more intriguing when you take the time to think about it is that when this woman stood accused of adultery and even condemned according to the Law Jesus spoke not a word unto this woman. It’s almost as if Jesus cared absolutely nothing about the accusation of this woman, nor the condemnation of the Law, nor even that for which she was accused and condemned and only saw deliverance and freedom from the accusation, from the condemnation and even from the execution of the Law. Oh we dare not and must not miss the absolutely awesome importance of this for even when Jesus heard the accusation brought against this woman and even heard the condemnation of the Law He would not speak to this woman nor even acknowledge her sin. Even when He did speak unto those who were present and acknowledge them after the second time they asked the question He would simply invite those who were without sin to cast the first stone. It wasn’t until Jesus was alone with this woman absent her accusers and absent those who would condemn and judge her that He would finally speak to her. When it was just Jesus and the woman He would not ask her what she had done, nor ask her why she did it, nor even if she was sorry or remorseful for what she had done. Jesus made absolutely no mention of sin within this woman’s life and the only thing He initially asked her was where her accusers were. If there is one thing I so love about the words found in this passage of Scripture it’s that Jesus never asked for nor did He ever demand this woman repent of her sins. Nowhere in this passage will you find Jesus asking this woman if she was sorry for what she had done nor even why she had done it in the first place. The question Jesus asked this woman was indeed a question about her accusers and those who stood to condemn her and where they were. Jesus would ask this woman where her accusers were to which she would respond by saying that there was none. It would be in direct response to this Jesus would then declare unto her that He neither condemned her before commanding her to go and sin no more. Oh how absolutely wonderful and beautiful the words and language in this passage of Scripture truly are for they call and draw our attention to the fact that Jesus never acknowledged the adultery, Jesus never accused this woman of adultery, Jesus never condemned this woman of the adultery, and Jesus never asked this woman for repentance of the adultery. Jesus delivered her of her accusers and those who would condemn her and when it was just He and her alone He would declare unto her that He did not condemn her before commanding her to go on her way and sin no more. Oh how absolutely wonderful and incredible this is when you take the time to consider it for it calls and draws our attention to the absolutely wonderful truth surrounding Jesus’ demonstration of grace and mercy as well as His demonstration of forgiveness. Jesus deliberately and intentionally chose not to accuse this woman nor participate in the condemnation of her and instead chose to deliver her out of the hands of her accusers and those who would condemn her. Oh we must needs recognize and understand this for the words the apostle Paul wrote not only emphasize there is no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus but they also demonstrate the fact that anyone who is in Christ is a new creation and old things have passed away and behold all things are become new. What a truly beautiful truth is found in this passage and how Jesus did not condemn this woman but instead commanded her to go her way and sin no more. Oh that we would indeed be a people who recognize the tremendous grace and mercy that is found in the person and presence of the Lord Jesus that we might indeed be those who experience His forgiveness as we are able to participate in His tender mercies and love.

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