Turning Points: Blinded By Light & Thrown From Your Horse

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament account of the spiritual body of Jesus Christ which is the church birthed on Pentecost as written and recorded by the physician Luke. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the first nineteen verses of the ninth chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find what would be the third transitional moment in the history of the early church. If you read the New Testament book of Acts you will quickly discover that the early church was brought into existence and given life on the day of Pentecost which was fifty days after the Passover and when Jesus the Christ was crucified upon the cross outside Jerusalem. In the second chapter of the book of Acts you will find that when the one hundred and twenty were with one accord and in one place there in the upper room there was the sounds as of a mighty rushing wind, and as cloven tongues of fire rested upon each of them giving them the ability to speak with other tongues. It was on the day of Pentecost when all those who were present within the upper room were not only filled with but also baptized with the Holy Spirit and with Fire exactly as Jesus the Christ had spoken of and predicted. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand that which took place and that which we find and read in the second chapter of the New Testament book of Acts, for it is what we read in this chapter that not only brings us face to face with the arrival of the Holy Spirit as Jesus had promised, but where we also see three thousand being added to the one hundred and twenty that were present in the upper room. Pause for a moment and think about that, for on the day of Pentecost—not only were all one hundred and twenty baptized and filled with the Holy Spirit, but there were also added unto their number three thousand souls which continued with them daily in the temple and daily from house to house as they broke bread and gave themselves to fellowship one with another. The events we find and read about in the second chapter of the book of Acts bring us face to face with the birth and creation of the early church, while everything we find and read thereafter describes the church’s presence, role and function within the earth. Absolutely everything we find and read within the book of Acts is a wonderful and powerful description of the early church and how it moves and operated in the midst of the Roman culture and empire which was so pervasive and prevalent during the days of Jesus, as well as during the days of the apostles and of Christ. It is necessary that we first begin with the history of the early church and how it began, for it is when we encounter and come face to face with how it was born that we can understand the turning points which transitioned the early church as it continued to move and function within the earth.

As you continue reading the book of Acts—specifically within the first nine chapters—you will come face to face with the reality that there were essentially three turning points and three transitional moments which drastically altered the landscape of the church as we and as they would know it during their days. The first of these transitional and transformative events which took place within the history of the early church was found at the end and conclusion of the seventh chapter when one of the seven deacons ordained and appointed by the apostles—Stephen—was martyred and stoned to death by the religious council, by the Jews and by those who sought to accuse him of words and crimes he did not commit. The end of the seventh chapter reveals how upon the conclusion of Stephen’s defense before the Sanhedrin he was dragged outside of the city as those who heard the words he spoke were cut to the heart, and stopped their ears to that which he was speaking. When the seventh chapter of the book of Acts draws to a close it does so with Stephen—one of the seven deacons ordained by the apostles—being dragged out of the city and ultimately stoned to death. In all reality, I would dare say there were four true defining moments which took place within the church—five if you count what is found within the thirteenth chapter when the Holy Spirit separates Paul and Barnabas unto Himself for a missionary work among the Gentiles. In all reality, that which we find and that which we read in chapters seven, eight, nine and ten are all key events which took place within the history of the early church—events which would not only dramatically alter and transform the landscape of the church, but which would also take the church beyond Jerusalem and would catapult them into the surrounding regions, lands, nations and peoples round about Judaea and Samaria. It is truly necessary for us to recognize these events, for by understanding these events we come to understand the role of the Holy Spirit within the church during those days, as well as how the Holy Spirit works within our generation and in our midst. It is within the seventh chapter of the book of Acts that we find the first transitional event taking place within and among the saints of the early church, for it is within the seventh chapter where we find the death of Stephen at the hands of those who would accuse him of speaking blasphemy and speaking unlawful words against the Temple and against the Jewish faith. Ultimately, Stephen would see the heavens opened and the Son of God standing at the right hand of the Father before he asked that the actions of stoning him would not be laid against their charge. Oh it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we understand this key event, for it would be the stoning and death of Stephen that would set in motion that which we find and read in the eighth chapter.

If you come to the eighth chapter of the book of Acts you will find written and recorded there an event which took place as a direct result of the stoning of Stephen. In all reality, I would dare say it was the stoning and death of Stephen which directly impacted and set in motion that which we find and that which we read in the eighth chapter. Beginning with the first verse of the eighth chapter you will discover that a young man named Saul consented to the death of Stephen, and how immediately after we read of his consent to the death of Stephen we read of something else that would be a part of the church from that day moving forward. As you continue reading within the eighth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts you will find that immediately after the death of stolen there would arise and emerge a great persecution of the church and would ultimately result in many of those within the church in Jerusalem being scattered within and throughout the regions of Judaea and Samaria. There is not a doubt in my mind that when you read the eighth chapter—specifically the opening verses of the chapter—you will encounter a second event that would dramatically alter and transform the early church and would completely alter its trajectory within and upon the earth. We dare not and cannot miss and lose sight of the importance of what we find and read in the opening verses of the eighth chapter, for they would set in motion something that would run parallel and side by side with the church as it would continue within and upon the earth. In all reality, that which we find in the opening verses of the eighth chapter are in direct alignment with the words which Jesus spoke unto His disciples when He declared unto them how they would be hated of all men for His name’s sake, and how they would be opposed and persecuted by those who thought they were doing a service to the living God. Jesus Warner and prepared the disciples of the early church that rather than being loved by those before and around them they would be hated, and if they hated and persecuted Him, so also would they persecute them in the coming days after His departure. When Jesus prepared the disciples for His departure—not only did He command them to love their neighbors and enemies, but He also prepared them to be hated by all those around them, as well as to be persecuted for the sake of the gospel and for the sake of the name of Jesus the Christ. What we find in the eighth chapter of the book of Acts is a tremendous and powerful picture of this hatred and persecution which would break out against the early church, for not only so we find and read of the persecution which would break out against the church, but we also find and read how this same man Saul who consented to the death of Stephen wreaked havoc against the early church by entering into homes and dragging men and women out and committing them unto prison. The opening verses of the eighth chapter are quite an astonishing and remarkable picture of one of the most critical and pivotal events which took place within the history of the early church, for while when we think of persecution against the early church we typically think of Rome—it actually began within Jerusalem and began with the Jews, and even with Saul. Even if you read certain of the writings of the apostle Paul you will encounter and come face to face with his own words how in ignorance he persecuted the church to no end thinking he was doing a service unto the living God. The words found in the opening verses of the eighth chapter of the book of Acts are such which ring us face to face with a second critical and pivotal moment which took place within the history of the early church which would dramatically alter and shape it from that day on.

At the opening of the eighth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts you will come face to face with Saul consenting to the death of Stephen—and not only will you come face to face with Saul consenting to the death of Stephen, but you will also find at that same time a great persecution breaking out against the church which was at Jerusalem. Please don’t miss and please don’t lose sight of this incredible reality, for when you think about the early church you would think of it in terms of the power and presence of the Holy Spirit, as well as relative peace that would be manifested in their midst because of the presence of the Holy Spirit. The truth of the matter is that while we do read in the second chapter of the book of Acts a relative short period of peace, that peace would be short lived, as eventually the apostles Peter and John would find themselves arrested by the religious leaders of that day and threatened against preaching the gospel of the kingdom, against preaching the resurrection of Jesus the Christ, as well as against the name of Jesus the Christ. What’s more, is that you will also find and read in the early chapters of the book of Acts the apostles as a whole being arrested and cast into prison for preaching the name of Jesus the Christ. We dare not and ought not miss and lose sight of this incredible fact, for when we think about the history of the early church we must come face to face with and understand the awesome and incredible fact that almost from the start of the early church they would be faced with opposition and persecution—first that which begin with and against the apostles, as they would be the first to experience this animosity, this opposition and persecution. Ultimately and eventually Stephen would find himself in the crosshairs of this opposition and persecution, as the religious leaders and council would rise up in rage and animosity toward and against him, and would ultimately drag him out of the city where they would stone him to death. What would begin with the apostles first being threatened, and then actually imprisoned and beaten would transition to a place where Stephen himself would be cast out of the city and would stoned to death by Jews and religious leaders alike. It is worth noting and understanding that which we find and that which we read concerning Stephen, for it is his death and his being martyred at the hands of the Jews and their religious leaders that set in motion the tremendous hatred and animosity of this man named Saul who would take the persecution of the early church to an entirely different level, as he would enter into houses and homes alike and would drag men and women out of their homes and away from their families that he might cast them into prison. While most of the eighth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts centers upon Philip and the ministry he partook of and engaged in in Samaria, as well on the road leading toward Gaza, it must be understood that it began with a great persecution breaking out against the early church, and this man named Saul entering into houses and homes and separating family members one from another as he would drag them out of their homes and cast them into prison.

The more I read and the more I seek to understand the words which are written and found within the New Testament book of Acts the more I can’t help but come face to face with the awesome and incredible fact that while perhaps one of the turning points of the early church was in fact the death and stoning of Stephen, a secondary turning point—perhaps one of the greatest turning points within the early church—would be the great persecution which would break out against it, and this man named Saul who would enter into houses and homes and would drag men and women out of their homes that he might cast them into prison. With that being said, it might also very well be said that another turning point and defining moment of the early church’s young history and existence within and upon the earth was found in the fifth chapter when a man and a woman by the name of Ananias and Sapphira dared lie to the Holy Spirit and dared lie to men about that which they were truly offering and presenting unto the living God through their offering. The beloved physician Luke writes and records how this couple had a piece of land which they sold, and yet instead of bringing the full proceeds to the apostles and laying it at their feet, they chose to keep a portion of it back. Taking a quick sidestep from the subject of this writing it is important for us to note that it wasn’t necessarily their holding a portion of the proceeds back that was that which offended the Holy Spirit, but it was the fact that they dared lie to the Holy Spirit about what they were actually bringing into the presence of the living God. If you are going to understand the account of Ananias and his wife Sapphira you must understand that it wasn’t necessarily that they chose to keep a portion of the proceeds back for themselves, for both the land and proceeds were theirs before they brought it into the house of the living God, and before they brought it into the presence of the Holy Spirit. The true tragedy of this couple is that they dared lie to the Holy Spirit about what they were truly offering in the presence of the living God, as well as the fact that their holding a portion of the proceeds back for themselves demonstrated and proved that they were unwilling to truly live in community and were willing to withhold a piece and portion—not only of the proceeds of the sale, but also of themselves. The simple fact that they chose to withhold a portion of the proceeds for themselves demonstrated a willingness to lie to the Holy Spirit, as well a willingness to live independent and outside of community, as they still chose to live for themselves. As a direct result of their sin and transgression in the sight and presence of the living God they were both struck dead in the presence of the apostle Peter, as well as before all those who were witness to what had unfolded and taken place at that time. Luke goes on to write and record how great fear came upon all those who were present within the church as they witnessed and beheld this couple fall as dead in the presence of the Holy Spirit, in the presence of the apostle Peter, and in the presence of all those who were present at this time. It might very well be said that the deaths of Ananias and his wife Sapphira was an additional defining moment and transitional event which took place within the young history of the early church, for it caused great fear to come upon all those present within the early church because of the person and presence of the Holy Spirit.

With the fifth chapter describing the deaths of Ananias and Sapphira, with the seventh chapter describing the death and martyrdom of Stephen, and with the eighth chapter describing the great persecution which broke out against the church, as well as this man named Saul wreaking havoc upon the church by casting men and women into prison, it is in the ninth chapter of the book of Acts where we encounter a critical and crucial turning point and defining moment within the history of the early church. If you read the words which are written and found within the ninth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts you will notice that while persecution was a common thread that ran parallel to the power and presence of the Holy Spirit, there was something else that would truly alter and transform the early church. If persecution had the ability to run parallel to the existence of the early church, and if persecution had the ability to dramatically alter, affect and impact the early church, then the conversion of one who was heavily involved with that persecution would be a defining moment within the history of the early church. There is not a doubt in my mind that what we read and find in the ninth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts is a wonderful and powerful picture of an event which would dramatically alter and transform the landscape of the early church. As much as persecution would directly impact and affect the church, I would dare say that the conversion of this man named Saul would impact and affect the church as much—if not more than the persecution itself. If you continue reading the history and account of the early church you will notice that persecution would not cease, and it would eventually transition beyond Jerusalem, as Jews which were found in various other lands and regions would rise up against the apostle Paul, the companions of the apostle Paul, as well as the Christians that would be found in this specific regions. What’s more, is that if you read the words which are found within the book of Acts, as well as words which would be written concerning church history you will find that persecution would ultimately reach Rome where it would essentially reach its zenith and pinnacle within the known world at that time. The history of the early church is one of the person, power and presence of the Holy Spirit, but it is also one that entails tremendous persecution that would break out against the Christians—first in Jerusalem, and then in the surrounding lands and regions before reaching its pinnacle and height within Rome itself. It’s interesting and worth noting that as surely as Christianity was birthed within the city of Jerusalem, and as surely as the early church was brought into existence within the city of Jerusalem, so also did persecution initially break out against the early church within the city of Jerusalem as well. In fact, what would begin within the city of Jerusalem in terms of persecution against the early church would eventually and ultimately culminate with it reaching Rome as Rome itself would be one of the greatest persecutors of the church within and throughout the history of the church. It might very well be said that as surely and as much as the gospel would eventually and ultimately reach Rome, persecution would also reach Rome, and would seemingly follow the name of Christ and Christianity to that ultimate location. Despite the fact that the apostle Paul would ultimately find himself in Rome, and despite the fact that the apostle Paul would write an epistle unto the Roman congregation, persecution would be at its ultimate height in and within Rome itself.

If you take the time to read and study the history of the early church you will notice and encounter the absolutely incredible reality that with the power and presence of the Holy Spirit would also come the persecution of the early church—first from and with the Jews, and next from the Gentiles themselves as Rome would be the greatest and ultimate source of persecution, opposition and hatred of the Christians and of Christ during those days. We dare not, we cannot and we must not miss and lose sight of this reality, for to do so would be to miss out on the tremendous significance and importance of that which we find in the ninth chapter of the book of Acts. What we read and what we find in the ninth chapter of the book of Acts is perhaps one of the greatest turning points within the history of the early church, for it is within the ninth chapter that we find this man named Saul who wreaked havoc on the early church still breathing out murderous threats toward and against the early church. It is what we read and what we find in the opening verses of the ninth chapter that sets the stage for one of the most dramatic conversions in all of church history, as this man named Saul would be met by and would be encountered by Jesus the Christ on the road to Damascus. If you begin reading with and form the first verse of the ninth chapter you will find how Saul was still breathing out murderous threats and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, and how he went unto the high priest, and desired of him letters to Damascus to the synagogues, that if he found any of this way—the way of Christ and the way of Christians—being they men or women, he might bring them bound unto Jerusalem. As the ninth chapter of the book of Acts opens, it does so with Saul not merely wreaking havoc within and upon the early church by entering into homes and haling men and women as he cast them into prison, but also with Saul breathing out threatening and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord. When the ninth chapter of the book of Acts begins and opens, it does so with Saul continuing to breathe threatening and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, and seeking to take his hatred and animosity toward and against the church all the way to Damascus which was in Syria. In other words, Saul wasn’t content with simply opposing the Christians which were found within the city of Jerusalem, but he wanted to completely eradicate them from within and throughout the surrounding regions. Luke writes and records how Saul sought to take his vehement opposition and persecution of the early church to a completely different level by asking of the high priest letters that he might go unto the synagogues which were in Damascus that if he found any who were of this way, he could bring them back unto Jerusalem bound where they might stand trial, where they might be cast into prison, and where they might even be cast into prison. Oh how absolutely necessary and important it is for us to truly understand and grasp the nature of this man named Saul, and that we would understand the specific actions he took toward and against the early church, for until and unless you understand his actions against the church you cannot and will not understand how dramatic his conversion truly was on the road to Damascus.

I sit here this morning and I can’t help but be confronted with the incredible and undeniable fact that there is perhaps no greater turning point, and perhaps no greater defining moment that altered the course of the early church as much as the conversion of Saul who would eventually and ultimately become the apostle Paul. With that being said, it’s actually quite interesting to think about and consider the fact that as much as persecution would run parallel to the early church in its early days, there would be one who would be raised up side by side that persecution who would strengthen and encourage the church. What’s more, is that this Saul who would become the apostle Paul would not only strengthen and encourage the church, but he would also be the apostle unto the Gentiles, and would be a wonderful and powerful witness for suffering, for troubles, for trials, for affliction, for persecution, and for opposition all around him during that day. Pause for a moment and think about the fact that as surely as persecution would run parallel to the course of the early church, and as much as persecution would be as prevalent within the history of the early church, there would be one whom the Lord would raise up in the midst of that persecution who would himself at one point be the greatest persecutor of the early church—at least up to that time. Eventually and ultimately Rome herself would get involved with the persecution of the early church, and would reach its zenith and pinnacle under the reign of Nero who would accuse the Christians of burning Rome, and using this false accusation as grounds and means to persecute them to no end. What would begin with the apostle Paul would eventually and ultimately find its zenith and pinnacle with Nero who would be emperor of Rome in the late 60’s A.D. and even at the time when the Jewish Temple was destroyed within the city of Jerusalem. What I so absolutely love about the fact that persecution would run parallel and side by side with the power and presence of the Holy Spirit, is that Jesus the Christ would take one of the greatest persecutors of the early church and would dramatically save and transform him, and would use him for His glory and for His honor. The events which we read and find in the ninth chapter of the book of Acts might very well begin with Saul continuing to breath out threatening and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, but it would ultimately result in Jesus the Christ encountering Saul on the way to Damascus by appearing to him in blinding light and knocking him off his horse. While the first two verses of the ninth chapter describe Saul breathing out threatening and slaughter a against the early church, and seeking to hail men and women of the way bound from Damascus and bringing them unto Jerusalem, the third verse on describes a dramatic scene that would unfold as Saul drew and came near unto Damascus. In fact, as you begin reading with and from the third verse of the ninth chapter you will encounter Saul drawing near to the city of Damascus, and how suddenly there shone round about him a light from heaven, and how he fell to the ground, and heard a voice saying unto him, “Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?” In the third and fourth verses of the ninth chapter of the book of Acts we find and encounter a great light shining round about Saul, thus knocking him off his horse and him falling to the ground before Jesus the Christ Himself would speak unto him concerning his actions.

Beginning to read with and from the third verse of the ninth chapter you will find that as Saul drew near to the city of Damascus, a great light would shine round about him, and how he would fall to the earth, and would hear a voice speaking unto him. The voice that would speak unto him would begin by calling him by name, and then by asking him a very pointed and powerful question. Please mark this within your mind, for when Jesus appeared unto Saul, not only did he call him by his name—not once, but twice—but He also asked him why he was persecuting Him. It’s necessary and imperative that we pay close attention to this particular reality, for within the question Jesus asked Saul is actually something quite interesting—particularly and especially when you consider words which Jesus spoke unto the disciples—words which the apostle Matthew recorded for us in the twenty-fifth chapter. If you turn and direct your attention to the twenty-fifth chapter of the New Testament gospel of Matthew you will find Jesus separating all those who would stand and appear before Him into two groups—one group on one side which were sheep, and another group on the other side which would be goats. Unto the sheep Jesus would invite them to enter into the joys of His presence and kingdom, for when He was hungry they fed Him, when He was thirsty they gave Him to drink, when He was in prison they came to visit Him, when he was naked they clothed Him, and when He was sick they came unto Him. Unto the goats Jesus would speak the opposite, for when He was sick they would not come and visit Him, when He was in prison they did not come and visit Him, when He was naked they did not clothe Him, when He was hungry they did not feed Him, and when He was thirsty they did not give Him to drink. It’s worth noting that both groups would essentially ask Jesus how they either ministered unto Him, or didn’t minister unto Him, and He would respond by declaring that whatever they did unto the least of these His people they did unto Him. Pay close attention to this reality and concept, for that which Jesus was declaring was that what they did unto those before and around them would actually be committed and done—either for or against Him within and upon the earth. This must be understood, for when you come to the conversation which Saul had with Jesus on the road to Damascus you will find Jesus asking him why he persisted in persecuting Him. I would imagine that Saul would wonder how he could have possibly persecuted Jesus the Christ, yet at that time he did not have any concept or knowledge of Jesus being the head of the body, and how any actions committed against the body would ultimately be committed against the head. At that time Saul did not understand that the church was the spiritual body of Jesus the Christ, and that his actions toward and against them would be actions committed against Christ and His body. It’s quite astounding actually to think about and consider the fact that what was committed against the spiritual body of Jesus the Christ here upon the earth would actually be committed against Jesus the Christ in heaven, and would be considered as persecuting Him. Ohh that we would recognize and understand this tremendous reality, for it speaks to and reveals the tremendous significance of the conversion of Saul, and how absolutely incredible and remarkable it truly was.

There is not a doubt in my mind that what we find and what we read in the ninth chapter of the New Testament book of Acts is one of the single greatest turning points and defining moments in all of church history, for it would be in the ninth chapter of the book of Acts we encounter the conversion of that one who at that time was the single greatest persecutor of the early church. What we find and read in the ninth chapter is not only the conversion of the greatest persecutor of the church up to that time, but also the beginning of the transformation of one that one who would not only be the apostle unto the Gentiles, but also one who would give us thirteen of the twenty-seven books of the New Testament. There are twenty-seven books found within the New Testament, and almost half of the New Testament in terms of total books written was written by and given unto us by the apostle Paul. What we find and read in the ninth chapter of the book of Acts is the beginning of a wonderful transformation that would not only result in an apostolic ministry unto the Gentiles within and throughout Asia, but would also result in nearly half of the New Testament literature and books we have in our Bibles today. When we think about and consider the conversation of Saul we must understand that his conversion was one that was truly dramatic, for it would pave the way for that one who at one point in time persecuted the church to be shown by Jesus the Christ how much He must suffer for the sake of the name of Jesus the Christ. In fact, when Jesus was speaking unto Ananias as he instructed him to go and lay hands on Saul, He declared unto him that he was a chosen vessel unto Him, to bear His name before the Gentiles, and kings, and the children of Israel, for he would be shown how great things he must suffer for the sake of the name of Christ. Pause for a moment and consider this fact that that one who was the greatest persecutor of the early church up to that moment would not only be a witness and testimony unto the Gentiles and unto kings, but would also be shown how much he must suffer for the sake of the name of Jesus the Christ. This one who previously persecuted the Christian church would be chosen by Jesus the Christ to be a vessel and witness unto the Gentiles and kings, and in the midst of that witness would be a wonderful reality of how much he would suffer for the sake of the name of Christ. Oh that we would understand just how dramatic and how radical this conversion truly was, for Jesus the Christ would take the greatest persecutor of the church up to that time, would save and transform him, and would not only make him a witness and testimony unto the Gentiles, but would also show him how much he must suffer for the sake of the name of Jesus the Christ. There is not a doubt in my mind that what we find and what we read in the ninth chapter of the book of Acts is a wonderful witness and testimony of what is perhaps one of the greatest turning points and defining moments in the history of the early church. There are certain moments which define the church, and certain moments that would alter its course and trajectory, and what we find here in the ninth chapter would be one of those events and moments that would forever alter the course of the history of the church as we know it.

Oh that we would read the words which are found within the ninth chapter of the book of Acts and would truly encounter a Jesus who is able to dramatically and radically manifest Himself unto anyone He desires and anyone He chooses. Saul was the greatest persecutor of the church up to that point in time, and yet Jesus the Christ appeared unto him as he drew near to Damascus, and would bring about a wonderful and powerful transformation that would not only transform Saul, but would also transform the early church, as well as the church as a whole throughout history. One thing we must come face to face with when reading this particular chapter is that which Jesus spoke unto Saul concerning why he persecuted Him, for with these words we come face to face with the fact that what we do unto, and how we treat those before and around us directly influences and impacts how we treat Jesus the Christ. I can’t help but read the words which are found within this passage and think about and consider them in light of the words which Jesus spoke unto the disciples concerning the sheep and goats, and how what we do or don’t do unto the least of these is a direct reflection and expression of how we treat Jesus the Christ. It is absolutely necessary and imperative that we recognize and understand this awesome and incredible reality, for it ought to bring us face to face with how we treat those who are before and around us. Jesus made it very clear that whatever we do and don’t do unto the least of these we do and don’t do unto Him, and when speaking unto Saul, Jesus didn’t ask him why he persecuted the church, but why he persecuted Him. Thus with the words which Jesus spoke unto Saul we encounter the tremendous and incredible reality that Saul’s actions weren’t committed against the church and Christians alone, but were actually committed against Jesus Christ Himself. Oh that we would be careful how we treat the body of Christ, and that we would be careful how we are treating and how we have treated Jesus the Christ. There is a tremendous and powerful warning found within these verses concerning our treatment of the body of Christ, and how we are in fact treating Jesus the Christ in this life. Oh that we would read these words and not only come face to face with a turning point and defining moment within the history of the early church, but also that we would come face to face with how we are treating the body of Christ, and how we are treating Jesus the Christ in this life, and within and upon the earth. Oh that we would examine our hearts and that we would truly recognize and understand how our actions in this life not only affect and impact this life, and perhaps those around us, but also Jesus the Christ Himself, and might very well be committed against Him.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s