Delivered From the Stones of Accusation In the Dirt of Grace & Mercy

Today’s selected reading continues in the New Testament gospel account of the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ as written and recorded by the apostle John. More specifically, today’s passage is found in the first twenty verses of the eighth chapter. When you come to this particular portion of scripture you will find the apostle John shifting gears from the feast of tabernacles to another event which took place within the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ—one that has caused a lot of division and speculation concerning it. In fact—the words which we find within the opening passage of the eighth chapter are submitted in certain translations in parenthesis or as some extra text that was included in this particular gospel. Throughout the years there have been scholars and students of the scripture alike who have had issue with the words and language which are found in the opening verses of this chapter because of the explosive nature that is found therein. As if the words and language we find within the fourth chapter of this gospel wasn’t controversial and explosive enough in nature, the apostle John now brings us face to face with an event within the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ which to the natural and casual reader may have a difficult time with. As I stand here today I can’t help but feel within my heart and soul that any one who takes issue and even offense to and with the words which are found within this passage have not known grace—or at very least have known grace in a very limited capacity. I would dare say that anyone who reads the words which are found within this passage of scripture and takes offense to the explosive nature and context of it has not known and experienced the mercy of the living God, and have yet to know the compassion of Jesus within their own hearts and lives. The words and language which we find within the opening verses of this chapter bring us face to face with the awesome and incredible reality of grace and mercy—and not only grace and mercy, but also of compassion and loving kindness displayed by Jesus the Christ. The words and language we find before us on this particular day within the life and ministry of Jesus the Christ are quite intriguing and alarming for within them we come face to face with the fact that after the feast of tabernacles had concluded and had come and gone, Jesus was not only still in Judaea, but Jesus was also still within the city of Jerusalem. As you begin reading the words which are found in this passage of scripture you will quickly encounter and come face to face with the tremendous reality that Jesus was not only in the city of Jerusalem, but was still walking within and among Jewry. When the first verse of the preceding chapter emphasized the reality that Jesus would not walk in Jewry because the Jews sought to kill Him, this passage emphasizes the fact that Jesus was still within and mind Jewry.

As you read the words which are found within the opening verses of the eighth chapter of this New Testament book you will come face to face with and encounter the tremendous reality that Jesus chose to abide and remain within the city of Jerusalem. Having risen up on the last and great day of the feast of tabernacles and emphatically declares unto all those who were present within the city of Jerusalem that if anyone was thirsty, they should come unto Him and drink of the living water He provides, Jesus now chooses to remain within a city where public and popular opinion com earning Him was divided. If you read the final verses of the seventh chapter you will encounter the reality that public and popular opinion concerning and regarding Jesus the Christ was in fact divided, for some thought that He was the Prophet, while others thought that He was truly and indeed the Christ and the Messiah. With that being said, however, there were others within Jewry who would and could not receive Him. What’s more, is the last time Jesus was in Jewry through persecuted, opposed and sought to kill Him because He had broken the sabbath by healing a man, and had spoken of God as His Father, thus making Himself equal to God. The fifth and seventh chapters are intrinsically linked and connected, for within the seventh chapter we find Jesus speaking unto those who previously sought to Kill Him and asked them why they in fact sought to do so. The fifth and seventh chapters of this gospel are intrinsically linked and interconnected by the simple fact that Jesus spoke unto the Jews in Jewry and within the city of Jerusalem and spoke unto them of wanting to kill Him. What’s more, is that the events which are found within the seventh chapter of the gospel of John surround one of the three pilgrimage feasts which took place within the city of Jerusalem—feasts where men and women would not only come unto Jerusalem from Judaea and Galilee, but also from the surrounding regions and nations during that time. The feast of tabernacles which was emphasized in the previous chapter found Jesus once more journeying from Galilee unto Judaea and Jerusalem in order that He might celebrate and observe the feast of the Lord. Interestingly enough there are no words and there is no language within the seventh chapter that points and reveals any of Jesus’ actions in Jerusalem at the feast as it persons to celebrating the feast and observing it. The only thing we find within the seventh chapter is Jesus speaking unto the Jews concerning the Law and concerning their desire and intent to kill Him. What’s more, is that during a time when the Jewish people lived and dwelt in “sukkots,” Jesus would call our unto all those who were thirsty and would invite them to come and drink.

When you come to the eighth chapter of this New Testament gospel which was written by the apostle John you will come face to face with and encounter the tremendous reality of Jesus still remaining within the city of Jerusalem and continuing to walk in the midst of Jewry. What’s more, is that when you come to this passage you will find Jesus coming unto the temple—the temple where He has previously upset and offended both Jew and religious leader alike by overturning the tables of money, as well as driving out both money changer, seller of merchandise and merchandise alike. As you come to the eighth chapter of the gospel written by John you will find Jesus remaining and abiding within the city of Jerusalem where He had previously fashioned a cord of whips and driven out the commerce and merchandise that was found within the temple. The eighth chapter is perhaps so explosive in nature—not only because of the actions of the scribes and Pharisees, as well as the actions (or inaction of Jesus), but also because of where the events of this day took place. It’s not enough that the Pharisees and scribes brought this woman who was taken in adultery, and it’s not enough that she was brought unto Jesus, but it took place within the temple. The apostle John isn’t clear how soon after the feast of tabernacles the events of this day took place, it I would dare say that there were perhaps still a number of Jews—perhaps even still a number of strangers—within the court of Jerusalem having just observed and celebrated the east of tabernacles. I have to admit that I wonder how many men and women gathered before and gathered in front of Jesus as He sat down in the temple and taught them. I wonder how many men, women, children, families and strangers came from all over for the feast of tabernacles and were still present within the city of Jerusalem. Is it possible that there were many who came unto Jerusalem for the feast of tabernacles, yet once they learned and discovered that Jesus the Christ was present within the city, they chose to remain and abide within the city. Despite the fact that the festivities and events surrounding the feast had drawn to a close and were over, there might have been countless men and women from all over who chose to remain within the city because Jesus of Nazareth was there. Pause for a moment and consider the fact that it is possible that there were countless men and women who came to the city for the feast of tabernacles, and came to observe a Jewish feast, and yet many of those same individuals chose to remain and abide within the city because of Jesus. Oh, how many might come to the house of the Lord, or might come unto a gathering together of believers because of some preacher or some minister, and yet they choose to remain because of the person and presence of Jesus the Christ? Consider the men of Sychar who initially believed in Jesus because of the word of the woman, but after spending two days with Jesus and hearing and listening to Him speak, they believed on Him all the more. They came because of the word of the woman, however, they remained and believed because of Jesus Himself.

I have to admit that what we find within the eighth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John is actually quite remarkable and astounding on so many different levels—particularly and especially when you consider that which is found in the fourth chapter of the same New Testament gospel. If you turn and direct your attention back to the fourth chapter of this gospel you will find Jesus journeying from Judaea unto Galilee and needing to pass through Samaria. While journeying through Samaria Jesus sat down by Jacob’s well which was found within a town called Sychar. The apostle John emphatically writes that when Jesus arrived at the well in the town of Sychar it was the sixth hour, and He was weary from the journey out of Judaea. While sitting at the well Jesus would be joined by a local woman who came from her home with a water pot in order that she might draw the day’s supply of water. If you read the interaction you will notice two distinct stigmas surrounding this particular interaction, for not only was Jesus a Jew talking with this woman who was a Samaritan, but when the disciples returned unto Jerusalem to find Jesus at the well, they were astonished and shocked to find Him speaking with a woman. What’s more, is that as you read the words which are found within this passage you will quickly notice that a conversation which began with and about water would quickly transition to Jesus speaking unto the woman and inviting her to go and call her husband. This particular invitation of Jesus was quite interesting and unique when you consider it, for when the woman responded to Jesus she declared unto Him that she had no husband. Jesus in His omniscience knew that the words which this woman spoke was indeed and was in fact true, for she had in fact had five husbands, and the man with whom she was now with was not her husband. It is quite clear from Jesus’ words unto this woman, as well as His invitation unto her to go and call her husband exposed something incredible about the woman—namely, that she was undoubtedly seeking after and searching for something. You do not marry five times and get involved with a sixth man if you aren’t looking for something very specific within your heart and life. You do not give yourself to marriage on five different occasions if you are not desperately searching for something within your heart and life and not finding it. While it is true that you don’t give yourself in marriage five times if you aren’t looking for something, you also don’t divorce five different times if you haven’t come to the place of realizing that what you have been looking for you haven’t yet found. What so intrigues me about the words which we find in the fourth chapter is not only the search this woman had within her heart and soul, but also the incredible and tremendous realization that she had not yet found that which she was looking for.

HAVE YOU YET FOUND WHAT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR? What we find within the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John is quite astonishing and remarkable when you take the time to carefully consider it, for it’s one thing for this woman to have been involved in marriage on five different occasions, and with five different men, but it is something else entirely for this woman to have engaged in marriage with each of these men only to find and discover that what she had gotten herself into was not at all what she expected, nor even was what she was looking for. You do not give yourself in marriage five times, and five times allow yourself to go through divorce if you weren’t searching for something, and felt as though you did not find that which you were looking for. What’s more, is the fact that this woman was now with a sixth man—even after she had been previously married five times, and had undergone and experienced five separate divorces. What’s so clear from the words which Jesus spoke unto this woman was that the simple fact that she was now with a sixth man indicates that she was still seeking after and searching for something. It is quite clear and quite obvious that this woman had not found what she was looking for in each of the marriages she engaged in and entertained, and it is equally clear that this woman was still searching for something—perhaps desperately—being now with a sixth man. Oh, I can’t help but wonder if this sixth man was aware of her past and aware of her history with men, and how she had previously been married five times, and five times gone through and experienced divorce. When this woman began entertaining this man, and when she began to be involved with this man, did she disclose unto him that she had been with five different men before him, and that he came after multiple failed attempts at marriage and commitment? If this man was somehow aware of this woman’s past, and how she had been married five different times, and five different times been divorced, what would have kept him from questioning what this woman was in fact looking for? What would have prevented this man from thinking and believing that he himself might very well be just another experiment of this woman as she was seeking after and searching for something? It was quite clear and quite obvious that this woman was indeed and was in fact searching for something, however, it is also equally clear that this woman had yet to find that which she was looking for. I can’t help but wonder if this man was aware of this woman’s past and her history with men, and whether or not this woman would do to him the very same thing she had previously done with other men. It would have been one thing for this woman to do this a single time, and maybe even twice, but five times is something that’s a bit much and a bit excessive. You don’t give yourself in marriage five different times, and five different times allow yourself to go through a divorce unless you were searching for something and realized you hadn’t yet found it.

I am convinced that in order for us to understand the language and context of what we find in the eighth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John, it is absolutely necessary and imperative that we come face to face with that which is written and found in the fourth chapter, for it is what we find in the fourth chapter that brings us face to face with a different woman—one who was clearly and obviously searching for something, had not found it, and undoubtedly had a sordid past. The woman who we find in the fourth chapter of the New Testament gospel of John undoubtedly had a sordid past, and one that was littered with multiple failed marriages, which clearly indicated that she was seeking after and searching for something, and hadn’t found it. When you come to the eighth chapter of the same New Testament gospel which the apostle John wrote you will again find Jesus in the company of a woman—this time, however, it was a woman who was brought into the presence of Jesus by the scribes and Pharisees. What we read and what we find in the eighth chapter of the gospel account which the apostle John wrote does not take place at a well within the region of Samaria, but in the Temple of the Lord within the city of Jerusalem. After the feast of tabernacles had drawn to a close, Jesus went unto the mount of Olives, and early in the morning He came again into the Temple. The apostle John writes that while Jesus was in the Temple all the people came unto Him, and He sat down and taught them. Please pay close attention to this, for while the encounter between Jesus and the Samaritan woman took place in a personal and private place there at Jacob’s well, the encounter and interaction between Jesus and this woman took place in the Temple of the Lord, and was a very public event. Pause for a moment and consider this reality, for it has the ability to completely and utterly change your perspective on what we find and read concerning the account of this woman. When and as you read the words which are written and recorded within the eighth chapter of this gospel concerning this particular woman, you will find that she did not get a personal and private audience with Jesus, and her own indiscretion was not revealed by Jesus the Christ in private, but was publicly exposed and revealed by religion, as the scribes and elders themselves brought this woman into the company and presence of Jesus. We dare not, we cannot and must not miss and lose sight of this tremendous reality, for to do so would be to miss out on what actually took place here at the Temple—namely, the public exposure and humiliation of a woman who had not only been caught in adultery, but had also been taken in adultery. What we read and what we find within this passage is a tremendous account of a woman who was caught in the act of adultery, and rather than handled and dealt with privately and personally, this woman was dragged by religion into the presence of Jesus for starters, and dragged into the Temple and courts of the Lord.

WHEN RELIGION DRAGS YOUR SIN INTO THE PRESENCE OF JESUS! WHEN RELIGION DRAGS YOUR SIN INTO THE COURTS OF THE LORD! WHEN RELIGION DRAGS YOUR SIN INTO THE HOUSE OF THE LORD! What we find and what we read within this particular passage of Scripture is actually quite unique and quite remarkable when you take the time to consider it, for it would have been one thing if the scribes and Pharisees had brought this woman into the presence of Jesus in a personal and private manner. It would have been one thing if the scribes and Pharisees had dealt with the actions and indiscretion of this woman in a personal and private manner rather than publicly exposing her sin, and publicly humiliating her in the company and presence of all those who were present on this particular day. What we find at the very outset and opening of this chapter is that not only was Jesus present within the Temple which stood within the city of Jerusalem, but Jesus was not alone there in the Temple. It might have been different if Jesus had been alone there in the Temple, and in the courts of the house of the Lord, however, the apostle John sets the stage by including the fact that all the people came unto Him, and how He sat down and taught them. This is quite astonishing and remarkable, for not only did the scribes and Pharisees drag this woman’s sin and indiscretion into the public eye, but they also dragged this woman’s sin into the house of the Lord. What’s more, is that they felt compelled to interrupt Jesus as He sat and taught the people who had come unto Him to hear and listen to Him speak and teach. The scribes and Pharisees felt the great need to take and bring this woman who had been caught and taken in the act of adultery into the presence of Jesus, and even more so into the presence of Jesus while He was in the Temple, and while He sat down and taught all the people who had gathered themselves unto Him to hear and listen to Him speak. It wasn’t enough for this woman to be caught in the act and to be taken in adultery, but the scribes and Pharisees felt it absolutely necessary to drag this woman into the company and presence of Jesus while in the Temple of the Lord there in the city of Jerusalem in order that they might accuse her in His presence and in the presence of all those who were present on this particular day. What’s quite unique and astonishing about this passage is not only do we find the scribes and Pharisees seeking to accuse this woman of adultery in the presence of Jesus and all those who were present on this day, but the scribes and Pharisees also sought to use this woman’s transgression, immorality, infidelity, and adultery as a means to tempt and trap Jesus in His words that they might find reason to accuse Him. Think about that for a moment, for by accusing this woman of her own adultery, the scribes and Pharisees were seeking to give themselves grounds to accuse Jesus the Christ Himself of His own words and actions on this particular day. How absolutely incredible and interesting it is to think about and consider the fact the scribes and Pharisees sought to use this woman’s transgression to accuse her in the presence of Jesus, and by accusing her in the company and presence of Jesus, they might give themselves grounds to accuse Jesus of His own words and actions.

As I sit here this morning and consider the account of this woman, and how she was not only caught and taken in the act of adultery, but also dragged into the public eye and publicly humiliated in the sight of all those who were present on this day, I can’t help but wonder within my own heart and mind whether or not a trap was in fact laid and set for this woman in order that they might lay hold of her for the very reason and purpose we find here. Is it possible that the scribes and Pharisees had set a trap for this woman in order that they might catch her in the very act of adultery in order that they might bring her into the presence of Jesus, accuser her in His presence, as well as speak of that which the law commands concerning such actions—namely, being stoned. What we find within this passage is not only the scribes and Pharisees seeking to accuse this woman in the presence of Jesus, but the scribes and Pharisees also called for the stoning of this woman based on her actions. How incredibly interesting it is to think that the scribes and Pharisees accused this woman before and in the presence of Jesus, reminded Jesus of that which the Law demands concerning such transgression, and does so in order that they might see what Jesus would say and do. What has often fascinated me about this passage is that it was the woman alone who was brought before and in the presence of Jesus and not the man. WHERE IS THE MAN? I can’t help but read the words which are found in this passage of Scripture and look back to the garden of Eden, and how when Adam was confronted about the sin and transgression of eating the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, he turned to the woman and blamed her before and in the presence of Jesus. All the way back in the garden of Eden in the very first book of the Old Testament we find the woman being blamed by man for transgression and sin—a reality which is again manifested within this particular passage in the New Testament gospel of John. I have long been fascinated and intrigued with and by the fact that it was the woman alone who was brought into the company and presence of Jesus, and it was the woman alone who was dragged into the public’s eye, while the man—whoever he was—is not even mentioned. I can’t help but wonder if the man with whom this woman was caught in adultery with was part of an elaborate plan to ensnare and entrap a woman in order that they might bring her into the presence of Jesus to not only accuse her, but also find grounds to accuse Jesus. What’s more, is that I can’t help but wonder if the man with whom this woman was caught in adultery with wasn’t part of the scribes and Pharisees, or a part of one of the religious sects within Jewry, and consented to leading this woman into adultery in order that she might be dragged from both bed and house and into the presence of Jesus. Is it possible that this woman was used as a pawn in a much bigger and much larger game—namely, that they might bring her into the company and presence of Jesus that they might ultimately accuse Him.

How incredibly interesting it is to think about the fact that by accusing this woman in the presence of Jesus, and by calling for the judgment and punishment of this woman in the presence of Jesus, the scribes and Pharisees were actually seeking to accuse Jesus in the courts of the Temple. Consider for a moment the reality of religion actually seeking to accuse Jesus in the courts of the Temple of the Lord. Consider for a moment religion actually trying and actually seeking to accuse Jesus in the Temple of the Lord—in the very house of His Father which stood within the he city of Jerusalem. It is actually quite intriguing to think and consider that religion would actually seek to enter into the Temple and house of the Lord, and would seek to accuse Him in the very house of His Father. Please don’t miss and lose sight of this tremendous and incredible reality, for the ultimate objective and goal of religion on this particular occasion was not to accuse this woman, but to use this woman’s adultery, this woman’s transgression, and this woman’s sin to find grounds to accuse Jesus the Christ. Religion did not seek to accuse this woman alone on this particular day, but sought to accuse Jesus, and to find reason to accuse Him of some wrong and some evil. I am completely and utterly fascinated at the fact that religion would seek to publicly expose this woman’s sin the presence of Jesus, and in the presence of all those who were present on this particular day, and they did so—not so they could cast judgment upon this woman, but so they could find reason to accuse Jesus. Oh, I can’t help but wonder if one of religion’s greatest tactics and objectives is to expose and reveal our sin and our transgression in the presence of Jesus, and even in the house of the Lord in order that it might find grounds to accuse Jesus the Christ. Of course we know and understand that it is absolutely and completely impossible for religion and even the religious spirit to destroy and kill Jesus the Christ any more, as Jesus is now and has been seated at the right hand of the Father in heaven. This has not stopped and it will not stop religion and the religious spirit from finding reason to accuse Jesus in the company and presence of others in order that He might somehow be discredited, and in order that they might destroy Him from within public opinion. We dare not and must not miss and lose sight of that which is written and found within this passage of Scripture, for religion sought to accuse this woman of her own transgression and adultery in order that they might find reason to accuse Jesus the Christ on account of that which she had committed. What I find to be so alarming about that which is present within the eighth chapter is that neither the scribes nor the Pharisees cared all that much for this woman’s adultery and this woman’s transgression—only that they might find grounds to accuse Jesus the Christ of some wrong and some evil. It wasn’t ultimately the transgression and adultery of this woman that so intrigued and captivated the scribes and Pharisees, but rather that which they might have the ability to accuse Jesus of. The scribes and Pharisees might have deliberately and intentionally set a trap of adultery and transgression for this woman, and they most likely did so—not that they might accuse her and call for her judgment, but in order that they might accuse Jesus and call for His judgment.

What I so love about that which we find in this passage is that rather than immediately rebuking and condemning the woman who had been taken and caught in the act of adultery, Jesus immediately stooped down in the dirt of the ground and began writing with His finger. Scripture is certainly unclear as to what Jesus actually wrote in the dirt and ground of the courts of the Temple, but while we will never know that which Jesus wrote in the ground, we must recognize and understand Jesus’ willingness to get down in the dirt of this woman in order that He might deliver her from the accusation and judgment of those who had brought her into His presence. DELIVERED FROM ACCUSATION BY MERCY! DELIVERED FROM JUDGMENT BY GRACE! I absolutely love that Jesus didn’t deny that which the Law of Moses had stated and declared while this woman was brought into His presence by the scribes and Pharisees. Jesus never once questioned the Law, nor did He ever diminish that which the Law of Moses commanded and instructed. Rather than rebuking this woman of her adultery and transgression, and rather than debating the Law of Moses with the scribes and Pharisees, Jesus simply got down in the dirt of this woman, began writing in the ground, and made as though He did not hear and had not heard that which the scribes and Pharisees were speaking. Oh how I greatly appreciate the fact that not only did Jesus not rebuke this woman of her adultery and transgression, but Jesus didn’t debate the Law of Moses and that which commanded by His Father in the law. Nowhere within this passage will you find Jesus debating and questioning the law, and nowhere within this passage will you find Jesus rebuking this woman of that for which she was being accused. What’s more, is that Jesus knew that this woman was guilty of adultery—regardless of whether or not a trap was set for this woman or not. Jesus knew what the Law of Moses had commanded, and Jesus knew that according to the Law of Moses, and according to the Law of God this woman was guilty, and yet not once did He ever pronounce guilt upon her. What’s more, is that when you come to the end of this passage you will find Jesus asking this woman point blank where her accusers were after they had one by one departed from their presence beginning with the oldest and ending with the youngest. After Jesus had asked this woman where her accusers were, He would also go on to ask her if there was any one to condemn her. Upon realizing that there was no one left to accuse or condemn her, Jesus first declared unto her that neither did He condemn her, and then instructed and commanded her to go and sin no more. Rather than pronouncing guilt upon this woman, and rather than debating the Law of Moses with the scribes and Pharisees, Jesus simply got down in the dirt of this woman, and delivered her from the company and presence of her accusers. Oh how absolutely wonderful and remarkable it is to think about and consider the fact that not only did Jesus deliver this woman from her accusers and from those who would condemn her, but so also would Jesus choose not to condemn her, and send her on her way with instruction not to sin any more.

Please don’t miss that which is found within this passage, for what would begin with a woman caught in the act of adultery, dragged into the courts of the Temple of the Lord, and accused in the company and presence of the Lord and those who were there would end and conclude with this woman being left alone in the company and presence of Jesus without any one left to accuse and condemn her. Oh how absolutely wonderful and remarkable it is to think about and consider the fact that this woman’s story began with the act of adultery, began with her being accused by religion in the company and presence of Jesus, and would conclude with her deliverance from accusation, from condemnation and even from judgment. What’s more, is that through this woman’s life we see a wonderful and powerful picture of that which Jesus would offer and provide to those who believe on His name, and through the work which He would complete and finish on the cross—namely, deliverance from the penalty and judgment of the Law of Moses. Through this woman’s story and through this woman’s life we come face to face with the awesome and incredible reality that Jesus the Christ is perfectly able—not only to deliver us from accusation and condemnation, but Jesus is also able to deliver us from the Law and from the judgment and penalty the Law demands. The scribes and Pharisees were correct when they stated that the Law demanded that such an individual be stoned to death because of these actions, however, Jesus rose up as an advocate for this woman, and delivered her from the judgment and penalty of the law of Moses. In fact, it might very well be said that Jesus stooped down into the dust and stooped down into the ground in order that He might deliver this woman from the penalty and judgment of the Law—a wonderful and powerful picture of how He stepped down from, and stepped out of heaven and into the earth in order that He might deliver each and every one of us from the curse, the penalty, and the judgment of the Law of Moses and that which the Law demanded and required. DELIVERED FROM OUR DIRT BY GETTING DOWN IN THE MIDST OF THE DIRT! It’s quite interesting that when the Lord finished speaking unto Adam in the garden He declared that from dust he was created and unto dust he would return, and yet in order to deliver this woman from her own dirt, Jesus got down in the midst of the dust—down in the midst of that from which man was created—and wrote with His finger in the midst of it. The same hand and finger which wrote on the tables of stone in the wilderness would now write in the dirt and dust of the ground in order that it might bring about the deliverance of this woman from her adultery and iniquity, and from the judgment and penalty of the Law. Oh how absolutely wonderful and remarkable it is to think about and consider this awesome and incredible reality, for through the account and story of this woman we encounter a Jesus who is willing to deliver us from the clutches of accusation and condemnation, and is willing to deliver us from the judgment and penalty of the Law of Moses, and that which it demanded and required.

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